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Psychology

Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU1214V Foundation of Psychology

5 1 term, MT N/A Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

This module traces the development of the discipline of psychology from its philosophical and physiological foundations right up to its present-day application in various spheres of human activity.
Students will be introduced to key historical happenings, conceptual issues, research approaches, and practices within the major psychological perspectives and fields of study.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU1234V Thinking

5 1 term, MT Introductory Psychology Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

The aim of this module is to provide a foundation in human thinking, in particular to familiarise students with contemporary explanations from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science, drawing on evidence from cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence, linguistics, philosophy and cognitive neuroscience.
The module aims to provide
(a) an understanding of the conceptual underpinnings of the study of higher level cognition;
(b) analyses of various aspects of thinking, including creativity, reasoning, problem solving, decision making, and of some relevant aspects of long term memory,;
(c) discussion of current challenges in the study of higher level cognition, including the relation of cognition and emotion, and the problem of consciousness.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSUV2007 Developmental Psychology

5 1 term, MT Introductory Psychology Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

This course provides an introduction to the study of the development of children and adolescents. Students will learn about the changes that occur across different domains of development throughout infancy, childhood and adolescence. In addition, students will learn about developmental theories, themes and concepts, and about the methods involved in developmental research.
The course will also address critical issues and frameworks that shape how we understand and study development, such as the interacting roles of nature and nurture in development, debates about continuity and discontinuity in development, the influence of the socio-cultural context on development, the role of children in their own development, and the interaction of the social, cognitive and biological domains in development.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU3437V Child Development in Changing Family Contexts

5 1 term, MT Introductory Psychology Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

This module provides students with an understanding of how families matter in children’s development. The course examines theory, research and applied perspectives on the family as a context for children’s development.
The course aims to provide students with knowledge of research and theoretical advances on the relations between child development, and family processes, parenting, and diverse family structures.
The module covers topics such as parent-child relationships, marital conflict and divorce, single, step- and same-sex parenting. Research on these topics is considered within a framework that takes account of developmental processes and broader socio-cultural contexts.

Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU3439V Applied Issues in Developmental Psychology

5 1 term, MT Intro to Psychology or equivalent Final Essay

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

This module further develops students’ understanding of developmental psychology by exploring the contribution that major theories of developmental psychology have made to our understanding of a number of issues relevant to the lives of children and young people in contemporary society. Three themes cut across all topics - the role of theory in guiding research, the importance of adopting a developmental perspective and critical analysis of research. The course illustrates how theories and research in developmental psychology are applied to guide and inform practice and policy relating to contemporary issues that affect the lives of children and young people.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU3440V Psychology of Criminal Behaviour

5 1 term, MT Introductory Psychology or equivalent Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

This module will impart an understanding of the psychology of criminal conduct and will investigate a range of perspectives from psychological literature that seek to shed light on crime and its commission. It will provide students with knowledge regarding the measurement and distribution of crime in society and official responses with regard to crime prevention and investigation. It aims to promote an understanding of crime categories, offenders, and how a psychological understanding impacts on prevention, rehabilitation, and treatment. The module will also provide an overview of applied professional practice in Forensic and Investigative Psychology.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PPSU3454V Social Neuroscience

5 1 term, MT Introductory Psychology or equivalent Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

Social Neuroscience is one of the newest fields in Psychology and explores the neural systems underlying social behaviour. Emerging from a synthesis of ideas and methods from social psychology and the neurosciences, social neuroscience seeks to broaden our understanding of human brain function beyond basic motor, perceptual and cognitive processes by elucidating the brain’s fundamental role in governing interpersonal relations. This endeavour has the potential to greatly improve our understanding of how the brain works and, at the same time, to refine theories of social processes. The course will outline the theoretical origins of the field, basic neuroanatomy and core methodologies including brain imaging techniques and behavioural paradigms. In addition, key areas that will be covered include how the brain enables the processing of faces, emotions, theory of mind, prejudice and stereotypes, moral judgments and economic decision making. In so doing, the course will highlight prominent disorders of social function, such as autism, and how limitations in seemingly ‘non-social’ cognitive abilities can greatly influence our social behavior. Finally, the course will also consider some of the ethical implications associated with our growing understanding of the neural determinants of interpsonal behaviour and the impact this knowledge can have on our notion of free will and responsibility.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU3458V Preclinical and Clinical Models of Neuropsychiatric and Neurological Disorders

5 1 term, MT Introductory Psychology or equivalent Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

Neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders are widespread and disabling conditions in society, compromising individual quality of life and diminishing productive potential while placing a great strain on health-care systems and care-givers. This course examines a number of these disorders, and places a particular focus on the translation of basic neuroscience to clinical disorders, and vice versa. This module provides students with an understanding of neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders, particularly in terms of their interrelatedness with neurocognitive function and their modelling by preclinical animal models. A particular focus will be on current and developing neurotherapeutic strategies (from molecular to behavioural to assistive/invasive technology approaches). Advances in technologies to model, probe and support nervous system function will be a key feature too, whether from a behavioural, pharmacological and/or neural prosthetic perspective.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU3474V Policy and the Behavioural and Brain sciences

5 1 term, MT Introductory Psychology or equivalent Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

The course ‘Policy and the Behavioural and Brain Sciences’ focuses on how policy is developed and implemented at the interface between the behavioural and brain sciences (BBS) and policy development and implementation in the public and private spheres. There is considerable research conducted at the intersection between the BBS and other disciplines, as well as society at large. The course is therefore intended to broaden and deepen the understanding of the student how the BBS inform and shape policy formation and policy execution, as well as the place of the BBS as they interact with organisations and society at large. This course will cover a range of topics, from the origins of policy, through to how recent advances in theory and practice have shifted our thinking on outcomes for society. Major findings from behavioural economics and nudge theory, to large-scale applications of behavioural insights teams within governments, NGOs and the private sector will also be included.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSUV1009 Psychological Disorder

