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Germanic Studies

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

GR1000 German Language 1

Michaelmas Term half-module = GR1020 (5 ECTS)

Hilary Term half-module = GR1017 (5 ECTS)

(10 ECTS credits) (MT - 5) (HT - 5) MT/HT Minimum level: German A2; please meet with module co-ordinator before enrolling 4 pw Ms Katrin Eberbach (eberback@tcd.ie)

Assessment

Students take an assessment test at the beginning of Michaelmas term.

  • 3-hour end-of-year written examination (comprising comprehension, composition and grammar) [60 marks]
  • 10-minute end-of-year oral examination. Students are expected to read and answer questions on a short text and/or advertisement and to converse with the examiners about themselves, their course, plans and so on. The material used in the oral examination also draws on the JF Spoken German classes. [10 marks]
  • 1-hour end-of-year aural examination (comprising dictation and tape-work) [10marks]
  • In-Class Test, Wk 1, HT (20 marks)
  • All students must do weekly on-line tests and complete weekly homework. 
  • The end-of-year written examination must be passed; other failed components may be compensated as long as the overall numerical mark is 40 or above.

Description

Aims

This module aims to consolidate existing written, oral and aural German language skills and to encourage the further development of communicative and cultural competence. 

Content

The module develops grammatical structures through systematic revision of basic structures; text comprehension as well as written, oral and aural skills in the L2 with a focus on syntactic analysis; and production of a range of both written and oral/aural text types including descriptive and narrative texts and written expression of opinion (Leserbrief). Students improve their speaking skills by talking about different aspects of German life and people.

Methods of Teaching Student Learning

  • Contact teaching: Tutorials, seminars and lectures
  • Directed learning: Homework
  • Blended learning: Self-access on-line exercises and language laboratory aural comprehension activities

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

  • understand radio and news broadcasts, lectures and discussions
  • participate in conversations about their lives and interests, university and general topics such as mentioned in newspapers
  • participate in conversations specific to their degree course, such as business, law or literature
  • write short but accurate narrative and descriptive texts on contemporary topics and topics covered in class
  • build up and expand a solid basic active and passive vocabulary
  • correctly apply the basics of German grammar to both spoken and written German

The module also aims to develop study skills as well as the following transferable skills:

  • Planning
  • Time-management
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR1010 German Area Studies)

(5 ECTS credits) MT NA 1 pw Professor Jürgen Barkhoff (jbrkhoff@tcd.ie)

Assessment

2-hour end of year written examination in German Area Studies (100 marks)
The paper has three questions, weighted equally, consisting of 2 essay questions and one question requiring short explanations of terms.

Description

Area Studies Aims

This stream aims to introduce students to the study of contemporary German-speaking society through the medium of German.

Content

Area Studies provides an introduction to the history, politics, society and economy of the German-speaking countries in the period 1945 to the present. Taught in German, with English summaries, it also trains listening comprehension, and as such helps prepare for studying in a German-speaking country and for future study in TCD. Listening skills developed in this module contribute to the performance level in the JF Aural examination (See GR 1000).

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning

Lectures.

Learning Outcomes

Students who successfully complete this module stream should be able to

  • describe the recent history and the political, economic, social and cultural features of the three German-speaking countries.
  • discuss in detail major events and trends in these countries since the Second World War.
  • deploy this knowledge and understanding in clear written English.
  • follow lectures, presentations and commentaries in German on contemporary themes.

read introductory and intermediate level written material in German on contemporary themes.

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR1012 Textual Analysis)

(5 ECTS credits) HT NA 2 pw Dr Daragh Downes (downesda@tcd.ie)

Assessment

1.5 hour end-of-year written exam.Students are also required to complete a number of written analyses throughout the module.

Description

This module is designed to train students in the art of close reading of literary and non-literary texts in German. A text is understood here as any piece of written German, but for reasons of practicality the pieces that are used in TA (either extracts or complete works) are normally no longer than one A4 sheet.

Aims

  • to develop the skillset required for sensitive and nuanced reading of German texts;
  • to help students understand why and how structure, vocabulary and style combine to produce a particular kind of literary or non-literary text;
  • to guide students from a text-descriptive to a text-analytical mode of engagement with literary and non-literary texts in German;
  • to build up general vocabulary.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • read literary and non-literary texts independently in German;
  • offer concise analyses of German texts in which findings are supported by the appropriate use of textual evidence;
  • identify key characteristics of different text types;

understand the distinction between descriptive and analytical modes of engagement with texts.

