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Germanic Studies

Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

GR1000 German Language 1

Michaelmas Term half-module = GR1020 (5 ECTS)

Hilary Term half-module = GR1017 (5 ECTS)

(10 ECTS credits) (MT - 5) (HT - 5) MT/HT Minimum level: German A2; please meet with module co-ordinator before enrolling 4 pw Ms Katrin Eberbach (eberback@tcd.ie)

Assessment

Continuous assessment in MT and HT (60%):
  • online aural tests in MT and HT (15%)
  • in class tests in weeks 6 and 11 MT, week 8 HT (15% each)
  • Written end of year exam (40%)
  • Description

    Aims

    This module aims to consolidate existing written, oral and aural German language skills and to encourage the further development of communicative and cultural competence. The course also aims to develop study skills as well as the following transferable skills:

    • Planning
    • Time-management

    Content

    The module develops grammatical structures through systematic revision of basic structures; text comprehension as well as written, oral and aural skills in the L2 with a focus on syntactic analysis; and production of a range of both written and oral/aural text types including descriptive and narrative texts and written expression of opinion. Students improve their speaking skills by talking about different aspects of German life and people. comprehension activities

    Learning Outcomes

    Students who successfully complete this course should be capable of demonstrating an ability:
    • to understand radio and news broadcasts, lectures and discussions
    • to participate in conversations about their lives and interests, university and general topics such as mentioned in newspapers
    • to participate in conversations specific to their degree course, such as business, law or literature
    • to write short but accurate narrative and descriptive texts on contemporary topics and topics covered in class
    • to build up and expand a solid basic active and passive vocabulary
    • to understand and apply the basics of German grammar to both spoken and written German
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

    (GR1010 German Area Studies)

    (5 ECTS credits) HT NA 1 pw TBC

    HT:

    • Week 8: Essay 50% 1500 words in English Due Wed 12.00
    • Revision week: Essay 50% 1500 words in English Due Wed 12.00

    Assessment

    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the study of contemporary German-speaking society through the medium of German.

    Content

    This module is an introduction to the history, politics, society and economy of the German-speaking countries in the period 1945 to the present. Taught in German, with English summaries, it also trains listening comprehension, and as such helps prepare for studying in a German-speaking country and for future study in TCD. Listening skills developed in this module also support performance in the JF Aural examination (see GR1000).

    Methods of Teaching and Student Learning

    Lectures.

    Learning Outcomes

    Students who successfully complete this module stream should be able to

    • describe the recent history and the political, economic, social and cultural features of the three German-speaking countries.
    • discuss in detail major events and trends in these countries since the Second World War.
    • deploy this knowledge and understanding in clear written English.
    • follow lectures, presentations and commentaries in German on contemporary themes.

    read introductory and intermediate level written material in German on contemporary themes.

    Description

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

    (GR1012 Textual Analysis)

    (5 ECTS credits) HT NA 2 pw Mr Daniel Pust (pustd@tcd.ie)

    Assessment

    MT:

    • Week 6: Test 1 50%
    • Week 12: Test 2 50%

    Students are trained in the ‘close reading’ of literary and non-literary texts in German. A ‘text’ is understood as any piece of written German, but for reasons of practicality the pieces that are used in TA (either extracts or complete works) are normally no longer than one A4 sheet.

    Aims

    This module aims to show how factors such as structure, vocabulary and style are combined in a particular way to produce a text of a particular kind, with one or more meanings. In bracketing out text-external elements and extra-textual information, students’ attention is focused exclusively on the formal, thematic and discursive features of the text in front of them.

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • identify and explain why and how structure, vocabulary and style combine to produce a particular kind of literary or non-literary text.
  • write concise analyses of German texts in which findings are supported by the appropriate use of textual evidence.
  • Description

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

    (GR2000 German Language 2)

    (10 ECTS credits) MT & HT Minimum level: German B1; please meet with module co-ordinator before enrolling 3 pw Ms Katrin Eberbach (eberback@tcd.ie)

    Assessment

    Continuous assessment in MT and HT (60%):

    • In-class tests weeks 6 & 11 MT (15% each)
    • Fachsprache essay, 800 words, due Wed 12.00, week 10 HT (15%)
    • Oral presentations weeks 8 & 9 HT (15%)
    • Written end of year exam (40%)

    Description

    Aims

    This programme is designed to enhance existing written, oral and aural German language skills through systematic introduction of complex grammatical structures and to encourage the further development of communicative and cultural competence, particularly in the specialist register. The module also aims to develop the following transferable skills:

    • Critical and analytical approach to understanding advanced information sources;
    • Presentation skills and use of Power Point;
    • Time management.

