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November 2013

Intel and its contribution to Ireland’s High Tech Success 
IIIS Director Professor Louis Brennan was quoted extensively in the Irish Times special anniversary supplement marking 50 years of the paper’s Business coverage. The supplement was published in the print edition of November 13th, 2013. Dr. Brennan featured in the article “Intel turned Leixlip into Ireland’s Silicon Valley”. The article can be accessed here


July 2013

Europe, Asia and adapting to change

The article can be accessed here


Wanderlust, 'a surf at lunchtime' and graduate mobility
The latest report, published in The Irish Times on 15 April, from the Learning from Poland/Irish Abroad Study (by Department of Sociology and IIIS) reflects on a recent fieldtrip to London, Sydney and Melbourne and advertises an important Graduate Survey. The Learning from Poland project looks at the strategies of Irish graduates in overseas labour markets and compares these with the strategies of young Poles entering the Irish labour market in the 2000s.


L-R Louis Brennan, Frank Barry

The Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) recently recognized the authors of the 400th Discussion Paper to be added to the Institute’s Discussion Papers series. This represents a significant milestone in the research output of the Institute and its members.


Discussion Papers are the product of the Institute’s scholarly endeavors and cover a range of topics pertinent to the College’s research of International Integration. They are accessible from the Institute’s website at www.tcd.ie/iiis

The 400th Discussion Paper “Venture Capital in Ireland in Comparative Perspective” was co-authored by Frank Barry, School of Business, Trinity College Dublin, Clare O'Mahony, Dublin Institute of Technology and Beata Sax, Investors TFI Fund Management, Warsaw.

The attached photo shows the Director of the Institute Professor Louis Brennan presenting one of the authors
Professor Frank Barry with the Institute’s certificate of recognition.

 


 

April 2012


IIIS Research Associate, Gaia Narciso, paper features in article written in the The Wall Street Journal

The Effect Of Mafia On Public Transfers
Gaia Narciso, IIIS Research Associate and Assistant Professor, TCD Department of Economics and colleague Guglielmo Barone, Bank of Italy

Organized crime is widely regarded as damaging to economic outcomes. Yet little is known about the mechanism at work. This paper contributes to filling this gap by analyzing the impact of organized crime on the allocation of public subsidies to businesses. We focus on Sicilian mafia and measure its presence using a unique data set, which provides detailed information on crime at municipality level, by article of the Italian Penal Code, over the period 2004-2009. Public transfers are measured by aggregating the amount of funds transferred to firms at municipality level under Law 488/92. These funds have for many years been the main policy instrument for reducing territorial disparities in Italy by offering a subsidy to businesses willing to invest in poorer regions. The research finds that:
  • Mafia diverted about 35% of the total amount of public transfers.
  • Organized crime pockets at least part of the disproportional amount of funds by creating fictitious firms and by corrupting public officials who play a role in the funding allocation.
  • The positive relationship between mafia presence and public transfers is not due to a more generous attitude of the State towards areas with mafia presence. If anything, these areas are underfunded in terms of expenditure on education relative to those where mafia is absent.

The results indicate that the design of geographically targeted aid policies, such as European Structural Funds, should be supported by detailed analysis of local crime activities, in order to prevent that part of the money feeds into organized crime.


 

Congratulations to IIIS Research Associate Dr Clionadh Raleigh who receives Prestigious European Research Council Starting Grant

A 1.4 million euro grant has been awarded to Dr Clionadh Raleigh of the Department of Geography in the School of Natural Sciences to enable her to continue her research on the causes of the various types of political violence found within and across African states. The prestigious European Research Council (ERC) Starting Grant, which aims to support the most talented early career researchers to carry out pioneering work in all fields of research, was awarded for a period of five years.

Political violence in Africa ranges from civil wars to communal conflict, political militia activity to violence directed towards civilians.  Dr Raleigh’s research takes a holistic approach to look at all of these forms of violence and seeks to explain them within a novel theoretical framework, emphasising two stages of onset indicators, and employing the latest available disaggregated data methodologies for spatial and temporal dynamics. It also introduces spatial and scaled approaches to comprehensively study conflict, as risks, triggers and dynamics are spatially inscribed and hierarchical.