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR1011 Introduction to German Literature)

(10 ECTS credits) MT & HT NA 2 pw Dr Daragh Downes (downesda@tcd.ie)

Assessment

Three compulsory short essays (20% each) plus one compulsory longer essay (40%). The deadlines for submission are given in the list of assignments.

Description

This module is designed to introduce students to the study of German literature as an end in itself; as a means of gaining cultural and historical knowledge of the German-speaking lands; and as a means of improving linguistic competence. Students will read a broad range of texts dating from around 1800 to the present day.

Aims

  • to develop reading skills in a range of literary text types;
  • to introduce students to the terms and concepts of literary criticism;
  • to develop nuanced and alert critical responses to German literary texts;
  • to cultivate pluralistic understanding of literary-critical and theoretical approaches to the study of literature;
  • to provide students with guided practice in conceiving and writing critical essays;
  • to introduce students to the use of secondary literature in essay writing;
  • to build up general and specialist vocabulary.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • read literary texts independently in German;
  • use literary texts as a source of linguistic and cultural-hiustorical knowledge;
  • identify key characteristics of different literary genres;
  • write informed and original critical essays in which primary and secondary material is handled correctly.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR2000 German Language 2)

(10 ECTS credits) MT & HT Minimum level: German B1; please meet with module co-ordinator before enrolling 3 pw Dr Clemens Ruthner (ruthnerc@tcd.ie)

Assessment

  • 3-hour end-of-year written paper containing comprehension and grammar exercises (cloze test) and a translation exercise (60 marks)
  • 20-minute end-of-year oral/aural examination (Referat with question/answer session) (20 marks)
  • Fachsprache Project (20 marks)
  • All students must complete weekly homework and preparatory Referate..    
  • The end-of-year written examination must be passed; other failed components may be compensated as long as the overall numerical mark is 40 or above.

Description

Aims

This programme is designed to enhance existing written, oral and aural German language skills through systematic introduction of complex grammatical structures and to encourage the further development of communicative and cultural competence, particularly in the specialist register.

Content

Students will be introduced to the prevailing terminology of the German university system and to the Fachsprache (specialist register) of their study field/cohort. This will be accomplished through the guided discussion of appropriate text examples, along with vocabulary, grammar, comprehension and translation exercises.

Methods of Teaching and Student Learning

  • Contact Teaching: Tutorials and seminars
  • Directed Learning: Homework
  • Group-work

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • understand and apply more complex features of German grammar, including participial phrases and passive voice, in spoken and written contexts;
  • understand and use appropriately the specialist vocabulary (Universität) and the lexical and syntactic features of a particular field of study (Fachsprache) ;
  • read and understand articles from academic publications and translate extracts into correct and idiomatic English;
  • identify the syntactic and structural differences between oral and written Fachsprache;
  • write essays in German on a topic from their field of study;
  • give oral presentations in German on a topic from their field of study.

The module also aims to develop the following transferable skills:

  • Critical and analytical approach to understanding advanced information sources;
  • Presentation skills and use of Power Point;
  • Time management.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR2023 German Literary History 1)

(5 ECTS credits) HT NA 2 pw Dr Clemens Ruthner (ruthnerc@tcd.ie)

Assessment

3-hour written exam (quiz questions and textual analysis)

Description

On successful completion of this module, students

  • will have received a survey on early German literature until ca. 1800
  • should be able to contextualise future readings in this framework and carry out a literary analysis considering the historical background.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR2012 German Cultural History)

(5 ECTS credits) MT NA 2 pw Dr Clemens Ruthner (ruthnerc@tcd.ie)

Assessment

  • 1 x 2-hour written examination (70%)
  • • Essay of 1200-1500 words in German (30%)

Description

This module aims to increase students’ background knowledge and cultural competence in respect of the historical and cultural development of the German-speaking world. It also provides training in listening comprehension. Both aspects are preparation for studying in a German-speaking country.

The module investigates how the history and culture of Germany, Austria and Switzerland, especially since 1800, have shaped today’s society. This will be achieved by a thematic rather than a chronological approach to the key issues of the cultural history of Austria, Germany and Switzerland.

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

  • discuss aspects of the history and culture of the three German-speaking countries.
  • describe how cultural history has shaped modern society in these countries.
  • understand a lecture in German.

process the acquired knowledge and apply this critically to the writing of an extended essay.

