Skip to main content

Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin

Menu Search



You are here Orientation > Visiting and Erasmus Students

Microbiology

Junior Sophister Modules are available to visitors if they are deemed suitably qualified.

Junior Sophister Modules

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

MI3M01 Microbial Physiology

(10 ECTS credits) Semester 1 Biology, chemistry, maths 44 Prof Alastair Fleming

Assessment

MI3M01 is examined during the annual examination period in Trinity Term. The practical class and cell imaging tutorials are assessed in course at the end of the respective courses.

Description

  1. Microbial Physiology: The lectures deal with specialized bacterial and fungal cell wall components, nutrient uptake mechanisms and regulation, microbial metabolism (glycolysis, aerobic and anaerobic respiration, fermentation), adaptation to nutrient depletion and cell death.
  2. Bacterial Surfaces: These lectures deal with the structure and function of bacterial envelope components, surface proteins and polysaccharides.  The contribution of each component to bacterial survival and pathogenesis is examined.  Biosynthesis, post-translational modification and secretion of protein and polysaccharide structures are described.  The potential to use bacterial surface structures as vaccine antigens and to exploit our knowledge of biosynthetic pathways to discover new antimicrobial drug targets are discussed.
  3. Protein Structure & Function:  The lectures involve a description of protein structure and folding, beginning with amino acid chemistry.  The hierarchy of protein folds, and the forces that shape a compact and globular 3-dimensional structure are discussed.  Specific examples are shown, such as DNA-binding proteins, globins,and immunoglobulins to highlight the link between fold and function.  Prion proteins are discussed in the context of protein folding.
  4. Protein Analysis:  The lectures will detail the different methods used for the analysis of proteins including descriptions of techniques such as mass spectroscopy and NMR spectroscopy. Lecture 1; The physical and analytical chemistry of biological systems – Biophysics for the ‘rest of us’; Spectroscopy in general. Lecture 2; UV/Vis spectrophotometry; “left or right-handed” molecules; the world of fluorescence. Lecture 3; Partially-folded proteins; neurodegenerative diseases; measuring protein stabilities. Lecture 4; Fluorescence polarization; lasers; Why biochemists like to “FRET” about protein interactions. Lecture 5; Mass spectrometry and proteomics; the structural genomics initiative.
  5. Laboratory course in Biomembranes: This laboratory course deals with preparation of inner and outer membranes of Escherichia coli, analytical techniques for bacterial membranes including Lowry protein assay, solubilization of membranes, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and numeracy exercises. The course is designed to maximize hands-on experience and to teach data handling, presentation and interpretation.
  6. Tutorials in Cell Imaging:  These tutorials will introduce students to imaging of cells in the broadest sense from high resolution electron microscopy to imaging of cells and organelles with advanced light microscopy. It will cover transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and light, fluorescence, epifluorescence and confocal microscopy. The tutorials will focus on illustrating the techniques with worked examples and will highlight the applications and limitations of the various approaches.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of Microbial Physiology students should be able to:

  • Explain the difference in bacterial and yeast cell wall structures and describe some specialised functions of cell wall-associated components such as bacterial flagella and yeast flocculins.
  • Describe the various responses of microorganisms to nutrient depletion, including sporulation in yeasts and bacteria, and quiescence and apoptosis in yeasts, discuss the regulatory mechanisms governing these processes, highlight the major similarities and differences between sporulation in yeasts and bacteria and comment upon the role of apoptosis in a unicellular organism.
  • Describe the general features of sugar uptake systems in yeasts and bacteria
  • Describe the major pathways (mechanisms and outcomes) of glucose sensing and signalling in yeasts and bacteria.
  • Describe the general features of the major metabolic pathways covered, and explain how different pathways are utilised for energy release from nutrients in response to the environment.
  • Outline the experimental approaches used to elucidate the microbial physiology topics covered in 1–5.
  • Describe procedures for the successful isolation of the various subcellular fractions/compartments of bacteria.
  • Discuss the mode of action and uses of detergents in membrane biology.
  • Describe the basic properties of membrane proteins.
  • Describe a variety of chemical, immunochemical, molecular genetic and cross-linking techniques used in the analysis of membrane and membrane protein architecture.
  • Interpret the results of data derived from the use of the experimental techniques.
  • Demonstrate experimental skills in the principal methodologies used to prepare membrane fractions from bacteria.
  • Conduct common experiments using a variety of biochemical and immunochemical techniques employed in the analysis of membranes and their components.
  • Employ basic biochemical conventions, definitions and principles, and use them in data management.
  • On successful completion of Bacterial Surfaces and Biomembranes & Cell Surfaces students should be able to:

    • Describe the structure, function and biological properties of the major surface polymers of bacteria
    • Detail the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan and other selected surface polymers and demonstrate an appreciation of the reactions targeted by antimicrobial agents
    • Detail the structure and biological properties of the principal classes of bacterial lipids
    • Discuss the importance of the gel-liquid crystalline phase transition in biological membranes
    • Explain homeoviscous adaptation and the molecular mechanisms involved
    • Use molecular graphics computer software
    • Recognise the principal structural features of proteins and nucleic acids
    • Describe display modes for various atomic bond types
    • Interrogate Protein Data-Base files to derive, display and highlight important structural information about the target molecule(s) and the nature of any ligand-protein interactions involved
    • Locate external databases and other resources to provide additional structural information on the target molecule.

    On successful completion of Protein Structure & Function Students and Protein Analysis students should be able to:

    • Recall and integrate key knowledge and concepts of the hierarchy of polypeptide structure and the forces that stabilize the three-dimensional shape of proteins
    • Define how protein structure is linked to biological activity, and with examples, propose how inappropriate structure is linked to human diseases
    • Categorize enzymes into various classes and demonstrate an understanding of how to assay biological activity in the laboratory
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the mechanism of enzyme inhibitors and propose how this can be exploited for drug therapy
    • Describe the complex kinetics of multi-substrate catalytic reactions and identify and compare the assays utilized to study the mechanisms
    • Recognize the functional group of biological molecules, such as lipids, DNA and proteins, and relate how the chemistry is linked to biological function.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

MI3M02 Microbial Pathogenicity & Immunology

(10 ECTS credits) Semester 2 Biology, chemistry, maths 46 Prof Kim Roberts

Assessment

MI3M02 is examined during the annual examination period in Trinity Term.
Laboratory course in Bacterial Pathogenicity is assessed at the end of the laboratory course.  The assessment takes the form of MCQ/Short Answer/Data handling or interpretation paper.

The Laboratory course in Virology is assessed through continual assessment in the form of short answer questions completed during each session and a short presentation to the class.

Description

  1. Bacterial Pathogenicity: The course covers the molecular basis of bacterial pathogenesis, including adhesion to host cells and tissue, invasion of mammalian cells, survival within professional phagocytes, evasion of innate immune responses and damage to host tissue. The major bacterial protein toxins will be covered (cholera enterotoxin, neurotoxins, and shiga toxins, pore-forming cytolysins, and superantigens). Several important bacterial pathogens will be discussed including Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Neisseria meningitidis.
  2. Virology: This course discusses the diversity amongst viruses and how viruses are grouped and classified. It describes a variety of virus replication strategies and ways in which viruses interact with host cells during entry, replication and egress.  Specific viruses are showcased to highlight important aspects of virology, such as virus-host interactions, disease, emerging viruses, transmission and control methods.  Viruses of topical interest include: Picornaviruses; Influenza viruses; Poxviruses; Papillomaviruses; HIV; Hepatitis viruses. 
  3. Introduction to Immunology:The study of the organs, cells, molecules and genes that work together in the body to detect and respond to danger, damage, infection and malignancy.  This course introduces the cells and molecules involved and some of the mechanisms used to exert their effects. 
  4. Laboratory course in Bacterial Pathogenicity:  Tests that are used in the clinical microbiology laboratory to distinguish Staphylococcus aureus from S. epidermidis will be performed. Quantitative measurement of bacterial biofilm formation and adhesion to immobilized ligands will be performed in a 96 well microtitre plate format. An ELISA to measure antibodies to a specific antigen in serum  will be performed. The practical is assessed at the end of the laboratory course.  The assessment takes the form of MCQ/Short Answer/Data handling or interpretation paper.
  5. Laboratory course in Virology:  This course is divided into wet laboratory practical classes and tutorials in the computer room. The laboratory classes cover aseptic technique, cell culture, safe use of Microbiological Safety Cabinets and methods used to quantify viruses. The self-directed tutorials in the computer lab investigate virus gene sequences and evolution, and viral transmission routes and how we try to control the spread of viruses.  The final session involves a series of short presentations given by the class. 

