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LL.M. (Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law)

Welcome

Technology is ubiquitous. It is the infrastructure of our daily lives; it is constantly developing; and it gives rise to many exciting and weighty legal issues

Overview of Programmes


The tensions between rewarding intellectual development, on the one hand, and incentivising further developments, on the other, are most acute in the context of technological advance. And such issues arise in the context of information technology (IT) law more generally, where the rapid emergence of new technologies raises questions of how, if at all, the law should respond to, regulate, and promote, such developments.


On the LL.M in Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law, you will take modules in which you will study the inter-relationships between law, science and technology. These modules cover the substantive, policy, and practical elements of IP and IT law within European and International contexts. This programme provides graduates with the knowledge and tools to meet the demands of our sophisticated knowledge economy.

Pan-European Seal’ Professional Traineeship Program

The School of Law at Trinity College Dublin is a strategic partner of the ‘Pan-European Seal’ Professional Traineeship Program, having signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the European Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) and the European Patent Office (EPO) in October 2016. Students enrolled in the LL.M. (Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law) have the opportunity to apply for these paid traineeships annually. Since becoming a partner, a number of LL.M students have taken part in this traineeship programme and put the knowledge acquired during their studies into practice in this highly-esteemed professional and multi-cultural environment.

Programme Structure


The LL.M. (Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law) degree is taught over a period of one academic year, commencing in September. The year is divided into two semesters during each of which students are required to take three modules. Each module is offered in one semester only and involves 22 hours of classwork. Various forms of assessment are utilized in the different modules. Where modules are assessed by way of examination, as the examinations are scheduled at the end of each semester, in December and April/May. Students may be required to take Supplemental examinations in August/September. In addition, all students must complete a research dissertation over the academic year on an approved theme. These dissertations must be submitted on or before end of June.

In addition to a mandatory research dissertation, students will study three modules per semester, choosing from an extensive and diverse range of modules, each worth 10 ECTS. At least two modules must be chosen from the list of Section A modules set out below. The remaining two modules may be chosen from either Section A or Section B modules set out below:

Section A modules

    Advanced Lawyering Techniques
    Contemporary Issues in EU Law
    Contemporary Issues in International Law
    Copyright and Innovation
    Copyright in the EU Digital Single Market: Law, Policy and Licensing Practices
    Cyber Security Law And Policy
    Data Protection: Law, Policy and Practice
    EU Competition Law
    EU Digital Single Market (Media and Content Regulation)
    European Trademark and Design
    Freedom of Expression and Intellectual Property Law
    Intellectual Property Remedies and Sanctions
    International and European Copyright Law and Policy
    International Business Tax Law
    International Dispute Resolution
    International Trade Law
    Patent Law in the Globalised World
    Regulation of Cyberspeech

Section B modules

    African Human Rights Law
    Business and Human Rights
    The Chinese Legal System in Comparative Perspective
    Comparative Constitutional Law and Theory
    Comparative Product Liability
    Contemporary Issues in Refugee Law
    Corporate Governance in the EU
    EU Aviation Law
    EU Consumer Law
    EU Financial Services Law
    Globalisation and Law
    Fiduciary Controls on Directors in US Corporate Law
    International Aviation Law
    International Criminal Law
    International Economic Law
    International and European Human Rights Law
    International Humanitarian Law
    Islamic Law
    Judicial Review and Human Rights: Theory and Practice
    Law and Risk
    National Security Law
    Principles of Commercial Arbitration
    Regulation of Alternative Investment Fund

*The Law School reserves the right to vary the following list and, in particular, the right to withdraw and add modules. Note that timetabling considerations may also restrict choice.

Programme Outcomes


Having successfully completed this programme, students should be able to:

  • Identify, evaluate and synthesise jurisprudential theories and concepts as they apply to intellectual property and information technology law at a level appropriate to masters graduates;
  • Use appropriate legal theories, doctrines and concepts to identify, formulate, analyse and solve legal problems within national and international contexts;
  • Critically analyse the interplay between law and social change in a variety of different contexts as they pertain to international and domestic intellectual property and information technology law;
  • Conduct effective and targeted research in case law, legislation and academic legal commentary in areas pertaining to intellectual property and information technology law at both national and international levels at a level appropriate to masters graduates;
  • Discuss and debate different perspectives on legal problems, theories and doctrines in the area of intellectual property and information technology law;
  • Communicate effectively in oral and written modes in professional and academic settings and work effectively in multi-disciplinary settings;
  • Demonstrate flexibility, adaptability and independence in order to engage productively with a changing, commercial and technological environment; and
  • Have the capacity to engage in life-long learning, including vocational training for the legal profession.