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR2356 Indien in der Deutschen Literatur )

(5 ECTS credits) MT NA 2 pw Dr Peter Arnds (arndsp@tcd.ie)

Assessment

1 essay (2,500 words max.)

Description

Dieser Kurs beschäftigt sich mit literarischen und philosophischen Texten, die von der besonderen Anziehungskraft Indiens auf Europa während der letzten zwei Jahrhunderte erzählen. Dabei interessiert uns vor allem die Frage, wie Indien zu einem Gegenbild europäischer Kulturen wird, wie dieses Land mit seinen einzigartigen Landschaften, diversen Kulturen und seiner Vielfalt von Mythen europäische und spezifisch deutsche Sehnsüchte und Wunschprojektionen erfüllen konnte und immer noch kann, die der Rationalismus Europas nicht stillen konnte. Es interessieren uns insbesondere Texte und ihre Autoren unmittelbar nach der Aufklärung, wie etwa Goethe und Heine, aber auch die bekannten Indientexte deutscher Autoren im zwanzigsten Jahrhundert, allen voran Hermann Hesses Siddharta und Günter Grass’ Zunge zeigen. Kulturtheoretisch soll dieser literarische Blick auf Indien zusätzlich mittels Saids Konzept des Orientalismus angereichert werden. Indien in deutscher Literatur, aber auch deutsche Literatur in der indischen Literatur. Ein Blick auf Girish Karnads Theaterstück und seinen Subtext Die vertauschten Köpfe von Thomas Mann wird verdeutlichen, dass diese beiden Länder in einer literarischen Wechselbeziehung stehen.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

  • read and understand the selected primary texts studied in the original German;
  • critically engage with and evaluate the selected primary texts and the relevant secondary literature;
  • demonstrate a clear understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;

present their critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured and correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR2359 Die Kunst der Revolution: Expressionismus und Dadaismus)

(5 ECTS credits) MT NA 2 pw Dr Caitríona Leahy (cleahy@tcd.ie)

Assessment

1 essay (2,500 words max.)

Description

In diesem Seminar werden Theorien und Praxis von zwei der wichtigsten Strömungen der Europäischen Avantgarde am Anfang des 20. Jahrhundert untersucht. Vor dem Hintergrund der modernistischen Suche nach neuen Formen in der Kunst, um die neue 'moderne' Welt auszudrücken, wird die Frage gestellt, inwieweit die Reproduktion der Welt in der Kunst die Welt auch beeinflussen kann. In den im Seminar behandelten Kunstwerken und Manifesten präsentiert sich die Kunst als radikale Art, Politik zu betreiben. Doch endet das nicht bei einer gefährlichen Ästhetisierung der Politik? Und hört die Kunst auf Kunst zu sein, wenn sie von der Politik vereinnahmt wird? Diese und andere Fragen werden wir im Seminar erörtern

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

  • read and understand the selected primary texts studied in the original German;
  • critically engage with and evaluate the selected primary texts and the relevant secondary literature;
  • demonstrate a clear understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;

present their critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured and correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR2365 Pathologies of the Modern Self)

(5 ECTS credits) MT NA 2 pw Professor Mary Cosgrove (cosgroma@tcd.ie)

Assessment

1 essay (2,500 words max.)

Description

The nineteenth century notoriously re-thought the human subject in biological and psychological terms, moving away from Christian understandings of humankind to an increasingly secular view. This major paradigm shift of modernity was fraught with conflicts: while the turn to science emerged in part from Enlightenment optimism in human rationality, reason and progress, from the mid-nineteenth century on this optimism increasingly gave way to pessimism, as writers, thinkers and critics observed the effects of rapid modernisation on different social groups. Against the ideal of modernity as persistent progress and continuing social improvement appeared the darker view of modernity as pathological, decadent and sick. This went hand in hand with the historical decline of empire, the rise of bourgeois capitalism and the crisis of masculinity. In this context, the new sciences of psychiatry and psychoanalysis explored – and thereby partly constructed – pathologies of the modern self with an emphasis on physical, sexual and psychological deviance. This module frames the discussion of modern pathologies of the self against the backdrop of the end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and with reference to the influential scientific outlooks of Austro-German psychiatrist, Richard von Krafft-Ebing, and the Viennese founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud. It examines four texts from the period in question: Leopold von Sacher-Masoch’s Venus im Pelz (1870), Franz Kafka’s stories Die Verwandlung (1915) and Ein Landarzt (1917), and Arthur Schnitzler’s Fräulein Else (1924). We will explore how these literary works expressed, often satirically, the major themes of pessimistic modernity through extreme images of the body, and also how they engaged with new ideas concerning sexual and psychological pathologies.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