    Content

    Students will be introduced to the prevailing terminology of the German university system and to the Fachsprache (specialist register) of their study field/cohort. This will be accomplished through the guided discussion of appropriate text examples, along with vocabulary, grammar, comprehension and translation exercises.

    Methods of Teaching and Student Learning:
    • Contact Teaching: Tutorials and seminars
    • Directed Learning: Homework
    • Group-work

    Learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • understand and apply more complex features of German grammar, including participial phrases and passive voice, in spoken and written contexts;
  • understand and use appropriately the specialist vocabulary (Universität) and the lexical and syntactic features of a particular field of study (Fachsprache) ;
  • read and understand articles from academic publications and translate extracts into correct and idiomatic English;
  • identify the syntactic and structural differences between oral and written Fachsprache;
  • write essays in German on a topic from their field of study;
  • give oral presentations in German on a topic from their field of study.
  • The module also aims to develop the following transferable skills:

    • Critical and analytical approach to understanding advanced information sources;
    • Presentation skills and use of Power Point;
    • Time management.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

    (GR2023 German Literary History 1)

    (5 ECTS credits) HT NA 2 pw Dr Clemens Ruthner (ruthnerc@tcd.ie)

    Assessment

    HT: Take-home exam (100%)
    • to be made available to students Thu week 11
    • to be submitted to Department Mon week 12.

    Description

    Aims

    This module aims to give students a survey of / intro to German-language literature from first beginnings to 1800.

    Content

    The module consists of a series of lectures and seminars. Students are asked to prepare for in-class discussions by being assigned pointed questions about each reading as homework.

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module, students

    • will have received a survey of early German literature until ca. 1800
    • will be able to contextualise future readings in this framework and carry out a literary analysis considering the historical background.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

    (GR2012 German Cultural History)

    (5 ECTS credits) MT NA 2 pw Dr Clemens Ruthner (ruthnerc@tcd.ie)

    MT:

    • Week 8: Essay 1: 50% 2000 words in English: Due Wed 12.00
    • Week 12: Essay 2: 50% 1000 words in German: Due Wed 12.00

    Assessment

    Description

    Aims

    This module aims to increase students’ background knowledge and cultural competence in respect of the historical and cultural development of the German-speaking world. It also provides training in listening comprehension. Both aspects are preparation for studying in a German-speaking country.

    Content

    The module investigates how the history and culture of Germany, Austria and Switzerland, especially since 1800, have shaped today’s society. This will be achieved by a thematic rather than a chronological approach to the key issues of the cultural history of Austria, Germany and Switzerland.

    Methods of student teaching and learning

    • Contact teaching: Lectures with accompanying tutorials
    • Directed and self-directed learning (production of a critical essay)
    • On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

    • discuss in detail aspects of the history and culture of the three German-speaking countries.
    • describe how cultural history has shaped modern society in these countries.
    • understand a lecture in German.
    • process the acquired knowledge and apply this critically to the writing of an extended essay.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

    (GR2333 Kurzgeschichten der Moderne)

    (5 ECTS credits) MT NA 2 pw Dr Caitríona Leahy (cleahy@tcd.ie)

    MT: Revision Week: Submission of continuous assessment journal 100%

    Assessment

    Description

    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the work of three of the most important writers of the 20th century, and to give them a clear understanding of the main themes of modernism.

    Content

    In diesem Seminar lesen wir Kurzgeschichten und Novellen von drei der wichtigsten deutschsprachigen Autoren des zwanzigsten Jahrhunderts – Thomas Mann, Robert Musil und Gottfried Benn. Es wird versucht, anhand dieser Geschichten eine Einsicht in einige der Hauptthemen der modernistischen Periode zu bekommen: Identitätskrise, die Rolle der Kunst, die Darstellung einer sinnlosen Welt… und nicht zuletzt die Frage zu erörtern: warum wird die Literatur heute noch maßgebend von Modernism geprägt?

