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Current Research Students

Anna Attwood

Anna Attwood

The Memory of the Late Middle Ages in Ireland: The preservation and modification of historical narratives by the Irish Record Commission

The objective of this research is to investigate the role and remit of the Irish Record Commission 1810-1830. As a medievalist, I am particularly interested in how the Irish Record Commission understood the medieval period, how they classified documents, and how they edited them. By investigating the familial connections, educational and political background, and the interests of the record sub-commissioners, I hope to shed light on the ways in which narratives about the medieval period in Ireland were developed and shaped by the Commission and how these narratives, in turn, impacted upon the subsequent study of Irish history.

Supervisors: Peter Crooks and Micheál Ó Siochrú
Funding: Provost’s Project Award (2019-2023)

Judy Bolger

Judy Bolger

Birth, Death and Survival’: Perceptions of Irish impoverished motherhood, 1880-1911

My PhD research examines the social discourse surrounding impoverished mothers and women’s experiences of maternity and motherhood in Irish workhouses during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. My research on the representation of workhouse mothers within nineteenth-century Irish newspapers was published in Historical Studies (2019). I holds a first-class M.Phil. degree in Modern Irish History from Trinity College, Dublin and a first-class Honours B.A. degree in English and History from Carlow College in which both of my thesis works centred upon the social history of Irish women through the lens of reproduction.

Supervisors: Dr Georgina Laragy and Professor Eunan O’Halpin
Funding: Trinity College, Dublin 1252 Postgraduate Research Scholarship (2017-2022); Cluff Memorial Scholarship (2020)

David Briscoe

Poverty, poor relief and citizenship in revolutionary France: A case study of the Gironde department

After receiving my History BA from TCD, I completed an MA in Medieval History in Durham (title of dissertation: Testamentary charity and the social aesthetics of poverty in late medieval York, 1350-1470). My doctoral research project analyses concepts of citizenship and community membership in France during the latter half of the eighteenth century through the lens of poor relief. It combines a survey of contemporary poor relief programmes at a national level and the political and popular discourse surrounding them, with an in-depth study of the provision of poor relief in the city of Bordeaux.

Supervisor: Joseph Clarke
Funding: TCD Foundation Scholarship 2013-2020; Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship, 2017-2021.

Audrey Covert

Audrey Covert

Gender, power and sexual morality in fourteenth-century England and France

I completed my undergraduate degree at the University of St Andrews before coming to Trinity College Dublin in 2017 to complete my MPhil. My current research focuses on the intersection of gender, power and sexual immorality through the examination of a series of noble and royal case studies from fourteenth-century England and France. By applying gender and power theories to medieval history, I hope to be able to better illuminate the nuance found in late-medieval gendered power structures and understand how accusations of sexual immorality affected the trajectory of lives and careers.

Supervisor: Professor Ruth Karras

Anna Devlin

Anne Devlin

Imagining Ireland’s economic future, 1893-1923

My doctoral research explores the issue of the economic future of a self-governed Ireland in the decades immediately prior to partition/independence. Through examining the economic visions of key opinion leaders, the increasing availability of and commentary on Irish economic data and statistics, reaction to the Home Rule Bills/Acts as well the anticipation, from an economic perspective, by institutions, associational groups, businesses and individuals of the regime change, the significant role of economic considerations in Ireland’s revolutionary era will be uncovered. My work sets Ireland’s economic deliberations in the European context of the time and seeks to trace their influence post-partition/independence.

I received my B.A. in History and an MPhil in Modern Irish History, both from Trinity College Dublin. I previously worked as a film/TV producer and prior to that in strategic management consultancy and business development. I also hold a B.A. B.A.I. in Mechanical Engineering from Trinity College Dublin and an M.B.A. from University College Dublin.

Supervisor: Dr. Anne Dolan
Co-supervisor: Professor Frank Barry
Funding: Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Post-graduate Scholarship (2020-23)

Daria Pola Drazkowiak

Daria Pola Drazkowiak

Grief and Self-Representation in the Posthumous Commemoration of Women in Fifteenth Century Tuscany.

Prior to undertaking my PhD, I completed an MA in Medieval History at Durham University and a BA in History at Trinity College Dublin.

