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Film Studies

The following pages list the Sophister modules available for the academic year 2018-2019. Visiting students are advised that you are considered to be Junior Sophisters while at Trinity. Places are limited in all options. In particular, you may only sign up for Documentary filmmaking (HT) if you have already gained sufficient production skills.

Module Name Module Code and ECTs credits Semester Contact Hours Module Personnel

Digital Theory and Practice

FSS028 (5 ECTS) 1 (Michaelmas Term) 22 class hours plus 22 screening hours TBD

Description

Rationale and aims

This module will consider some of the major transformations that have taken place in the 21st century as a result of the increasing dominance of digital technologies and the rapidity of their evolution. It will analyse key concepts in digital theory and introduce students to the foundational components of digital practice. Students will apply the critical and conceptual tools under discussion to the creation of their own digital content.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:
  • Evaluate current trends in digital theory (PO2)
  • Evaluate current trends in digital practice (PO3)
  • Contextualise their knowledge of key aspects of digital theory and practice within its social, cultural, economic and industrial framework (PO1)
  • Engage in elements of digital practice informed by the theoretical and creative concepts under discussion (PO3, PO4, PO5)
  • Resources

    There is no set text for this course. Required viewing and reading is set each week. Further viewing and reading is recommended as appropriate.

    Methods of Teaching and Student Learning

    Teaching methods include lectures, seminar discussions, and digital practice exercises. Students will be expected to attend all classes and undertake all the required viewing; read from primary as well as secondary sources and comment upon these readings; participate in class discussion; perform the required assessment(s). Students may be required to make a class presentation on some aspect of the course covered.

    Methods of assessment

    90% coursework (including written and digital practice-based components) 10% participation

    Module Evaluation

    Course and Teaching Surveys will be circulated to students at the end of the module. Feedback will inform course development.
    Module Name Module Code and ECTs credits Semester Contact Hours Module Personnel

    Tracing Film Noir

    5 1 (Michaelmas Term) 22 lecture/seminar hours. 22 screening hours Dr. Padraic Killeen

    Description

    Rationale and aims

    In this module we will discuss and examine the emergence of film noir in 1940s American cinema. We will analyse its historical and sociopolitical origins as well as its complex connections to American hardboiled fiction, the gangster genre, French Poetic Realism, German Expressionism, and existential philosophy. We shall address the difficulties in categorising film noir as a genre and ask whether it is better understood as a given historical cycle of films, a formal style, or an aesthetic sensibility. We shall trace the influence of noir across genres and map the many diverse paths it takes in cinema and other media forms from the late 1960s onwards. The module will examine the narrative patterns distinctive to film noir and identify key characteristics of noir iconography, sound, and performance. We will analyse the problematic philosophical questions film that noir poses about gender, sexuality, identity, and the stability of the self. We will also address complex problems of temporality that are uniquely to the fore in film noir. Finally, we will attend to the diverse philosophical and critical impulses within noir and examine its significance in relation to psychoanalysis, existentialism, and affect theory.

    Course Content

    • Historical Origins of Noir
    • Narrative Patterns of Noir
    • Noir Iconography
    • Sound and Music in Film Noir
    • Psychoanalysis and the Divided Self
    • Gender, Sexuality, and the Femme Fatale
    • Time and Temporality in Film Noir
    • The Spaces and Places of Noir
    • The ‘Modern Noir’
    • Film Noir and Philosophy
    • The Complex Noir Mediascape

    Learning outcomes

    Successful completion of this module will enable students to:
  • Identify the key historical determinants and aesthetic elements of Film Noir.
  • Theorise the central socio-cultural and philosophical issues of identity construction, gender, and temporality that arise in Film Noir.
  • Analyse the idea of Film Noir as a complex counter-cultural force within the Classical Hollywood Cinema.
  • Apply a diverse set of theoretical models and critical approaches both to Film Noir and to a wider range of films and cultural phenomena.
  • Resources

    There is no set text for this course. Required viewing and reading is set each week. Further viewing and reading is recommended as appropriate.

    Methods of Teaching and Student Learning

    Teaching methods include screenings of films and film excerpts, lectures and seminar discussions. Students will be expected to attend all classes and screenings; read from primary as well as secondary sources and comment upon these readings; participate in class discussion; perform the required assessment(s). Students may be required to make a class presentation on some aspect of the course covered.

    Methods of assessment

    90% coursework 10% participation Further assessment details will be provided in the course outline.

    Module Evaluation

    Course and Teaching Surveys will be circulated to students at the end of the module. Feedback will inform course development.
    Module Name Module Code and ECTs credits Semester Contact Hours Module Personnel

    Female Directors of the Middle East and the Maghreb.