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to
    • read and understand the selected primary texts studied in the original German;
    • critically engage with and evaluate the selected primary texts and the relevant secondary literature;
    • demonstrate a clear understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;
    • present their critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured and correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

    (GR2344 Blutsauger von deutscher Zunge: Vampirismus als literarisches und kulturelles Thema)

    (5 ECTS credits) HT NA 2 pw Dr Clemens Ruthner (ruthnerc@tcd.ie)

    Assessment

    HT:

    Revision Week: Essay (100%) 2500 words Due Wed 12.00

    Aims

    Students will learn how to read and analyse literary texts from a certain genre thorugh the lens of historical context and thematic / theoretical approaches

    Content

    Wir leben wieder einmal in einem "untoten" Zeitalter: Bram Stokers Dracula wurde 2009 zum "Stadtbuch" von Dublin gewählt und Stephenie Meyers Romane füllten immer wieder die Schaufenster der Buchhandlungen – und Kinos - weltweit. Weniger bekannt dürfte sein, dass Texte in deutscher Sprache – und habsburgische Geopolitik - eine wichtige Rolle spielten, als nach 1732 der Vampirismus in Europa bekannt und zum Thema kultureller Debatten wurde. 1748 erscheint das erste Vampirgedicht der westlichen Literaturen – in deutscher Sprache. Aber auch spätere Texte (darunter einige österreichischer AutorInnen) haben dem Thema wichtige oder zumindest interessante Aspekte hinzugefügt.

    Mein Seminar wird sich der Frage annehmen, was der Vampir als kulturelles Phantasma im sakulären Zeitalter nach der Aufklärung "bedeutet": Für welche "unsichtbaren" Themen wird er, der kein Spiegelbild hat, als literarischer "Container" verwendet? Welche Diskurse verbergen sich hinter seiner Gestalt, die sich stets verwandelt? Was ist seine "Ästhetik" und "Politik"? Häufig verkörpert der Vampir das ethnisch Fremde, so z.B. Phantasien über den "Balkan"...

    Dahinter steht die Frage, wie eine "westliche" Kultur überhaupt mit dem "Anderen", d.h. mit Alterität (otherness) und Alienität (z.B. Monstren) umgeht – und dabei zeigt sich, dass der Vampir als Figur des Imaginären durchaus "reale" Spiegelbilder hat: Gender und Sexualität, Macht und Herrschaft, Rassismus, Immigration etc. Dies soll anhand einer Textauswahl mit Schwerpunkt auf dem 20. Jh. gezeigt und diskutiert werden.

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

    • read and understand the selected primary texts studied in the original German;
    • critically engage with and evaluate the selected primary texts and the relevant secondary literature;
    • demonstrate a clear understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;
    • present their critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured and correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).

    Description

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

    (GR2365 Pathologies of the Modern Self)

    (5 ECTS credits) MT NA 2 pw Professor Mary Cosgrove (cosgroma@tcd.ie)

    Assessment

    MT: Revision week: Essay (100%) – 2500 words – due Wed 12.00

    Aims

    • to read and understand the selected primary texts studied in the original German;
    • to read and understand the selected theoretical texts, where possible, in the original German;
    • to develop an understanding of the fin-de-siecle period, especially its perspective on gender, masculinity, the bourgeois family and the individual;
    • to develop skills of research and critical analysis of primary and secondary literature in essay work that is well-structured and correctly referenced in coherent English;
    • to develop skills of research and critical analysis for oral presentation in class;
    • to develop group-work skills in class.

    Content

    The nineteenth century notoriously re-thought the human subject in biological and psychological terms, moving away from Christian understandings of humankind to an increasingly secular view. This major paradigm shift of modernity was fraught with conflicts: while the turn to science emerged in part from Enlightenment optimism in human rationality, reason, and progress, from the mid-nineteenth century on this optimism increasingly gave way to pessimism, as writers, thinkers, and critics observed the effects of rapid modernization on different social groups. Against the ideal of modernity as persistent progress and continuing social improvement appeared the darker view of modernity as pathological, decadent, and sick. This went hand in hand with the historical decline of empire, the rise of bourgeois capitalism, and the crisis of masculinity. In this context, the new sciences of psychiatry and psychoanalysis explored – and thereby partly constructed – pathologies of the modern self with an emphasis on physical, sexual, and psychological deviance. This module frames the discussion of modern pathologies of the self against the backdrop of the end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and with reference to the influential scientific outlooks of Austro-German psychiatrist, Richard von Krafft-Ebing, and the Viennese founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud. It examines three texts from the period in question: Leopold von Sacher-Masoch’s Venus im Pelz (1870), Franz Kafka’s short story Ein Landarzt (1917), and Arthur Schnitzler’s novella, Fräulein Else (1924). We will explore how these literary works expressed, often satirically, the major themes of pessimistic modernity through extreme images of the body, and also how they engaged with new ideas concerning sexual and psychological pathologies.