My research project examines the posthumous commemoration of women in fifteenth century Tuscany from an interdisciplinary standpoint, focussing on the intersection between art history, gender history, and the history of emotions. I draw upon wills, church records, various forms of material culture, and a wide range of ego-documents to investigate contemporary understandings and expressions of grief, and to chart female agency in auto-commemorative practices.

Supervisors: Catherine Lawless and David Ditchburn
Funding: Trinity College Postgraduate Studentship, 2019-2021

Olivia Frehill

Women, Work and Welfare in Dublin c. 1890 - 1940.

Supervisor: Dr Carole Holohan
Funding: Provost's PhD award (2018 -2022)

Catherine Healy

Catherine Healy

Kitchen Politics: Irish Domestic Servants in England and the United States, c1870-1945

My PhD project examines the representation of Irish female immigrants in Anglo-American political and cultural discourse, with a particular focus on bourgeois discussions of domestic labour. I hold a first-class honours BA in history and English literature from TCD, and returned here for postgraduate research after several years working in journalism.

Supervisor: Dr Ciaran O'Neill
Funding: IRC Postgraduate Scholarship (2017-21); Huntington Library Research Fellowship (2018)

Joel Herman

Joel Herman

My current research project, funded through a Trinity Provost Project Award, traces the revolutionary currents that flowed between Ireland, America, and Britain in the Age of Revolutions. I have published on related subjects including identity and patriotism in eighteenth-century Ireland and early America, and I am particularly interested in the transnational dimensions of revolutionary conflicts in the late eighteenth-century Atlantic world. I was recently named the A.C. Elias Irish-American Research Fellow for 2021 by the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and the Eighteenth-Century Ireland Society. The travel fellowship will fund a research visit to key New York archives where I will conduct research for my dissertation project, 'Revolutionary Currents: Ideas, Information, and the Imperial Public Sphere.

Supervisor: Dr Patrick Walsh

Annie C. Humphrey

Annie C. Humphrey

The Hiberno-Norse in Middle Irish Historical Narratives c. 1030-1130

Annie holds a Cert in Irish Studies from University College Cork, a BA in History and Medieval Studies from Rutgers University, and an MA in Medieval Studies from the University of Connecticut. Before coming to Dublin, they worked in public outreach at the Higgins Armory Museum, State Museum of New Jersey, and the American Swedish Historical Museum; and taught western and world history at Brookdale Community College and Rowan University. Their thesis is on the depiction of Norse speakers found in three pre-Norman vernacular texts that purport to tell the history of the Vikings in Ireland. These sources reveal the Gaelic Irish cultural memory of their neighbours, the Hiberno-Norse.

Supervisor: Seán Duffy
Funding: Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship (2018-22) Supervisor: Ashley Clements

Alexander Kelleher

Alexander Kelleher

The Channel Islands in the Plantagenet Realm, 1254–1341

I graduated from Trinity College Dublin in 2019, attaining a 1st Class honours, Bachelor of Arts, History (Single Honors). My main research interest is in the history of the Channel Islands from 1204–1453 and, more broadly, the history of the Plantagenet kings of England. My current doctoral research aims to challenge the omission of the Channel Islands from the historiographies of England and France by examining their place within the wider environment of the Plantagenet realm . My central research questions arise from the problematic position of the Channel Islands, literally and constitutionally between the kingdoms of England and France at a time of rapid development in concepts of nationhood and identity. In particular, I am interested in developing the conceptual approach of viewing the territories of the Plantagenet kings as an ‘empire’. This concept seeks to integrate the diverse territories of the Plantagenet realm, such as Ireland and Gascony, without sacrificing their individual political and cultural differences, or diminishing their influence in the realm for the sake of neat categorisation.

Supervisor: Dr. Peter Crooks
Funding: States of Jersey Bursary (2019–2022), De La Lancy & De La Hanty Foundation (2019), Société Jersiaise Millennium Research Fellowship (2021–2023)
Publications: 'Petitions from the Channel Islands in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries', The Jersey & Guernsey Law Review, Vol. 22 (February 2021).