  • read and understand the selected primary texts studied in the original German;
  • critically engage with and evaluate the selected primary texts and the relevant secondary literature;
  • demonstrate a clear understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;

present their critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured and correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR2364 Die Figur des AuBenseiters)

(5 ECTS credits) HT NA 2 pw Dr Daragh Downes (downesda@tcd.ie)

Assessment

1 essay (2,500 words max.)

Description

Spätestens seit der Romantik haben zahlreiche Schriftsteller den männlichen Außenseiter als ein Faszinosum ersten Ranges thematisiert - und fetischisiert. In diesem Seminar werden wir eine Reihe von Prosatexten über diese höchst problematische Figur lesen.
In der Regel stellt die erbärmliche Existenz des literarischen Außenseiters eine hoffnungslose Kritik am verheerend entfremdenden Charakter bestehender Gesellschaftsverhältnisse dar. Gerade deswegen aber bietet uns diese Figur eine Art > fotografisches Negativ< einer utopischen sozialen Anordnung, in welcher der Individualismus nicht vom inauthentischen System gef ährdet wird und die höchsten Hoffnungen des Menschen dem Realitätsprinzip nicht ständig untergeordnet werden. Der literarische Außenseiter konfrontiert uns daher wie kaum eine zweite literarische Figur genau an einer Stelle, wo politische, psychologische und künstlerische Anliegen zusammenlaufen.
Letzteres darf auf keinen Fall außer Acht gelassen werden: Nur wenn man die gezielt erzähltechnische Handhabung dieser Figur aufseiten des jeweiligen Autors in Betracht zieht, wird man in der Lage sein, die wesentliche Rolle der ästhetischen Vermittlung wahrzunehmen.
Zusätzlich zu den unten genannten Fiktionen werden wir im Laufe des Seminars auch die Gelegenheit ergreifen, einige eher theoretische Überlegungen (u.a. Friedrich von Schiller, Friedrich Nietzsche, Theodor W. Adorno und Colin Wilson) zur kulturpolitischen Problematik des Außenseiters zu lesen.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

  • read and understand the selected primary texts studied in the original German;
  • critically engage with and evaluate the selected primary texts and the relevant secondary literature;
  • demonstrate a clear understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;

present their critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured and correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR2366 Die Deutschen und ihr Wald: Eine Kulturgeschichte)

(5 ECTS credits) HT NA 2 pw Dr Peter Arnds (arndspa@tcd.ie)

Assessment

1 essay (2,500 words max.)

Description

Dieser Kurs untersucht die Evolution des Motivs Wald in der deutschen Literatur und Kulturgeschichte anhand von Kulturtheorien wie zum Beispiel Freuds Konzept des Unheimlichen oder Heideggers Rekurs auf die griechische Lethe. Wir lesen Texte der gesamten Literaturgeschichte, angefangen mit Exzerpten aus Tacitus, weiterführend über Romantik (Ludwig Tiecks Waldeinsamkeit und Wilhelm von Eichendorffs Naturpoesie), Realismus (erste ökologische Krisen im Industriezeitalter), und die politischen Schriften Heines (Harzreise). Es interessieren uns aber auch die darstellende Kunst, so zum Beispiel die Bilder von Caspar David Friedrich, sowie kulturelle Erscheinungen wie die Wandervögel, die Politisierung des Waldes im Dritten Reich (Blut und Boden), Ernst Jüngers Bild des Waldes als Ort des Widerstandes (DerWaldgang, 1951), sowie der Wald und sein Sterben in der j üngeren Vergangenheit. Wie wird der Wald zum Spiegel der Gefühlswelt zwischen Sehnsucht und Furcht, welche Funktionen hat er als Ort des Rückzugs, des Widerstands, des Bergens und Verbergens? Warum wandern die Deutschen so gern und warum ist der deutsche Märchenwald auf tieferer psychologischer Ebene so unheimlich? Solche Fragen und vieles mehr werden wir anhand von Texten aus Literatur, Philosophie, Psychologie und Anthropologie erforschen.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

  • read and understand the selected primary texts studied in the original German;
  • critically engage with and evaluate the selected primary texts and the relevant secondary literature;
  • demonstrate a clear understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;

present their critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured and correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR2344 Blutsauger von deutscher Zunge)

(5 ECTS credits) HT NA 2 pw Dr Clemens Ruthner (ruthnerc@tcd.ie)

Assessment

1 essay (2,500 words max.)