 

On successful completion of Bacterial Pathogenicity & Medical Microbiology Practicals students should be able to:

  • Describe the features of the bacterial pathogens covered and explain mechanisms by which they cause disease, including how they attach to and invade mammalian cells and how they avoid host innate and adaptive immune responses
  • Describe how protein toxins damage mammalian cells
  • Describe principles for investigating pathogenesis at the molecular level (Molecular Koch’s Postulates)
  • Demonstrate expertise in bacteriological techniques
  • Perform laboratory procedures to isolate and purify commensal bacteria from the skin, mouth and nose
  • Perform laboratory tests used to identify streptococci, staphylococci and pseudomonads, including commercially available tests used in the clinical diagnostic laboratory
  • Work with units of weight, volume and molarity, and perform a series of doubling dilutions.

On successful completion of Virology I & Virology II Practical students should be able to:

  • Explain the properties of viruses, including their classification and structure
  • Discuss attachment and entry of viruses into cells
  • Describe the molecular biology of DNA and RNA virus replication
  • Describe the features of the viral pathogens covered and explain mechanisms by which they cause disease, and how they avoid host innate and adaptive immune responses
  • Discuss viruses of topical interest. 

On successful completion of Introduction of Immunology Students should be able to:

  • Identify cells, receptors and soluble component of the innate immune system and how they function to eliminate pathogen
  • Define how an adaptive immune response is initiated and how different types of adaptive immune responses are used to eliminate particular pathogens
  • Identify how the immune system specifically deals with different pathogens including bacteria, viruses and parasites
  • Identify how the immune system can cause disease and how it can be exploited therapeutically.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

MI3M03 Research Essay & Transferrable Skills

(5 ECTS credits) Semester 1 & 2 Biology, chemistry, maths 10 Profs Alastair Fleming and Kim Roberts

Assessment

The research essay is internally assessed.

Transferrable Skills  Assessment is based on student attendance and participation as well as marks given for evidence of application of skills within the essay.

Description

  1. Research Essay:A list of research essay titles is provided to the JS class which then devises a selection procedure such that individual members of the academic staff are each allocated three or four students.  The essay will not be a summary of standard textbook information.  A starter reference will be provided by the academic supervisor concerned and students will be expected to conduct a thorough review of the relevant current literature including reviews, journal articles, symposia and reports and textbooks. Their essays will be based on the results of their reviews. The research essay must be typed and must not exceed 4000 words.  A peer critique/feedback exercise is associated with the research essay which is designed to develop critiquing skills.  The list of essay titles and more specific instructions with regard to write-up and the peer critique process will be issued to the class in late October.  The deadline for handing in essays will be towards the middle of January. 
  2. Transferable Skills: Tutorials will be held with the primary aim of giving the student the tools necessary to submit a high quality research essay: Tutorials will cover topics including; (i) performing a search of biomedical literature using PubMed, (ii) understanding a research paper and writing a summary, (iii) writing a research essay, (iv) using Powerpoint to prepare figures and presentations, (v) composing a bibliography using Endnote, and (vi) understanding and avoiding plagiarism. The course is also designed to ensure that Sophister students in Microbiology are fully aware of the computers, computing facilities and IT resources available to them in College.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the Research Essay students should be able to:

  • Deliver a comprehensive review of a topic of significance in the field of Microbiology
  • Provide a historical summary of the field and critically analyse the current literature
  • Explain the significance of the subject
  • Present the review in the appropriate scholarly format.