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

    • read and understand the selected primary texts studied in the original German;
    • critically engage with and evaluate the selected primary texts and the relevant secondary literature;
    • demonstrate a clear understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;
    • present their critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured and correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).

    Description

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

    (GR2372 Die Erzählungen von E. T. A. Hoffmann)

    (5 ECTS credits) HT NA 2 pw Dr Daragh Downes (downesda@tcd.ie)

    Assessment

    HT: Revision Week: Essay – 2500 words (100%) - Due Wed 12.00

    Aims

  • To develop wide and deep familiarity with the shorter fiction of E.T.A. Hoffmann
  • To cultivate, through exploration of cultural and social context, an appreciation of Hoffmann’s status as a Romantic writer
  • To use Hoffmann’s texts as an opportunity to explore a multiplicity of literary-critical reading strategies
  • To learn how to enter into productive dialogue with the relevant critical literature
  • Content

    If anyone has claim to be the Godfather of modern fantasy, horror and science fiction—not to mention the detective story—then it is surely the writer, composer, critic and artist Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann (1776-1822). In this seminar we will immerse ourselves in a diverse selection of Hoffmann’s shorter tales, which represent a gloriously weird and macabre flowering of the German Dark-Romantic spirit.

    Ghosts, automatons, doppelgänger, mesmerism, mania, magic, murder: small wonder that the influence of this explorer of the uncanny antagonisms of social life, and the ‘night’ side of the human psyche, can be felt in the works of such later luminaries as Charles Dickens, Hans Christian Andersen, Nikolai Gogol, Edgar Allan Poe, Emily Brontë, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Lewis Carroll, Sigmund Freud, Franz Kafka, Fritz Lang, Daphne du Maurier, Alfred Hitchcock, Günter Grass, Angela Carter, Cornelia Funke and Stephen King.

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

  • read and understand the selected primary texts studied in the original German;
  • critically engage with and evaluate the selected primary texts and the relevant secondary literature;
  • demonstrate a clear understanding of the specific literary or linguistic topic and its cultural, historical, theoretical and/or linguistic contexts;
  • present their critical analysis of the primary (literary or linguistic) material in a well-structured and correctly referenced essay in coherent English (or German, where required).
  • Description

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

    (GR3402 German Language 3)

    Michaelmas Term half-module = GR3002 (5 ECTS)

    Hilary Term half-module = GR3004 (5 ECTS)

    (10 ECTS credits) MT/HT Minimum level: German B1/B2; please meet with module co-ordinator before enrolling 3 pw Dr Caitriona Leahy (cleahy@tcd.ie)

    Assessment

    Continuous assessment:
  • In-class test week 12 MT (20%)
  • Oral exam at the end of HT (20%)
  • Written end of year exam: 2 hours (60%)

    Content

    The principal emphasis in this module is on the comprehension and analysis of advanced rhetorical and discursive texts and the production of related text types.

    Aims

  • to develop analytical, critical and descriptive skills in a variety of text types
  • to develop narrative, descriptive and rhetorically appropriate skills in writing and translating
  • Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

    • conduct an advanced stylistic analysis of different text types
    • respond appropriately in writing to journalistic texts
    • reproduce set text types using the appropriate style and register
    • translate journalistic and literary text types
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

    (GR3012 German Literary History 2)

    Michaelmas Term half-module = GR3003 (5 ECTS)

    Hilary Term half-module = GR3013 (5 ECTS)

    (10 ECTS credits) MT/HT NA 2 pw Professor Mary Cosgrove (cosgroma@tcd.ie)

    Assessment

    MT: Revision week: Essay 1 50%, 2500 words

    HT: Revision Week: Essay 2 50%, 2500 words

    Aims

    To survey key epochs, developments and concepts, and a range of significant texts, in German literature from the late 18th century to the present.