Description

Wir leben wieder einmal in einem "untoten" Zeitalter: Bram Stokers Dracula wird 2009 "Stadtbuch" von Dublin gewählt und Stephenie Meyers Romane füllen die Schaufenster der Buchhandlungen in deutschen Großstä dten. Weniger bekannt dürfte sein, dass Texte in deutscher Sprache eine wichtige Rolle spielten, als nach 1732 der Vampirismus in Europa bekannt und zum Thema kultureller Debatten wurde. 1748 erscheint das  erste Vampirgedicht der westlichen Literaturen – in deutscher Sprache. Aber auch spätere Texte haben dem Thema wichtige oder zumindest interessante Aspekte hinzugefügt.
Mein Seminar wird sich der Frage annehmen, was der Vampirismus im sakulären Zeitalter nach der Aufklärung " bedeutet": Für welche "unsichtbaren" Themen wird der Vampir, der kein Spiegelbild hat, als literarischer "Container" verwendet? Welche Diskurse verbergen sich hinter seiner Gestalt, die sich stets verwandelt? Was ist seine "Ästhetik"  und"Politik"?
Dahinter steht die Frage, wie eine "westliche" Kultur überhaupt mit dem  "Anderen", d.h. mit Alterität (otherness) und Alienität (z.B. Monstren) umgeht – und dabei zeigt sich, dass der Vampir als Figur des Imaginären durchaus "reale" Spiegelbilder hat: Gender und Sexualität, Macht und Herrschaft, Rassismus, Immigration etc. Dies soll anhand einer Textauswahl mit Schwerpunkt auf dem 20. Jh. gezeigt und diskutiert werden

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

  • read and understand the selected primary texts studied in the original German;
  • critically engage with and evaluate the selected primary texts and the relevant secondary literature;
  • demonstrate a clear understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;

present their critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured and correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR3402 German Language 3)

(10 ECTS credits) MT/HT Minimum level: German B1/B2; please meet with module co-ordinator before enrolling 3 pw ?

Assessment

3-hour examination paper (70%).15-minute oral examination (30%) involving stylistic analysis of text received one week beforehand. There are required homework assignments but these do not form part of the assessment mark.

Description

The principal emphasis in this module is on the comprehension and analysis of advanced rhetorical and discursive texts and the production of related text types.

Aims

  • to develop analytical, critical and descriptive skills in a variety of text types
  • to develop narrative, descriptive and rhetorically appropriate skills in writing and translating
  • Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

    • conduct an advanced stylistic analysis of different text types
    • respond appropriately in writing to journalistic texts
    • reproduce set text types using the appropriate style and register
    • translate journalistic and literary text types
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR3012 German Literary History 2)

(10 ECTS credits) MT/HT NA 2 pw Dr Peter Arnds (arndsp@tcd.ie)

Assessment

One 3-hour examination (50%). 1 essay (ca. 2000 - 2500 words) (50%)

Description

Aims

To survey key epochs, developments and concepts, and a range of significant texts, in German literature from the late 18th century to the present.

Content

The module treats German classicism, romanticism, realism, naturalism, expressionism, 'neue Sachlichkeit', literature 1933-45 and since 1945 by examining key concepts, developments and texts from the relevant epochs.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

  • discuss the developments, trends and themes of German literary history since the 18th century  and deploy the relevant critical terms appropriately.
  • describe how German literary history relates to the development of modern Germany in this period.
  • process the acquired knowledge and apply this critically to the writing of extended analytical essays.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR4001 German Language 4)

(10 ECTS credits) MT/HT Minimum level: German B2; please meet with module co-ordinator before enrolling 3 pw Ms Katrin Eberbach (eberback@tcd.ie)

Assessment

Assessment is by examination and continuous assessment. 3-hour end-of-year written examination [60 marks]

20 minute end-of-year oral examination (to include a presentation) [40 marks]

To pass this module, students must receive a mark of at least 40 overall in GR4001 and 40 in the GR4001 written paper.

Description

Aims

This module is designed to develop advanced oral and written rhetorical skills in the L2. It also aims to consolidate existing written, oral and aural German language skills through systematic revision of grammatical structures and to encourage the further development of communicative and cultural competence.

