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History

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI1101 Doing history)

(05 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 100% continuous assessment 1 lecture per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Dr Grace O'Keeffe

Description

This module will introduce you to the sources that historians use in trying to reconstruct the past. These 'primary' sources include written documents, and you will work with a variety of texts - from official archives to legal documents and from personal memoirs to annals and chronicles. But historians also use other sources - for example, archaeological remains and our architectural heritage, and visual art and literature - and you will learn how they can help us to fill in the picture. You will also get the opportunity to engage with these sources in some of the great national repositories located on our doorstep, such as Trinity's own Long Room, Ireland's National Museum, National Gallery, National Library, and National Archives. When historians use these primary sources to piece together the past, they produce 'secondary' sources - the books and articles with which you are already familiar. But these are not 'the truth'. They are a version of the past as interpreted by men and women who, no matter how hard they try, cannot but be affected by their own experiences and preconceptions. And so this module will also introduce you to some central issues in historiography - the writing of history - in order to enrich your experience in the reading of history throughout your Trinity years.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Discuss the value of different types of written and non-written sources used by historians
  • Undertake a review of a scholarly book
  • Deliver a brief oral presentation on a set topic to a seminar group and to write-up a report on the presentation
  • Outline and discuss the connections between history and heritage
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI1102 Interpreting history)

(05 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 100% coursework 1 lecture per week Prof. Patrick Geoghegan (Patrick.Geoghegan@tcd.ie)

Description

Historians often disagree. Disunity should not, however, be regarded by students as merely confusing and unhelpful. It is through argument that history develops and this module seeks to introduce students to debates, arguments and differences in historical approach and understanding. This is a lecture-only module held once per week. The theme for 2015-16 is warfare and conflict.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Outline the arguments advanced by different historians in key historiographical debates
  • Discuss some key methodological and theoretical approaches used by historians involved in those debates
  • Undertake a basic critique and assessment in written format of arguments advanced in selected historiographical debates
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI1216 Kingship and warfare: Ireland c.1000-c.1318)

(10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Dr Niav Gallagher (gallagno@tcd.ie)

Description

This module begins with the rise Brian Boru from modest origins to become Ireland's most famous high king-a spectacular career that ended in the iconic battle of Clontarf in 1014. We explore how Irish society and kingship changed in the aftermath of Clontarf as a result of inter-provincial warfare and the changing role of the church. The second half of the module examines the causes and implications of the English (or Anglo-Norman) invasion of the late 1160s, perhaps the single most formative development in Irish secular affairs. We study the interaction of cultures in its aftermath and the Irish opposition to English rule that saw the emergence of England's ongoing Irish problem through later centuries. The module closes with the most serious challenge to English power in medieval Ireland: the Scottish invasion (1315-18) led by Edward Bruce, brother of Robert Bruce king of Scots.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Outline chronologically the key developments in Ireland c.1000-1318
  • Offer explanations for the key developments in the period
  • Evaluate the significance of those key developments and appreciate their impact on the subsequent course of Irish history
  • Search for, and critically appraise, relevant literature
  • Undertake an analysis of select contemporary records (in translation)
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI1219 Popes, kings and crusaders, c.1075-c.1250)

(10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Dr Thomas Smith (thsmith@tcd.ie)

Description

This module draws upon a wide range of medieval documents - all in English translation - from chronicles and letters, to poems and propaganda tracts, and will introduce students to key movements and institutions of the Central Middle Ages. In particular it will look at one of the most important phenomena of the medieval world, the rise of papal power, and how this shaped the course of political, religious and social development throughout the Central Middle Ages and beyond. This module will explore the ways in which popes manifested their power, and it will introduce students to such events and developments as: the crusading movement; heresy hunts and the Inquisition; the preaching orders; and the ruthless papal-imperial conflicts. At the end of the course, participants will have gained a profound understanding of the popes, kings and crusaders who shaped the course of central medieval history.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Outline chronologically, and analyse, key events and developments in the history of the Central Middle Ages
  • Assess key developments in the history of the papacy and the Church in the Central Middle Ages
  • Discuss the core features of European society and the crucial institutions and movements of the Central Middle Ages
  • Analyse the impact of different aspects of political, religious and social development in Europe during the central middle ages
  • Undertake a basic analysis and evaluation of selected primary sources in translation?
  • Present and discuss in written and oral format analysis of key questions relating to the history of Europe during the central Middle Ages.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI2127 The Hundred Years War c.1337-1453)

