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Current Research Students

Susannah Ashton

Susannah Ashton

Cosmos and Crisis: Re-evaluating Conceptions of Time and Space in Archaic and Classical Greece

Prior to undertaking my PhD, I completed an MPhil at Trinity College Dublin and my BA at the University of Birmingham. My current research seeks to reassess conceptions of time within the earliest surviving cosmological records from ancient Greece, spanning the mythological narratives of Hesiod and Pherekydes, to the ‘proto-scientific’ accounts of the pre-Socratic philosophers. Through implementing the methodology of anthropology and scientific philosophy, this research challenges the application of modern understandings of time to ancient texts and attempts to reconstruct its meaning in this formative period in ancient thought.

Supervisor: Ashley Clements
Funding: IRC Postgraduate Scholarship (2019-21), Ferrar Memorial Studentship in Ancient Philology (2018-19)

Neil Carolan

Neil Carolan

Hellenistic Queenship and the Phenomenon of Ruler Cult

My research aims to examine the phenomenon of ruler cult in the context of queenship in the Late Classical and early Hellenistic period. Cultural attitudes would have affected how women were perceived in roles of power, and my research will examine how women in the royal courts dealt with social preconceptions and obstacles. The comparison between queens and non-royal women will allow for an analysis of the difference royal status made.

Supervisor: Shane Wallace

Alastair Daly

Susannah Ashton

A New Epic Humour: The Influence of Comic Literature on Apollonius’ Argonautica

I studied for a BA in Ancient Greek and English Literature here in Trinity before completing an MPhil in Classics (also in Trinity), with my research focusing on Herodas' Mimiamb 2. My current research as a PhD student is concerned with the influence of Greek comic literature on Apollonius' Argonautica
https://tcd.academia.edu/AlastairDaly

Supervisor: Martine Cuypers
Funding: IRC Postgraduate Scholarship (2019-23)

Lisa Doyle

Susannah Ashton

Margins of Learning: Exploring the scholia on Apollonius’ Argonautica

The objective of this research project is to explore the scholarly commentaries, which survive mainly as scholia, written about Apollonius Rhodius' 3rd century BCE epic, Argonautica. By investigating the nature of textual criticism in these scholia, and establishing the scholarly interests in Apollonius’ work, I hope to shed light on an important source for ancient intellectual history.
https://tcd.academia.edu/LisaDoyle

Supervisor: Martine Cuypers
Funding: Provost’s Project Award (2019-2023)

Judith Finlay-McAlester

Bringing it All Back Home: Repatriation, Restitution and the Healing Museum

Supervisor: Christine Morris

Ellen Finn

Susannah Ashton

Tomb-readers: Anthropological Approaches to the Funerary Archaeology of Prepalatial Crete

Turning the lens on the interdisciplinary approach in its own right, my current research focuses on the discourse surrounding early Bronze Age tombs in Crete, in order to examine how anthropological models such as those related to death, religion and cultural cohesion have been applied to the archaeological record, in addition to the interpretative influence these methods exert. https://tcd.academia.edu/EllenFinn

Supervisor: Christine Morris
Funding: IRC Postgraduate Scholarship (2015-19)

Elizabeth Foley

Susannah Ashton

The Nesiotic Leagues: Island Cooperation and Connectivity in the Hellenistic Aegean (c.314–166 BCE)

After my BA in Jewish and Islamic Civilisations and Classical Civilisation at TCD and an MPhil in Ancient History at Oxford, I am pursuing a PhD on the political, economic and social histories the Cyclades after Alexander. I explore the ways in which the islands engaged one another and hegemonic powers and expressed that engagement individually and at a group level. I am interested in the confluence of landscapes and political communities in ancient history. I love Greek inscriptions of all periods and am particularly excited by Classical and Hellenistic Athens as well as the cities of Karia in Asia Minor.
https://tcd.academia.edu/ElizabethFoley

Supervisor: Shane Wallace
Funding: IRC Postgraduate Scholarship (2017-21)

Delphine Geoghegan Culligan

Susannah Ashton

The Concept of ‘Placefulness’: a heritage tool to safeguard spirit of place

Place is complex; we build on what has gone before. Connecting to the past whilst projecting forwards – in landscapes, towns and cities – a woven social fabric of meaning exists in the physical materiality and the transcendent longings that devised it. This project reconsiders place heritage, explores the critical layer between authorised tangible and intangible values, and proposes a methodology to decipher the unique qualities of spirit of place.

