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Research

As part of Healthy Trinity's Living Lab approach, the following research has been undertaken by the physical activity group.

Active Breaks

Objective: To assess the acceptability, appropriateness and feasibility of an active break designed to disrupt prolonged sitting in university students.
Participants: Students attending lectures in Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
Methods: Participants took part in an active break which consisted of following a short exercise video lasting approximately 4 minutes. They then completed a validated questionnaire consisting of 12 statements with two open ended questions capturing likes/dislikes.
Results: Overall 106 (response rate 96%) predominately female (83%, n=87), health sciences students (91%, n=96) participated. Percentage agreement ranged from 93.4% (n=99) to 96.2% (n= 102) for acceptability, 84.9% (n=90) to 93.4% (n=99) for appropriateness and 80.2% (n= 85) to 96.2% (n=102) for feasibility. Space constraints and warm temperatures impacted negatively. 
Conclusion: An active break delivered during lectures is an acceptable and feasible intervention to disrupt sitting in students. Further investigation using a broader representation of the university population is needed prior to implementation.

Keating R, Ahern S, Bisgood L, Mernagh K, Nicholson  GH and Barrett EM.  Stand up, stand out. Feasibility of an active break targeting prolonged sitting in university students. Journal of American College Health 2020:1-7. doi: 10.1080/07448481.2020.1847119

#MakeItFit Campaign

You can see the #MakeItFit, a six week physical activity promotion campaign on our campaigns page. This abstract about the campaign was accepted at the Irish Network of Healthcare Educators scientific meeting 2021.

Stair Prompts

Background:Stair use is a simple and cost-effective method of increasing daily incidental physical activity. Initiatives encouraging stair use through the installation of point of decision prompts have been found to be widely effective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of such an intervention on stair use within a health science building in Trinity College Dublin.
Methods:This was a time-series observational study during which stair and elevator use within the building were made pre-, mid- and post-intervention.
Results:A total of 2506 observations were recorded. Overall,no significant change in stair usage was found, however, a significant decrease in the number of users exiting the elevator on the second floor was recorded (p<0.05).
Discussion:Study results are discussed with reference to the feasibility and implementation of point of decisions prompts within a university environment.

Griffin S, White S, Flanagan K, Ryan S, Maguire F, Mullin M, Tanner M and Barrett EM. Doubling down on stair usage: The effect of point of decision prompts on stair usage in a university building. Irish Ergonomics Review 2019; 38-43. Available at: http://www.irishergonomics.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Irish-Ergonomics-Review-2019.pdf

Conference Presentations

Griffin S, White S, Flanagan K, Ryan S, Maguire F, Mullin M, Tanner M and Barrett EM. Doubling down on stair usage: The effect of point of decision prompts on stair usage in a university building. Platform presentation Irish Ergonomics Society Annual Conference, 2019, Dublin.