(10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Dr David Ditchburn (ditchbud@tcd.ie) & Dr Peter Crooks (pcrooks@tcd.ie)

Description

The Hundred Years War was in reality a series of wars, on both land and sea, arising primarily from the political and dynastic conflicts of the kings of England and France. It was fought mainly in France but also engulfed Brittany, Scotland, the Iberian kingdoms, the Netherlands and other countries. The first part of the wars is retailed in considerable detail by the contemporary chronicler, Jean Froissart, whose powerful portrait of warfare and political rivalry is set against a backdrop of chivalric endeavour and glory. The module takes its lead from Froissart's vivid chronicles. Tutorials are focussed exclusively on various aspects of his chronicles and students will be expected to write an essay on Froissart's work. Lectures concentrate on key themes associated with Froissart's world, such as kingship, chivalry and warfare, diplomacy and popular revolt.

Key reading: Froissart's Chronicles, ed. G. Brereton (Penguin Classics)

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Outline chronologically and explain key developments in the political history of western Europe in the later middle ages
  • Assess the impact of the Hundred Year War on the development of western Europe
  • Search for, and critically appraise, relevant literature
  • Undertake an extended analysis of select contemporary sources in translation
  • Communicate analysis and argument in written and verbal format
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI2134 Life in modern Ireland)

(10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Dr Ciaran O'Neill (Ciaran.ONeill@tcd.ie)

Description

What do we mean by modern Ireland? Where is modern Ireland and when did it begin? Having broached these questions, this course will investigate what life was like on the island of Ireland across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Reflecting the increased focus on social and cultural themes in Irish historiography, this course will address the ways in which historians have, and are, tackling a broad range of societal questions. What characterised peoples' family, working and social lives? How did people interact with the apparatus of the state and of religious bodies? How did the evolution of media affect daily life? What forces and ideas shaped the provision of education and welfare? What impact did emigration have on both host and home societies? Key to the course is an understanding of what differentiated experiences; how did gender, class, geography and moral/status hierarchies of different kinds shape individual lives. It will also place the social history of Ireland in comparative and global contexts, in order to question ideas of Irish insularity and exceptionalism.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Outline chronologically and explain key developments in the history of nineteenth and twentieth-century Ireland
  • Assess the impact of social and cultural developments in shaping life in modern Ireland
  • Discuss the social history of modern Ireland, including a comparative perspective
  • Search for, and critically appraise, relevant literature
  • Undertake an extended analysis of select contemporary sources
  • Communicate analysis and argument in written and verbal format
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI2135 Continental Europe since 1918)

(10 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Prof. Kramer (alkramer@tcd.ie)

Description

This one-term module encompasses some of the most dramatic events and developments in European and world history: the First World War, the rise of fascism and communism, the Second World War, the Holocaust. It explores the reconstruction and recovery of Europe after 1945 – both as a divided continent during the Cold War and in light of moves towards and challenges to European solidarity and unity. Furthermore, it considers shifting conceptions and geopolitical configurations of a continent in flux, as well as the global dimensions of European history throughout the century. While some sessions will focus on particular European nations, others will focus on key events or themes in comparative and transnational perspectives. The module thus provides an overall view of the history of modern Europe since the early 20th century and of the foundations of contemporary Europe.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Outline chronologically and explain key developments in the history of continental Europe during the later twentieth century
  • Assess the impact of these developments on continental Europe
  • Search for, and critically appraise, relevant literature
  • Undertake an extended analysis of select contemporary sources in translation
  • Communicate analysis and argument in written and verbal format
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI2300 Imagining history)

