Skip to main content

Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin

Trinity Menu Trinity Search



You are here Orientation > Visiting and Erasmus Students

History

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI1101 Doing history)

(05 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 100% continuous assessment 1 lecture per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Professor Seán Duffy

Description

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Understand the difference between primary and secondary sources, and between difference kinds of primary sources (narrative sources, record sources, maps, visual art, archaeological artefacts, architectural heritage, etc), and be able to use them
  • Understand how to make effective use of the history resources of Trinity College Library
  • Understand how to cite books and articles in footnotes and in a bibliography
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI1102 Interpreting history)

(05 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 100% exam 1 lecture per week Dr Robert Armstrong

Description

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Outline the arguments advanced by different historians in key historiographical debates
  • Discuss some key methodological and theoretical approaches used by historians involved in those debates
  • Undertake a basic critique and assessment in written format of arguments advanced in selected historiographical debates
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HIU12020: Kingship and Warfare: Ireland, c.1000-1318 )

(10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Professor Seán Duffy)

Description

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Outline chronologically the key developments in Ireland c.1000–1318
  • Offer explanations for the key developments in the period
  • Evaluate the significance of those key developments and appreciate their impact on the subsequent course of Irish history
  • Search for, and critically appraise, relevant literature
  • Undertake an analysis of select contemporary records (in translation)

We explore how Irish society and kingship changed in the aftermath of Clontarf as a result of inter-provincial warfare and the changing role of the church. The second half of the module examines the causes and implications of the English (or Anglo-Norman) invasion of the late 1160s, perhaps the single most formative development in Irish secular affairs. We study the interaction of cultures in its aftermath and the Irish opposition to English rule that saw the emergence of England's ongoing Irish problem through later centuries.

The module closes with the most serious challenge to English power in medieval Ireland: the Scottish invasion (1315-18) led by Edward Bruce, brother of Robert Bruce king of Scots.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

Outline chronologically the key developments in Ireland c.1000–1318 Offer explanations for the key developments in the period

Evaluate the significance of those key developments and appreciate their impact on the subsequent course of Irish history Search for, and critically appraise, relevantliterature

Undertake an analysis of select contemporary records (in translation)

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HIU12021: Religion and Society, c.1095-c.1517 )

(10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Prof Ruth Karras

Description

At the beginning of the twelfth century western Christendom had a new optimism: a commercial and urban boom, new religious orders, new church buildings, the codification of religious law, a flourishing of religious art, a movement to “recover” the Holy Land. Between 1250 and 1500 war, plague and religious dissent had a profound impact on European life. This module offers a thematic survey of religious practices and the impact of religion on society more generally in the central and later medieval west, where everyday life was carried on to a soundtrack of church bells and sermons, but where the culture allowed for a surprising amount of diversity of belief and practice as well. Lectures and tutorials focus on the practice and impact of religion in medieval society, on social structures (such as family and community) and on relations with other cultures.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HIU12025 – Climate in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds)

(5 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 1 lecture per week and 4 tutorials over the course of the term Dr Francis Ludlow

Description

These aims can be best achieved by combining evidence from both natural and human archives. In this module we will examine the historical development of natural archives such as tree-rings and ice-cores and introduce how they can be used to reveal climate variations in the past. We will then examine how this information can be combined with evidence from human archives, including written and archaeological records, to understand the social impacts of climate change and extreme weather. In doing so, we will draw upon case studies of major episodes of climate change from the ancient and medieval eras.

These case studies will bring us from ancient Egypt and Babylonia to the ancient American Southwest, and from there to Medieval Ireland, Japan, China and beyond. In these places we will examine the role that explosive volcanic eruptions and rapid changes in the Sun’s output of energy played in causing extreme weather that was often accompanied by major human impacts such as famine, disease and conflict, before studying the ways in which ancient and medieval societies attempted to cope with these impacts and adapt to changing climates.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Situate climate history within the broader field of environmental history
  • Be able to source and interpret historical climate information from human and natural archives
  • Understand the strengths and weaknesses of human and natural archives, and the means by which their information may be integrated
  • Characterize the range of potential impacts that climatic changes and extreme weather had on ancient and medieval societies, as well as the coping strategies employed to mitigate these impacts
  • Understand the pitfalls associated with overly simplistic attempts to integrate a role for climate in human history (e.g. environmental determinism)
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

