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Undergradute Law FAQ'S


General – Programmes, Points, Quotas, Requirements.

What courses can I study?

We offer 6 programmes.

  • Law
  • Law and Business
  • Law and Political Science
  • Law and History
  • Law and French
  • Law and German
  • Do you offer Law and Spanish?

    No. You may be able to apply to take electives in your second or third year of studies in Spanish.

    What were the points for this year?

    • Law - 565
    • Law and Business - 602
    • Law and Political Science - 602
    • Law and History – unknown – new course
    • Law and French - 565
    • Law and German - 543

    Are you expecting the points to go down next year?

    Points are set based on supply and demand for places. Demand far exceeds the number of places available, and places are offered to people with the highest points. The School has no control nor does it see who applies and who gets offered a place. That being said, the points were higher for 2020/21 entry than in previous years due to the unusual circumstances.

    What do you think the points will be like for Law and History?

    As points are determined by demand for places, and places will be offered to those with the highest points, it is expected that the points will be similar to Law and Business/Law and Political Science (602 in 2020). From our market research, many students interested in those programmes, particularly Law and Political Science have also expressed interest in Law and History. However, we really don’t know what points will be required until the offers are made.

    I’d like to study in Trinity but I don’t think I’ll get the points?

    Your CAO preferences should be based on your course preference rather than the points you think you will get. We often hear from students who didn’t think they would make the points so put their Trinity course lower down. Your highest ranking course will be offered to you if you meet the points. It doesn’t work in reverse. Your Career Guidance teacher/School should be able to provide you with more advice.

    How many places are available for Law programmes?

    • Law – 90.
    • Joint Honors / Business, Political Science and History – 45 in total.
    • Joint Honors / French, German – 30 in total.

    Should I take any particular subjects in my Leaving Certificate/A-levels if I want to study law?

    A few of our programmes have prerequisites:

    • Law and Business – O4/H6 Leaving Cert Maths / B/6 GCSE / SL5 IB
    • Law and French - H3 Leaving Cert French / C Advanced GCSE / 6 IB
    • Law and German - H3 Leaving Cert German / C Advanced GCSE / 6 IB
    • Otherwise there are no prerequisites. It is probably good to pick subjects you're interested in and think you will do well in.  Subjects which involve reading and critical thinking would be useful but our students come to us with a variety of subject combinations and they all adapt to the study of law.

    If I don’t like my course can I transfer?

    In your first year you can apply to transfer into another course within the first few weeks of your first semester (term). This is only possible if:

    • There are places available in the course you want to apply for.
    • You meet the entry requirements eg have the points required.
    • You apply by the deadline (which will be communicated to you in advance).

    If I don’t get offered Trinity but get offered a place in another university can I transfer to Trinity after my first year?

    Unfortunately not. The only way to get into Trinity is to apply via the CAO or some other access route. We do not accept intervarsity transfers.

    Why Trinity?

    What is the difference between Law in Trinity and other Irish Law Schools?

    The first thing to note is that you will get a good legal education whichever law school in Ireland you choose! The single honors degree offered by Trinity is a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.), UCD, for example offers a Bachelor of Civil Laws (BCL). Both degrees are accepted by the Irish professional bodies. Both universities teach the core modules set out by the Law Society of Ireland and the Honorable Society of the Kings Inns. Both universities offer excellent programmes.

    What is the difference between a BCL and LL.B.?

    In Ireland the difference is in the name only. BCL stands for Bachelor of Civil Law, and originates from the postgraduate law qualification in Oxford (where the undergraduate qualification is a BA, the postgraduate is BCL). LL.B. is the traditional Latin moniker for Bachelor of Laws (Legum Baccalaureus). They therefore mean very similar things. Both can be offered as undergraduate or postgraduate degrees in Ireland.

    Why should I go to Trinity rather than another Irish university?

    The main thing is that you attend the right school for you and that will depend on a number of factors.  There are, however, a few things that make Trinity a bit special:

    • We are still quite small, relative to some other institutions, so you will get to know both your fellow-students and your lecturers quite well. 
    • We are committed to providing small group teaching – your seminars will have approximately 15-18 students in the class. Smaller numbers due to Covid-19 restrictions. Your seminars will be delivered by Seminarists – usually PhD researchers, practicing barristers or members of the School.
    • We do have really good staff-student interactions, we have many events throughout the year which involve a friendly staff-student rivalry, such as comedy debates, bake-offs and so on. 
    • We also have a pastoral care system, known as the tutorial system which makes sure you don't get lost or fall behind and which provides a point of contact should you run into any issues.  You will be assigned a Tutor at entry. Your Tutor may be one of your lecturers, but the role of Tutor is not a teaching role (the term should not be confused with Seminarists).
    • Our Tutors get training before they start as tutors which is important to note.  
    • We offer a student mentoring system which involves senior students being paired with first years to help them during the Junior Freshman (first year).
    • We also are internationally recognised and it is very common that our graduates go on to careers in London or New York or further afield.  Our students often pursue graduate work at Harvard, Oxford, Cambridge.  
    • We also produce students with really strong research skills.
    • We have an international profile and known globally.
    • Our city centre location, in the beautiful historic campus, is close to the Courts and easy access to all transport networks.
    • We have great students, intelligent, enthusiastic and welcoming!

    Courses in Detail.

    What degree will I get?

    Single Honors students will get an LL.B. degree (Bachelor of Laws)

    Joint Honors students will get:

    • LL.B. (Law and Business, Political Science, History, French, German) if they major in Law
    • B.A. if they minor in Law or continue with both

    What will I study?

    In the first two years, all students take compulsory foundational modules such as constitutional law, torts, criminal law and contract law, mostly taught by senior professors. These building blocks of a legal education equip students with the core skills of legal research, case analysis and legislative interpretation. They are also modules that are required for entry into the professional bodies. You will also be able to take modules from other Schools in your second and third year. These modules are offered by different Schools and include Psychology, languages, English literature, entrepreneurship.

    In the third and fourth years, you will continue with some core modules (administrative law, EU law, company law) whilst also being able to select modules in areas of law that take your interest and which might help direct you towards a particular career or area of practice.

    To find out more about the modules we offer – eg Commercial law, public interest, information technology, media law, refugee and immigration law – to name but a few, please check out our websites:

    I’ve heard you don’t have many hours of classes a week?

    Generally Law modules have 3 hours of lectures per week in the semester/term. The professional modules (those required if you want to go on and practice law) will also have compulsory seminars. These seminars take place every other week and are smaller in class size. You will be expected, on top of these lectures and seminars, to put in several hours per week, per module of independent study.

    How many will be in my class?

    In the first 2 years all Law programmes will attend a number of lectures together. You could have approximately 170 in these lectures. Single Honor students will take more law modules. Those lectures will only have 90 approximately attending. All seminars for all programmes will only have 15-18 students enrolled.

    What is the difference between Single Honors law and a Joint Honors (Law and …) Programme:

    Students on our joint degree programme study fewer law modules but have the opportunity to relate their legal knowledge and skills to the partner discipline. In the first year you choose both subjects equally. In the second year you can decide to specialise in one or the other if you so wish, or can opt to take both subjects equally and add new subjects in the form of Trinity Electives or Open Modules. These are modules offered by other Schools such as English, Religion, Philosophy, Psychology. For more information on Open Modules and Trinity Electives.

    Can I take a language course even if I don’t get Law and French/German?

    Yes. Every student can choose to take Trinity Electives or Open modules in their second and third year onwards. Language modules are offered. For more details on Open Modules or Trinity Electives, please see Trinity Joint Honors.

    Modules taught by other Programmes.

    The modules offered by our partner Schools – Business, Political Science, History, French and German – are in the first 2 years foundational modules which complement your course of studies in Law. From your second year onwards, the number of modules available to you will depend on the pathway you choose and whether you wish to Major or Minor in the subject.

    Single Honors Course Structure

    • JF: Foundations of Law I and II, Constitutional Law I, Torts, Legal Philosophy, Contract Law, Criminal Law, Legislation and Regulation.
    • SF: Constitutional Law II, Land Law, Equity, Private Law Remedies. Students must also choose Open Modules and Trinity Electives.
    • JS – students take 50 credits worth of modules including: administrative law, company Law, evidence, EU, commercial, criminology, employment law, competition policy, environmental Law, English land law, European human rights, Family and Child Law, Public Interest Law, Public International Law.
    • SS – students choose from the following: Advanced EU, conflicts of law, critical perspectives on law, current issues in constitutional law, clinical legal education, financial services law, insolvency law, intellectual property law, information technology law, international human rights, international trade law, legal philosophy, media law, medical law and ethics, refugee and immigration law, tax law. Students must also complete an independent research project.

    Open Modules

    Details of various modules currently available can be found here

    Trinity Electives

    Details of various modules currently available can be found here

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    For more information on Law modules, please see?

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    Joint Honors Programmes: Law and Business, Political Science, History, French and German.

