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Social Work and Social Policy

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(SS1766 Social Policy Concepts and Issues)

(10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas and Hilary NA Two essays Two 1 hour lectures per week Plus One tutorial per week Dr Catherine Conlon

Description

This module will run in both Michaelmas and Hilary term.

Semester One - Will focus on concepts and constructs shaping the field of Social Policy.

Semester Two - Will introduce students to a range of social policy issues allowing students appreciate how these concepts and constructs manifest when applied to current social concerns and contexts such as ageing, crime, housing, families, youth among others.

The Introduction to Key Concepts in Social Policy module aims to introduce students to the vibrant, diverse and highly relevant field of social policy through a discussion of key contemporary concepts, themes and debates. Students will encounter key concepts relating to social and economic justice with particular reference to higher income country contexts. Core embedded principles reflecting key concerns of contemporary society will be attended to including social justice, redistribution, solidarity, social need, citizenship, diversity and life course. An understanding of the multiple contexts shaping social policy across international, supra-national, national and local levels will be developed. Students will be given an appreciation of the continuously evolving political, ethical, theoretical, and material contexts that shape social policy making. The module will equip students for deeper exploration of specific policy issues and debates as they progress in their study of social policy.

After this module you should:

  • Appreciate key principles and constructs influencing contemporary social policy in (post) welfare state contexts.
  • Understand the architecture framing social policy and how local policy instruments and principles derive from international and supra-national frameworks as well as local frameworks and conditions.
  • Be equipped with basic conceptual tools to assess the premises and impacts of social policy instruments.
  • Be aware of how social policy frames and responds to a range of contemporary social issues.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(SS1730 Introduction to Psychology)

(10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas and Hilary Terms NA Michaelmas Term = MCQ Test (50%) Hilary Term = Blogs x 5 (50%) One 2 hour lecture per week Sadhbh Byrne

Description and Learning Outcomes

This 42-hour module comprises of one (two-hour) lecture each week, across Michaelmas and Hilary terms. In Michaelmas Term, the module will provide a broad introduction to the major areas of study within psychology. Throughout Hilary Term, special attention will be paid to psychological approaches to understanding social processes, such as group interaction and prejudice.

Learning Objectives:

On completion of this module, students will be equipped to:
  • Describe the main fields of study in contemporary psychology, and their associated theories
  • Understand the psychological processes that underpin human behaviour
  • Apply psychological theory to real-world situations
  • Be critical consumers of psychological knowledge, in order to effectively evaluate research findings and theoretical proposals
  • Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS2767 Irish Social Policy I (Social Policy & Housing Policy)

    (10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas and Hilary Terms NA Coursework and Annual Examination
    • Social Policy - Two 1 hour lectures per week plus a 1 hour tutorial
    • Housing Policy - Two 1 hour lectures per week plus a 1 hour tutorial
    Social Policy - Louise Caffrey Housing Policy - Simon Brooke

    Description

    This module, which will run in both Michaelmas and Hilary term, comprises two sections:

    • Social Policy
    • Housing Policy
    • The Social Policy section will run in Michaelmas and the Housing Policy section will run in Hilary term.

      Social Policy

      Details of this section are to be confirmed.

      Housing Policy

      This section of the module will provide a comprehensive introduction to housing and homelessness policy in Ireland.

      Module content will include the following:

      • What is housing policy?
      • Why do governments intervene in the housing market?
      • What is housing tenure, what are the differences between different tenures, and why does it matter?
      • What theoretical approaches are there to housing policy?
      • Why did house prices rise so quickly, only to fall again?
      • Has the Local Property Tax been a success or a failure?
      • What can be done about mortgage arrears?
      • What is Nama?
      • What is the housing experience of minority ethnic households in Ireland?
      • Have government housing policy objectives been achieved?
      • What theoretical explanations are there for the nature and extent of homelessness?
      • How have homeless services changed during the last 20 years?
      • What are the key current homelessness policy issues?