    5 Semester 1 (Michaelmas Term) 22 lecture/seminar hours Dr. Conor O’Kelly

    Description

    Rationale and aims

    The manner in which film can provide political agency to marginalized voices is examined in this module through an analysis of the films of women directors from the Middle East. Drawing from theories of postcolonial identity and biopolitics, the module includes films and filmmakers from countries with long and rich cinema histories such as Iran but also from the very new national cinema of Saudi Arabia. The themes of the module are reflected in those of the films screened, whereby the emancipatory potential of cinema is plotted in depictions of education, resistance and transgression. Students will consider how popular cinematic discourses, including ideas of authorship, spectatorship and genre are deeply affected by the political and religious environment in which they take place.

    Learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module students will be able to:
  • Synthesise their knowledge of female Middle Eastern and Maghrebi cinema within a wider economic, industrial, aesthetic and socio-cultural context; (PO1)
  • Analyse current issues relevant to the study of female directors within the broader context of currents within film studies; (PO2)
  • Identify shared tropes, subject matter and themes that are common across different Middle Eastern and Maghrebi cinemas ; (PO3)
  • Apply the theoretical models and critical approaches under discussion to specific films and film styles; (PO3, PO5, PO7)
  • Course Content

    • History of films by women in the Middle East
    • Postcolonial theory in cinema
    • Foucault’s biopolitics
    • The challenges of representation for the marginalised
    • Gender and cinema
    • Critical responses
    • Textual analyses

    Resources

    There is no set text for this course. Required viewing and reading is set each week. Further viewing and reading is recommended as appropriate. The following titles are useful accompaniments to the module as a whole. Foucault, Michel, and Colin Gordon. Power/knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings, 1972-1977. New York: Pantheon Books, 1980. Hillauer, Rebecca. Encyclopedia of Arab Women Filmmakers. Rev. and updated ed. Cairo ; New York: American University in Cairo Press, 2005. Morris, Rosalind C., and Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, eds. Can the Subaltern Speak?: Reflections on the History of an Idea. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010.

    Methods of Teaching and Student Learning

    Teaching methods include film screenings, lectures and seminar discussions. Students will be expected to attend all classes and screenings; read from primary as well as secondary sources and comment upon these readings; participate in class discussion; perform the required assessment(s). Students may be required to make a class presentation on some aspect of the course covered.

    Methods of assessment

    90% coursework 10% participation Further assessment details will be provided in the course outline.

    Module Evaluation

    Course and Teaching Surveys will be circulated to students at the end of the module. Feedback will be used to reflect on course development.
    Module Name Module Code and ECTs credits Semester Contact Hours Module Personnel

    Screening Irish-America

    FSS021 (5 ECTS) Michaelmas 11 hours lectures, 11 hours seminars, 22 hours screenings Professor Ruth Barton

    Description

    Learning outcomes

    This course will enable students to:
  • be conversant with the historical, political and social backgrounds to these works (PO1, PO2)
  • employ textual analysis to discuss and illustrate these issues (PO3)
  • confidently evaluate the shifting nature of film representation in the period covered (PO1, PO2, PO3)
  • Learning aims

    This is a Sophister Option course. We will be asking what kind of narratives and cinematic space Irish characters have occupied within Hollywood and how political events, such as 9/11, have inflected these representations. The objective is to produce a critical historical approach to issues of representation in Irish-American themed films.

    Module Content

    This module will cover the history and development of the representation of Irish-America on screen from early and silent filmmaking to john Crowley’s Brooklyn (2015). We will consider the historical and sociological background to these representations and analyse the films via theoretical considerations of race, religion and ethnicity as well as genre, gender, stardom and authorship. Thus we will consider the key figures of James Cagney and John Ford and examine the contrasting depictions of masculinity and femininity in these films. We will discuss how films from the early and silent period and the Classic period built the foundation for subsequent filmmakers and how the model was altered by subsequent generations from the Kennedy era to the present.

    Recommended Reading List.

    The principal course textbook will be Ruth Barton (ed) (2009) Screening Irish-America (Dublin & Portland Or.: Irish Academic Press). Films to be screened and discussed will include: Irene (Alfred E Green, 1926), True Confessions (Ulu Grosbard, 1981), Miller’s Crossing (Joel Coen, 1990).

