Skip to main content

Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin

Trinity Menu Trinity Search



You are here Orientation > Visiting and Erasmus Students

History of Art

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HA1010: Introduction to the History of European Art & Architecture I)

(10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 2 slide tests (30%) and an exam (70%) 32 hrs lectures 11 hrs seminars Dr Rachel Moss

Description

This module offers a survey of Western art and architecture up to c.1520. It provides an introduction to the critical analysis of artworks, including painting, sculpture and building types. The module considers such matters as the iconography of major religious and mythological subjects, issues of style, the functions of works of art and architecture, as well as the range of technical methods employed by artists. Art works are considered in the context of influential factors such as historical period, geographic location, and the prevailing social, political and religious environments.

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Outline the chronology and main evolutionary stages in European art and architecture between c.800 and c.1520
  • Identify the major works of selected artists and architects during the period, their subject matter and key stylistic characteristics
  • Discriminate between major building types and the design issues that arise in the different phases of European architecture
  • Explain, using appropriate vocabulary, the typology and functions of visual art and imagery at key historical points over the period
  • Employ correctly technical terminology relating to the practices of painting, sculpture, architecture and the graphic arts
  • Apply knowledge accurately to comment on works of art and architecture, plans and elevations covered in the module
  • Evaluate the materials, basic structural methods and processes of design and construction in selected examples of European architecture
  • Search and retrieve information using appropriate methods, including use of the Library online catalogue and Blackboard, to written and visual sources.

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (HA1011: Introduction to the History of European Art & Architecture II)

    (10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 2 slide tests (30%) and an exam (70%) 32 hrs lectures 11 hrs seminars Dr Philip McEvansoneya

    Description

    This module offers a survey of Western art and architecture from c.1520 to the present. It provides an introduction to the critical analysis of artworks, including painting, sculpture and building types. The module considers such matters as the iconography of major religious and mythological subjects, issues of style, the functions of works of art and architecture, as well as the range of technical methods employed by artists. Art works are considered in the context of influential factors such as historical period, geographic location, and the prevailing social, political and religious environments.

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Outline the chronology and main evolutionary stages in European art and architecture between c.1520 and c.2000 AD
  • Identify the major works of selected artists and architects during the period, their subject matter and key stylistic characteristics
  • Discriminate between major building types and the design issues that arise in the different phases of European architecture
  • Explain the typology and functions of visual art and imagery at key historical points over the period
  • Employ correctly technical terminology relating to the practices of painting, sculpture, architecture and the graphic arts
  • Comment informatively on illustrations, plans and elevations relating to buildings covered in the course
  • Evaluate the materials, basic structural methods and processes of design and construction in selected examples of European architecture
  • Draw on key scholarly texts relevant to the study of the period and to show a comprehension of such sources
  • Search and retrieve information using appropriate methods, including use of the Library online catalogue, the location of written and visual sources, online databases and resources offered by public bodies and other third-level institutions
  • Undertake informed and critical analysis of works art, and communicate their findings by means of written assignments and class presentations on works of art before their peers Demonstrate a familiarity with the public collections of art and key buildings in Dublin
  • Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (BCHA1: Making and Meaning in Irish Art I)

    (5 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 1 essay (70%), 1 slide test (30%) 10hrs lectures, 4 hrs seminars Dr Rachel Moss

    Description

    Making and Meaning in Irish Art I course is designed as an introduction to Irish visual culture dating from Pre-History to the nineteenth century. Based around key themes, lectures will include the identification of major works from Irish art and architecture, addressing fine, applied and popular artforms. Throughout the course, Irish visual culture will be discussed within its artistic, social and cultural contexts and will be cognisant of its place within a broader European perspective.

    The course will provide students with

  • A general understanding of the key developments and chronology of Irish Art and architecture from Pre-History to c.1850 AD.
  • An awareness of and the ability to identify key stylistic movements and associated ideologies in Irish visual culture
  • A knowledge of and the ability to identify major Irish works and their authors
  • An understanding as to how visual culture, past and present, reflects aspects of Irish society and history
  • A general understanding of art historical approaches and the processes and materials of art and architecture

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (BCHA2: Making and Meaning in Irish Art II)

    (5 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 1 essay (70%), 1 slide test (30%) 10hrs lectures, 4 hrs seminars Dr Angela Griffith

    Description

    Making and Meaning in Irish Art I course is designed as an introduction to Irish visual culture dating from Pre-History to the nineteenth century. Based around key themes, lectures will include the identification of major works from Irish art and architecture, addressing fine, applied and popular artforms. Throughout the course, Irish visual culture will be discussed within its artistic, social and cultural contexts and will be cognisant of its place within a broader European perspective.