    Content

    The module treats German classicism, romanticism, realism, naturalism, expressionism, 'neue Sachlichkeit', literature 1933-45 and since 1945 by examining key concepts, developments and texts from the relevant epochs.

    Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this module, students should be able to

    • discuss the developments, trends and themes of German literary history since the 18th century  and deploy the relevant critical terms appropriately.
    • describe how German literary history relates to the development of modern Germany in this period.
    • process the acquired knowledge and apply this critically to the writing of extended analytical essays.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

    (GR4001 German Language 4)

    Michaelmas Term half-module = GR4071 (5 ECTS)

    Hilary Term half-module = GR4070 (5 ECTS)

    (10 ECTS credits) MT/HT Minimum level: German B2; please meet with module co-ordinator before enrolling 3 pw Ms Katrin Eberbach (eberback@tcd.ie)

    Assessment

  • End of year written exam, 2 hours, 60%
  • End of year oral examination, 20 min, 40%
  • To pass this module, students must receive a mark of at least 40 overall in GR4001 and 40 in the GR4001 written paper.
  • Aims

    This module is designed to develop advanced oral and written rhetorical skills in the L2. It also aims to consolidate existing written, oral and aural German language skills through systematic revision of grammatical structures and to encourage the further development of communicative and cultural competence.

    Content

    The module develops advanced rhetorical skills in the L2 focus on analysis and production of a range of both written and oral/aural text types, including editorials, speeches, interviews, ‘Erörterungen’, ‘Kommentare’ and ‘Glossen’.

    Methods of Student Teaching and Learning

    • Contact teaching (small group teaching)
    • Directed learning (group work, homework)
    • Experiential learning (presentations)
    • Self-directed learning (private study)

    Learning Outcomes

    Students who successfully complete this module should be able to:

    • understand and analyse the stylistic and rhetorical strategies which characterize complex written and oral text types;
    • to filter information and to differentiate between fact and opinion as well as between relevant and irrelevant information in complex oral and written texts;
    • produce stylistically appropriate Erörterungen, Kommentare and Glossen on contemporary social, economic, political, literary themes in idiomatic and accurate German;
    • give oral presentations at an advanced level in idiomatic and accurate German, using the appropriate register, on contemporary social, economic, political, and literary themes;
    • demonstrate a confident use of media such as PowerPoint during presentations and  integrate all aspects of communication including  gestures, facial expressions, body language;
    • to communicate at an advanced level in terms of accuracy, fluency and expression in the L2 in a variety of situations such as discussions, negotiations and interviews;
    • demonstrate a sound knowledge and mastery of complex grammar and syntax including indirect speech, hypotaxis, conjunctions, modal particles, in spoken and written German.
    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Contact Hours Contact Details

    (GR4010 Translation)

    (5 ECTS credits) HT NA 2 pw Professor Mary Cosgrove (cosgroma@tcd.ie)/ Dr Caitriona Leahy (cleahy@tcd.ie)

    Assessment

    HT:

  • 1. Friday Week 11: Take home written exam, submit Monday week 12, 20%
  • 2. Exam 2 hours, 80%
  • Aims

    Though not translator training as such, the module aims to sensitise participants to issues and techniques for advanced German-English translation and increase language awareness and linguistic creativity generally. It presupposes a good level of German and English competence accumulated from wide reading and language practice. The necessity of good English style is stressed. The central productive skill of accurate translation of short extracts presupposes good reading and comprehension skills. Because of emphasis on practical work via weekly student presentations, discussion of translation theory is limited, though discussion of the texts and translations / translation rationale will provide some scope to step back and reflect on the processes involved.

    Content

    The module focuses on practical advanced German/English translation of texts from different registers (journalism, scholarship, literature etc.).

    Learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module stream, students should be able to
  • demonstrate a high degree of German comprehension (including knowledge of the cultural context);
  • comprehend and translate advanced texts in the relevant text types into clear, correct English;
  • render these texts at a satisfactory level of accuracy, consistency and appropriateness of register and expression.
  • present group translation work to the class, discussing and explaining translation rationale and strategy.