Dawn Adelaide Seymour Klos

Dawn Adelaide Seymour Klos

The Black Widow of Breedon: Revitalization Movements and Isolde Pantulf in England and Ireland, 1170-1230

Dawn A. Seymour Klos earned a B.A. in History at the University of New Orleans and completed two M.A. degrees in History and Anthropology at the University of Southern Mississippi. She is the founder of Trinity HistoryCon and editor of The Hublic Sphere Podcast.

Her thesis, ‘The Black Widow of Breedon: Revitalization Movements and Isolde Pantulf in England and Ireland, 1170-1230’ combines medieval history and anthropology to create the first micro-history of Isolde Pantulf. The project uses Isolde’s life as an individual case study to survey women’s rights, access to justice, and identity expression under English Common Law in both England and Ireland. Her work re-examines chancery records using anthropological frameworks to uncover new interpretations of feminism within medieval law.

klosd@tcd.ie

Twitter: @Medieval_Panda

Supervisor: Sean Duffy
Funding: IRC Postgraduate Scholarship (2015-19)

Kasper Kop

Kasper Kop

Demarcating the Dutch Borderlands: The Generaliteitslanden and the Emergence of the Modern Dutch State (1713-1763)

I am originally from the Netherlands and received my Bachelors degree from Maastricht University before coming to Ireland in 2018 for an MPhil in Early Modern History at TCD. My project focuses on the link between the governance of the eighteenth-century Dutch Republic’s borderlands, the Generaliteitslanden, and the process of state formation. By observing these particularly complicated regions existing within an equally anomalous state structure during a time generally overlooked in Dutch history, I hope to contribute to the broader understanding of borderland governance, state formation and the relationship therebetween, as well as the Republic’s history more generally. In this endeavour I am relying primarily on the vast and largely unexplored Fagel Collection, held in part by the TCD library and in part by the Dutch National Archives.

Supervisors: Micheál Ó Siochrú and Graeme Murdock
Funding: Trinity History Department: McDowell Memorial PhD Studentship (2020-2024), Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds: Jadefonds (2020-2021).

Cormac Leonard

Cormac Leonard

I am a PhD candidate from Drogheda, Co Louth looking at the Irish Deaf community and users of Irish Sign Language (ISL) in the period 1850 to 1924, specifically focusing on experiences of Deaf people in Irish courts, prisons, and workhouses. I strive to make my work as accessible as I can via Irish Sign Language and consult widely with Irish Deaf historians. My research can be seen at http://deafirishinstitutions.blogspot.com and https://tcd.academia.edu/CormacÓLóinín

Tobit Loevenich

First translation, edition, and commentary of the anonymous Computus Einsidlensis

I received a BA in History and Music Studies from Bonn University, Germany, before completing my MA in Medieval History at the University of Durham, UK. For my PhD thesis, I am editing the Computus Einsidlensis, an Irish textbook on computus (i.e. calculating the date of Easter and the reckoning of time in general) from ca. AD 700. The text was only discovered in 2005 by my supervisor, Immo Warntjes, in a single manuscript in Switzerland. By editing this text, I hope to shed more light on a decisive phase in the development of Early Medieval computistics, which in turn laid the foundation for our modern sciences and time reckoning in particular.

Supervisor: Immo Warntjes
Funding: IRC Laureate Award Project Postgraduate Scholarship (2018-22): IFCE The Irish Foundation of Carolingian Europe: the case of computus (calendrical science)

Lorraine McEvoy

Lorraine McEvoy

'Little Guests': Europe's Children in the Aftermath of WWII

My research explores initiatives for the recuperation of children in Europe in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War, with a focus on recuperative holidays, which involved sending groups of children abroad for short periods of time in order to restore their mental and physical well-being. I am working towards a transnational history of these schemes, while also using them as means to examine emotional histories of the aftermath and broader themes in the history of childhood, humanitarianism and the postwar period. I hold a B.A. in History and English Literature and an M.Phil in International History, both from Trinity College Dublin.

Supervisor: Molly Pucci
Funding: Ussher Fellowship

Rhonda McGovern

Rhonda McGovern

Rhonda is a PhD candidate at the Trinity Centre for Environmental Humanities (TCEH). She joined in March 2019 to work on the Climates of Conflict in Ancient Babylonia (CLICAB) project. Her work will focus on developing a climate reconstruction for Babylonia within the timeframe of 652-61BC through a combination of written and natural resources.