    Methods of assessment

    90% coursework 10% participation Further assessment details will be provided in the course outline.
    Module Name Module Code and ECTs credits Semester Contact Hours Module Personnel

    Writing For The Small Screen

    FSS035 (5 ECTS) Michaelmas Term 22 lecture/seminar hours Justin MacGregor

    Description

    Rationale and aims

    The aim is to develop your writing of narrative scripts for television or online exhibition by creative practice. You will explore screenwriting techniques for each of these mediums and undertake writing either a pilot script for an original television or online programme or a series bible for an original television or online programme. Building on the three-act structure, you will consider other storytelling methods that may be more suitable to your original programme. You will learn all aspects of script development from originating a series idea, to writing the script, to analysing possible exhibition and funding options for your project. This module is designed to familiarise you with the process and procedures involved in developing and writing a long form script suitable for the small screen.

    Learning outcomes

    This module will enable students to:
    • Devise ideas for television or online broadcast.
    • Be able to write a narrative script that is feasible to make and engages your chosen audience.
    • Develop tools to analyse and script-edit television or online broadcast scripts.
    • Create and write a range of effective scripts.
    • Participate in a writer’s room scenario.

    Resources

    Blake Snyder, Save the Cat!: The Last Book on Screenwriting You'll Ever Need, Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2005; David Howard, Edward Mabley, The Tools of Screenwriting: A Writer’s Guide To The Craft and Elements of a Screenplay, London: St. Martin’s Griffin, 1995; John Yorke, Into the Woods: How Stories Work and Why We Tell Them, London: Penguin, 2014.

    Methods of Teaching and Student Learning

    Classes will be a combination of lecture/seminar, written exercises and analysis.

    Methods of assessment

    Participation and Reflection 30% Two Drafts of a Pilot 70%

    Module Evaluation

    Course and Teaching Surveys will be circulated to students at the end of the module. Feedback will be used to reflect on course development.
    Module Name Module Code and ECTs credits Semester Contact Hours Module Personnel

    Contemporary Non-Western Cinema

    TBC (5/10 ECTS) Semester 2 (Hilary Term) 22 lecture/seminar hours Dr. Conor O’Kelly

    Description

    Rationale and aims

    This module explores the development of non-western cinema with particular reference to films from the last twenty years. Studying films from the Middle East, Asia and Australia, the module will explore the historical development of film-making with reference to specific national and cultural identities. With reference to the manner that cinema is a powerfully ideological medium the module will examine how film is used to express marginalized political positions. The course examines cinematic representation through a number of diverse theoretical methods.

    Course Content

    • Middle Eastern Protest Cinema.
    • The Rise of South Korean Cinema.
    • Representations of Aboriginal Australia.
    • The Art Cinema of Apichatpong Weerasethakul.
    • Taiwan's New Wave and Hou Hsiao-hsien
    • The Cinema of Ann Hui

    Learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module students will be able to:
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of current key film movements, directors and critical writings in the context of current non-western cinema.
  • Discuss the historical, political and cultural backgrounds relevant to the studied films and directors.
  • Use critical and theoretical models to analyse the films under discussion.
  • Resources

    There is no set text for this course. Required viewing and reading is set each week. A useful primer for the course is: Shohat, Ella, and Robert Stam. 2014. Unthinking Eurocentrism: Multiculturalism and the Media. Second edition. Sightlines. London; New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.

    Methods of Teaching and Student Learning

    Teaching methods include lectures and seminar discussions. Students will be expected to attend all classes and screenings; read from primary as well as secondary sources and comment upon these readings; participate in class discussion; perform the required assessment. Students may be required to make a class presentation on some aspect of the course covered.

    Methods of assessment

    90% coursework 10% participation Further assessment details will be provided in the course outline.

    Module Evaluation

    Course and Teaching Surveys will be circulated to students at the end of the module. Feedback will be used to reflect on course development.
    Module Name Module Code and ECTs credits Semester Contact Hours Module Personnel

    Film Theory and Criticism

    FSS033 (5 ECTS) 2 (Hilary Term) 22 lecture/seminar hours, 22 screening hours Dr. Paula Quigley

    Description

    Rationale and aims

    This module will consider some of the ways in which film has been theorised since its inception up to the present day. We will begin by considering early film theory’s focus on questions of medium specificity, film language, and film and reality. We will then expore models of film authorship and spectatorship. We will discuss ways in which the relationship between film and society and film and ideology has been conceptualised. Following this, we will look at more recent interventions and reorientations in relation to identity politics, as well as the so-called ‘corporeal turn’. Finally, we will consider the ways in which film theory is being reconceived in the digital age. Overall, this module is designed to develop and deepen students’ engagament with film theory and criticism through close readings of key texts.