(05 ECTS credits) Michaelmas Term NA 100% coursework 1 lecture per week and 3 workshops Dr Peter Crooks (pcrooks@tcd.ie)

Description

Most people, most of the time, never encounter the past through academic history books. Instead the past confronts them in images and interpretations that appear everywhere from museums to advertisements, movies to monuments. The imagining of history is such a prominent trend in popular culture that students need to be equipped to deconstruct representations of the past and to interrogate their own working assumptions about history imbibed from film and literature. This module explores three examples of how historical events and themes have been imagined in the world outside of professional historical scholarship. Students will examine how these subjects have been 'brought to life' in film and literature. Students will also have the opportunity to consider wider questions and problems which link together the three subjects addressed in the module. This is not a module designed to test the accuracy, in a narrow sense, of 'historical fiction' in literature and film. The aim is rather to enable students to examine the ways in which the past has been presented, interpreted and re-interpreted in various genres; to uncover the assumptions or agendas that shaped creative decisions and the responses of audiences to genuinely popular representations of the past; and to reflect critically upon the qualities that make for a great work of historical imagination or reconstruction, qualities which cannot easily be replicated by the conventional methods of historical inquiry.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Discuss the manner in which selected historical episodes and themes have been depicted in cinema and fiction
  • Complete analytical reviews of both historical fiction and film
  • Undertake a comparative assessment of historical representation in film and/or fiction
  • Demonstrate an understanding of some key questions relating to the imagining of history in fictional works
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI1215 Europe 1215-1517: religion, death and culture)

(05 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 1 lecture per week and 4 tutorials over the course of the term Dr David Ditchburn (ditchbud@tcd.ie)

Description

Between 1250 and 1500 Christendom was afflicted by war, plague and religious dissent. These developments had a profound impact on the religious unities and certainties of earlier centuries. This course offers a thematic survey of religious, social and cultural developments in the later medieval west, as Europe emerged from Christendom. Lectures and tutorials focus on the role and impact of religion in later medieval society, on social structures (such as the significance if marriage and family) and on the culture of this vibrant yet troubled era.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Outline chronologically an explain key developments in the religious, social and cultural history of later medieval Europe
  • Discuss the central importance of religion to European society in the later middle ages
  • Search for, and critically appraise, relevant literature
  • Undertake an extended analysis of select contemporary sources in translation
  • Communicate analysis and argument in written and verbal format
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI1217 Early Christian Ireland c.400-1000)

(05 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 1 lecture per week and 4 tutorials over the course of the term Prof. Sean Duffy (sduffy@tcd.ie)

Description

This module deals with what has traditionally been known as Ireland’s "Golden Age". Having begun with a brief introduction to prehistoric Ireland, it covers in more detail the period from the arrival of Christianity in the fifth century to the eve of the first Viking attacks at the end of the eighth. The focus is wide-ranging, from early Irish politics and the emergence of a high-kingship to St Patrick and the impact of Christianization, from Brehon law and the bonds of society to the study of landscape and settlement and early Irish farming, and from Hiberno-Latin and Gaelic literature to the visual art that culminated in the creation of the greatest masterpiece of the Golden Age, the Book of Kells.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Communicate analysis and argument in written and verbal format
  • Outline chronologically the key developments in Ireland c.400-c.800
  • Offer explanations for the key developments in the period
  • Evaluate the significance of those key developments and appreciate their impact on the subsequent course of Irish history
  • Search for, and critically appraise, relevant literature
  • Undertake an analysis of select contemporary records (in translation)
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI1218 Ireland c.1534-1815: a survey)

(10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term Basic knowledge of principles of Genetics/Biology Written exam 30 Prof. Frank Wellmer (wellmerf@tcd.ie)