The project, which is built on the most comprehensive, publicly available dataset on Armed Conflict Location and Events (ACLED) created by Dr Raleigh and her team of researchers, models the onset of political violence using sub-national factors, including political exclusion, economic marginalisation, human rights abuses, ecological shifts, public goods access and demographic characteristics. The research emphasises that insurgency and opposition violence is a spatial and political process, shaped by the political, economic and social geographies of states.

Currently the widespread view is that conflict in Africa is confined to a few crisis prone states. New evidence suggests however that almost all states are sites of substantial, widespread political insecurity. Civil war accounts for less than half of all conflict across African states; the remaining half is composed of communal and political militia violence, rioting, protests and violence against non-combatants outside of a war context. These forms of ‘invisible’ violence often involve state collusion and present a widespread risk to civilians.

ERC Starting Grants aim to support up-and-coming research leaders who have the proven potential of becoming independent research leaders. Dr Raleigh’s grant will support the creation of a new research teams which will consist of a lecturer, two post doctoral researchers and three doctoral researchers.


 

Highly Commended Award Winner at the Literati Network Awards for Excellence 2011

Louis Brennan, PhD, lauded for work on Chinese Multinationals

Louis Brennan, Director of the Institute for International Integration Studies and an Associate Professor within the School of Business and co-author Ruth Rios-Morales, PhD published “The emergence of Chinese investment in Europe” in peer-reviewed journal Euromed Journal of Business in 2010. The article was just named a Highly Commended Award Winner by the Literati Network Awards for Excellence 2011. Congratulations to Professor Brennan on this accomplishment!


 

Austerity is the least disruptive option, says analyst

by Brendan Keenan, The Irish Independent, 26th October 2011

BOND investors need to have confidence that the rules are not going to change if they are to lend again to troubled eurozone economies at affordable rates, one of the best-known analysts of the euro crisis told a seminar yesterday.

Ciaran O'Hagan, a senior analyst with Societe Generale in Paris, said the ECB's 90bn euro purchases of mainly Italian and Spanish bonds may not bring yields down because investors feel more insecure in their rights to repayment compared with the ECB, which would be protected from any "haircut".

Mr O'Hagan, one of four participants in the Henry Grattan lecture -- organised by the Trinity College-based Institute for International Integration Studies -- said debt default would not do away with the need for fiscal austerity. He believed that correcting budget deficits through an austerity programme was the least disruptive policy.

"With austerity, you take a lot of upfront pain for long-term gain," he said.

But the long term could be very long, according to Mike Dooley of University College Santa Cruz, a former IMF executive who worked on the Latin American crisis in the 1980s.

He believes that there will be no Greek default because it would "immediately put Italy into play".

"I think it's not going to happen and they will push it down the road," he said, arguing that the ECB and eurozone governments would pay off the banks as their loans fall due.

Risk

"The losers are the residents of the debtor countries because investors will not invest while this process is going on and it can last a long time."

Mr Dooley said this was what happened for 10 years in the 1980s until Mexico refused to continue because of the effects on its economy.

"I think it will be five or six years until everybody faces up to debt restructuring in the euro area," Mr Dooley said.

Peter Boone of Salute Capital Management, who lectures at the London School of Economics, said a risk premium would go right through eurozone interest rates as a result of the Greek default, which he saw as inevitable.

"Risk premia will stay high. You have to get back to making people comfortable about sovereign debt again," he said.

He added: "The ECB could be a backstop for countries while they solve their fiscal problems, but that could be highly inflationary."

Jean Pisani-Ferry, director of the Bruegel thinktank in Brussels, pointed out that the eurozone could not be another US.

"The biggest state debt is that of California, but it is only one percent of US GDP. The debt of little Greece is 4pc of eurozone GDP and Italy's is 20pc."

However, some kind of fiscal union seemed the best long-term solution.

"That raises the whole question of who will exercise control. We are talking about the fundamentals of democracy."

He added: "One cannot imagine some czar, in Brussels or elsewhere, telling national parliaments what to do. We are very far from an EU parliamentary body but we have to start thinking about it."