Supervisor: Christine Morris
Funding: Trinity College Postgraduate Studentship (2018-21)

Graham Gwozdecky

Susannah Ashton

Hero and Exile: Plutarch’s Life of Sertorius

I received my BA from Queen’s Univesity, Kingston before travelling to Dublin, Ireland to do my MA at University College Dublin. My PhD thesis from Trinity College Dublin concerns exile in Plutarch’s Parallel Lives. My research interests include ancient biography, Republican Rome, exile practices, ostracism, and Classical Athens. https://tcd.academia.edu/GrahamGwozdecky

Supervisor: Brian McGing
Funding: Trinity College Postgraduate Studentship (2017-19)

Andrew Hill

Susannah Ashton

Deisidaimonia' (Panic!): A study of crisis, climate, and rebellion in Carthaginian North Africa

I received my BA in University College Cork and his MPhil in Trinity College Dublin, and I have a research background in ancient North African revolt from Ptolemaic Egypt to Carthage. My current research investigates whether the sensitivity of Tunisian grain production to drought-induced failure was a factor contributing to the outbreak of the ‘Mercenary War’ (241-237) – Carthage’s most brutal conflict.

Supervisor: Shane Wallace
Funding: Ussher Postgraduate Award (2019-21), Trinity College Postgraduate Studentship (2018-19)

Sean McGrath

Susannah Ashton

A Comedy of Innocence, a Tragedy of Ignorance: The Ambivalence of Fishing in Oppian’s Halieutica

My research focuses on the moral relationship between humans and animals in Oppian’s Halieutica, a largely neglected Greek didactic epic about fishing from the second century AD. Remarkably, this poem can be quite critical of the actions of fishermen. In particular, I study how the poetic tradition is used to influence evaluations of the events in the Halieutica and how its poet positions himself within ancient debates on animal ethics.
https://tcd.academia.edu/SeanMcGrath

Supervisor: Martine Cuypers
Funding: IRC Postgraduate Scholarship (2018-22)

Alexandra Madela

Susannah Ashton

The Argonautica of Orpheus and the Epic Tradition in Late Antiquity

I received my B.A. in Classics at Trinity College. My PhD research focuses on the “Orphic Argonautica”, a mysterious Greek poem dating from the end of antiquity. She attempts to shed new light on this usually disregarded piece of literature by investigating different aspects of it, especially its language. She hopes to put the poem into context by highlighting both its traditional nature and its connections with contemporary poetry.

Supervisor: Martine Cuypers
Funding: Trinity College Non–Foundation Scholarship (2016–18), IRC Postgraduate Scholarship (2017-20)

Ralph Moore

Susannah Ashton

Roman Impact on Social Stratification and Mobility in the Rhône Basin c.125– 10BCE

I came to Dublin from the UK in 2012 to pursue an undergraduate degree at TCD. My PhD research evolves around the influence and impact of the Roman Empire on Gaul c.125–10BCE. It looks at how the inhabitants of Gaul engaged with their increasingly powerful neighbour to maintain, increase, and sometimes lose power, status, and wealth in their own societies. Such an analysis of inter-cultural interaction, especially between the powerful and those living on their margins, has a great deal of applicability to many other areas, past and present.

Supervisor: Hazel Dodge
Funding: IRC Postgraduate Scholarship (2018-21)

Kathryn Murphy

Susannah Ashton

“Lions and Tigers and Bears, Oh My” (The Wizard of Oz – 1939 film) An interdisciplinary Study of Animals and Spectacle Management in the Roman Empire

I am a PhD candidate from New Zealand researching animal behaviour in Roman spectacles. I completed my Undergraduate and Honours degrees at The University of Auckland where I majored in Classics and Ancient History. My interest is human-animal relations in antiquity, specifically the exploitation of animals for warfare and entertainment. I integrate zoological methodologies in my research by applying my practical experience in wildlife management at Auckland and Dublin Zoo.

