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Migration Seminar Series

Migration and Employment Seminar Series

Past Seminars: Migration Seminar Series



Title:
'Financialization, new modes of value accumulation and the labour process'
Speaker: Jean Cushen, DCU

Date: Thursday 24th October 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building
Lunch and coffee/tea provided



Title: 'Who are you calling an immigrant?' Various ways the term is understood in Ireland today and the implications for researchers
Speaker: Martina Byrne, TCD

Date: Thursday 21 Novemeber 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
Lunch and coffee/tea provided


Title: 'When East Meets West? The Crisis and Labour Market Institutions in Ireland and Romania'
Speaker: Prof Michael Doherty, Dept of Law, NUI Maynooth & Dr Aurora Trif, Business School, DCU

Date: Thursday 5 December 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
Lunch and coffee/tea provided


Title: Changes in the unfavourable attitude towards homosexuality among Polish migrants in Western Europe
Speaker:
Antje Roder and Marcel Lubbers

Abstract
This contribution investigates the attitudes towards homosexuality of newly arrived immigrants from Poland in two Western European countries, Ireland and the Netherlands, with a particular interest in how these attitudes develop over time after migration. Polish natives are on average less accepting of homosexuality than those of these two host countries. We will infer from comparisons between migrants and non-migrants residing in the countries of origin whether a selection effect of migrants with a more liberal attitude toward homosexuality exists. Using data collected shortly after arrival of immigrants and from a second wave one and a half year later in the host country, we will show whether immigrants adapt to the norms of the host country and to what extent they maintain the dominant attitudes of the origin country and region. We find that changes are affected by the level of social integration in the host country and religion.

Date: 23rd January 2014
Venue
: IIIS Seminar room, 6th floor of Arts Block
Time: 1-2pm
Lunch and coffee/tea provided



Title: ‘Gender and migration on the labour market: Additive or interacting disadvantages in Germany?’
Speaker:
Dr. Fenella Fleischmann Assistant Professor Utrecht University, Holland

Date: 20th February 2014
Venue
: IIIS Seminar room, 6th floor of Arts Block
Time: 1-2pm
Lunch and coffee/tea provided


Title: Migrant children in Ireland: questions of language and identity
Speaker:
Dr. Rachel Hoare French Department (Head of Department) TCD

This exploratory qualitative research uses a multi-method framework to gain insight into the lived experiences of migrant children in Ireland, in relation to their heritage language(s) and culture(s), their identity and their well-being. This research provides children with a number of different ways to share their own experiences and define their own realities. These include taking part in focus groups and engaging in the participatory approaches of journaling, photography, and oral accounts, all of which are designed to bring a greater level of understanding about the important aspects of their lives. The participants in this research are children of migrant parents, who are currently living in Dublin. The initial focus of the research has been on the experiences of two age groups: 6 to 7 year olds and 10 to 11 year olds. Preliminary analysis of the data reveals the following themes: the impact of bilingualism and dual identity on family and peer relationships; first language recognition in school; linguistic insecurity; and language brokering.  In addition to looking at the background issues and some preliminary results, the focus of this seminar paper will be on the methodology, which is designed to present children with opportunities for engaging in an active and participatory process of reciprocal learning.

Date: 6th March 2014
Venue
: IIIS Seminar room, 6th floor of Arts Block
Time: 1-2pm
Lunch and coffee/tea provided


Title: Migration from Ireland during the crisis
Speaker:
Dr. Irial Glynn Marie Curie fellow Leiden University, Holland

Date: 3rd April 2014
Venue
: IIIS Seminar room, 6th floor of Arts Block
Time: 1-2pm
Lunch and coffee/tea provided


Title: ‘White migrations: Gender, Whiteness and Privilege in Transnational Migration’
Speaker:
Catrin Lundstrom Associate Professor Linköping University Norrkoping, Sweden