 

Professor Alan Matthews, former Director of the IIIS elected President of the European Association of Agricultural Economists (EAAE)

Professor Alan MatthewsProfessor Emeritus of European Agricultural Policy, Alan Matthews, former Director of the IIIS, was elected President of the European Association of Agricultural Economists (EAAE) at its recent triennial Congress in Zurich, Switzerland. The EAAE brings together agricultural economists and others interested in the problems of the agricultural and food industries and rural development in Europe and has around 1500 members. Professor Matthews will serve for a three year term until the next EAAE Congress in Ljubljana, Slovenia in 2014.

 

 

 

 


 

The Business of Space The Next Frontier of International Competition by Dr Louis Brennan and Dr Alessandra Vecchi
As the space industry increasingly evolves from one dominated by governments and their military establishments to one which is undergoing rapid commercialization across a wide number of areas, there is a need for a business perspective on the industry. Tracing its origins from the middle of the twentieth century as a government and military domain, the authors look at the ongoing evolution of space exploration and travel, and forecast what might happen in the industry. As the impact of climate change and resource constraints make terrestrial survival for the human species increasingly problematic, the need to develop the means of evacuating Planet Earth and sustaining extraterrestrial human existence becomes critical. Since the space industry is crucial in this respect, this book provides a timely exposition on the emerging state of the industry. Brennan and Vecchi offer invaluable insights on this changing landscape that will have major relevance for the industry players and policy and decision-makers.

DR LOUIS BRENNAN Director of International Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS), Fellow of Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, and an Associate Professor in the School of Business at Trinity College where he teaches and researches in the areas of Global Strategy and Technology and Operations Management and Strategy. From 2011, he will serve as the Director of the Institute for International Integration Studies at Trinity College Dublin. Dr. Brennan has undergraduate and graduate degrees in Engineering and an MBA. He has lived and worked in several countries in Asia and Europe and in the United States. Dr. Brennan's consulting interests lie in mediating the future.
DR ALESSANDRA VECCHI Research Fellow in the School of Business and in the Institute of International Integration Studies at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. She has been recently appointed as a Senior Research Fellow in Fashion Management at the University of London Arts. She has worked on the SMART project which aimed to support intelligent business networking and consumer services based on information/knowledge sharing and collaboration across supply chain partners, capitalising on the fact that products are uniquely identified with the use of the RFID technology. She teaches at undergraduate and postgraduate level in the areas of international business and globalisation studies.
Purchase the book


 

The New Scramble for Africa by Padraig Carmody, IIIS Research Associate (author)
Dr. Padraig Carmody, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin has recently published the book, “The New Scramble for Africa”.This book explores the nature of resource and market competition in Africa and the strategies adopted by the different actors involved be they world powers or small companies. Focusing on key commodities, the book examines the dynamics of the new scramble and the impact of current investment and competition on people, the environment, and political and economic development on the continent. New theories, particularly the idea of Chinese "flexigemony" are developed to explain how resources and markets are accessed. While resource access is often the primary motive for increased engagement, the continent also offers a growing market for lower priced goods from Asia and Asia owned companies. Individual chapters explore old and new economic power interests in Africa; oil, minerals, timber, biofuels, food and fisheries; and the nature and impacts of Asian investment in manufacturing and other sectors. The New Scramble for Africa will be essential reading for students of African studies, international relations, and resource politics as well as anyone interested in current affairs.
Purchase the book


Congratulations to Ms. Wenjie Chen on winning the Best Paper Prize at the 2011 Irish Academy of Management conference held on September 01-02, 2011. Wenjie has been a visiting doctoral student from Hunan University in China at the Institute over the past academic year under the supervision of Professor Louis Brennan. The title of Wenjie’s paper was “Modelling Supply Chain Collaborative Innovation A System Dynamics Approach” and it was co-authored with Professor Brennan and Professor Deming Zeng from the College of Business Administration at Hunan University. We wish Wenjie continued success as she returns to China this week to continue her studies there