    What is the difference between Single Honors law and a Joint Honors (Law and …) Programme?

    Students on our joint degree programme study fewer law modules but have the opportunity to relate their legal knowledge and skills to the partner discipline. In the first year you choose both subjects equally. In the second year you can decide to specialise in one or the other if you so wish, or can opt to take both subjects equally and add new subjects in the form of Trinity Electives or Open Modules. These are modules offered by other Schools such as English, Religion, Philosophy, Psychology. For more information on Open Modules and Trinity Electives.

    Joint Honors Course Structures for first 2 years:

    From your second (SF) year onwards you may choose to go down a particular pathway and Major, Minor or continue with both subjects.

    Law Modules:

    • JF Modules include: Torts, Contract and Foundations of Law I and II
    • SF Modules may include: Constitutional Law I, Criminal, Equity, Land Law
    • In order to continue on the professional pathway, students would have to take all of the above modules, either as a Law Major or Single Honors student.

    See Single Honors for details of Sophister Law modules.

    Business Modules:

    • JF Modules include: Economic Policy, Management and Organisation, Quantitative methods for business or Language* – French/German/Polish/Spanish/Russian or Central, Eastern European and Russian Area studies
    • SF Modules may include: Organisational Behaviour, Principles of Marketing, Introduction to Accounting, Introduction to Finance, Introduction to Operations Management, Creative Thinking, Innovation and Entrepreneurial Action, Climate Change for Managers, Research Methods for Business Students 

    See Single Honors for details of Sophister Law modules.

    To talk to someone in Business, please contact: here

    Political Science Modules:

    • JF Modules include: Introduction to Political Science, Introduction to Sociology, Introduction to Economic Policy
    • SF Modules include: History of Political Thought, International Relations, Comparative Politics, Economy of Ireland

    To talk to someone in Political Science, please contact: here

    History Modules:

    • JF Modules include: Religion & Society 1095-1517; Ireland 1534-1815; Doing History: Sources; Doing History: Interpretations

    To talk to someone in History, please contact: here

    German Modules:

    • JF Modules include: German Area Studies, Introduction to Literature, Textual Analysis, European and Russian Area Studies
    • SF Modules may include: German language, Nazism, Conditio Judaica, Repräsentationen des Kriegs, Hitler, Kurzgeschichten der Moderne

    To talk to someone in German, please contact: here


    Open Modules: Details of various modules currently available can be found: here

    Trinity Electives:: Details of various modules currently available can be found here: here

    Joint Honors Programme Office: For more information on our Joint Honors, or other Joint Honors programmes please see here

    Can I take a language course even if I don’t get Law and French/German?

    Yes. Every student can choose to take Trinity Electives or Open modules in their second and third year onwards. Language modules are offered. For more details on Open Modules or Trinity Electives, please see Joint Honors Programme Office.

    So if I don’t like Law I can drop it?

    If you are on a Joint Honors programme eg Law and Business, Political Science, History, French or German, you can choose from your second year onwards to either:

    • Major in other subject/Minor in Law - Drop/reduce the amount of the other subject you study and over the rest of the degree place more emphasis on this subject or
    • Single Honors in other subject - You can apply to take the Single Honors course in this subject eg Single Honors Business and drop Law completely. If you choose either of these pathways, you will be awarded a BA degree.
    • Continue studying both subjects. This will lead to a BA degree.

    If I don’t like my other subject (Business, Political Science, History, French or German), what can I do?

    If you are on a Joint Honors programme eg Law and Business, Political Science, History, French or German, you can choose from your second year onwards to either:

    • Major Law / Minor other subject - Drop/reduce the amount of the other subject you study and over the rest of the degree place more emphasis on Law or
    • You can apply to take the Single Honors Law programme.

    Majoring in Law or taking the Single Honors programme will lead to a degree (LL.B.) which will enable you to apply for entry to the professional legal bodies in Ireland and possibly other jurisdictions.

    Am I better off doing Law and … or Single Honors?

    This will very much depend on your preferences and if you are interested in continuing your studies with 2 subjects.

    All our degree programmes have been favourably received by Law firms and other non-legal organisations. Corporate firms, NGOs etc are as likely to recruit students from Single Honors Law as they are from Joint Honors programmes. However, if you would like to specialise in eg Corporate Law then a Joint Honors programme would expose you to more business modules than the single honors programme?

    Law is also a good foundational degree for other career paths including those in business and the public sector. Law graduates have well-developed critical thinking skills which are readily transferable.