    Course Content

    • Ontology of the film image
    • Film and reality
    • Film and authorship
    • Film and/as language
    • Film and ideology
    • Film and gender
    • Film and spectatorship
    • Film and politics
    • Film and the body
    • Film theory in the digital age

    Learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module students will be able to:
    • Identify key issues in the history of film theory and criticism (PO1)
    • Analyse key issues in the history of film theory and criticism (PO2)
    • Apply the theoretical models and critical approaches under discussion to specific films and film styles (PO3, PO5, PO7)

    Resources

    There is no set text for this course. Required viewing and reading is set each week. Further viewing and reading is recommended as appropriate.

    Methods of Teaching and Student Learning

    Teaching methods include screenings of films and film excerpts, lectures and seminar discussions. Students will be expected to attend all classes and screenings; read from primary as well as secondary sources and comment upon these readings; participate in class discussion; perform the required assessment(s). Students may be required to make a class presentation on some aspect of the course covered.

    Methods of assessment

    90% coursework 10% participation Further assessment details will be provided in the course outline.

    Module Evaluation

    Course and Teaching Surveys will be circulated to students at the end of the module. Feedback will inform course development.
    Module Name Module Code and ECTs credits Semester Contact Hours Module Personnel

    Russian cinema

    FSS007 (5 ECTS) Hilary Term 11 hours lectures, 11 hours seminars, approx 58 hours self study and assignments Prof. Ruth Barton

    Description

    Rationale and aims

    This is a Sophister Option course. The objective is to introduce students to Soviet and Russian filmmaking via a selection of key films and filmmakers. Students will be encouraged to explore the ideological and political backgrounds to the films and to familiarise themselves with aesthetic concerns in order to be able to evaluate the films critically.

    Course content:

    This course focuses on a selection of key Russian films and filmmakers with a particular emphasis on the work of Andrei Tarkovsky and his legacy. The course will open with an introduction to Soviet filmmaking and policies and then move on to examine the cinema of Tarkovsky. We will then look at a number films made before and after the fall of communism. These will include Little Vera (Vasili Pychul 1988), Nikita Mikhalkov’s Burnt by the Sun (1994), The Return (Andrei Zvyagintsev, 2006) and the films of Alexander Sokurov. Attention will be paid to issues of freedom of expression, social critique, government policies on filmmaking and the reception of Soviet and Russian films outside of the country. We will also be considering the aesthetics and production contexts of these films.

    Learning outcomes

    This course will enable students to:
  • be conversant with the historical, political and social backgrounds to these works (PO1)
  • employ textual analysis to discuss and illustrate these issues (PO 2, PO3)
  • confidently evaluate the shifting nature of film representation in the period covered (PO2, PO3, PO7)
  • Resources

    Films to be screened and discussed include: Man With A Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929), Andrei Rublev (Tarkovsky, 1966), Nostalgia (Tarkovsky, 1983), Little Vera (Vasili Pychul 1988), Nikita Mikhalkov’s Burnt by the Sun (1994), The Return (Andrei Zvyagintsev, 2006) and the films of Alexander Sokurov. Course textbooks will include: David C Gillespie, Early Soviet Cinema (2000), Russian Cinema (2003); Andrew Horton & Michael Brashinsky, The Zero Hour: Glasnost and Soviet Cinema in Transition; Birgit Beumers (2007), The cinema of Russia and the former Soviet Union, (2007); Andrei Tarkovsky Sculpting in Time: Reflections on the Cinema, (1989; revised ed.); George Faraday, Revolt of the Filmmakers (2000).

    Methods of Teaching and Student Learning

    This course will be taught through a combination of film screenings, lectures and seminars. Students will be expected to prepare for seminar discussion by reading the set texts and viewing the set film. Students may be required to make a class presentation on some aspect of the course covered.

    Methods of assessment

    90% coursework 10% participation Further assessment details will be provided in the course outline.

    Module Evaluation

    This course will be evaluated by an end-of-term survey.
    Module Name Module Code and ECTs credits Semester Contact Hours Module Personnel

    Digital Storyworlds

    FSS030 (5 ECTS) 2 (Hilary Term) 22 class hours TBD

    Description

    Rationale and aims

    Media are fundamental to our sense of living in a social world. Since the beginning of modernity, media have transformed the scale on which we act as social beings. And now in the era of digital media, media themselves are being transformed as platforms, content, and producers multiply. This has led to the most recent development in media: Digital Storyworlds – the created universe in which transmedia narrative is set across different platforms. These transmedia, interconnected narratives can be fiction, non-fiction or a combination of the two. In this module, students will explore the structures of transmedia narratives and begin to understand how to develop and create their own storyworld within which real or imagined objects, individuals, events, and research can co-exist to “tell” a story.