The Business of Space The Next Frontier of International Competition by Dr Louis Brennan and Dr Alessandra Vecchi
As the space industry increasingly evolves from one dominated by governments and their military establishments to one which is undergoing rapid commercialization across a wide number of areas, there is a need for a business perspective on the industry. Tracing its origins from the middle of the twentieth century as a government and military domain, the authors look at the ongoing evolution of space exploration and travel, and forecast what might happen in the industry. As the impact of climate change and resource constraints make terrestrial survival for the human species increasingly problematic, the need to develop the means of evacuating Planet Earth and sustaining extraterrestrial human existence becomes critical. Since the space industry is crucial in this respect, this book provides a timely exposition on the emerging state of the industry. Brennan and Vecchi offer invaluable insights on this changing landscape that will have major relevance for the industry players and policy and decision-makers.

DR LOUIS BRENNAN Director of International Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS), Fellow of Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, and an Associate Professor in the School of Business at Trinity College where he teaches and researches in the areas of Global Strategy and Technology and Operations Management and Strategy. From 2011, he will serve as the Director of the Institute for International Integration Studies at Trinity College Dublin. Dr. Brennan has undergraduate and graduate degrees in Engineering and an MBA. He has lived and worked in several countries in Asia and Europe and in the United States. Dr. Brennan's consulting interests lie in mediating the future.
DR ALESSANDRA VECCHI Research Fellow in the School of Business and in the Institute of International Integration Studies at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. She has been recently appointed as a Senior Research Fellow in Fashion Management at the University of London Arts. She has worked on the SMART project which aimed to support intelligent business networking and consumer services based on information/knowledge sharing and collaboration across supply chain partners, capitalising on the fact that products are uniquely identified with the use of the RFID technology. She teaches at undergraduate and postgraduate level in the areas of international business and globalisation studies.
Purchase the book

 


 

The Emergence of Southern Multinationals: Their Impact on Europe by Louis Brennan, IIIS Director (author)
December 2010

DR. LOUIS BRENNAN Director of the Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) and Associate Professor in the School of Business at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. He is also the co-founder and Director of the Global Business Systems Centre at Trinity College. Louis has lived and worked in America, Asia and Europe. He was the proposer of and currently serves as chair of EU COST Action IS0905 on the emergence of southern multinationals and their impact on Europe.


 

The IIIS has just launched a new website “Exploring links between EU agricultural policy and world poverty”
Sept 2010

The IIIS has just launched a new website “Exploring links between EU agricultural policy and world poverty”.  This website has been developed as part of a project led by Professor Alan Matthews under the Framework Grant on Policy Coherence for Development which the Institute received jointly with the School for Biological Sciences in UD from the Advisory Board for Irish Aid. The purpose of the website is to outline the impacts which EU agricultural policy has on developing countries and to discuss the ways in which reform of this policy could impact, both positively and negatively, on developing countries.


 

The New Director of the IIIS is announced
Sept, 2010

Professor Louis Brennan (School of Business) has been appointed as the new Director of the IIIS following the retirement of Professor Alan Matthews on 28th September 2010. Professor Brennan will take up his appointment on 1 January 2011. In the meantime, the Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences Professor Michael Marsh will be Acting Director.  Professor Brennan has been associated with the IIIS since its foundation. His particular research interests are in supply chain management, global business and technology management, and culture and operations management, and he is associated with the Centre for Global Business Systems in the School of Business. We look forward to having Louis Brennan join us as Director in January and wish him well in this new position.


 

Surrounded by the An Post Corporate Communications Team Dr Ronit Lentin, Principal Investigator in the TII Migrant Networks project (third from right) looks on as Anna McHugh, Head of Corporate Communications, An Post, and Martina Byrne, PRO TII, display the Chambers Ireland President's Award for Corporate Social Responsibility.Trinity Immigration Initiative Migrant Networks Exhibition Wins Chambers Ireland Award
Sep 22, 2010

 ‘Leaders', a photographic exhibition that showcased the contribution made by migrant networks in Ireland and compiled by the Trinity Immigration Initiative Migrant Networks, was recently awarded a Chambers Ireland Award for Corporate Social Responsibility.  The ‘Good Neighbour’ category award was presented by Minister for Community, Equality and Gaeltacht Affairs, Pat Carey to Dr Ronit Lentin, academic leader of the Trinity Immigration Initiative (TII) and Anna McHugh, Head of Corporate Communications for An Post, who supported the exhibition.