HIU12026: American History: A Survey

(10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 seminars over the course of the term TBC

Description

Among topics covered are the colonial period; the establishment of American independence; the U.S. constitution; slavery; the Civil War; industrialization, urbanisation and the problems of a multi-ethnic society. Changes in American popular culture are considered, as are the emergence of the US as a world power and American foreign policy.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Outline chronologically key events and developments in the history of north America since the sixteenth century
  • Assess the causes and consequences for America of the War of Independence, the Civil War, the two World Wars and the Vietnamese war
  • Discuss the core features of north American society since the colonial era Analyse the impact of different aspects of political, social and cultural development in north America since colonial times Undertake a basic analysis and evaluation of selected primary sources relating to aspects of north American history s
  • Present and discuss in written and oral format analysis of key questions relating to the history of North America since the colonial period.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

HIU12027: Imperialism to Globalism: Europe and the World 1860-1970

(10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas NA 2 lectures per week and 6 seminars over the course of the term Dr Robert Armstrong & Dr Isabella Jackson

Description

This module investigates some of the events and processes which have led to a more integrated world order between the mid-nineteenth century and the later twentieth century. For most of that period much of the world was carved up between a number of inter-continental empires centred in Europe. How those empires grew, exerted control and in due course retreated will be the particular focus of the module. But other processes, too, will be considered, as will be the evolution of such ideologies as imperialism or Communism and whether such ideologies impacted upon changing global power relationships. The module is designed on a comparative model, though course reading will be provided in English, and while broadly chronological in approach will focus on a wide range of themes in cultural, economic and political history.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Outline chronologically and explain key developments in global and imperial history during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries
  • Assess the impact of developments which leave led to a more integrated world order since 1860
  • Analyse the impact of different aspects of intercontinental cultural, economic and political changes
  • Undertake a basic analysis and evaluation of selected primary sources relating to aspects of global history
  • Undertake a basic analysis and evaluation of selected primary sources relating to aspects of global history
  • Discuss the core aspects of the imperial order of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

HHU22002: Humans and the environment in modern history

(5 ECTS credits) Michaelmas NA 1 lecture per week and 4 tutorials over the course of the term Dr. Katja Bruisch

Description

Dichotomies, such as humans/nature and nature/culture, have been central to modern worldviews. Nevertheless, humans have always lived in complex relationships with the non-human world: While human societies have harnessed animals, plants, minerals or the soil for their own needs, the living and non-living environment always put constraints on or even interfered with human agency. In contrast to the modern myth of mankind’s liberation from nature, human interactions with the non-human world got more – and not less – intense in the past 200 years, creating some of the most severe environmental problems that we are facing today.

In this module, we will take an environmental perspective on European imperialism, the Industrial Revolution, modern farming practices and international conflict to explore the relationship between social and ecological change in the modern world. At the same time, we will trace the rise of nature protection and environmental policies as responses to modernity’s unintended by-products, such as pollution, the loss of wildlife, nuclear accidents and climate change. This module will introduce key approaches to the exciting study of historical human-nature relations, and combine local and transnational case studies that exemplify how the environment has mattered in modern history.

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

HHU22002: Humans and the environment in modern history

(5 ECTS credits) Michaelmas NA 1 lecture per week and 4 tutorials over the course of the term Dr. Katja Bruisch

Description

Dichotomies, such as humans/nature and nature/culture, have been central to modern worldviews. Nevertheless, humans have always lived in complex relationships with the non-human world: While human societies have harnessed animals, plants, minerals or the soil for their own needs, the living and non-living environment always put constraints on or even interfered with human agency. In contrast to the modern myth of mankind’s liberation from nature, human interactions with the non-human world got more – and not less – intense in the past 200 years, creating some of the most severe environmental problems that we are facing today.