On successful completion the Transferable Skills students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate proficiency in the use of software packages for literature searching and reference management
  • Analyse data in a research paper and write an extended abstract
  • Explain the theoretical basis of using restriction endonucleases to clone into a plasmid vector and in the design of primers for PCR
  • Use basic statistical methods in biological research
  • Access or upload files for assessment purposes
  • Use templates to construct documents using word-processing software
  • Access a range of useful websites related to microbiological subjects
  • Search general and scientific databases
  • Construct scientific presentations and posters using presentation software
  • Undertake statistical calculations and graphical representation using spreadsheet software
  • Outline the range of basic statistical methods most relevant to biological questions and make judgements about their application to different biological data collections
  • Explain the concept of resolution in microscopy
  • Describe the advantages and limitations of electron microscopy for imaging of cells and tissues
  • Detail the advantages and limitations of epifluorescence and confocal microscopy for imaging of cells and tissues
  • Illustrate the use of fluorescence probes and proteins in cell imaging
  • Describe the concept of multidimensional imaging analysis of cells.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

MI3M04 Bacterial Molecular Biology & Genetics

(10 ECTS credits) Semester 3 Biology, chemistry, maths 49 Prof Kevin Devine

Assessment

MI3M04 is examined during the annual examination period in Trinity Term.

The practical is assessed by written examination immediately after the end of the course.

Description

  1. Microbial and Molecular Genetics: This lecture course presents an evidence-based description of the basic cellular processes of transcription, translation and DNA replication.  The approach is to discuss in detail the players involved and their roles in each of the processes.  The major mechanisms by which bacteria regulate expression of genetic material as well as aspects of bacterial replication and recombination will be discussed.  ` The course covers the major events in transcription initiation, positive and negative control of transcription, coordinated control of transcription, the operon, the regulon, the stimulon, an introduction to global regulation, DNA structure and gene regulation, environmental adaptation through variations in gene expression, stereotypic and stochastic responses, and transposition – insertion sequences IS1 and IS3, transposons Tn3, Tn5, Tn7, Tn10 and the life cycle of bacteriophage Mu.
  2. Laboratory course in Microbial and Molecular Genetics: This course covers the theory and practice of bacterial molecular genetics, with an emphasis on gene regulation and the bacterial response to environmental stress. Practical aspects include the use of reporter gene fusions to detect environmentally-regulated promoters, reporter gene assays, detection of regulatory genes by transposon mutagenesis, marker rescue, characterization of regulatory mutants and complementation tests. The course also covers the application of whole genome analysis methods to the study of bacterial gene expression.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of Microbial and Molecular Genetics & Transcriptional, Translation and replication students should be able to:

  • Describe the structure and function of RNA polymerase in bacteria.
  • Describe in detail the model regulatory systems controlling expression of the lac and ara operons in Escherichia coli.
  • Explain how transcription factors work.
  • Describe the seven sigma factors of E. coli and name at least some of the genes whose transcription they help to initiate.
  • Explain how the positive and negative regulation of transcription in Gram-negative bacteria relates to the environment in which the bacteria live.
  • Explain the concepts of bacterial growth, growth phase and adaptation to different stages of growth.
  • Explain the concepts of local and global regulation of gene expression.
  • Explain DNA rearrangements that involve homologous recombination, site-specific recombination and transposition.
  • Explain the concepts of genetic marker rescue and complementation.
  • Devise selection strategies to discover environmentally-regulated genes in bacteria.
  • Describe the structure of the ribosome: ribosome binding sites, and how their strengths are established.
  • Describe aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, tRNA structure and function and the role of modified bases in tRNA.
  • Explain features of the genetic code and the machanisms of suppression.
  • Describe initiation, elongation and termination of translation.
  • Explain the concept of suppression and the different ways that this occurs.
  • Describe the structure and function of DNA polymerases in Escherichia coli.
  • Describe the structure and function of the Escherichia coli origin of chromosomal DNA replication (oriC).
  • Describe the initiation of chromosomal replication at oriC.
  • Explain the control of DNA replication at oriC: DnaA initiator protein and autoregulation of expression; hemimethylated DNA, Dam methylase; SeqA; refractory period.
  • Explain the problems associated with replicating linear genomes.
  • Explain how these problems are surmounted by lambda phage, T7 phage.
  • Describe the discovery, structure and function of telomeres and telomerase.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(MI3M05 Eukaryotic Molecular Biology & Genetics)

(10 ECTS credits) Semester 1 Biology, chemistry, maths 68 Prof Ursula Bond

Assessment

Assessment: MI3M05 is examined during the annual examinations in Trinity Term

The practical is assessed at the end of the laboratory course.  The assessment will include a written exam and a take-home assignment. 

