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Music

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

(MUS 173 Lyrics)

(05 ECTS credits) 12 Weeks MT17 NA A combination of written assignments totalling c. 3000 words and a presentation 2 hours per week Dr. Jonathan Hodgers

Description and Learning Outcomes

In 2016, The Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded to Bob Dylan “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.” In redrawing literature’s boundaries to include American song, the award opens fascinating questions as to popular music’s poetic qualities. If America has a great song tradition (or traditions?), can its history be mapped according to its lyrics? Where do music and poetry overlap? Are there meaningful differences between songs and poems? This module addresses such questions by looking at pop’s most prominent writers, including Dylan, the Beatles and others, for the poetic qualities of their music. Lectures cover formal poetic techniques (rhythm, rhyme, syntax), textual strategies (metaphor, tone, irony, ambiguity), and texts in context (genre, intertextuality, pop music history). This module will profit those with an interest in popular music, and anyone interested in the art and craft of songwriting.

Learning Outcomes

Students who successfully complete this module will be able to
  • show familiarity with poetic analysis and its applicability to song lyrics;
  • show an understanding of the history of poetry’s relationship to music;
  • exercise “close reading” techniques;
  • navigate issues pertaining to lyrics’ status as literature;
  • analyse the contribution of music to lyrics’ meaning;
  • display a knowledge of pop music structures and how they intersect with poetic structure;
  • evaluate the contribution of pop’s prominent lyricists.
  • Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (MUS 174 Rock 'n' Roll)

    (05 ECTS credits) 12 Weeks HT 18 NA A combination of written assignments totalling c. 3000 words and a presentation 2 hours per week Dr. Jonathan Hodgers

    Description and Learning Outcomes

    This module traces the history of the genre, from its forbearers in the 1100%s, to its chart dominance in the 1950s,to its fragmentation into multiple styles in the early 1960s. Lectures will feature topics such as the appropriation of black musical forms by white artists, rock ‘n’ roll’s stylistic origins in rural blues and country music, and its musical descendants such as doo-wop and surf music. Artists considered include Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly, and Chuck Berry. The module illuminates the genre’s pivotal role in 1950s popular culture, its impact on race relations in the United States, and its continuing impact on popular music discourse.

    Learning Outcomes

    Students who successfully complete this module will be able to
  • show familiarity with the genre’s origins and evolution;
  • display a knowledge of rock ‘n’ roll’s representation of gender, race, and class;
  • show awareness of rock ‘n’ roll’s formal components and lyrical the mes;
  • analyse the contribution of rock ‘n’ roll to broader popular culture;
  • display an awareness of the genre’s recording and production techniques;
  • navigate the stylistic differences occurring among record labels and regional variants;
  • evaluate the contribution of rock ‘n’ roll’s most influential performers.
  • Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (MUS 172 Music Journalism)

    (05 ECTS credits) 12 Weeks MT 18 NA Assessment Details: One essay of approximately 2,000 words, to be written either on a topic given in the lecture notes, or on a topic to be agreed in consultation with the lecturer (50%); one radio feature programme, fifteen minutes in length (30%); and a weekly journal or portfolio of personal critical writing compiled through the duration of the course (20%). 2 hours per week Dr. Michael Lee

    Description and Learning Outcomes

    Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module students will:

  • be familiar with the history and development of writing on music in the public sphere
  • have developed a personal body of critical writing and produced a short radio feature
  • be able to discuss music criticism/discussion in print media, broadcast, and online
  • have engaged with selected critical and theoretical writings relevant to public musicology
  • understand the changing approaches to music writing and broadcasting practices of different settings
  • be equipped to engage critically with broader issues of music as a public art-form, including the role of state funding and cultural policy in Ireland
  • Module Learning Aims: Module Content: This course will offer an introduction to music journalism and public musicology as modes of writing and public dissemination. The history of music criticism will be surveyed, alongside changing perceptions of music as a public art-form, so as to provide a broad context for understanding the role and development of music journalism. In addition, the role of cultural policy in the creation and maintenance of public musical institutions, media outlets and funding bodies will also be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to engage with and discuss the work of music journalists, develop their own critical writing in a wekkly journal, and produce a short radio feature.

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (MU3431 Art of Recording)

    (05 ECTS credits) 12 Weeks MT 18 NA One project based chosen in consultation with the lecturer (3000 words, 60%); two reflective journals (40%) 2 hours per week Dr. Simon Trezise

    Description and Learning Outcomes

    In unit 1 (weeks 1-5) this module presents a historic orientated survey of the development of audio recording from early experiments in France to current digital techniques. The emphasis is upon the manner in which recording preserved the work of musicians rather than on the technical development that enabled systems of recording upon perfromance, musicians have producers who have played a key role in the history of recording, the manner in which composers have used recording to document their ‘intentions’, and the vast literature in journals that have grown up around recording and records. All styles of music are considered in this module, including jazz and pop. If the group opting for this module allows it, students will get hands-on experience of restoration technologies for the transfer of 78rpm (shellac) discs and magnetic tapes into the digital domain. The teaching of the module will be supported by the extensive holdings of the Music Department’s audio archive.

    Learning Outcomes:

    Students who successfully complete this module will be able to
  • be familiar with the broad history of recording
  • understand the effects of different recording techniques
  • be aware of the value of recording to composers and pedagogy
  • understand aspects of recording’s impact on performance
  • have encountered a wide range of music in performance styles that reflect the age of the recording and methods involved in its production
  • have some knowledge of the profession of recording
  • comprehend the relationship of audio recording to television, film and other media
  • Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (MU3428 Film Music)

    (05 ECTS credits) 12 Weeks MT 18 NA One project based on a film or part of a film chosen by the student in consultation with the lecturer (3000 words, 60%); two reflective journals (40%) 2 hours per week Dr. Simon Trezise

    Description and Learning Outcomes

    In unit 1 (weeks 1-5) this module presents a historically orientated survey of film music from the so-called silent era to the digital soundtracks of modern films. It examines the evolution of conventions governing the provision of diegetic and non-diegetic in a range of genres, and also reflects upon te way genre informs the style of compositon required. Supporting this, though without going into a great deal of technical detail, the changing technologies used to add music to films are discussed. In Unit 2(weeks 8-12) a variety of films are analysed, partly to show how the principles of film music (as defined by, for example, Claudia Gorbman) manifest themselves, and also to trace changing apporaches and fashions in film scoring.

    Learning Outcomes:

    Students who successfully complete this module will be able to:
  • show familarity with and an understanding of the broad history of film music, including silent cinema and the musical, from its origins to the present
  • show familiarity with some of the main theories of film music
  • show awareness of the value of music for film as a form
  • to analyse the contribution of music to a scene in a film
  • show some familiarity with the technical means required to synchronise music and film from the earliest days to the present
  • disucss the contribution of a small number of composers and associated directors