Date: 17th April 2014
Venue
: IIIS Seminar room, 6th floor of Arts Block
Time: 1-2pm
Lunch and coffee/tea provided


Title: Migrant labour and labour market intermediaries by
Speaker:
Robert MacKenzie University of Leeds Professor of Work and Employment

Date: 1st May 2014
Venue
: IIIS Seminar room, 6th floor of Arts Block
Time: 1-2pm
Lunch and coffee/tea provided

 


 

Past Seminars
Migration Seminar Series 2013

 


Title: “Contemporary trends in Irish and European (e)migration”
Speaker: Dr Piaras MacEinri, Lecturer in Migration Studies, UCC
Date:
1 November 2013
Time:
1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD
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Title: Elite schooling, equality of opportunity and meritocracy: the case of Ireland' by
Speaker: Dr Aline Courtois, Research Associate, UCD
Date:
15 November 2013
Time:
1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD

Abstract
Her work looks at social mobility and the correlation between high fees and academic results within the Irish education system. She considers the emphasis that fee-paying schools place on economic capital in recruitment processes, their particular mechanisms of closure, and their unchallenged symbolic domination. Thus, as elite schools, they carry out their mission to protect privilege, to reproduce - and to some extent also, to rationalize - the social hierarchy; all of which have important implications for the character of social inequality in Ireland
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Title: Moving and staying: pathways of migration to and from Ireland
Speaker: Dr Mary Gilmartin
, Senior Lecturer, Department of Geography, NUIM
Date:
29 November 2013
Time:
1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD

Abstract
This presentation considers the intersections between mobility and immobility in contemporary Ireland. It focuses on the lived experiences of 39 people from EU member states living in Ireland, and explores the different pathways by which EU migrants move to Ireland and become part of Irish society. The presentation outlines three key pathways - cultural, social, and economic - and discusses how and why the relationship between these pathways changes over time. While focusing on EU migrants in Ireland, the presentation has broader relevance for understanding why migrants decide to move or stay, and the difficulties they encounter as a consequence of these decisions.
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Title: Union Availability, Union Membership and Immigrant Workers: Empirical and Theoretical Considerations
Speaker: Dr Tom Turner
, Lecturer, Personnel and Employment Relations, UL
Date:
13 December 2013
Time:
1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD
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Title: Learning from the Materiality of the Polish Migration Experience
Speaker:
Kathy Burrell
Date: 24 January 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD
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Abstract
This paper will consider the significance of material culture in the contemporary experiences of Polish migrants. Using interviews undertaken with Polish migrants in the UK, the paper will explore two different perspectives of the materiality of Polish migration, drawing out for wider discussion the implications these have for our understandings of migration more generally.
First, the paper will consider the significance of material culture in these personal migration projects. The things which are packed, carried back and forth, displayed and used at home are all windows into different expectations and experiences of migration. They speak volumes about the sorts of lives Polish migrants are leading and the transnational/translocal ties they continue to nurture. Second, the paper will discuss the wider economic contexts of these material experiences.  Courier services, for example, are fundamental in material exchanges between migrants and their families. Shops selling Polish goods, have a similar economic significance locally. Supporting the mobility of Polish migrants' material lives is also big business.
This paper, then, will reassert the significance of the material for appreciating the dynamics and disruptions of contemporary Polish migration.


Title: Migration and the Life course: Polish nationals in Ireland.Migration and the Life course: Polish nationals in Ireland.
Speaker: Justyna Salamonska, Researcher, University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy
Date: 7 February 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD
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Abstract to follow


Title: Social Capital and migrant labour integration: An approach from the personal netowrks' perspective
Speaker: Mireia Bolibar, Department de Sociologia-Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona
Date: 14 February 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD

Abstract
The objective of the paper is to analyze the role of social capital on migrant’s labour market incorporation in the Catalan host society (Spain). With this purpose, personal networks data of 153 Moroccan and Ecuadorian migrants is analyzed. According to the geographical distribution and the ethnic characteristics of their contacts,  a typology of networks is created. Then it is explored if the resulting classification is related to different positions in the labour market, and whether it is due to human capital effects on it or not. Results point at the existence of significant differences on the behaviour in the labour market (presence, job security and occupational category) and the benefits obtained from their networks depending on the type of networks migrants develop in their settlement process into the host society. Human capital is only relevant to explain the activity sector where migrant workers are placed. Finally, important gendered differences on the access and use of social capital are shown.