Description

This module presents an evidence-based description of the basic cellular processes of transcription, translation and DNA replication in bacteria. The approach is to discuss in detail the players involved and their roles in each of the processes. The major mechanisms by which bacteria regulate expression of genetic material as well as aspects of bacterial replication and recombination will be discussed. The module covers the major events in transcription initiation, positive and negative control of transcription, coordinated control of transcription, the operon, the regulon, the stimulon, an introduction to global regulation, DNA structure and gene regulation, environmental adaptation through variations in gene expression, stereotypic and stochastic responses, and transposition - including insertion sequences IS1 and IS3 and transposons Tn3 Tn5, Tn7, Tn10 and bacteriophage Mu. Major features of the genetic code and suppression will be discussed together with mechanisms for the initiation, elongation and termination of translation. We will discuss DNA polymerases, the origin of chromosomal DNA replication (oriC) in Escherichia coli and the mechanisms by which the DNA replication is initiated and controlled. The special problems associated with replicating linear genomes and how they are surmounted will be discussed. In this context, the structure of telomeres, how they are replicated with telomerase and their association with aging will be discussed.

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI1220 Europe 1500-1800: power and culture )

(10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Dr Joseph Clarke (Joseph.Clarke@tcd.ie), Dr Graeme Murdock (murdocg@tcd.ie)

Description

This module explores the political and cultural history of Europe during the early modern period. It analyses the efforts of reformers to revive their churches and societies during the sixteenth century. It then examines the legacy of these reform movements, and considers how cultural divisions as well as competition for power led to prolonged periods of conflict within states and between states during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This module then charts the emergence during the eighteenth century of new ways of thinking about private life and popular culture and of new ideas about science, society and the self of the Enlightenment. Finally, it explores how these ideas contributed to political crisis following the French Revolution.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Outline chronologically key events and developments in the history of early-modern Europe
  • Assess the causes, consequences and impact of these developments
  • Discuss the core features of European society during the early modern period
  • Analyse the impact of different aspects of political, social and cultural development on early-modern Europe
  • Undertake a basic analysis and evaluation of selected primary sources in translation relating to this period of European history
  • Present and discuss in written and oral format analysis of key questions relating to the history of Europe during the early modern period.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI1208 American history: a survey)

(10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Prof. Ciaran Brady (cbrady@tcd.ie)

Description

An introduction to the main events of American history from the beginnings of English colonization in the early seventeenth century to the present, this module is divided chronologically in two parts. Among topics covered are the colonial period; the establishment of American independence; the U.S. constitution; slavery; the Civil War; industrialization, urbanisation and the problems of a multi-ethnic society. Changes in American popular culture are considered, as are the emergence of the US as a world power and American foreign policy.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Outline chronologically key events and developments in the history of north America since the sixteenth century
  • Assess the causes and consequences for America of the War of Independence, the Civil War, the two World Wars and the Vietnamese war
  • Discuss the core features of north American society since the colonial era
  • Analyse the impact of different aspects of political, social and cultural development in north America since colonial times
  • Undertake a basic analysis and evaluation of selected primary sources relating to aspects of north American history
  • Present and discuss in written and oral format analysis of key questions relating to the history of North America since the colonial period.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI2133 Imperialism to globalism: Europe and the wider world 1860-1970)

(10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 20% essay, 80% examination 2 lectures per week and 6 tutorials over the course of the term Dr Robert Armstrong (Robert.Armstrong@tcd.ie)

Description

Global integration is not only a fact of modern life, but of modern history writing. The interconnectedness of distant societies and states, and powerful forces making for social, cultural and economic interaction have prompted significant scholarly assessment. This module investigates some of the events and processes which have led to a more integrated world order between the mid-nineteenth century and the later twentieth century. For most of that period much of the world was carved up between a number of inter-continental empires centred in Europe. How those empires grew, exerted control and in due course retreated will be the particular focus of the module. But other processes, too, will be considered, not least the integrating force of economic changes and the spreading power of capitalism across the globe. Attention will be given to the evolution of ideologies of imperialism and social Darwinism and to whether or not such ideologies impacted upon changing global power relationships. The module is designed on a comparative model, though course reading will be provided in English, and while broadly chronological in approach will focus on a wide range of themes in cultural, economic and political history.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Outline chronologically and explain key developments in global and imperial history during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries
  • Assess the impact of developments which leave led to a more integrated world order since 1860
  • Discuss the core aspects of the imperial order of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries
  • Analyse the impact of different aspects of intercontinental cultural, economic and political changes
  • Undertake a basic analysis and evaluation of selected primary sources relating to aspects of global history.
  • Present and discuss in written and oral format analysis of key questions relating to modern global and imperial history.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(HI2301 History: concepts and methods)