The exhibition, which opened in Trinity College Dublin in May 2009, highlighted how migrant networks facilitate social, cultural, and political integration in Ireland through their contributions in the areas of rights advocacy, gender issues, health, culture, the media, and religion.  Following the opening of the exhibition in TCD, it also featured in a number of other public spaces such as Dublin City Council Civic Offices, Dublin City libraries, Dublin Docklands, and Croke Park and reached an estimated 2 million members of the public. read more


 

Economics/IIIS PhD Student selected for a FEEM Award at the Annual Congress of the European Economic Association (EEA)
August 2010

Benjamin ElsnerCongratulations to Ben Elsner (PhD Student) who was recently awarded one of three Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM) awards at the Annual Congress of the European Economic Association (EEA) for his paper Does Emigration Benefit the Stayers? The EU Enlargement as a Natural Experiment.  Evidence from Lithuania.  The winners, whose papers were selected from over 700 international applicants, were presented with their awards by Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz, EEA president Timothy Besley, and FEEM executive director Bernardo Bortolotti.

 

Migration impacts on both receiving and source countries however to date most research has focused its impact on the receiving countries.  In his paper, Ben studies the effect of migration in the source country resulting from the eastern enlargement of the European Union in 2004.  From 2004 to 2007, around 9% of the Lithuanian workforce emigrated to the UK and Ireland.   The research finds that demographic and educational groups in which a larger share emigrated had a more positive wage trend.   He concludes that emigration had a significant positive effect on the wages of those who stay.  This effect is only significant for men, and the impact is greater for unmarried people.  These are important pieces of evidence to evaluate welfare consequences of migration flows.

More details about FEEM award at: http://www.eea2010glasgow.org/feem-award.asp


 


Professor Alan Matthews, IIIS Director, has been appointed as one of three members of The Review Group on State Assets and Liabilities
Alan Matthews

Professor Alan Matthews, IIIS Director, has been appointed as one of three members of The Review Group on State Assets and Liabilities which was recently established by the Minister for Finance to examine and provide advice on the proper stewardship of state assets and on opportunities for the better use of those assets. The following Terms of Reference have been set out for the Group:

  • To consider the potential for asset disposals in the public sector, including commercial state bodies, in view of the indebtedness of the State
  •   To draw up a list of possible asset disposals.
  •   To assess how the use and disposition of such assets can best help restore growth and contribute to national investment priorities.
  •   To review where appropriate, relevant investment and financing plans, commercial practices and regulatory requirements affecting the use of such assets in the national interest.

The Group is expected to carry out its analysis in the coming months and to report to the Minister by the end of 2010.

Read More at Department of Finance


 

Alan Matthews The CAP post 2013 Conference

Professor Alan Matthews, IIIS Director and Professor of European Agricultural Policy, was one of the two invited conference rapporteurs for the “The CAP post 2013" Conference on the public debate on the future of the Common Agricultural Policy held in Brussels, 19-20 July 2010 and organised by the Directorate General for Agriculture and Rural Development of the European Commission. His conference conclusions can be heard in this videocast

 

 

 


Trinity Immigration Initative (TII) Publish New Report
Trinity Immigration Initiative (TII) Publish New Report: Addressing the Current and Future Reality of Ireland's Multi-Cultural Status.