      On completion of the Housing Policy section of the module students will:

    • have a clear understanding of why and in what fashion governments intervene in the housing market, and to what effect.
    • have a good understanding of the operation of the housing system and the role played by different housing tenures
    • be equipped to assess the impact of housing policy initiatives.
    • have a comprehensive understanding of a number of topical issues in housing policy.
    • have a thorough understanding of the causes, nature and extent of homelessness.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS2785 Irish Social Policy 2 (Crime and Irish Society & European Refugee Policy)

    (10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas and Hilary Terms NA Two pieces of coursework
    • Crime and Irish Society - One 2 hour lecture per week plus a 1 hour tutorial
    • Irish Society & European Refugee Policy - Two 1 hour lectures per week
    Crime and Irish Society - Gillian Smith Irish Society & European Refugee Policy - Dr Philip Curry

    Description

    This module, which will run in both Michaelmas and Hilary term, comprises two sections:

    • Crime and Irish Society
    • European Refugee Policy

    The Crime and Irish Society section will run in Michaelmas and the Irish Society & European Refugee Policy section will run in Hilary term.

    Crime and Irish Society

    This section of the module examines crime and punishment in Ireland under the lens of social policy. It gives a historical overview of the approaches of the state to criminal justice, and explores trends, systems and policies in crime and punishment in Ireland.

    Module Content
    • Defining, classifying and measuring crime
    • Trends in crime in Ireland
    • Imprisonment in Ireland
    • Coercive confinement in Ireland
    • The use of non-custodial sanctions in Ireland
    • Drugs policy in Ireland
    • Youth justice in Ireland
    • White collar crime in Ireland

    On completion of this section of the module students will be able to:

    • Analyse issues associated with the definition and measurement of crime and crime trends.
    • Identify and analyse the main trends in crime and punishment in Ireland over the past century.
    • Describe and analyse the historical development of criminal justice policies in Ireland.
    • Give a critical appraisal of penal policy development since the establishment of the State in Ireland.
    • Critically discuss the use of custodial and non-custodial sanction in juvenile and adult criminal justice.
    • Critique policy approaches to drugs, white collar crime, youth justice and penal policy broadly.

    European Refugee Policy

    The number of people worldwide who have been forcibly displaced from their home as a result of conflict, systemic discrimination, persecution, and other human rights violations has been steadily growing over the last decade to reach an unprecedented 65 million in 2015. The protection of asylum seekers and refugees has correspondingly become an urgent global policy issue.

    This section of the module examines the legal basis of modern asylum and refugee systems, how these systems operate in practice and how the protection of people who have been forcibly displaced has come to be intertwined with the politics and policies of migration more generally. While recognizing that forced displacement is a global issue, this course focuses on the European Union and the nations of Europe.

    On completion of this section of the module students will:

    • Understand the main provisions of the United Nations Convention and Protocol relating to the status of refugees
    • Comprehend how asylum and refugee protection systems operate in practice and the kinds of difficulties they encounter
    • Be able to identify key dimensions of the lived experience of forced displacement and how it varies across cultural, gender, age and ethnic groups.
    • Be able to assess how and why governments have attempted to control and direct migration using legal and policy frameworks and the impact this has had on the victims of forced displacement.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS2788 Social Policy )

    (05 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA To be confirmed Two 1 hour lectures per week plus a 1 hour tutorial Louise Caffrey

    Description

    Module content to be confirmed

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS2770 Housing Policy)

    (05 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA Coursework Two 1 hour lectures per week plus a 1 hour tutorial Simon Brooke

    Description

    This module will provide a comprehensive introduction to housing and homelessness policy in Ireland.

    Module content will include the following:

    • What is housing policy?
    • Why do governments intervene in the housing market?
    • What is housing tenure, what are the differences between different tenures, and why does it matter?
    • What theoretical approaches are there to housing policy?
    • Why did house prices rise so quickly, only to fall again?
    • Has the Local Property Tax been a success or a failure?
    • What can be done about mortgage arrears?
    • What is Nama?
    • What is the housing experience of minority ethnic households in Ireland?
    • Have government housing policy objectives been achieved?
    • What theoretical explanations are there for the nature and extent of homelessness
    • How have homeless services changed during the last 20 years?
    • What are the key current homelessness policy issues?

    On completion of the Housing Policy section of the module students will:

    • have a clear understanding of why and in what fashion governments intervene in the housing market, and to what effect.
    • have a good understanding of the operation of the housing system and the role played by different housing tenures
    • be equipped to assess the impact of housing policy initiatives.
    • have a comprehensive understanding of a number of topical issues in housing policy.
    • have a thorough understanding of the causes, nature and extent of homelessness.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS2780 Crime and Irish Society)

    (05 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA Coursework One 2 hour lecture per week plus a 1 hour tutorial Gillian Smith

    Description

    Crime and Irish Society examines crime and punishment in Ireland under the lens of social policy. It gives a historical overview of the approaches of the state to criminal justice, and explores trends, systems and policies in crime and punishment in Ireland.