    The course will provide students with
  • A general understanding of the key developments and chronology of Irish Art and architecture from Pre-History to c.1850 AD.
  • An awareness of and the ability to identify key stylistic movements and associated ideologies in Irish visual culture
  • A knowledge of and the ability to identify major Irish works and their authors
  • An understanding as to how visual culture, past and present, reflects aspects of Irish society and history
  • A general understanding of art historical approaches and the processes and materials of art and architecture
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (HA2001: Arts of Japan)

    (5 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 1 essay (70%), 1 slide test (30%) 1 lecture per week and 1 seminar per fortnight Ms Ruth Starr

    Description

    This module will examine cultural highpoints in the arts of Japan from the fourteenth to the nineteenth centuries. Artefacts in all media - painting, ceramics, lacquer and textiles - will be examined in the context of the influence of China on Japan, the creation of the Shogun Court, the rise of the merchant classes and the establishment of the pleasure districts in burgeoning Tokyo. Particular attention will be paid to lacquer ware created for the domestic and European market, the arts associated with the tea ceremony and traditional Japanese theatre. Themes of Japonisme will be explored, particularly in nineteenth century Ireland as Japan emerged after 250 years of self-imposed isolation from the outside world.

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Recognize and explain a range of themes in Japanese art relating to: social contexts; various media; explain how meaning is conveyed, through in-depth study of pertinent examples from the fourteenth to the nineteenth centuries.
  • Compare and evaluate different approaches to understanding art traditions in Japan.
  • Assess critically the materials and themes explored in the course through the use of particular examples of Japanese art
  • Employ correctly the range of skills used in art history and undertake independent analysis and research, and communicate their findings through written assignments and class presentations on works of art before their peers
  • Demonstrate a familiarity with the holdings of public collections of Asian art in Dublin.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (HA4320: City Court and Campagna)

    (10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term Some knowledge of art history preferred but not essential 1 essay (15%), 1 slide test (15%), 1 project (30%) and an exam (40%) 21 hrs lectures, 5 hrs seminars Prof Christine Casey

    Description

    The dominant patterns and typologies of western European architecture in the early modern period originate in Italy in the fifteenth century. In the cities and courts of central and northern Italy a virtual laboratory of architectural form generated new typologies of domestic, civic and ecclesiastical architecture. In particular the development of domestic or residential design as a subject of focused architectural endeavour reflects the increasing secularisation of European society. This module aims to introduce students to the formal characteristics of architecture in the period 1400-1700, to examine the relationship of function, form and patronage in architectural design and to consider in particular the development of the villa and palace form.

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Describe and analyze the relationship of plan, elevation and section of key European buildings from the period 1400-1660
  • Identify the manner in which specific historical circumstances influenced the character of domestic and public architecture in the period.
  • correctly the stylistic terminology employed in the description and analysis of renaissance and baroque architecture.
  • Assess the content and character of the period's most significant architectural treatises.
  • Engage with the principal modern authorities on the architecture of the period and identify the dominant approaches within this literature.
  • make an effective visual presentation on a specific topic that demonstrates creative research.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (HA2346: Painting and Sculpture in 17th century Europe)

    (10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term Some knowledge of art history preferred but not essential 1 slide test (15%), 1 project (30%) and an exam (40%) 21 hrs lectures, 5 hrs seminars Dr Peter Cherry

    Description

    This module examines painting and sculpture at European courts in the seventeenth century, paying particular attention to works produced in papal Rome and the courts of Brussels, London, Madrid and Paris. The relationship of artists and their patrons is examined. The development and function of religious art in a Counter-Reformation context is studied in depth in the work of such artists as Caravaggio, Bernini and Rubens. Also included is a detailed account of evolving stylistic debates around the values of classicism during the period. The use of portraiture and mythology in the projection of courtly and royal ideals will be analyzed through the works of Velasquez, among others. Close attention will be paid to the rise of secular art in the seventeenth century in the form of genre, still life, and landscape painting.

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • identify the major works of a selected number of painters and sculptors in Rome, Paris and Antwerp during the period c.1580-c.1700.
  • analyze key trends in style, artistic practice and patronage at different historical points and in different artistic centres over the period
  • explain the function and meaning of a range of types of visual art and imagery in different cultural contexts over the period
  • engage critically with texts, methodologies and scholarly debates which have shaped art-historical interpretations of the period
  • interpret visual and written evidence to formulate informed, contextual analyses of visual art of the period
  • defend an argument in response to a specific question in written and oral presentations, using concrete examples of works of art
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (HA4327: The Age Rembrandt & Vermeer)

    (10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term Some knowledge of art history preferred but not essential 1 slide test (15%), 1 project (30%) and an exam (40%) 21 hrs lectures, 5 hrs seminars Dr Philip McEvansoneya

    Description

    The module will examine some of the wealth of artistic production in the Netherlands in the seventeenth century. The module will be based around the study of Rembrandt and Vermeer as contrasting and complementary figures who represent some of the diverse tendencies of the time. This will entail the study of the development of individual styles and subject matter ranging from history painting to portraiture, landscape and genre painting. The distinct artistic character associated with centres of production, even ones that were geographically close, will be assessed with an emphasis on Amsterdam, Delft and Utrecht. The final block of the module will look at the posthumous reputations of Rembrandt and Vermeer, examining questions of attribution, authenticity, canonicity and rediscovery.