  • Download Report
  • Read More TII

  • IIIS Research Associate Book Lauch
    May 2010 Dr Raj Chari


    Dr Raj Chari's new co-authored book - Regulating Lobbying: A Global Comparison examines - a principal means by which more transparency and accountability in the world politics can be achieved: the regulation of lobbyists. It provides innovative insights into lobbying regulations across four continents - North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. read more

     

     


    Philip Lane2010 Bhagwati Award24th February 2010Professor of International Macroeconomics, Philip Lane, of Trinity’s Economics Department and Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) has been selected for the 2010 Bhagwati Award, jointly withhis collaborator Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti of the International Monetary Fund.A prize is given every two years for the best article published in the Journal of International Economics during the previous two years. The award is in honour of the renowned trade economist Jagdish Bhagwati for his many contributions to the field of international economics.Selected by the Editorial Board of the Journal of International Economics, the sixth paper to win the Bhagwati Award is The External Wealth of Nations: Mark II: Revised and Extended Estimates of Foreign Assets and Liabilities, 1970-2004 by Philip R.Lane and Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, which appeared in the JIE in November 2007. The External Wealth of Nations project calculates the foreign asset and foreign liability positions for 145+ countries since 1970 and is widely used in academia, policy organisations and the financial sector in the analysis of topics such as global imbalances, debt sustainability and financial globalisation. The original version of this database was developed in the late 1990s. The Mark II version expanded the country coverage from 67 to 145 countries and extended the time period covered by the dataset. The dataset was described byThe Economistmagazine (September 22nd, 2005) as “the world's best dataset on foreign assets and liabilities” and it is widely used around the world in research on financial globalisation by academics, policy organisations and the private sector.Commenting on the award, Professor Lane said: “The Journal of International Economics is the leading field journal in international economics, with many of the world's leading international economists on its Editorial Board so it is quite an honour to be selected for this award. It is valuable recognition for a large-scale project that has expanded over the last decade. Research students at the IIIS have assisted in the development of the dataset and several doctoral dissertations have been devoted to the analysis of these data. This award further establishes the reputation of the IIIS as a leading centre for research in international economics.”Back to top
    Professor Alan Matthews appointed by the Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food to the Agriculture 2020 Strategy Committee.Alan MatthewsProfessor of European Agricultural Policy in the School and Director of the Institute of International Integration Studies, was recently appointed by the Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food to the Agriculture 2020 Strategy Committee which has been established by the Department to draw up a long-term strategy for the agri-food, forestry and fisheries sectors. The Committee has been asked to produce a short, sharp document which sets out the key strategies required for the future development of the sector and has been asked to report by the 1st June 2010.For further information, see http://www.agriculture.gov.ie/press/pressreleases/2010/february/title,39668, en.htmlBack to top
    Policy Coherence for Development: The State of Play in Ireland.Policy CoherenceJan 2010Michael King (Senior Research Officer in the Institute for International Integration Studies) and IIIS Research Associates Frank Barry (School of Business) and Alan Matthews (Department of Economics, School of Social Sciences and Philosophy) have just published a book entitled Policy Coherence for Development: The State of Play in Ireland. The book is the outcome of a research project funded by the Advisory Board for Irish Aid. Policy coherence for development (PCD) is where a government tries to ensure that its domestic policies across a range of issues support, or at the very least, do not undermine, the attainment of its development co-operation objectives. PCD was made an objective of the Irish aid programme in the White Paper on Development published in 2006, and this book is the first systematic assessment of PCD across Irish government departments. The book investigates where policy coherence or incoherence exists in a number of major policy areas (trade, agriculture, fisheries, migration, environment, finance, S&T, defence and security) and makes recommendations on how PCD could be improved by changes in Irish domestic policies in these areas. Policy Coherence for Development: The State of Play in Ireland. Download here Pdf [1.6MB] Back to top