Rhonda completed a BA in Geography from Maynooth University followed by MSc in Climate Change through Irish Climate and Research Units (ICARUS) in Maynooth University.

Research Interests: Environmental history, data rescue, citizen science.
mcgoverh@tcd.ie
Orcid ID: 0000-0002-3931-1944

Publications
  • McGovern, R. (2021) Eleanor Robson's 'Ancient Knowledge Networks: A Social Geography of Cuneiform Scholarship in First-Millennium Assyria and Babylonia' [Book Review], Archaeological Review from Cambridge, 35.2
  • Ludlow, F. & McGovern, R. (2020) Five centuries of human observation reveal Europe's flood history. Nature, 583, pp. 522-524. DOI: 10.1038/d41586-020-02138-2
  • McGovern, R., & Thorne, P. (2020) Citizens assemble: a study on the impact of climate reporting in the Irish media ‘before’, ‘during’ and ‘after’ the Citizens’ Assembly on ‘how the state can make Ireland a leader in tackling climate change’, Irish Political Studies, DOI: 10.1080/07907184.2020.1811970
  • Ryan, C., Murphy, C., McGovern, R., Curley, M. & Walsh, S. (2020) Ireland's pre-1940 daily rainfall records. Geoscience Data Journal, pp.1-13. DOI: 10.1002/gdj3.103
  • Noone, S., Brody, A., Brown, S., Cantwell, N., Coleman, M., Sarsfield Collins, L., Darcy, C., Dee, D., Donegan, S., Fealy, R., Flattery, P., McGovern, R., Menkman, C., Murphy, M., Phillips, C., Roche, M., and Thorne, P. (2019) Geo-locate project: a novel approach to resolving meteorological station location issues with the assistance of undergraduate students, Geosci. Commun., 2, 157–171, https://doi.org/10.5194/gc-2-157-2019.

John Marshall

John Marshall

From Strongbow’s conquest to the Marshal partition: the making and breaking of English Leinster, 1170-1247

John Marshall is a PhD candidate having previously obtained a BA and MA in history from Dublin City University. His research at present focuses on the three-quarters of a century foundational period of the Leinster lordship, with a specific emphasis placed on the encastellation and settlement of English Leinster, and the flourishing economy that followed. This research includes a long overdue reappraisal of the Marshal partition, a fruitful corpus of documentation largely neglected since Goddard Henry Orpen’s analysis over one hundred years ago, with a permeation of national boundaries to include the vast transnational Marshal holdings.

John is also interested in cartography and the promotion of history through community engagement, which is reflected in his forthcoming public lecture at Kilkenny Castle for the Ros Tapestry exhibition. He is also a current external reviewer for Past Tense Graduate Review of History, University of Toronto.

Supervisor: Professor Seán Duffy

Daryl Hendley Rooney

Daryl Hendley Rooney

Using and Abusing the Irish Other in Early Plantagenet England, c. 1169–c. 1272

Daryl Hendley Rooney is a PhD candidate and recipient of the Cluff Memorial Studentship (2019/20 & 2020/21) and was an Erasmus Mundus Action II Israel scholar (2015). Daryl earned his B.A. in English and History, as well as his M.A. in Medieval Studies, at University College Dublin. His doctoral research examines how the Irish were constructed as ‘other’ by historians and chroniclers in early Plantagenet England, c. 1169–c. 1272. Focusing upon the works of Roger of Howden, William of Newburgh, Gerald of Wales, Gervase of Canterbury, Matthew Paris and others, this dissertation examines the insights these writers provide into the spectrum of medieval attitudes towards Ireland, her people and affairs during the first century or so of English conquest in Ireland.

Daryl is also interested in public outreach and is the treasurer of the Friends of Medieval Dublin, a study group founded in 1976 that promotes interest in and the study of the history, archaeology and heritage of medieval Dublin.