    Module Content
    • Defining, classifying and measuring crime
    • Trends in crime in Ireland
    • Imprisonment in Ireland
    • Coercive confinement in Ireland
    • The use of non-custodial sanctions in Ireland
    • Drugs policy in Ireland
    • Youth justice in Ireland
    • White collar crime in Ireland

    On completion of this section of the module students will be able to:

    • Analyse issues associated with the definition and measurement of crime and crime trends.
    • Identify and analyse the main trends in crime and punishment in Ireland over the past century.
    • Describe and analyse the historical development of criminal justice policies in Ireland.
    • Give a critical appraisal of penal policy development since the establishment of the State in Ireland.
    • Critically discuss the use of custodial and non-custodial sanction in juvenile and adult criminal justice.
    • Critique policy approaches to drugs, white collar crime, youth justice and penal policy broadly.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS2783 European Refugee Policy)

    (05 ECTS credits) Hilary Term) NA Coursework Two 1 hour lectures per week Dr Philip Curry

    Description

    The number of people worldwide who have been forcibly displaced from their home as a result of conflict, systemic discrimination, persecution, and other human rights violations has been steadily growing over the last decade to reach an unprecedented 65 million in 2015. The protection of asylum seekers and refugees has correspondingly become an urgent global policy issue.

    This module examines the legal basis of modern asylum and refugee systems, how these systems operate in practice and how the protection of people who have been forcibly displaced has come to be intertwined with the politics and policies of migration more generally. While recognizing that forced displacement is a global issue, this course focuses on the European Union and the nations of Europe.

    On completion of the module students will:

    • Understand the main provisions of the United Nations Convention and Protocol relating to the status of refugees
    • Comprehend how asylum and refugee protection systems operate in practice and the kinds of difficulties they encounter
    • Be able to identify key dimensions of the lived experience of forced displacement and how it varies across cultural, gender, age and ethnic groups.
    • Be able to assess how and why governments have attempted to control and direct migration using legal and policy frameworks and the impact this has had on the victims of forced displacement.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS2139 Introduction to Irish Family Law)

    (05 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA Coursework One 2 hour lecture per week Sonya Bruen

    Description

    The module explores key aspects of Irish and International Child and Family Law with particular focus on Public Child Care Law and the statutory role of Social Work Practitioners. The module will also provide an overview of relevant aspects of Private Family Law, including marriage breakdown, domestic violence, custody and guardianship.

    On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

    • Understand and illustrate the structure of the Irish Legal System, with particular reference to Child and Family Law.
    • Consider the inherent difficulty of balancing parent's rights and children's rights in Public Law matters;
    • Have a good understanding of fair procedures for parents and families, including issues such as informed consent and the rights of parents to access legal representation
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS3383 Life Courses and Evolving Welfare States)

    (10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA
    • Attendance and active class participation = 20 %
    • Group project and presentation = 30 %
    • End-of-term essay = 50 %
    One two-hour seminar per week. Attendance is mandatory and influences grade. Dr Catherine Conlon

    Description

  • This module will run in Hilary term (2017) and will be delivered by Professor Virpi Timonen.
  • Lectures / Seminars: One two-hour seminar per week. Attendance is mandatory and influences grade.
  • During this module, the students will have an opportunity to reflect on the notion of the life course: how the timing of our birth and the context we are born and grow up in influences opportunities and outcomes throughout our lives. The students will be sensitised to how the life course is changing as a result of transformations in what are still considered major milestones for individuals. For instance, the time spent in education is increasing and entry into employment and long-term partnerships is being postponed. The module will connect these changes in the life course to welfare state structures, which are arguably lagging behind the pace of change, but are also trying to catch up with and adapt to these changes. The module draws on examples from a variety of welfare states and different policy sectors, with a focus on how welfare states are trying to address the new social risks of weak educational opportunities, youth unemployment, precarious work, the challenges of reconciling work and parenthood, and the mega-trend of ageing.
  • Learning outcomes include:
    • Understanding of the social processes that shape the life course from childhood to old age
    • Cognizance of the main societal and economic forces that are bringing about changes in the life course.
    • Awareness of how welfare structures shape the life course
    • Good grasp of what are seen, from the point of social policy, to be the main challenges that now confront children and young workers, families, low-income workers and ageing workers
    • Appreciation of differences in how welfare states respond to evolving social risks, and the broad outline of the consequences of these responses
    • Understanding of the divergent views expressed in debates about what welfare states should do in response to new challenges
  • Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS3351 Youth and Society)

