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You are here Undergraduate > Single Honors History > Ireland in Rebellion: Constitutional Nationalism v. Republicanism, 1782-1916

HIU34544: Ireland in Rebellion: Constitutional Nationalism v. Republicanism, 1782-1916

Between 1782 and 1916 we see the birth of the modern Ireland as both a parliamentary tradition and a revolutionary tradition, were developed, intersected, clashed and struggled for dominance. This was a time when ideas of nationalism and republicanism were being debated around the word, and in Ireland there was tension between the supporters of the constitutional nationalist tradition and those who argued Irish independence would never be achieved without the use of violence, something that continues to be debated in the 21st century.
  • Module Coordinator:
    • Professor Patrick Geoghegan
  • Duration:
    • Michaelmas Term
  • Contact Hours:
    • 2 hours per week
  • Weighting:
    • 10 ECTS
  • Assessment:
    • 100% coursework (2 essays 40% and 60%)

There has always been a tension between the supporters of the constitutional nationalist tradition in Ireland and those who believe Irish independence would never have been achieved without the use of violence. Supporters of ‘The Irish Parliamentary Tradition’ have asserted the importance of Grattan, O’Connell, and Parnell in the development of the Irish ‘nation’ from the late-eighteenth century on, and their role in ensuring the successful transition to parliamentary democracy in an independent Ireland in the twentieth. Others would argue that without the revolutionary example of figures such as Tone and Emmet, and the sacrifice of Pearse and leaders of the 1916 Rising, an independent Irish state would never have been achieved. This module explores the development of these two conflicting and competing traditions in Ireland and examines the challenges of commemorating these two traditions, which until recently were seen as mutually exclusive. Using a mixture of innovative team debates, historiographical critiques, and primary and secondary sources, it explores the development of the constitutional nationalist tradition from Grattan to Redmond, and how it intersected throughout this period with the revolutionary republican tradition which developed from Tone to Pearse, sometimes in conflict, occasionally co-operating, and how these traditions have shaped the development of modern Ireland.