5 1 term, HT Introductory Psychology or equivalent Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

This course describes and outlines the major theoretical approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders. It considers the historical development of the concept of mental illness/psychological disorder and examines the various lenses through which it is currently viewed. The module will identify contemporary diagnostic criteria for a range of disorders and will critically evaluate the role of biological, social, cultural and economic influences in defining and diagnosing mental health. The course will examine the application of various research methodologies to studying the causes of mental illness, along with current best-practice psychological and pharmacological interventions. Finally, ethical and legal implications of approaches towards psychological disorders will also be considered.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU1205V Evolutionary Psychology

5 1 term, HT Introductory Psychology or equivalent Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

The aim of this course is to illustrate the advantages of adopting a “biological perspective” in studying human behaviour. Evolutionary Biology provides explanations for two sets of phenomena: 1) How the plethora of species emerged from a common single ancestral species in a series of descendant and radiating lineages; 2) How organisms come to be well-matched to face the threats and opportunities in the environment they inhabit. Evolutionary Psychologists claim that their account of human nature follows from applying the principles of evolutionary biology to the study of the human mind. Questions to be addressed in this module include: 1) What are the contemporary principles of evolutionary biology? 2) Are these principles being applied by Evolutionary Psychologists? Together with discovery of the nature of particulate inheritance (the gene) and the sciences of molecular and developmental biology, evolutionary biology provides the fundamental basis for our understanding the human condition, and of our relationships with our physical, social, and biotic environment. An effective comprehension of typical and atypical human behaviour, both in health and disease, requires knowledge of evolutionary principles and an appreciation of the manner in which they have shaped biological processes at both an individual and a population level.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU1208V Fundamentals of Neuroscience and Behaviour

5 1 term, HT Introductory Psychology or equivalent Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

This module is designed to introduce students to the field of social psychology and the principles underlying group and individual interaction. It will present the historical and philosophical roots of social psychology in the context of the current state of the discipline. Students will be acquainted with debates and tensions between different schools within social psychology and to present critiques of the discipline. The module aims to present the richness, complexity and variety of human social behaviour and the discipline that studies it in a conceptually integrated way
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU3464V The Brain Throughout the Lifespan

5 1 term, HT Introductory Psychology Module or equivalent Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

The format of lectures is conventional, but students are encouraged to ask questions and to engage the lecturer in discussion where practicable. Both the reduced numbers in these optional modules and the fact that the module is based in the lecturer’s own area of research expertise and interest facilitates increased class discussion and debate. Inclusive curriculum: Each lecture and any supporting and accompanying documentation is posted on our school website to facilitate independent study and self-paced learning and/or will be posted on the course blog or other appropriate format.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU3470V Psychoanalysis and Personality

5 1 term, HT Introductory Psychology Module or equivalent Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

The main aims of this module are to provide students with a basic knowledge of psychoanalytic ideas, drawing on a number of traditions within psychoanalysis and exploring the differences between such perspectives and other psychological perspectives. An aim of the module is also to demonstrate the manner in which psychoanalytic ideas can be drawn on in thinking about cultural phenomena as well as in clinical contexts. The module thus gives students a foundation in ideas they may later draw on in clinical and counselling psychology training as well as in fields of counselling and psychotherapy.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU3472V Creative Cognition

5 1 term, HT Introductory Psychology, Introductory Neuroscience Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

The aim of this module to provide an advanced evaluation of psychological knowledge on creative cognition that builds on the foundation provided in the PS1234 Thinking module. It will familiarize students with the core theoretical and methodological issues in the scientific study of human creativity and imagination. It will enable students to develop a critical assessment of experimental studies of human innovation, including conceptual combination, category expansion, the creation of alternatives to reality in adulthood and the role of pretence in childhood. It will facilitate students in the formulation of rigorous evaluations of experimental investigations of human insight, analogy, scientific discovery and imagery. It will foster a critical appreciation of the influence of contextual factors such as culture in creative endeavours.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU3473V Human Reasoning

5 1 term, HT Introductory Psychology, Introductory Neuroscience Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

The aim of this module is to provide an advanced evaluation of psychological knowledge on human reasoning that builds on the foundation provided in the PS1234 Thinking module. It will familiarize students with the core theoretical and methodological issues in the scientific study of human reasoning and decision making. The module is designed to enable students to develop a critical assessment of experiments on human social reasoning, including moral judgment, intentional reasoning, and reasoning about social dilemmas. It will facilitate students in the formulation of rigorous evaluations of experimental studies of human hypothetical thought, including conditional reasoning, counterfactual thought, causal reasoning, and argumentation. It will foster a critical appreciation of experimental investigations of decision making, including planning and risky choices.
Module Code and Module Name ECTs credits Semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact

PSU3475V Psychology of Religion and Spirituality

5 1 term, HT Introductory Psychology Module or equivalent Final Essay Dr. Paul Dockree

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

In this module we examine the core phenomena of religious and spiritual belief and practice – faith, guilt & forgiveness, worship - through the lenses of different psychologies. Psychoanalysis, social, cognitive, behavioural, biological, evolutionary and positive psychology have all addressed these. We explore their theoretical perspectives, methodologies and the types of empirical data they have gathered. We also look at distinctive features of human culture that, while not specifically religious, are arguably fundamental to the experience of being human, such as art, fiction and humour. Core to the module is consideration of multiple rationalities & the nature and status of different types and levels of knowledge – religious vs scientific, psychological vs sociological, evolutionary vs humanistic – in understanding the human condition.