    Learning outcomes

    This module will enable students to:
  • Plan and develop digital storyworlds across different platforms
  • Theorize existing digital storyworlds
  • Create and produce parts of a digital storyworld
  • Analyze and critique related theory and practice
  • Module content:

    Classes will be a combination of lecture/seminar, written exercises and analysis, and digital practice.

    Resources

    Materials provided on Blackboard. Other current reading lists provided at start of term.

    Methods of assessment

  • 1) Ongoing assessment and participation 10%
  • 2) Coursework combining theory and practice 90%
  • Further assessment details will be available in the course outline
  • Module Evaluation

    Student feedback will be requested every year and will feed into development of this module.
    Module Name Module Code and ECTs credits Semester Contact Hours Module Personnel

    Practical Documentary Filmmaking

    FSS013 (5 ECTS) Hilary Term 22 lecture/seminar hours Justin MacGregor

    Description

    Rationale and aims

    This practical module is designed to give students a basic understanding of the processes of developing, scripting, planning, shooting and selling a documentary film. It will concentrate on the practical aspects of documentary filmmaking and the inherent issues and problems. It will provide students with the audio and camera skills required to document a subject. We will look at the problem of access: how to get it and what it means; how to treat your subject, conduct interviews and chose a style for your work and how to successfully realise your project. We will look at planning and scripting and how best to pick a style that suits your subject needs. In addition, we will have camera classes where students will be taught the basics of filming real life scenes. Students will be required to come up with ideas for a short form documentary, 5 minutes in duration and set on the grounds of TCD. Classes will be organised around a practical format working first through a series of exercises and then taking these projects through to completion.

    Learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module students will be able to:
  • plan, prepare and shoot a short documentary film
  • identify the story, deciding an angle or view-point and the journalistic approach
  • choose a mode of filmmaking appropriate to your story
  • use cameras and audio equipment in the field
  • understand the language of documentary and different styles of documentary filmmaking
  • interview subjects in a professional manner
  • construct a narrative and prepare for an edit
  • Module content:

    • Basic concepts of documentary: what is a documentary film?
    • Treatments: what do I want to say and how best to say it?
    • Planning, what is the documentary style?
    • How to prepare a shoot.
    • How to write a script
    • An understanding of shots, scenes and the vocabulary of film.
    • Camera skills: how to operate a camera.
    • How to film in a real life setting (fly-on-the-wall).
    • Audio skills: recording clean audio in the field.
    • Problem solving in the field.
    • How to conduct interviews and put your subject at ease.
    • How to prepare for an edit with a paper edit.
    • Writing voice over and narration.

    Resources

    Materials provided on Blackboard. Other reading lists provided at start of term.

    Methods of Teaching and Student Learning

    Classes will be a combination of lecture/seminar, written exercises and analysis

    Methods of assessment

  • Participation and Reflection 30%
  • Paperwork / Film 70%
  • Module Evaluation

    Course and Teaching Surveys will be circulated to students at the end of the module. Feedback will be used to reflect on course development.
    Module Name Module Code and ECTs credits Semester Contact Hours Module Personnel

    Writing For The Big Screen

    TBD (5 ECTS) Hilary Term 22 lecture/seminar hours Justin MacGregor

    Description

    Rationale and aims

    The aim is to expand and develop your writing of narrative scripts to feature films. You will explore screenwriting techniques for this medium by undertaking to write either a treatment for a feature film or the first half of a feature film from the setup through to the midpoint. Building on the three-act structure, you will consider other methodologies that may be more suitable: such as the five-act structure and the six-stages of structure among others. You will explore the creation of fully realized characters, the best use of subtext, and the role of subplots. This module is designed to familiarize you with the process and procedures for developing and writing a feature film script aimed at development for the big screen.

    Learning outcomes

    This module will enable students to:
  • Devise ideas suitable for a feature film.
  • Be able to write a feature film script that is feasible to make and engages your target audience.
  • Develop tools to analyse and script-edit feature film scripts.
  • Create a range of fully realized characters.
  • Effectively use subtext and subplots to enhance your story.
  • Create and write a range of effective scripts.
  • Participate in a writer’s room scenario.
  • Resources

    Blake Snyder, Save the Cat!: The Last Book on Screenwriting You'll Ever Need, Studio City: Michael Wiese Productions, 2005; David Howard, Edward Mabley, The Tools of Screenwriting: A Writer’s Guide To The Craft and Elements of a Screenplay, London: St. Martin’s Griffin, 1995; John Yorke, Into the Woods: How Stories Work and Why We Tell Them, London: Penguin, 2014.