Supervisor: Hazel Dodge
Government of Ireland Global Excellence Scholarship (2018-19)

Eleanor Neil

Susannah Ashton

Inclusion and Multivocality: Evaluating Community Archaeology

I am originally from the US, but have been living in Ireland since 2013. I first studied Ancient History and Archaeology for my Bachelors and then went on to an MPhil in Public History and Cultural Heritage, both at TCD. My project will be examining community archaeology in Cyprus, looking at inclusive methodologies such as multivocal narrative creation and the use of digital spaces as methods of outreach.

Supervisor: Christine Morris

Tyler Nye

Susannah Ashton

Rome’s First Port-of-War? Archaeology, Historiography, and Monumentality of the Portus Iulius complex

I hold an M.A. in History and Archaeology of the Greek and Roman World from Cardiff University and an M.Phil in Classics from TCD. My thesis, partially funded by The Kittredge Fund, explores how the artificial naval base of Portus Iulius represents the material conjunction of advances in hydraulic engineering with monumental projection of power. Through a synthesis of the archaeological record alongside the literary recreation of the harbourworks, I reconstruct the built environment and how the ancients reacted to such technological innovation.

Supervisor: Hazel Dodge

George Prekas

Susannah Ashton

The notion of connecting and coherence in Manilius' Astronomica

I have completed my Master’s in Latin Philology in the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (title of dissertation: “The Stories that the Stars Tell: The Role of Myth in Manilius’ Astronomica”). My current research focuses on the language of the poem and the lexical items Manilius employs to convey the notions of connection, unity, and coherence inside the work (philosophy, structure), as well as the relationship-connection of the Astronomica with other literary works of the past.
https://tcd.academia.edu/GeorgePrekas

Supervisor: Monical Gale
Funding: Ferrar Memorial Studentship in Ancient Philology (2019-22)

Giulia Roncato

Susannah Ashton

Space and Communication: Proxemics in the Iliad and Odyssey

I studied Classics and Modern Literatures in Padua, Italy (BA, 2015; MA, 2017). In 2014, I spent an Erasmus period at the University of St. Andrews. I started a funded structured PhD in Classics at TCD in Sept 2019, with a project focusing on spatial relationships in the Homeric poems, as well as on their reception in contemporary culture (especially in cinema). My main research interests include early Greek epic poetry (particularly Homer), sociolinguistics, anthropology of the ancient world and reception studies.

Supervisor: Ahuvia Kahane
Funding: Trinity College Postgraduate Studentship (2019-22)

William Strigel

 

Plato and Aristophanic Comedy

https://tcd.academia.edu/WilliamStrigel

Supervisor: Ashley Clements

Guy Walker

Susannah Ashton

Neoplatonic Thought in Nonnus’ Dionysiaca

My project examines Neoplatonic influences on Nonnus' Late Antique poem, the Dionysiaca. In Nonnus' lifetime, he wrote a hexameter paraphrase of the Gospel of John, and a forty-eight book epic about the pagan god Dionysus. Until relatively recently scholars used this as evidence that Nonnus had been born a pagan, and converted to Christianity during lifetime. Now, it has been shown that both poems were composed simultaneously, and together they reflect the remarkable cultural syncretism between Christianity and the Roman Empire's Hellenistic heritage and identity.

Supervisor: Martine Cuypers
Funding: Trinity College Postgraduate Research Studentship (2016–19), IRC Postgraduate Scholarship (2017-20)

Matthew Ward

Susannah Ashton

Discourse and narrative function of ships in the Iliad



My research considers the prominence, poetics, verbal presentation of ships in the Iliad, and how they shape the difference between several basic ontic categories in the poem: between mortals and immortals, men and women, Greeks and Trojans, leaders and followers, and more. I am also concerned with poetic diction itself, and the mechanics of oral (derived) composition. Focusing on a fundamental element of the Iliadic world allows us to expose the ways in which conceptual, hierarchical, and narrative differences are encoded in – and by – the regularised and stochastic form-function pairings of epic language.



Supervisor: Ahuvia Kahane