    Can I practice Law if I study Law and …

    Provided you choose to major in Law (or move to Single Honors) you will be able to take all the modules that satisfy the Irish professional bodies. You should be sure to check which modules the professional bodies require on a regular basis as the requirements can and do change.

    Mature students

    I am a mature student how do I apply?

    • Applicants over the age of 23 may be eligible to apply for mature student admission
    • You must apply to the CAO and
    • You must apply to the College directly

    The deadline for application is the same for both. Once you have applied and TCD has verified that you have applied correctly via the CAO we will receive your application in the School. Your application will be assessed and you may be invited to attend an interview. If successful, you will receive your offer via the CAO.

    Are there any tips for applying as a mature student?

    You should ensure you fill out the TCD form with as much detail as possible. Educational background eg Leaving Cert, College courses etc should be listed. All work experience, hobbies etc are relevant. Careful consideration should be given to your personal statement and the reason why you want this course. The application form should be treated no differently to a job application form. The more information you give us the better.

    Mature student Information

    More information can be found: here

    Careers – what can I do with my degree?

    Our LL.B. degrees prepare students not only for life as ‘lawyers’, but also enable them to enter many career fields such as business, journalism, accountancy, banking, insurance, politics, foreign affairs and diplomacy and public services. The skills learned through studying law are useful in all walks of life. A law degree teaches students to think logically and analytically. It also equips students with the ability to carry out research, to apply relevant information to problems, to use language precisely, carefully and objectively.

    From graduation onwards our students have moved into the following careers Legal Profession – Solicitors, Barristers, inhouse Counsel; Public Affairs – Policy makers, public servants, NGOs; Business/Finance – Banking, finance / investment and taxation consultants, accountants; Journalism and Media

    What is the difference between a Solicitor and a Barrister?

    A barrister deals with all court-related work such as arguing cases in court, drafting court documents and writing legal arguments. A solicitor works with the barrister on court-related work but also deal with all the legal work that does not involve the courts. This includes things like drafting contracts, selling property (conveyancing) and buying and merging companies. 

    I don’t come from a family with a law background, will that make it more difficult for me?

    We get this question so often. The majority of our students will be in the same boat as you! You should not see this as an obstacle. There will be plenty of opportunities for you to engage with people from a variety of professions (not just legal), during your time with us. You will receive information on internships, placements and mentoring from the School and Careers Advisory Service. We are fortunate to have a very generous and enthusiastic database of graduates that are willing to help.

    We always encourage students to get involved with Societies and groups, particularly the our Law Society, FLAC, Trinity College Law Review, TCD Law Student Colloquium, the Eagle and ELSA as are so proactive in liaising with organisations and creating many wonderful events that can help you along the way.

    Can I practice Law if I study Law and…

    Provided you choose to major in Law (or move to Single Honors) you will be able to take all the modules that satisfy the Irish professional bodies. You should be sure to check which modules the professional bodies require on a regular basis as the requirements can and do change.

    Internships/Placement/Mentoring

    Will I be able to take up an internship/placement as part of my degree?

    During your time, you will receive regular updates from the School advertising internships available to TCD Law students. Usually these are available from the second year onwards, with more offered in the final two years. Some internships are located in the US or abroad.

    Clinical Legal Education

    In your final year you can apply to take a Clinical Legal Education module in place of a traditional module. This module offers an introduction to legal practice, allowing students the opportunity to develop core professional skills essential for a lawyer as well as to gain valuable practical experience in a legal environment. You will undertake placements in a variety of organisations in the not-for-profit, private and public sectors. Under the supervision of experienced professionals, students will gain first-hand experience of legal practice, observing, assisting and participating in the organisations’ work. This gives students an opportunity to apply and develop their legal skills and knowledge in a practical way and to learn from this experience.

    Mentoring

    We offer an opportunity for third/fourth year students to be mentored by graduates. The graduates come from a diverse professional background and offer invaluable advise from their experience in their chosen careers.

    Year Abroad

    Can I go abroad?

    Yes: Law and French/German students must spent their 3rd year in a French/German university. All other programmes can apply to spend a semester or year in a partner university abroad in Europe, USA, Canada, Australia, Hong Kong.

    Where can I go?

    Trinity Law School has links with many of the leading Law Schools in the world, such as the Sorbonne, Bologna, Fudan (Shanghai), Hong Kong University, Sydney University and Notre Dame.

    Details of current partners are available: here

    College Wide Exchanges

    If you want to find out more about College-wide exchanges, please check here

    Accommodation

    Details of College accommodation are available: here