    Methods of Teaching and Student Learning

    Classes will be a combination of lecture/seminar, written exercises and analysis.

    Methods of assessment

  • Participation and Reflection 30%
  • Two drafts of the first half of a feature film or a treatment 70%
  • Module Evaluation

    Course and Teaching Surveys will be circulated to students at the end of the module. Feedback will be used to reflect on course development.

    Music

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    (MUU34003 – Blues)

    (5 ECTS credits) MT19 – 1st Semester (Sept – Dec 19) NA A combination of written assignments totalling c. 3000 words.) 11 weekly 2-hour lectures Dr Jonathan Hodgers

    Description

    This module traces the blues from its birth in the late 19th century to the present day. Sweeping through America in the early 1910s, the genre was a pervasive influence on the popular mainstream until the 1970s, and continues to be played and heard today. The module draws on social history, cultural studies and musicology. Topics will include the blues’ musical characteristics, its verbal lexicon, its performance standards, its ties with African-American culture, as well as its intersection with other popular music genres. Alongside a historical approach, lectures will also consider some of the blues’ regional variants (Chicago, Mississippi, Memphis), along with its most significant artists, such as pre-eminent pre-war performers like Robert Johnson and Bessie Smith, stars of the electric era like Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, and the genre’s most notable acolytes in the 60s and beyond.

    Learning Outcomes

  • ·Recognise the blues’ musical features (8, 12 and 16 bar structures, typical chord progressions).
  • ·Display a knowledge of its lyrical form and themes.
  • ·Relate the genre to broader American as well as West African culture.
  • ·Deal sensitively with the ethical, moral and cultural implications of the genre’s appropriation;
  • ·Discuss key performers and their major works.
  • ·Understand the blues’ historiographic debates.
  • Content

    Historical overview of the genre Cultural context, particularly that of the ‘Jim Crow’ era and the Great Depression Thematic studies, such as women in blues; genre crossovers; and modern exponents In-class discussion and close readings of important performers and texts.

    Select Readings

    Harrison, Daphne Duval, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920s (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1990). Oliver, Paul, Blues Fell This Morning: Meaning in the Blues (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990). Palmer, Robert, Deep Blues (London: Penguin, 2001). Rowe, Mike, Chicago Blues: The City & the Music (New York: Da Capo, 1981). Wald, Elijah. Escaping the Delta: Robert Johnson and the Invention of the Blues (New York: HarperCollins, 2004).

    Availability

    Open to students from all disciplines subject to timetabling. There is no restriction on the number of students who may take this option other than the capacity of the Boydell Recital Room , House 5.

    Reassessment

    One three-hour examination (100%).

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    MUU34002 Cultural Perspectives: Race, Class and Gender in Popular Music

    5 ECTS 11 Weeks HT, 2nd Term (Jan-April 20) None See Below 2 hours per week Dr. Elis Czerniak

    Description

    A cultural history of popular music from 1900 to 1990, this module examines the social and political conditions that influenced the development of genres in popular music by evaluating key releases from influential artists. Students will analyse the growth of popular music from the turn of the twentieth century through to 1990. They will study the development of successive genres from delta blues and early jazz onwards, exploring the dynamic relationship between popular music, popular culture, and social change. The module also provides an introduction to critical approaches to culture and popular music such as postmodernism, postcolonialism, feminism, and Marxian analysis.

    Learning Outcomes

    Students will examine the development of popular music genres through the practice of key artists in the context of relevant economic, social, and cultural developments:

  • ·Popular music and race, including the influence of African American music and the Origins of the Blues at the turn of the century.
  • ·Popular music and gender/sexuality, including the impact performers such as Gladys Bently, Ma Rainey and Bessy Smith.
  • ·Urbanisation, the New Negro Movement and The Harlem Renaissance with the impact of artists such as Duke Ellington, Jelly Roll Morton and William Grant Still.
  • ·Music and the marketplace – the construction of ‘Race Records’ and the development of African-American media in the 1920s.
  • ·New Orleans and its ‘melting pot of culture’. The melding of Latin, African, Cuban and Native American music in the evolution of second line culture and ‘Jass’ music.
  • ·Popular music and historical events, including the impact of war and economic depression in twentieth century popular music. Artist include Lead Belly, Woodie Guthrie and Bob Dylan.
  • ·The 1960s cultural and social revolution – second wave feminism, the civil rights movement and music as protest.
  • Selected Readings

    Feldstein, R., How It Feels to Be Free: Black Women Entertainers and the Civil Rights Movement, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013). Kaufman, W., Woody Guthrie: American Radical, (Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2011). Longhurst, Brian and Danijela Bogdanovic, Popular Music and Society, (Cambridge: Polity, 2014). Storey, John, Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: An Introduction, (Oxon & New York: Routledge, 2012).