Supervisor: Professor Seán Duffy
Funding: Cluff Memorial Studentship (2019/20 & 2020/21)

Christian Schweizer

Christian Schweizer

First translation and commentary of Dicuil’s Liber de astronomia

I studied Latin and History for a ‘Staatsexamen’ at the University of Tübingen, and taught both subjects for two years at a grammar school. Currently, I am editing, translating, and analysing five books written by the Irish scholar Dicuil as gifts for Louis the Pious over the years 814-818. This work of highly advanced computistical, scientific, and poetic content is mostly known by the modern titles Liber de astronomia or Computus.
https://tcd.academia.edu/ChristianSchweizer



Supervisor: Immo Warntjes
Funding: IRC Laureate Award Project Postgraduate Scholarship (2018-22): IFCE The Irish Foundation of Carolingian Europe: the case of computus (calendrical science)

Mary Staines

Mary Staines

The Anglo-Irish Treaty Debate 1921-2: Who Decided and Why?

Following my retirement as a consultant psychiatrist, I undertook a M Phil in Trinity in 2015. My dissertation looked at the 121 TDs who voted in the debate on the Treaty. The PhD expands this work through the prisms of revolutionary activity and socio-cultural associations of the TDs to develop a narrative about their decision-making in relation to their vote for or against the Treaty.

Supervisor: Dr Anne Dolan

Michel Summer

Michel Summer

Beyond Mission: Willibrord as a Political Actor Between Early Medieval Ireland, Britain and Merovingian Francia (658-739)

https://hcommons.org/members/michelsummer/

Supervisor: Dr Immo Warntjes
Funding: AFR PhD scholarship, Luxembourg National Research Fund (2017-2021)

Morgan Wait

Morgan Wait

‘‘Where is she?’: Women and Irish television 1958-73’

I received my BA in History from Salisbury University before moving to Dublin to do my M.Phil in Modern Irish History in 2015. My PhD, titled ‘‘Where is she?’: Women and Irish television 1958-73’, looks at the multifaceted relationship between women and television in Ireland during the long 1960s. It examines the place of women in early television debates, women’s programmes on R/TÉ, the broader representation of women on the station during the period, and the role of women in programme making during the 1960s and early 1970s.
https://tcd.academia.edu/WaitMorgan

Supervisors: Carole Holohan and Anne Dolan
Funding: Cluff Memorial Scholarship 2019-2021

Publications: Writing the History of Women's Programming at Telifís Éireann: A Case Study of Home for Tea in Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media , Issue 20, 2020

Caitlin White

Caitlin White

I am from Tipperary and hold a Bachelor of Arts in History, English and Theatre from NUI Galway and a Masters in Philosophy in Public History from Trinity College. My PhD investigates the projection of identities through public history in the two Irish states following partition and uses public history workshops to investigate the effects of deeper engagement with this public history on individuals and public history’s possible potential as a tool for reconciliation, empathy and critical thinking. I am passionate about using history in the public sphere and engaging with the wider public, and my research interests include commemoration, monuments, memory, identity and class.   

Funding: Universities Ireland (2019/20), Cluff Memorial Scholarship (2021).

Elysée Yhuel

Elysée Yhuel

Commemorating the Past: The Breton Church and its Irish Element, c. 700-1100

I hold an M.Phil in Medieval History from Trinity College Dublin. My PhD thesis is a study of the cultural memory of Breton monasteries from the eighth to eleventh century, exploring how Breton monks interacted with the past and present through their writings. I'm particularly interested in the role Ireland and the Irish play in these writings and the extent to which Ireland influenced Brittany's spiritual ideologies.

Supervisor: Sean Duffy
Funding: IRC Postgraduate Scholarship

Shelby Zimmerman

Shelby Zimmerman

Medicalisation of Death in the Dublin City Workhouses, 1872-1920

I received my B.S. in History and Museum Studies from Towson University and my MPhil with Distinction in Modern Irish History from Trinity College, Dublin. In 2018, I presented my MPhil research on the South Dublin Union's response to the smallpox epidemic of 1871-3 at the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPI) as a finalist for the Kirkpatrick History of Medicine Award. I co-curated the Little Museum of Dublin's new exhibition on Victorian Medicine. I am primarily interested in the history of medicine, institutions, the Irish Poor Law, poverty, and death. My research centres on the role the workhouse played in Dublin's medical landscape for the sick and dying poor in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Supervisors: Georgina Laragy, Ciaran O'Neill