Description

  1. Eukaryotic Molecular Biology and Cell Biology. Lectures discuss all aspects of eukaryotic gene expression from transcription to translation including the organisation and packaging of nucleic acids within the nucleus, the basic mechanisms of RNA biogenesis in eukaryotic cells including transcription, processing and export from the nucleus, concepts of steady state levels of messenger RNAs, the balance between RNA synthesis and degradation, the basic mechanisms of mRNA degradation and translation as well as the folding, sub-cellular trafficking, modification and degradation of nascent proteins in eukaryotic cells.
  2. The course also includes lectures on how cell division is regulated by external and internal forces to a cell. The role of the major gene products such as cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their regulators, the CDK inhibitors, in regulating the cell cycle are discussed. Additionally, lectures will examine how cancer develops as a result of mutation of genes that regulate cell division.

  3. Molecular Biotechnology. Lectures introduce the student to ways in which molecular biology techniques can be applied to current problems in Industry, Agriculture and Medicine. Topics covered include the major scientific discoveries leading to the development of the field of biotechnology, recombinant DNA techniques and genetic engineering in bacteria and yeasts, concepts of production of genomic and cDNA libraries and whole genome sequencing. The production of recombinant proteins in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells for industrial use or for use in human gene therapy are discussed as is the the role of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutic agents in human disease. The lecture course also introduces the students to the use of bioinformatic databases and software, and their use in the analysis of genomes.
  4. Genomics. Lectures will introduce students to current techniques used for the analysis of genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes.
  5. Laboratory course in Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology.  This laboratory course introduces students to a variety of techniques used in microbial genetics, molecular biology and biotechnology. Students will develop an understanding of commonly used techniques in microbial genetics such as plasmid transformation, DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction, plasmid isolation and DNA separation by gel electrophoresis. Topics will include the life cycle of haploid and diploid cells of the common bakers’ yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mating between haploid cells and the ability of yeast strains to carry out fermentation of sugars to alcohol. Students will also carry out a large scale lager brew using industrial lager strains of yeast. Students will gain experience in recombinant protein purification and protein separation by gel electrophoresis. 

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of Molecular and Cellular Biology Core Lectures students should be able to:

  • Describe the general organisation and packaging of nucleic acids within the nucleus of eukaryotic cells
  • Explain the basic mechanisms of RNA biogenesis in eukaryotic cells including transcription, processing and export from the nucleus
  • Describe the concept of steady state levels of messenger RNAs, the balance between RNA synthesis and degradation, the basic mechanisms of mRNA degradation and the mechanisms of regulation of messenger RNA translation
  • Explain the importance of folding, sub-cellular trafficking, modification and degradation of nascent proteins in eukaryotic cells and how they are achieved

Understand the regulation of the cell cycle in eukaryotic cells.

  • On successful completion of Molecular Biology of Fungal and Protozoal Pathogens students should be able to:
  • List the basic biological characteristics of the major pathogenic eukaryotes and explain (for specific examples covered) the molecular, cellular and biochemical properties of these organisms and how they differ from those of the host
  • Devise simple experimental protocols to help demonstrate the presence and relevance of these properties
  • Argue for the importance of work on these organisms to biomedical science
  • Explain the experimental basis for the key knowledge in 1–3 above

On successful completion of Molecular Biotechnology students should be able to:

  • Describe the major scientific discoveries leading to the development of the field of biotechnology.
  • Understand the basic mechanisms of DNA cloning
  • Knowledge of bacterial and yeast vectors.
  • Understand the concept of genomic and cDNA libraries.
  • Explain the requirements for the production of xenobiotic proteins in bacteria and yeasts
  • Describe the role of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutic agents in human disease.