Title: Highly skilled French Migrants in London’s Financial and Business sectors
Speaker: Louise Ryan, Professor of Sociology and Co-Director of Social Policy Research Centre, Middlesex University
Date: 21 February 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD
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Abstract
Although social networks are often taken for granted in migration studies literature, these social ties are not spontaneous but require effort and nurturing. There has been insufficient research on the actual process of networking, especially among highly skilled migrants. The reasons why and how migrants form networks with particular characteristics are still poorly understood. In this paper we argue that it is necessary not only to consider the structure of networks, but also their content - the nature of the relationships as well as the flow of resources within various social ties.

Drawing on qualitative data from a study of highly skilled French migrants in London's business and financial sector, we use a micro-analysis of network making processes. Bringing together classic literature on professional networking with wider discussions on how relationships are managed across time and space, our work contributes to a fuller understanding of why and how highly skilled migrants form networks with particular characteristics.

This is a jointly authored paper - Prof Louise Ryan and Dr Jon Mulholland, Middlesex University.

 


Title: Polish double return migration and changing transnationalism?
Speaker: Anne White, Senior Lecturer in Russian and East European Studies, University of Bath
Date: 27th February 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD
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Abstract
Many Poles who have arrived in the UK since EU accession show signs of settling. Often (especially for families with school-age children) this is a gradual process. Other Poles have returned to Poland, but Poland currently seems to be having problems keeping its return migrants. Many go back only to depart again. The paper focuses on why some returnees change their minds and decide to make a long-term home abroad. It also explores the implications of this decision for their transnational practices and identities. It argues that often their key objective is stability. Choosing to settle abroad in hope of a stable life they failed to find on return to Poland, they attempt to live less split lives. While maintaining certain transnational practices, they scale down others, such as return visits to Poland and keeping well-informed about Polish current events. Simultaneously, they make a decisive effort to integrate into the regular UK labour and housing markets.

 


Title: Youth Mobility: Learning from Ireland and Portugal
Speaker: David Cairns, Senior Researcher, CIES-IUL, Portugal
Date: 7th March 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD
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Abstract
Following a long period of relative neglect, the study of youth mobility now occupies a prominent position within Migration Studies. One particular area of interest concerns the geographical movement of tertiary educated young people. This is an important issue not only for individuals who may be seeking new or better opportunities abroad but also for societies, given the implications of significant inflows or outflows of emerging talent. This paper explores this theme, using evidence from Ireland (Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland) and Portugal. This includes quantitative and qualitative research conducted with 800 students aged between 18 and 25 during 2010 and 2011. Contextually, this work also provides an opportunity to observe the impact of the financial crisis on mobility decision-making, alongside the importance of family and other social ties. Results show that in both Ireland and Portugal, the majority of those surveyed were contemplating transnational mobility for work or study. For the more determined leavers, most moves were envisaged as being temporary and to English language speaking destinations. In respect to the financial crisis, while there are some exceptional cases of hardship leading to contemplation of an exit in Portugal, the more frequent scenario was one of mobility decisions having been made irrespective of economic conditions. Evidence from the qualitative interviews in Ireland stressed the importance of possessing the right combination of social and economic resources, and practical know-how. The concluding part of this discussion considers what can be learnt from this evidence. There is support for the idea of brain circulation, as opposed to brain drain phenomena but a general refutation of the idea that the financial crisis is stimulating substantial outward movement amongst this educational cohort. And in ‘explaining’ youth mobility, evidence points towards the importance of young people’s own and their families’ resources, an outcome which has possible social inequality implications.