In this module, we will take an environmental perspective on European imperialism, the Industrial Revolution, modern farming practices and international conflict to explore the relationship between social and ecological change in the modern world. At the same time, we will trace the rise of nature protection and environmental policies as responses to modernity’s unintended by-products, such as pollution, the loss of wildlife, nuclear accidents and climate change. This module will introduce key approaches to the exciting study of historical human-nature relations, and combine local and transnational case studies that exemplify how the environment has mattered in modern history.

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

HIU12028: War and Peace in Modern Europe, 1900 – the present 0

(10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 2 lectures per week and 6 seminars over the course of the term Dr. Molly Pucci

Description

In this module, we discuss how Europe was defined through war, military occupations, civil conflicts, and peace agreements in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Drawing on examples of various—through often interrelated—conflicts, we discuss several major questions: How did international and civil conflicts shape European culture and politics? Why was the twentieth century so violent? How did Europe become divided into “right” and “left,” and “East” and “West”? How are these conflicts and political extremes remembered or forgotten today? Comparing writings and films from across the continent, including Britain, Poland, Spain, Yugoslavia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Germany, we ask how the map of the continent has changed over the past century and whether it is possible to write a single history of Europe.

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(Life in Modern Ireland)

(10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Dr Anne Dolan

Description

While this module will analyse the political changes that shaped the century from Home Rule and Unionism to revolution and independence, from dominion to republic, from self-rule to direct rule, from ‘ourselves alone’ to the EEC, it will also question the emphasis historians of the century have placed on the centrality of the political narrative. Throughout, the module will consider how methodologies from social, economic and cultural history raise significant challenges for the traditional study of Ireland’s twentieth century north and south.

By examining a wide range of sources and by considering a diverse range of experiences of Ireland’s twentieth century, this module will introduce students to the ways in which the historiography of twentieth century Ireland is changing and how it might continue to change. Placing the Irish twentieth century in a variety of broader contexts the module will also question certainties about Irish insularity and challenge assumptions that have taken Irish exceptionalism for granted.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Outline chronologically and explain key developments in the history of Ireland during the twentieth century
  • Assess the impact of these developments on Ireland Search for, and critically appraise, relevant literature
  • Undertake an extended analysis of select contemporary sources
  • Communicate analysis and argument in written and verbal format.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HIU12023: Ireland, 1534-1815: A Survey)

(10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Prof. Micheál Ó Siochrú

Description

The first half of the course adopts a chronological framework, exploring key themes such as conquest and colonisation, as well as religious and political reform across three centuries from the reign of Henry VIII to the Act of Union. The second half of the course (after Reading Week) is structured thematically, examining a succession of social, cultural and economic issues, from women and the family in early modern Ireland to the origins and legacies of the 1798 Rebellion. There are two lectures each week in this course. Tutorials begin in Week 3 and will complement the lecture course, with a particular focus on contemporary texts. All tutorial documents and readings will be made available on Blackboard.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • To recognise the principal social, political, military and cultural events in the period 1534-1815
  • Discuss the leading scholarly contributions to the field of early-modern Irish history
  • Analyse the different interpretations of developments in early-modern Ireland
  • Undertake a basic analysis and evaluation of selected primary sources relating to aspects of early-modern Ireland
  • Present and discuss in written and oral format key arguments relating to the history of early-modern Ireland.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

HIU12024: Europe, 1500-1800: Power and Society

(10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Dr Joseph Clarke

Description

It then examines the legacy of these reform movements, and considers how cultural divisions as well as competition for power led to prolonged periods of conflict within states and between states during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This module then charts the emergence during the eighteenth century of new ways of thinking about private life and popular culture and of new ideas about science, society and the self of the Enlightenment. Finally, it explores how these ideas contributed to political crisis following the French Revolution.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Outline chronologically key events and developments in the history of early-modern Europe
  • Assess the causes, consequences and impact of these developments
  • Discuss the core features of European society during the early modern period
  • Analyse the impact of different aspects of political, social and cultural development on early-modern Europe
  • Undertake a basic analysis and evaluation of selected primary sources in translation relating to this period of European history
  • Analyse the impact of different aspects of political, social and cultural development on early-modern Europe
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

HIU12030: The Hundred Years War

(5 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA TBC TBC Dr David Ditchburn & Dr Peter Crooks

Description

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

are devoted to a study of texts on Joan of Arc. Lectures concentrate on key themes associated with Froissart’s world, such as kingship, chivalry and warfare, diplomacy and popular revolt.