Content

The module develops advanced rhetorical skills in the L2 focus on analysis and production of a range of both written and oral/aural text types, including editorials, speeches, interviews, ‘Erörterungen’, ‘Kommentare’ and ‘Glossen’.

Methods of Student Teaching & Learning

  • Contact teaching (small group teaching)
  • Directed learning (group work, homework)
  • Experiential learning (presentations)
  • Self-directed learning (private study)

Learning Outcomes

Students who successfully complete this module should be able to:

  • understand and analyse the stylistic and rhetorical strategies which characterize complex written and oral text types;
  • to filter information and to differentiate between fact and opinion as well as between relevant and irrelevant information in complex oral and written texts;
  • produce stylistically appropriate Erörterungen, Kommentare and Glossen on contemporary social, economic, political, literary themes in idiomatic and accurate German;
  • give oral presentations at an advanced level in idiomatic and accurate German, using the appropriate register, on contemporary social, economic, political, and literary themes;
  • demonstrate a confident use of media such as PowerPoint during presentations and  integrate all aspects of communication including  gestures, facial expressions, body language;
  • to communicate at an advanced level in terms of accuracy, fluency and expression in the L2 in a variety of situations such as discussions, negotiations and interviews;
  • demonstrate a sound knowledge and mastery of complex grammar and syntax including indirect speech, hypotaxis, conjunctions, modal particles, in spoken and written German.
Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR4010 Translation)

(5 ECTS credits) HT NA 2 pw Professor Mary Cosgrove (cosgroma@tcd.ie)

Assessment

Coursework: fortnightly written translations; one 1-hour translation class test (corrected but not part of degree assessment) in Week 6 of HT. The result does not count towards the module mark. Examination: 3-hour translation paper at the May B.A. examinations. Two passages, both to be translated, equally weighted.

  1. the first (no choice) corresponds to the general registers practised in the first half of the semester.
  2. the second: free choice between texts from the various registers

Description

This module focuses on practical advanced German/English translation. In the first half of the semester, the emphasis will be on general registers; in the second, more specialist registers relating to each specific degree programme will be in focus. Though not translator training as such, the module aims to sensitise participants to issues and techniques for advanced German-English translation and increase language awareness and linguistic creativity generally. It presupposes a good level of German and English competence accumulated from wide reading and language practice. The necessity of good English style is stressed. The central productive skill of accurate translation of short extracts presupposes good reading and comprehension skills. Because of emphasis on practical work, discussion of translation theory is limited, though discussion of the texts and translations will provide some scope to step back and reflect on the processes involved.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module stream, students   should be able to

  • demonstrate a high degree of German comprehension (including knowledge of cultural context).
  • comprehend and translate advanced texts in the relevant text types into clear, correct English;

render these texts at a satisfactory level of accuracy, consistency and appropriateness of register and expression

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR4069 Perspectives on New Economy Capitalism in Contemporary German-language literature and film)

(10 ECTS credits) MT & HT NA 2 pw Professor Mary Cosgrove (cosgroma@tcd.ie)

Assessment

1 x 2 hour written examination (50%), 1 x 3000 word essay (50%)

Description

Emerging from the major financial challenges of unification and against global trends, the German economy has been thriving since the turn of the millennium. Yet recent and contemporary German-language literature and film has tended to feature the “new economy”, or neoliberal capitalism as it is also known, as highly problematic, a global force that has been eroding the fabric of local and individual everyday life since the fall of the Wall. In their works, German-language writers and filmmakers scratch the surface of wealthy Germany (and by implication the wealthy West), exposing the extreme pressures and affective realities that new economy capitalism bring to bear on the worker-consumer. The primary texts and films on the course offer a differentiated overview of this critical field of cultural production. They cover topics such as: the financial aftermath of unification and the spectre of the GDR in contemporary capitalist Germany (Petzold, Hein, Bauder); the commercialisation of Holocaust memory in the Berlin Republic (Hanika); the precariousness of existence as a white-collar employee of a multinational company (Röggla, Mora, Losmann); global high finance and the global city (Hochhäusler); new neoliberal identities, such as the “entrepreneurial self” (Nawrat). Secondary literature and theoretical texts will include reflection on: the defining features of neoliberal capitalism; the corrosion of character in the new economy; time and 24/7 culture in the digital era; the abstraction of finance capitalism and the question of how to represent it in film / literature; place, non-place and the body.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students should be able to