    (05 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA Coursework One 2-hour lecture per week Dr Paula Mayock

    Description

    This module is inter-disciplinary and will draw upon research linked to Youth Studies, Sociology, Criminology, Psychology and Social Policy. The core aim is to provide students with an in-depth, research-based understanding of youth, adolescence, and emerging adulthood. The course will focus on key theoretical approaches to understanding youth in society and will consider a range of substantive issues and areas within contemporary research on both 'mainstream' and 'marginalised' youth, but with a strong emphasis on youth 'at risk', including homeless youth, young people with care experience, and young people who use drugs. Varying approaches to the study of youth will be reviewed and we will explore how social and economic forces influence the lives and experiences of young people generally and marginalised youth in particular.

    The aim of this section of the module is

    • To enable students to identify the theoretical constructs that have been used to conceptualise and understand 'youth' across time.
    • To critically analyse the impact of social context, social diversity and inequality on the lives and experiences of young people.
    • To highlight challenges faced by young people due to structural inequalities within contemporary society, particularly during the transition from 'child' to 'adult'.
    • To consider how governments, and Irish social policy in particular, have conceptualised and responded to the lived experience and needs of both mainstream and marginalised young people.

    On completion of section students will:

    • Have knowledge and understanding of the ways in which 'youth' and 'adolescence' have been conceptualised over time.
    • Be able to identify key concepts and themes that are relevant to understanding the multiple and diverse aspects of youth and youth experience.
    • Have the knowledge to critically assess popular discourses and dominant debates on young people.
    • Understand how social inequalities impact the life experiences and life chances of young people in general and marginalised youth, in particular.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS3401 Families, Youth and Society: Contemporary Issues)

    (10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas and Hilary Term NA Michaelmas Term
    • One 1,000 Word Essay = 10%
    • One 1,000 Word Essay = 15%
    • One 3,000 Word Essay =25%
    Hilary Term One - 3,000 word essay = 50%
    Micaelmas Term - Two 1-hour lectures per week Hilary Term - One 2-hour lecture per week

    Contemporary Issues in the Family

    -Dr Catherine Conlon

    Youth and Society: Contemporary Issues

    -Dr Paula Mayock

    Description

    This introductory module, which will run in both Michaelmas and Hilary term, and will be delivered by Dr Catherine Conlon and Dr Paula Mayock. The module comprises two sections:

    Section One - Contemporary Issues in the Family will run in Michaelmas term -Dr Catherine Conlon

    Section Two - Youth and Society will run in Hilary term

    Families and Family Policy in Contemporary Society

    This section of the module will consider how 'family' as norm, institution and practice has evolved in the context of changing social practices. We will explore how the family as a social construct has been theorised and relate the changes observed in Irish family structure and life to these theories. We will assess the family as institution by examining how social policy frames family and personal life. We will draw on social research portraying recent trends in family formation and the practices of family life throughout the module to critically assess the dynamics between the normative, institutional and practiced families we live by. Dr Conlon's own research will be drawn on through a research led teaching approach.

    Aims of this module are:

    • To provide students with an understanding of theoretical developments and debates in the field of the family and personal life.
    • To debate how changes in personal relationships across gender, generation and sexualities are transforming family.
    • To develop an understanding of the diversities of families we live by in contemporary society.
    • To consider how social policy relates to the changing formations and practices in family and personal life.

    On completion of this section students will:

    • Have knowledge of changing patterns and forms of family living.
    • Understand contemporary sociological approaches to explaining modern family and personal life.
    • Be able to critically assess policy relating to the family in Ireland.
    • Be competent to critically assess contemporary social research and popular debates relating to the family and private life.
    Youth and Society

    This section of the module is inter-disciplinary and will draw upon research linked to Youth Studies, Sociology, Criminology, Psychology and Social Policy. The core aim is to provide students with an in-depth, research-based understanding of youth, adolescence, and emerging adulthood. The course will focus on key theoretical approaches to understanding youth in society and will consider a range of substantive issues and areas within contemporary research on both 'mainstream' and 'marginalised' youth, but with a strong emphasis on youth 'at risk', including homeless youth, young people with care experience, and young people who use drugs. Varying approaches to the study of youth will be reviewed and we will explore how social and economic forces influence the lives and experiences of young people generally and marginalised youth in particular.