On successful completion of Molecular Biotechnology Practicals should be able to:

  • Demonstrate ability to carry out experiments with yeast species.
  • Understand the concept of auxotrophy and auxotrophic markers
  • Carry out yeast mating experiments
  • Demonstrate ability to introduce DNA plasmid into bacteria and yeast (translformation).
  • Retrieve plasmid DNA  from transformants and characterise by PCR amplification and restriction enzyme analysis.
  • Carry out experiments to exhibit the use of yeasts in lager fermentations and determine the environmental conditions affecting fermentations.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(MI3M06 Applied & Environmental Microbiology)

(10 ECTS credits) Semester 1 & 2 Biology, chemistry, maths 54 Prof Carsten Kroeger

Assessment

 Assessment: MI3M06 is examined during the annual examinations in Trinity Term.

The bioinformatics component will be assessed in course.

The statistics component is assessed by test at the end of the lecture course.

Description

  1. Applied microbiology: Lectures will discuss the essential features of microbiology relevant to the environment, food, pharmaceutical industries and clinical settings. While food and medicinal applications are a big portion of applied microbiology, the study of microorganisms has lead to commercial industries which are involved and affect almost all aspects of human life. The course includes lectures that will cover main areas in Applied Microbiology: (i) Environmental microbiology and Water quality; (ii) Food microbiology; (iii) Biotechnology; and (iv) Clinical Microbiology and Public Health.
  2. Antimicrobial Agents: These lectures cover (i) the general properties of the major antimicrobial agents in use and under investigation, (ii) targets/mechanisms of action of current and potential drugs, and (iii) mechanisms of drug resistance in microbial pathogens.
  3. Bioinformatics class: The Bioinformatics class is a combination of introductory lectures and a practical component. It allows students to put into practice basic bioinformatic methods. With guidance, students work individually in this course to develop hands-on skills to mine common public scientific databases and use sequence analysis tools to investigate biological questions.

  4. Statistics Tutorials: The main objective of this course is to make students see the need for understanding data analyses as a step preceding the design of new experiments. These tutorials include: 1. Description of main concepts in Statistics including sampling, descriptive statistics and probability distributions. 2. Probabilities and Probability Distributions. 3. Hypothesis testing.  4. Analysis of Variance.  5. Linearity testing of relationships between variables.  6. Factor variance analysis and re-building of new hypothesis.  The course is given in 4 sessions of two hours each and the understanding of the students is examined through a final test, which includes 4 questions.  Two of the questions are short answers and the other two consist on developing a problem and unfolding the possible conceptual and statistical solutions.   The course is highly active and requires the active participation of the students.  This is assured by presenting example problems and by asking students to form groups to address the problem.

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of Applied and Environmental Microbiology & Practical students should be able to:

    • Describe the scope of applied microbiology
    • List the requirements for design and establishment of an analytical microbiology laboratory and explain the function of air handling units, HEPA filters, safety cabinets and clean rooms
    • Describe the use of and explain the practical aspects of calibration and validation in microbiology
    • Use microbiological laboratory management and Quality Assurance systems
    • Explain how microbiological Quality Assurance systems are applied in the food and pharmaceutical industries
    • Explain the general principles of spoilage, measures used to control it, and extrinsic and intrinsic parameters affecting microbial growth in foodstuffs and commercial products
    • Explain the general principles of food poisoning and its major causes, and HACCP systems and limit values for foodstuffs
    • Explain the basis of disinfection and hygiene in health care, food process, pharmaceutical and other areas
    • Explain the importance of biofilms and their implications
    • Describe rapid analytical and diagnostic techniques in microbiology
    • Write a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP)
    • Demonstrate appropriate practical skills and aseptic technique in the preparation of growth media and reagents under quality control, testing efficacy of disinfectants, and sterility testing
    • Explain the capabilities and limitations of differential and selective media
    • Describe a range of Standard Methods
    • Determine shelf-life of products.