  • read and understand selected complex primary texts in the original German;
  • demonstrate a detailed critical knowledge of the primary texts studied in the course and of the relevant secondary literature;
  • display a deeper understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;

present a critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured, correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR4033 Kunst nach Auschwitz)

(10 ECTS credits) MT & HT NA 2 pw Dr Caitriona Leahy (cleahy@tcd.ie)

Assessment

1 x 2 hour written examination (50%), 1 x 3000 word essay (50%)

Description

Adorno behauptete kurz nach dem Ende des Krieges, nach Auschwitz ein Gedicht zu schreiben sei barbarisch. Einige Jahre sp äter nahm er Abstand von der Aussage, doch sie ist der deutschsprachigen Kultur nachhaltig in Erinnerung geblieben. Was sagt die Kunst angesichts Auschwitz? Nachdem bei der Ermordung in den Konzentrationslagern Mozart gespielt wurde, tr ägt die Kunst da nicht eine gewisse Schuld in sich? Hat sie nun zu schweigen, weil das Recht auf eine ästhetische Erfahrung von der barbarischen Wirklichkeit zerstört wurde?

In den letzten 15 Jahren hat es eine regelrechte Flut an Holocaustliteratur gegeben. Das sind Memoiren, Autobiographien, und vor  allem Romane, die 50 Jahre nach dem Ende des Krieges von dem Bedürfnis zeugen, die Vergangenheit wieder neu in Erinnerung zu rufen, wieder neu darzustellen. Warum jetzt sprechen? Die Psychoanalyse und die Theorie des Traumas lehren uns, daß das Trauma erst “nachträglich”, das heißt, aus der zeitlichen Distanz erzählbar ist. Insofern kommt der Holocaust erst jetzt zu sich, sowohl bei den Überlebenden, als auch in der Kunst. Dann stellt sich aber auch eine andere Frage: nachdem die meisten Opfer verstorben sind, wem gehört der Holocaust? Wer soll als historischer Zeuge auftreten? Und wie kann man etwas gerecht repräsentieren, das man selbst nicht erlebt hat, und dem vielleicht auch keine Repräsentation gerecht werden kann?

Im Kurs wird eine Auswahl zeitgenössischer Romane gelesen. Wir werden uns auch mit einigen zentralen theoretischen Schriften befassen und uns mit der Repräsentation des Holocaust im Film, in der Malerie und in der öffentlichen Gedächtniskultur beschäftigen.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students should be able to

  • read and understand selected complex primary texts in the original German;
  • demonstrate a detailed critical knowledge of the primary texts studied in the course and of the relevant secondary literature;
  • display a deeper understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;

present a critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured, correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR4048 Kunstliche Menschen in der Literatur)

(10 ECTS credits) MT & HT NA 2 pw Professor Jurgen Barkhoff (jbrkhoff@tcd.ie)

Assessment

1 x 2 hour written examination (50%), 1 x 3000 word essay (50%)

Description

Wir leben, so sagen viele Theoretiker, im Zeitalter des posthuman: der Perfektionierung oder sogar Überwindung des Menschen durch plastic surgery, Gentechnologie, Chip-Implantate, Technoprothetik, Mensch-Maschine Symbiosen Künstliche Intelligenz und Internet Avatare, die second life bevölkern. Doch der Traum, mit Hilfe der Technik den Menschen zu verbessern und den Künstlichen Menschen zu schaffen, ist so alt wie die Menschheit selbst. Zu allen Zeiten hat die Literatur diesen Traum dargestellt, interpretiert und kritisiert. Der Ehrgeiz, Gott als Schöpfer zu übertreffen und eine, neue, den Menschen überlegene Spezies zu schaffen, der Wunsch, sich von den Schwächen und Hinfä lligkeiten des Körpers und des Geistes zu befreien, der Glaube an die unbegrenzten Möglichkeiten der Technik, aber auch politische Utopien vom perfekten und perfekt steuerbaren Menschen spiegeln sich in dieser Literatur. Wichtiger noch ist die Art und Weise, in der sie solche Omnipotenzphantasien kritisiert und den Traum als Alptraum darstellt, zum Beispiel in Frankenstein.
Anhand von ausgesuchten Texten von der Antike bis zur Postmoderne werden wir diesen Themen nachgehen. Neben der Literatur werden auch theoretische Texte und Beispiele aus anderen Medien (Terminator, Blade Runner) mit einbezogen.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students should be able to

  • read and understand selected complex primary texts in the original German;
  • demonstrate a detailed critical knowledge of the primary texts studied in the course and of the relevant secondary literature;
  • display a deeper understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;

present a critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured, correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR2344 Blutsauger von deutscher Zunge)

(5 ECTS credits) HT NA 2 pw Dr Clemens Ruthner (ruthnerc@tcd.ie)

Assessment

1 essay (2,500 words max.)