    On completion of the module students should, relative to the year of study, be able to:
  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of seventeenth-century Dutch art, and the work of Rembrandt and Vermeer in particular, in its historical and cultural context;
  • present, both orally and in writing, confident and accurate analysis of seventeenth-century Dutch art;
  • engage in discussion inter-relating the events, artists, concepts, influences, and texts studied on the course;
  • carry out observantly the visual analysis of works of art using the appropriate vocabulary and demonstrating the skills of interpretation and contextualization
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (HA3020: Approaches to Art History (A) Writing the History of Art)

    (5 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term Some knowledge of art history preferred but not essential 2 essays 11 hrs lectures, 5 hrs seminars Dr Laura Cleaver

    Description

    This module will provide an introduction to some of the major methods and theories used by writers on art and architecture. We will analyse art historical writing from the ancient world to the present day to explore some of the ways in which authors have approached the study of art and architecture and think about the value of those methods for art historical study in the twenty-first century.

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Recognise, identify and analyse using appropriate vocabulary selected texts by authors who have had a formative impact on the discipline of art and architectural history.
  • Explain, evaluate, and employ the methodologies of the authors covered in the module.
  • Critically assess the value of a range of methodologies in interpreting art and architecture of different historical periods and cultural contexts.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the broad intellectual history of the discipline and major issues germane to its more recent developments.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (HA4325: Insular art)

    (10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term Some knowledge of art history preferred but not essential 1 slide test (15%), 1 project (30%) and an exam (40%) 21 hrs lectures, 5 hrs seminars Dr Laura Cleaver

    Description

    Perched in the northwest corner of Europe, the islands of Ireland and Britain in the early medieval period were considered to be on the edge of the western world. Far from being remote out-posts however, they were the location of a rich cultural interface created by missionary activities, trade and the presence of significant centres of learning. This module aims to introduce students to the rich variety of art-forms produced in Ireland and parts of Britain and during the period spanning c. 600 to 1000 AD. The distinctive characteristics of manuscript illumination, fine metalworking and stone carving reflected in masterpieces such as the Book of Kells, Ardagh chalice and high crosses will be considered in the context of their wider, complex, artistic ancestry. Issues such as the technical difficulties overcome by artists and the iconographical conventions adopted by them will be explored. The unique legacy of the style, which has been the subject of several revivals, will also be examined as an example of how nationalist politics and historiography can impact on modern perceptions of particular periods of art history.

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Identify and explain major works of the period
  • Explain the function and meaning of a various forms of art and architecture over the period
  • Display an understanding of how different types of artwork were made
  • Engage critically with texts, methodologies and scholarly debates which have shaped art-historical interpretations of the period
  • Use appropriate terminology, concepts and approaches in the analysis of representative works of the period
  • Combine visual analysis with historical appraisal in response to specific questions
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (HA4323: The Glory of God: Art and Architecture of the Medieval Church 1100-1200)

    (10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term Some knowledge of art history preferred but not essential 1 slide test (15%), 1 project (30%) and an exam (40%) 21 hrs lectures, 5 hrs seminars Dr Laura Cleaver

    Description

    Medieval cathedrals and churches are numbered amongst the great monuments of European culture. However modern visitors have a very different experience to that of their medieval predecessors, as they encounter these buildings stripped of their treasures and often in a fragmentary state. This module will consider the medieval church as a Gesamtkunstwerk (or total work of art). It will address the surviving architecture, sculpture, wall-painting, stained-glass, metalwork and manuscripts associated with medieval churches to try to reconstruct the original appearance of these buildings. In doing so the module will explore questions of making, function and meaning. It will also consider the roles of patrons, artists and critics in determining what was appropriate for the house of God. Taking the period c.1100-1220 and the region of modern France as its focus the module will address the major stylistic change that occurred with the development of the Gothic style, and question what this meant for religious art and architecture. Attendance at all lectures and seminars is compulsory.

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of this module students will be able to:
  • Discuss medieval ecclesiastical material, orally and in writing, using appropriate vocabulary.
  • Demonstrate awareness of major themes in relevant scholarship.
  • Use primary and secondary sources in constructing arguments, and demonstrate an awareness of different types of evidence.
  • Combine visual analysis with an assessment of historical questions to produce critical responses to set questions.
  • Recognise key works of medieval ecclesiastical art and architecture.
  • Demonstrate awareness of the roles of restoration, conservation and loss in shaping the body of surviving evidence.