Title: "Early-life Causes and Later-life Consequences of Migration: Evidence from Older Irish Adults"
Speaker: Alan Barrett, ESRI
Date: 14th March 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD
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Abstract
Between 2009 and 2011, fieldwork was undertaken for the first wave of the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA). Extensive information was collected on about 8,500 individuals aged 50 and over and living in Ireland, covering topics such as economic circumstances and health. One of the features of Ireland’s older population is the remarkably high proportion of returned migrants, that is, former emigrants who have returned to live in Ireland. This is reflected in the TILDA sample with over 20 % being returned migrants. Given the large number of returned migrants in the TILDA sample and the fact that the respondents are older, it has been possible to use the data to provide insights into different dimensions of migration at different points in the life-cycle. This paper provides a review of this work to date. Three issues are addressed. First, what circumstances contributed to the decision to emigrate? Second, was there evidence that living away produced psychological stress? Third, do return migrants suffer from social isolation on their return? The data suggest that the return migrants were more likely to have suffered abuse as children, to have been more prone to alcohol problems and to be more socially isolated currently.

 


Title: The Labour Market Position of Poles in Ireland
Speaker: Peter Muhlau, Asst Professor in Sociology, PI at SCIP, TCD
Date: 28 March 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD

Abstract
How has the recession affected the employment and job quality of Polish migrants in Ireland?  Based on the reconstruction of the employment histories of more than 600 Polish migrants in Dublin, the study demonstrates that employment levels, occupational status and earnings have been surprisingly stable at the macro-level of the Polish community in Dublin between 2008 and 2010. Underlying this macro-stability is a high degree of individual transitions in and out of employment and of vertical earnings and occupational mobility.  Up-to 50 percent of Polish migrants in 2008 may have seen a deterioration of their labour market position until 2010, while in the same period about 40 percent may have seen gains in terms of employment and occupational attainment. The position of Polish women improved strongly relative to Polish men in this period. The main reason is that men on particularly well-paid and prestigious jobs had a particular high risk of losing their job. Job losses among women were fewer and the quality of the lost jobs was poor relative to the average job women held in 2008. The study is the first longitudinal study of labour market and occupational attainment of immigrants in Ireland.


Title: Irish commuter families across the EU: challenges and opportunities
Speaker: David Ralph, Post Doctoral Research Fellow, UCC
Date: 4 April 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD

Abstract
Among certain segments of the European population, the protracted economic downturn across the eurozone has given rise to what may be termed various ‘crisis mobilites’. For instance, the last few years has witnessed a massive upsurge in emigration among economically vulnerable groups (such as the young, those without tertiary-level educational qualifications), largely forced into leaving their home country in search of better career and employment prospects elsewhere. Yet such ‘crisis emigration’ is not the only form crisis mobility may take. Instead, some opt to become ‘extreme commuters’, working outside their origin country while maintaining their principal residence ‘back home’ and returning periodically (at weekends, monthly).

This paper examines the phenomenon of extreme commuting across the EU among Irish families as one particular response to the economic crisis. Specifically, it looks at Irish couples (married or cohabiting, with or without children) and examines how commuting impacts on family intimacies and dynamics-both for those who leave as well as those left behind. It asks: How is family life lived under conditions where one adult member works overseas? What challenges does this particular family arrangement present? What opportunities? Does commuting alter household gender dynamics? Do different social classes undertake commuting for different motives? And is commuting but a temporary arrangement before the more longer-term commitment that family emigration suggests? In answering such questions, this paper begins to deepen understanding of a little-studied but growing group of European migrants, and furthers insight into new family geographies emerging in the aftermath of the crisis.

 

 


Last updated 3 March 2014 by IIIS (Email).