    Assessment:

    Presentation and commentary

    1. 15 minute presentation (powerpoint and audio) evaluating the social, cultural, and political context of an important and influential performer in the period from 1900 to 1990. Choose an artist from this period and examine their relationship to the cultural and social framework of their era with reference to an important or influential album. Analyse and evaluate your chosen artist in relation to their impact on music and popular culture and their relationship to the themes of this module (class, race, gender, world events, technology, religion, etc.) as they are relevant. Students should liaise with the lecturer about their chosen topic before commencing any work. Presentations will take place in the second half of term at the end of each class.

    2. 1500 word commentary on the presentation including more detailed information. It should be formatted correctly and fully referenced. A bibliography should also be included.

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    MUU34008 – Film Music

    5 11 Weeks MT19 – 1st Semester None One project based on a film or part of a film chosen by the student in consultation with the lecturer (1500 words, 40%); weekly blog of around 500 words (60%) 2 hours per week Dr Simon Trezise

    Description

    This module presents a historically oriented survey of seminal works and practitioners involving improvisation and open score practices. It examines the evolution of conventions and generative processes through critical examination of individual cases. These creative processes should be reflective through creative individual and group projects. A public concert will result as a result of those experimentations, with the participants acting as performers.

    Learning Outcomes

    students who successfully complete this module will be able to:

  • ·show familiarity with and an understanding of the broad history of improvisation in contemporary classical music
  • ·show familiarity with some of the main approaches and composition practices
  • ·show awareness of seminal practitioners
  • ·reflect the case studies examined in the lectures through individual and group creative work
  • Assessment

    One project based on a film or part of a film chosen by the student in consultation with the lecturer (1500 words, 40%); weekly blog of around 500 words (60%)

    Select Reading

    Brown, Royal S, Overtones and Undertones: Reading Film Music (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994) Gorbman, Claudia, Unheard Melodies: Narrative Film Music (London: BFI, 1987) Lack, Russell, Twenty Four Frames Under: A Buried History of Film Music (London: Quartet Books, 1997)

    Availability

    Open to students from all disciplines subject to timetabling. There is no restriction on the number of students who may take this option other than the capacity of the Boydell Recital Room, House 5.

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    MUU34007 – The Film Musical from 1950 to its decline in the 1960’s

    5 HT – 2nd Semester (Jan – April 20) None A combination of written and/or oral assignments totalling c3000 words 11 Weekly 2-hour lectures per week Dr Simon Trezise

    Description

    This module examines the history and style of Hollywood film musicals from the early 1950s to the decline of the classic musical in the 1960s. In addition to considering musicals made in the traditional manner, such as The Pirate, Gigi, and The Sound of Music, departures from the canonic style are evaluated, both for the challenge they offered to convention and as reflections of society in rapidly changing times. They include Rock Around the Clock and West Side Story.

    Learning Outcomes

    Students who successfully complete this module will be able to:

  • • Show familiarity with, and an understanding of, the history of the American film musical in the period 1950–1970.
  • • Show familiarity with some of the main theories of film music.
  • • Show awareness of attributes of the musical that are essential to the genre and those on the periphery.
  • • Recognise different song and dance forms.
  • Assessment

    One project based on a film or part of a film chosen by the student in consultation with the lecturer (1500 words, 40%); weekly blog of around 500 words (60%).

    Availability

    Open to students from all disciplines subject to timetabling. There is no restriction on the number of students who may take this option other than the capacity of the Boydell Recital Room, House 5..

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    MUU34004 – Music and WWII

    5 HT – 2nd Semester (Jan to April 20) None A combination of written assignments totalling c. 3000 words. 11 weekly, 2 hours per week Dr Jonathan Hodgers

    Description

    This module interrogates music’s role during World War II. The war years (1939–45) provide insight into how music functions as a form of political and cultural expression. During this time, music could not occupy a rarified aesthetic plane removed from politics and ideology. Composers drawn into the war used their work to support their respective sides. The module studies this phenomena from various perspectives. Topics include: Nazi Germany, where music played an important role in the Third Reich’s cultural strategy; the remembrance of the Holocaust and the music of its victims; the Allies’ ‘drafting’ of popular music; musical censorship; the saga of Shostakovich’s Leningrad symphony, and post-war musical retrospectives.

    Prerequisites

    None: available for visiting students. Some background reading on the war would be useful. See reading list below.