    The aim of this section of the module is:

    • To enable students to identify the theoretical constructs that have been used to conceptualise and understand 'youth' across time.
    • To critically analyse the impact of social context, social diversity and inequality on the lives and experiences of young people.
    • To highlight challenges faced by young people due to structural inequalities within contemporary society, particularly during the transition from 'child' to 'adult'.
    • To consider how governments, and Irish social policy in particular, have conceptualised and responded to the lived experience and needs of both mainstream and marginalised young people.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS340B Families and Family Policy)

    (05 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA
    • One 1,000 Word Essay = 20%
    • One 1,000 Word Essay = 30%
    • One 3,000 Word Essay =50%
    Two 1-hour lectures per week Dr Catherine Conlon

    Description

    Families and Family Policy in Contemporary Society (5 ECTS)

    This module will consider how 'family' as norm, institution and practice has evolved in the context of changing social practices. We will explore how the family as a social construct has been theorised and relate the changes observed in Irish family structure and life to these theories. We will assess the family as institution by examining how social policy frames family and personal life. We will draw on social research portraying recent trends in family formation and the practices of family life throughout the module to critically assess the dynamics between the normative, institutional and practiced families we live by. Dr Conlon's own research will be drawn on through a research led teaching approach.

    Aims of this module are:

    • To provide students with an understanding of theoretical developments and debates in the field of the family and personal life.
    • To debate how changes in personal relationships across gender, generation and sexualities are transforming family.
    • To develop an understanding of the diversities of families we live by in contemporary society.

    On completion of section one students will:

    • Have knowledge of changing patterns and forms of family living.
    • Understand contemporary sociological approaches to explaining modern family and personal life.
    • Be able to critically assess policy relating to the family in Ireland.
    • Be competent to critically assess contemporary social research and popular debates relating to the family and private life.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS3382 Understanding Ageing Societies)

    (05 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA
    • Essay = 50%
    • Presentation with slides = 50%

    There is no end-of-year examination. The assignments that form the continuous assessment are expected to be based on extensive independent reading, in addition to consistent class attendance.

    One 2 hour lecture per week. Professor Virpi Timonen

    Description

    The purpose of the Ageing Societies course is to explore the sociology and social policy and ageing (social gerontology) with students. The module will provide students with an opportunity to discuss a range o f substantive topics that are relevant to both individual and population ageing, and to both 'young' and 'older' people. In order to help students acquire a critical understanding of both the opportunities and challenges that demographic ageing presents, the module will introduce students to issues relating to the social construction of ageing, long-term care systems, inter-generational relationships, theories of ageing, and ideas of 'active' and 'successful' ageing.

    Students will be able to:

    • Differentiate between and critically discuss theories of ageing
    • Outline how ageing and old age are socially constructed
    • Outline the contributions of older people to families, societies and economies
    • Demonstrate an awareness of diversity among older people, and of the main causes of this diversity
    • Critically examine prevailing views on population ageing and the implications they have for both social policy design and older people themselves
    • Apply theoretical and conceptual debates on ageing to the analysis of social policy documents and texts which relate to social policy and ageing
    • Demonstrate their written and verbal ability to communicate concise and theoretically grounded arguments as they relate to social policy and ageing
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS4830 Ageing Societies)

    (15 ECTS credits) Michaelmas and Hilary Terms NA Michaelmas Term
    • Assignment 1 (critical reflection) = 10%
    • Assignment 2 (essay) = 20%
    • Assignment 3 (presentation with slides) = 20%
    Hilary Term
    • Essay = 25%
    • Presentation with slides = 25%

    There is no end-of-year examination. The assignments that form the continuous assessment are expected to be based on extensive independent reading, in addition to consistent class attendance.

    Penalties (deduction of 10 percentage points from grade) will be applied where assignments are not submitted on time.