Key reading: Froissart's Chronicles, ed. G. Brereton (Penguin Classics) - strongly recommended for purchase

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module students should be able to:
  • Outline chronologically and explain key developments in the political history of western Europe in the later middle ages Assess the impact of the Hundred Year War on the development of western Europe
  • Search for, and critically appraise, relevant literature Undertake an extended analysis of select contemporary sources in translation
  • Communicate analysis and argument in written and verbal format
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI2300 Imagining history)

(10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 100% coursework 7 one-hour lectures, 4 two-hour workshops, 3 two-hour film screenings over the course of the term Dr Peter Crooks (pcrooks@tcd.ie)

Description

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
  • Discuss the manner in which selected historical episodes and themes have been depicted in cinema and fiction
  • Complete analytical reviews of both historical fiction and film
  • Undertake a comparative assessment of historical representation in film and/or fiction
  • Demonstrate an understanding of some key questions relating to the imagining of history in fictional works
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI2135 – Continental Europe since 1918)

(10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 seminars over the course of the term Prof. Alan Kramer

Description

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:
  • Outline chronologically and explain key developments in the history of continental Europe during the later twentieth century
  • Assess the impact of these developments on continental Europe
  • Search for, and critically appraise, relevant literature
  • Undertake an extended analysis of select contemporary sources in translation
  • Communicate analysis and argument in written and verbal format
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

HI2301 – History: concepts and Methods

(05 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 100% Coursework nine one-hour lectures and three two-hour workshops over the course of the term Prof. Ciaran Brady

Description

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:
  • order the main developments in historical theory and practice in Europe and North America in the twentieth and early twenty-first century.
  • assess the significance of the major trends in modern historiography.
  • evaluate the critical turning points in historiographical theory and practice.
  • engage critically with the most influential books and articles pertaining to the subject.
  • present a coherent summary and assessment of the historical debates and controversies relating to the subject.
  • demonstrate a continuing engagement with the latest developments and outstanding problems in the interpretation of the subject.
  • present a comparative assessment and evaluation of contributions to the wider debates on historical method and philosophy
  • demonstrate a written mastery of a range of general issues raised by recent theoretical challenges to the status and value of history writing
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI1208 – US History: A Survey )

(10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term N/A 20% essay, 80% exam 2 lectures per week and 6 seminars over the course of the term Prof. Ciaran Brady

Description

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:
  • Outline chronologically key events and developments in the history of north America since the sixteenth century
  • Assess the causes and consequences for America of the War of Independence, the Civil War, the two World Wars and the Vietnamese war
  • Discuss the core features of north American society since the colonial era
  • Analyse the impact of different aspects of political, social and cultural development in north America since colonial times
  • Undertake a basic analysis and evaluation of selected primary sources relating to aspects of north American history
  • Present and discuss in written and oral format analysis of key questions relating to the history of North America since the colonial period.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI2127 – Hundred Years War c 1337 - 1453)

(10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week (weeks 1-5), plus 6 seminars (weeks 8-11) Dr. David Ditchburn & Dr Peter Crooks

Description

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:
  • Outline chronologically and explain key developments in the political history of western Europe in the later middle ages
  • Assess the impact of the Hundred Year War on the development of western Europe
  • Search for, and critically appraise, relevant literature
  • Undertake an extended analysis of select contemporary sources in translation
  • Communicate analysis and argument in written and verbal format
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

HI2133 – Imperialism to Globalism: Europe and the world 1860 - 1970

(10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Dr Robert Armstrong & Dr Isabella Jackson

Description

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:
  • Outline chronologically and explain key developments in global and imperial history during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries
  • Assess the impact of developments which leave led to a more integrated world order since 1860
  • Discuss the core aspects of the imperial order of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries
  • Analyse the impact of different aspects of intercontinental cultural, economic and political changes
  • Undertake a basic analysis and evaluation of selected primary sources relating to aspects of global history
  • Present and discuss in written and oral format analysis of key questions relating to modern global and imperial history