    On successful completion of Molecular Biology of Fungal & Protozoal Pathogens students should be able to:

    • List the basic biological characteristics of the major pathogenic eukaryotes and explain (for specific examples covered) the molecular, cellular and biochemical properties of these organisms and how they differ from those of the host
    • Devise simple experimental protocols to help demonstrate the presence and relevance of these properties
    • Argue for the importance of work on these organisms to biomedical science
    • Explain the experimental basis for the key knowledge in 1–3 above
    • Describe the mechanisms of action of and resistance to the major classes of antimicrobial drugs used in medical practice
    • Describe the development and transmission of antimicrobial drug resistance
    • Define how antimicrobial drugs exhibit selective toxicity
    • Describe modern approaches to antimicrobial drug discovery and development.

    On successful completion of Antimicrobial Agents students should be able to:

    List the basic biological characteristics of the major pathogenic eukaryotes and explain (for specific examples covered) the molecular, cellular and biochemical properties of these organisms and how they differ from those of the host

    • Devise simple experimental protocols to help demonstrate the presence and relevance of these properties
    • Argue for the importance of work on these organisms to biomedical science
    • Explain the experimental basis for the key knowledge in 1–3 above
    • Describe the mechanisms of action of and resistance to the major classes of antimicrobial drugs used in medical practice
    • Describe the development and transmission of antimicrobial drug resistance
    • Define how antimicrobial drugs exhibit selective toxicity
    • Describe modern approaches to antimicrobial drug discovery and development.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(MI3M07 Microbiology Past and Present)

(5 ECTS credits) Semester 1 Biology, chemistry, maths 12 Dr Niamh Ni Bhriain and Prof Alastair Fleming

Assessment

MI3M07 component will be assessed on the basis of attendance, engagement, completion of in-course assignments and an end-of-course test. This component will be assessed based on attendance and engagement as well as marks given to assignments. BROAD CURRICULUM assessments are performed in-course.

Description

Students can choose between either:

  • A. MI3M07:  Microbiology, past and present  (Prof N. Ní Bhriain)
  • 5 ECTS Credits
  1. The evolution and impact of Microbiology: This component of the course will look at the emergence and development of the discipline of Microbiology. A combination of lectures and tutorials will allow students to consider the influence of Microbiology and Microbiologists on, inter alia, mankind’s thinking about the origins of life and the nature of disease; the discovery of the varied natures and lifestyles of “ germs”; the many and various approaches taken to combat microorganisms and their unwanted effects; the parts microbes have played in plagues, pestilences, conquests & colonisations and the roles of microorganisms as enemies and allies in warfare. Students will also consider some of the Microbiological challenges facing modern societies.

  2. Current Topics in Microbiology:This component will feature tutorials with various members of staff in which current topics in microbiology will be discussed. Typically members of staff will identify 4 appropriate seminars from the Microbiology Department’s seminar programme and students taking this course will be obliged to attend these seminars as well as attending related pre- and post- seminar briefings and tutorials. Alternatively, tutorials may be based on recent scientific discoveries or topics of interest highlighted in the press. Students will be expected to actively participate in all discussions and to complete written assignments based on seminar/tutorial content.

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of Genomics & Systems Biology students should be able to:

    • Describe and display understanding of key aspects of:
    • Transcription, Translation & Replication
    • Recombination, Repair & Mutation

    On successful completion of Bioinformatics students should be able to:

    • Demonstrate expertise in introductory bioinformatics applications
    • Display knowledge in the basic statistical methods relevant to genetical research
    • Ascertain when different methods may be appropriate
    • Use judgement in the interpretation of statistical results.
    • Perform basic computer programming to deal with genetic analyses and data.

     

    OR

    • B.Broad Curriculum (BC) Cross Faculty and Language Course
    • 5 ECTS Credits

    These modules provide students with the opportunity to study outside their principle discipline and are taught over the Michaelmas and Hilary terms.  Language modules provided by the Centre for Language and Communication Studies aim to provide added value to undergraduate studies. These modules are designed to help develop practical communication skills for study or work experience abroad. All modules are offered on a substitution basis, i.e. you may only take a BC module or language module provided that you drop an optional module of your course to the same value in credits.

    For latest information see  https://www.tcd.ie/Broad_Curriculum/

     

     

No Senior Sophister modules are available