(10 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 100% coursework 1 lecture per week and 3 workshops Prof. Ciaran Brady (cbrady@tcd.ie)

Description

This module's aim is to provide students with a survey of the some of the principal movements and debates which have shaped modern historical research and writing. Students will be introduced to major conceptual and methodological approaches, and some of the problems which confront historians in their everyday work, and will be given the opportunity to examine some of the classic texts of modern historical writing.

Historical construction takes place in several stages from the initial selection and examination of sources to the production of a final interpretation and each of these stages raises its own methodological and philosophical problems

What sources should the historian use?

What sort of evidence is convincing?

Which documents should be read, and how many?

How are previous interpretations and perspectives to be weighed?

Which interpretative concepts work best?

Which subjects are worth investigating in the first place, and on what ground is this selection and that approach based?

Can history writing be objective?

Should the writer even try to be free of value judgement?

Can historians erase their own assumptions, social attitudes and prejudices before beginning this series of intricate tasks?

Or should they frankly declare them and use them overtly in their historical interpretations and arguments?

It is to explore such questions about how historians have tried to write history that this?module has been designed. By introducing students to the wide variety of perspectives,?methods and concepts by which historians have actually approached the task of making sense of the past, it seeks to provide practical and usable answers to the theoretical problems inherent in History as a form of knowledge.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to demonstrate that they have acquired the ability:

  • to order the main developments in historical theory and practice in Europe and North America in the twentieth and early twenty-first century.
  • to assess the significance of the major trends in modern historiography.
  • to evaluate the critical turning points in historiographical theory and practice.
  • to engage critically with the most influential books and articles pertaining to the subject.
  • to present a coherent summary and assessment of the historical debates and controversies relating to the subject.
  • to demonstrate a continuing engagement with the latest developments and outstanding problems in the interpretation of the subject.
  • to present a comparative assessment and evaluation of contributions to the wider debates on historical method and philosophy
  • to demonstrate a written mastery of a range of general issues raised by recent theoretical challenges to the status and value of history writing
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(BCHIS5 Humans and nature in history)

(05 ECTS credits) Hilary Term NA 100% coursework 1 lecture per week and 4 tutorials over the course of the term Dr Katja Bruisch (bruischk@tcd.ie)

Description

The idea that humans are distinct from or superior to nature has a long history, and can even be seen in ancient texts including the Bible. But the idea has become ever more influential since the Enlightenment. It has spurred and justified intense efforts to shape almost all aspects of the natural world in accordance with human needs and desires, and paved the way for thinking of nature and culture as a dichotomy, just one consequence of which is the strict distinction now made between natural sciences and the humanities. Yet despite the many attempts to overcome the constraints imposed by the physical and living environment and establish themselves as masters of the world, humans have always been and still remain dependent on their natural environment, while at the same time constantly changing it without full understanding of the consequences. Natural disasters, conflicts over resources, climate change or nature conservation initiatives are only some examples illustrating that, alongside power, economy and culture, what has happened in and to the natural environment is an inseparable part of our history. In this module, we will introduce key approaches to the exciting study of environmental history, and present concrete case studies from the Ancient and Medieval Worlds to recent times that exemplify the broad range of ways that humans have influenced, and in turn been influenced by, the natural world, as well as the different sources and methods used to discover and study these.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Outline and explain key developments in human engagement with the natural world
  • Assess the impact of these developments on human history
  • Search for, and critically appraise, relevant literature
  • Undertake an analysis of selected source materials
  • Communicate analysis and argument in written and verbal format