    To be Confirmed Professor Virpi Timonen

    Description

    The purpose of the Ageing Societies course is to explore the sociology and social policy and ageing (social gerontology) with students. The module will provide students with an opportunity to discuss a range of substantive topics that are relevant to both individual and population ageing, and to both 'young' and 'older' people. In order to help students acquire a critical understanding of both the opportunities and challenges that demographic ageing presents, the module will introduce students to issues relating to the social construction of ageing, long-term care systems, inter-generational relationships, theories of ageing, and ideas of 'active' and 'successful' ageing.

    Students will be able to:

    • Differentiate between and critically discuss theories of ageing
    • Outline how ageing and old age are socially constructed
    • Outline the contributions of older people to families, societies and economies
    • Demonstrate an awareness of diversity among older people, and of the main causes of this diversity
    • Critically examine prevailing views on population ageing and the implications they have for both social policy design and older people themselves
    • Apply theoretical and conceptual debates on ageing to the analysis of social policy documents and texts which relate to social policy and ageing
    • Demonstrate their written and verbal ability to communicate concise and theoretically grounded arguments as they relate to social policy and ageing
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS2139 Introduction to Irish Family Law)

    (5 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Terms NA Essay (100%) One 2 hour lecture per week Sonya Bruen

    Description

    The module explores key aspects of Irish and International Child and Family Law with particular focus on Public Child Care Law and the statutory role of Social Work Practitioners. The module will also provide an overview of relevant aspects of Private Family Law, including marriage breakdown, domestic violence, custody and guardianship.

    Learning Outcomes:

    On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:
  • Understand and illustrate the structure of the Irish Legal System, with particular reference to Child and Family Law.
  • Consider the inherent difficulty of balancing parent’s rights and children’s rights in Public Law matters;
  • Have a good understanding of fair procedures for parents and families, including issues such as informed consent and the rights of parents to access legal representation;
  • Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS2788 Analysing Povery & Social Exclusion)

    (5 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA Course Work (100%) One 2 hour lecture per week and one 1 hour tutorial Louise Caffrey

    Description

    This module aims to introduce students to core knowledge and debates surrounding the ways that social policy understands, measures and explains poverty and social exclusion. It challenges students to critically apprise how poverty and social exclusion may be understood and how social policy goals and provision are influenced by conceptual interpretations of poverty and social exclusion.

    On completion of this section of the module students will be able to:

  • Recall and critique competing definitions and measurements of poverty and social exclusion
  • Critically evaluate competing theoretical explanations for the causes of poverty
  • Critically evaluate competing explanations for why specific groups are at higher risk of poverty
  • Assess the effectiveness of policies to address poverty and social exclusion
  • Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (SS4722 Poverty Inequality & Redistribution)

    (15 ECTS credits) Michaelmas and Hilary Terms NA Michaelmas = assignment (50%). Hilary = examination (50%) TBC Camille Loftus

    Description

    This module will run for two hours per week in both Michaelmas and Hilary term. The course will examine concepts of poverty and inequality, measurements of income inequality and changes in inequality over time. It will critically analyse different ways of defining and measuring poverty, paying particular attention to research findings on poverty in Ireland.

    The role of the tax and welfare systems, and of other social spending, in redistributing income, resources and life chances will also be examined. Alternative tax-benefit systems such as Basic Income will be critically reviewed, and specific aspects of social security, taxation, and welfare state policy will also be considered. The tension between "equality" and "efficiency" type objectives will also be outlined, along with recent policy ideas and initiatives to simultaneously pursue equity and efficiency objectives using ‘quasi-markets’, so-called.

    Learning Outcomes: The core learning objective of the course is to impart a critical knowledge of income distribution processes (very broadly defined) and related policy arguments and research methods. Specifically, students will learn how to:

  • analyse and critique quantitative poverty and income distribution and social expenditure data;
  • critically compare the strengths and weaknesses of alternative concepts of poverty;
  • understand the variety of methodologies- survey,
  • quantitative, ethnographic- in poverty research and the interplay between concepts and methodology;
  • integrate concepts and evidence from different social science disciplines;
  • Formulate policy proposals and critiques that reflect the interplay between conflicting policy goals.
  • In pursuing these learning objectives a number of learning styles will be applied, as follows:

  • Exposition of basic concepts and illustrative evidence through lectures;
  • Exploring and discussing key texts in student-led discussion;
  • Self-directed learning through choice of reading and essay topics;
  • One-to-one supervision and discussion of student’s reading and essay supervision.