    Kevin O'RourkeProfessor Kevin O'Rourke Receives European Research Council Grant to Study Trade Policy and Great DepressionA €1.4 million grant has been awarded to Professor Kevin O'Rourke enabling him to research the inter-relationships between trade, trade policy and the Great Depression. Jan 11, 2010Professor O'Rourke is the first Irish-based researcher to receive a European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Investigator Grant. Commenting on his research project, Professor O'Rourke stated: “The economic literature on the Great Depression has focussed on the macroeconomic policies which led to it, with trade being relegated to a minor role in most previous studies. We therefore know remarkably little about the extent to which international commodity markets disintegrated during the period. Furthermore, very little is known about the causes of the slump in trade, and the role of protectionism, and about the consequences of interwar protection for employment and growth in the short and long run”.ERC Advanced Investigator Grants allow exceptional established research leaders in any field of science, engineering and scholarship to pursue frontier research of their choice. They aim to encourage risk-taking and interdisciplinarity, and support pioneering research projects. Professor O’Rourke’s five year research project will explore the short run inter-relationships between output and employment, trade, and trade policy during the Great Depression. It will also place the event in the longer run context of the gradual spread of industry from the European and North American core to the European periphery and the rest of the world. The project will compile a large-scale online database available to other scholars including primary data from national and international statistical sources, for example the League of Nations. In addition it will include data produced subsequently by economic historians: on inter alia trade, trade policy, industrial output, and commodity and factor prices, for 1870-1960. The trade, output and policy data will be sectorally disaggregated, allowing a thorough assessment of the role of policy. The data will be analysed using standard economic techniques, but since the political and geopolitical consequences of such events are crucial in the long run, a more qualitative historical analysis will also be provided.Back to top
    Philip R. Lane In addition to his work with Vahagn Galstyan, his recent publications include “ A New Fiscal Strategy for Ireland,” Economic and Social Review (Summer 2009). He continues to work on fiscal topics, much of it in collaboration with postdoctoral fellow Agustin Benetrix.October 2009 In addition, his collaborative project with Jay Shambaugh ( Dartmouth College ) has yielded two forthcoming publications: “Financial Exchange Rates and International Currency Exposures,” American Economic Review, March 2010; and “ The Long or Short of It: Determinants of Foreign Currency Exposure in External Balance Sheets,” Journal of International Economics, forthcoming.During 2009, he has been appointed as a managing editor of the journal Economic Policy. In addition, he has been appointed a member of the National Statistics Board and the Bellagio Group. He has also received a grant from Fondation Banque de France for the project “International Leverage.” He has been a visiting scholar at the International Monetary Fund and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York during 2009.His PhD student Martin Schmitz has an article “ Financial Markets and International Risk Sharing ” forthcoming in Open Economies Review. Another PhD student Peter McQuade is an intern at DG-ECFIN during October 2009 to March 2010.Finally, he is the founder of The Irish Economy blog which has become a popular forum for discussion and analysis of the Irish economy.Back to top
    Catia Batista and Gaia Narciso were awarded funding from the Norface research program for the project Migration and Information Flows”. October 2009 This project will entail conducting two surveys of immigrants in Ireland spaced over a one-year period. Between surveys, sampled immigrants will receive phone call credits and information from the first survey. The aim will be to measure how this experimental variation in information flows will affect the arrival of new immigrants, return migration decisions and remittance flows. Back to top
    Professor Patrick Honohan appointed Governor of the Central Bank Professor of International Financial Economics and Development,September 2009Patrick Honohan, has been appointed the next Governor of the Central Bank by the Minister for Finance, Mr. Brian Lenihan T.D. Professor Honohan will be the first academic to hold this post when he takes on the position later this month. Patrick Honohan is Professor of International Financial Economics and Development in the Department of Economics. Previously he was a Senior Advisor in the World Bank working on issues of financial policy reform. During the 1980s he was Economic Advisor to the Taoiseach and spent several years at the Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin, and at the Central Bank of Ireland. A graduate of UCD and of the London School of Economics, from which he received his PhD in 1978, Professor Honohan has published widely on issues ranging from exchange rate regimes and purchasing-power parity, to migration, cost-benefit analysis and statistical methodology. Announcing the Government's selection of Professor Honohan for the position of Governor, the Minister for Finance stated: “Professor Patrick Honohan is highly regarded internationally as an expert on banking and financial systems. His experience in the various positions he has held during his career, including the Central Bank, the World Bank and the academic world will be of enormous value to him in working through the difficulties which the Irish Financial System faces”. “Throughout this financial crisis I have sought the views of Professor Honohan and he has consistently provided valuable advice. I look forward to working with him in his new role,” Minister Lenihan concluded. Professor Patrick Honohan's full Curriculum Vitae may be viewed at http://www.tcd.ie/Economics/staff/phonohan/ Back to top

    Last updated 15 November 2013 by IIIS (Email).