Description

Wir leben wieder einmal in einem "untoten" Zeitalter: Bram Stokers Dracula wird 2009 "Stadtbuch" von Dublin gewählt und Stephenie Meyers Romane füllen die Schaufenster der Buchhandlungen in deutschen Großstä dten. Weniger bekannt dürfte sein, dass Texte in deutscher Sprache eine wichtige Rolle spielten, als nach 1732 der Vampirismus in Europa bekannt und zum Thema kultureller Debatten wurde. 1748 erscheint das  erste Vampirgedicht der westlichen Literaturen – in deutscher Sprache. Aber auch spätere Texte haben dem Thema wichtige oder zumindest interessante Aspekte hinzugefügt.
Mein Seminar wird sich der Frage annehmen, was der Vampirismus im sakulären Zeitalter nach der Aufklärung " bedeutet": Für welche "unsichtbaren" Themen wird der Vampir, der kein Spiegelbild hat, als literarischer "Container" verwendet? Welche Diskurse verbergen sich hinter seiner Gestalt, die sich stets verwandelt? Was ist seine "Ästhetik"  und"Politik"?
Dahinter steht die Frage, wie eine "westliche" Kultur überhaupt mit dem  "Anderen", d.h. mit Alterität (otherness) und Alienität (z.B. Monstren) umgeht – und dabei zeigt sich, dass der Vampir als Figur des Imaginären durchaus "reale" Spiegelbilder hat: Gender und Sexualität, Macht und Herrschaft, Rassismus, Immigration etc. Dies soll anhand einer Textauswahl mit Schwerpunkt auf dem 20. Jh. gezeigt und diskutiert werden

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

  • read and understand the selected primary texts studied in the original German;
  • critically engage with and evaluate the selected primary texts and the relevant secondary literature;
  • demonstrate a clear understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;

present their critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured and correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

(GR2344 Blutsauger von deutscher Zunge)

(5 ECTS credits) HT NA 2 pw Dr Clemens Ruthner (ruthnerc@tcd.ie)

Assessment

1 essay (2,500 words max.)

Description

Wir leben wieder einmal in einem "untoten" Zeitalter: Bram Stokers Dracula wird 2009 "Stadtbuch" von Dublin gewählt und Stephenie Meyers Romane füllen die Schaufenster der Buchhandlungen in deutschen Großstä dten. Weniger bekannt dürfte sein, dass Texte in deutscher Sprache eine wichtige Rolle spielten, als nach 1732 der Vampirismus in Europa bekannt und zum Thema kultureller Debatten wurde. 1748 erscheint das  erste Vampirgedicht der westlichen Literaturen – in deutscher Sprache. Aber auch spätere Texte haben dem Thema wichtige oder zumindest interessante Aspekte hinzugefügt.
Mein Seminar wird sich der Frage annehmen, was der Vampirismus im sakulären Zeitalter nach der Aufklärung " bedeutet": Für welche "unsichtbaren" Themen wird der Vampir, der kein Spiegelbild hat, als literarischer "Container" verwendet? Welche Diskurse verbergen sich hinter seiner Gestalt, die sich stets verwandelt? Was ist seine "Ästhetik"  und"Politik"?
Dahinter steht die Frage, wie eine "westliche" Kultur überhaupt mit dem  "Anderen", d.h. mit Alterität (otherness) und Alienität (z.B. Monstren) umgeht – und dabei zeigt sich, dass der Vampir als Figur des Imaginären durchaus "reale" Spiegelbilder hat: Gender und Sexualität, Macht und Herrschaft, Rassismus, Immigration etc. Dies soll anhand einer Textauswahl mit Schwerpunkt auf dem 20. Jh. gezeigt und diskutiert werden

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

  • read and understand the selected primary texts studied in the original German;
  • critically engage with and evaluate the selected primary texts and the relevant secondary literature;
  • demonstrate a clear understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;

present their critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured and correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).