    Learning Outcomes

    students who successfully complete this module should be able to:

  • · Interpret the relationship between musical aesthetics and politics during the period.
  • · Reflect on the ethical issues involved in musical composition and performance.
  • · Understand the intimate relationship among musical life, Nazi ideology, and the war effort.
  • · discuss the appropriation of Beethoven, Wagner et al. by the Third Reich and use textual and musical analysis to detect music’s ideological undercurrents.
  • Assessment

    A combination of written assignments totalling c. 3000 words.

    Select Readings

    Baade, Christina L., Victory through Harmony: The BBC and Popular Music in World War II (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013). Fauser, Annegret, Sounds of War: Music in the United States during World War II (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013). Gilbert, Shirli, Music in the Holocaust: Confronting Life in the Nazi Ghettos and Camps (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006). Haas, Michael, Forbidden Music: The Jewish Composers Banned by the Nazis (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014). Levi, Erik, Music in the Third Reich (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 1994). Jones, John Bush, The Songs That Fought the War: Popular Music and the Home Front, 1939–1945 (Lebanon, NH: Brandeis University Press, 2006).

    Recommended preparatory reading:

    Stone, Norman, World War Two: A Short History (London: Penguin, 2014).

    Availability

    Open to students from all disciplines subject to timetabling. There is no restriction on the number of students who may take this option other than the capacity of the Boydell Recital Room, House 5.

    Reassessment

    One 3-Hour Examination (100%) during re-assessment period 2020

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    MUU34005 – Music Journalism

    5 MT – 1st Semester (Sept – Dec 19) None One essay (2000 words, 50%); one writing journal (20%), one audio package (20%), attendance & participation (10%) 11 weekly 2-hour lectures Dr Michael Lee

    Description

    This course will offer an introduction to music journalism and public musicology as modes of writing and public dissemination. The history of music criticism will be surveyed, alongside changing perceptions of music as a public art-form, so as to provide a broad context for understanding the role and development of music criticism and journalism. In addition, the role of cultural policy in the formation of public musical institutions and funding bodies—the institutional contexts of contemporary performance—will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to discuss the work of music journalists, develop their own critical writing in a weekly journal, and produce a short audio feature.

    Learning Outcomes

    Students who successfully complete this module will be able to:

  • • Be familiar with the history and development of writing on music in the public sphere.
  • • Have developed a personal body of critical writing and produced a short audio feature.
  • • Be able to discuss music criticism/discussion in print media, broadcast, and online.
  • •have engaged with selected critical and theoretical writings relevant to public musicology
  • •understand the changing approaches to music writing and broadcasting practices of different settings.
  • •be equipped to engage critically with broader issues of music as a public art-form, including the role of state funding and cultural policy in Ireland
  • Recommended Reading List:

    Katharine Ellis, Music Criticism in nineteenth-century France: La Revue et gazette musicale de France, 1834-1880 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007)Carole Fleming, The Radio Handbook, 3rd ed. (Abingdon: Routledge, 2010) Richard Pine, Music and broadcasting in Ireland (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2005)

    Assessment

    One essay (2000 words, 50%); one writing journal (20%), one audio package (20%), attendance & participation (10%).

    Availability

    Open to Drama, Film, Music, English, and International students

    Module Code & Name ECTs credits Duration and semester Prerequisite Subjects Assessment Contact Hours Contact Details

    MUU34006 – Poetry to Music: French and German Art Song

    5 HT – 2nd Semester (Jan to April 20) None One short essay (25%), one presentation (25%), one long essay (50%)) 11 weekly 2-hour lectures Dr Michael Lee

    Description

    The emergence of art song stands as one of the most notable achievements of the Romantic period in music. Divided into two sub-modules, (i) German Lieder and (ii) French Mélodie, the aim of this module will be to study the creation and performance of songs in their cultural settings, with consideration of reading, listening, compositional and performance practices. Composers studied will include Franz Schubert, Clara and Robert Schumann, Pauline Viardot, Gabriel Fauré, and Henri Duparc. The work of writers, including Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Heinrich Heine, Victor Hugo, and Paul Verlaine, will be discussed, and there will be opportunity to explore comparative settings of their texts by different composers

    Assessment

    Assessment: One short essay (25%), one presentation (25%), one long essay (50%)

    Drama

    Visiting Student Orientation

    Wednesday, 5 September 2018 at 3pm

    Venue: Drama Foyer of the Samuel Beckett Centre

    This meeting is only for students accepted to take Drama Modules, so it is important that you attend. Also, students will register for their modules at this meeting. Module Registration forms must be signed by Ann Mulligan, Drama Administrator, before returning the module form to the Academic Registry (AR)