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To submit an item to the bulletin please email the details in MS Word format to
Colette Keleher

The next Bulletin will be circulated in the new Academic Year
Please submit items for inclusion by 15th September 2014 to colette.keleher@tcd.ie

If you wish to subscribe to the IIIS weekly bulletin please e-mail iiis@tcd.ie

 

EVENTS

 

 



Economics Research Seminar Series

World Food Prices and Monetary Policy
Luis Catao (Joint Vienna Institute)

Date: 23 Septemeber 2014
Time: 12.30 - 2pm
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD

How should monetary policy respond to large fluctutations in world food prices? We study this question in an open economy model in which imported food has a larger weight in domestic consumption than abroad and international risk sharing can be imperfect. A key novelty is that the real exchange rate and the terms of trade can move in opposite directions in response to world food price shocks. This exacerbates the policy trade-o¤ between stabilizing output prices vis a vis the real exchange rate, to an extent that depends on risk sharing and the price elasticity of exports. We characterize implications for dynamics, optimal monetary policy, and the relative performance of practical monetary rules. While CPI targeting and expected CPI targeting can dominate PPI targeting if international risk sharing is perfect, even seemingly mild departures from the latter make PPI targeting a winner.


Centre for Contemporary Irish History Research Seminar

This seminar is a forum open to all with relevant interests inside and outside TCD. Proposals for papers can be directed to any of the four convenors: Dr Michael Kennedy (RIA, difp@iol.ie), Dr Deirdre McMahon (Mary
Immaculate College, University of Limerick, mcmahon_deirdre@yahoo.co.uk), Professor Eunan O'Halpin (TCD, eunan.ohalpin@tcd.ie), and Dr Anne Dolan (TCD, adolan@tcd.ie). Presenters are asked to speak for a maximum of 45 minutes, followed by a general discussion. Seminar details are also posted at http://www.tcd.ie/history/ccih/seminars/index.php

What's wrong with Irish historians?
Tim Pat Coogan

Date: 24 September 2014
Time: 4pm
Venue: Neill Hoey Seminar Room, Trinity Long Room Hub



Centre for Contemporary Irish History Research Seminar

This seminar is a forum open to all with relevant interests inside and outside TCD. Proposals for papers can be directed to any of the four convenors: Dr Michael Kennedy (RIA, difp@iol.ie), Dr Deirdre McMahon (Mary
Immaculate College, University of Limerick, mcmahon_deirdre@yahoo.co.uk), Professor Eunan O'Halpin (TCD, eunan.ohalpin@tcd.ie), and Dr Anne Dolan (TCD, adolan@tcd.ie). Presenters are asked to speak for a maximum of 45 minutes, followed by a general discussion. Seminar details are also posted at http://www.tcd.ie/history/ccih/seminars/index.php

Visual art during the Emergency, 1939-1945
Dr Roisin Kennedy, UCD

Date: 1 October 2014
Time: 4pm
Venue: Neill Hoey Seminar Room, Trinity Long Room Hub


TCD/UCD Sociology Seminar Series

Title: 'What Threatens Capitalism Now'?
Speaker: Professor Craig Calhoun (Director of London School of Economics)
Date and time: 2 October 2014, 5 pm
Venue: Edmund Burke Theatre, Arts Building

To attend please complete the online booking form as places are limited

Abstract

Global capitalism has not yet fully emerged from a period of serious fragility and stalled growth signaled by the financial crisis of 2008-9. Still it did not collapse in crisis nor did it face successful or even widespreadmovements in favor of a systemic alternative. It may be that capitalism is threatened less by collapse due to internal contradictions, or direct opposition than by external factors. Arguably the biggest risks before the world include not just systemic risk in the capitalist system but the potential for war, problems of the environment, the loss or casualization of employment, the rise of illicit capitalism, and the dissolution of social solidarity. These are not, however, entirely separate factors. They are caused, shaped, or exacerbated by capitalism’s externalities - its the ways capitalist enterprises create costs that are borne not on the balance sheets of firms but by others. Creating strong social institutions to mitigate the damage of capitalism’s externalities is a critical challenge globally and nationally. Karl Polanyi described this as a ‘double movement’ in which economic growth destabilises social life and states try to mitigate damage and restore solidarity. Today, relevant state institutions themselves face serious challenges. Philanthropy may help. The informal sector provides partial but not scalable solutions. Entrepreneurship may bring market solutions to some problems. But the questions of how to achieve solidarity, mitigate conflict, and manage global challenges like climate change are as basic as the question of how to achieve capitalist growth.

Biography

Professor Calhoun is a world-renowned social scientist whose work connects sociology to culture, communication, politics, philosophy and economics. He took up his post as LSE Director on 1 September 2012, having left the United States where he was University Professor at New York University and director of the Institute for Public Knowledge and President of the Social Science Research Council. Professor Calhoun took a DPhil in History and Sociology at Oxford University and a Master's in Social Anthropology at Manchester. He co-founded, with Richard Sennett, Professor of Sociology at LSE, the NYLON programme which brings together graduate students from New York and London for co-operative research programmes. He is the author of several books including Nations Matter, Critical Social Theory, Neither Gods Nor Emperors and most recently The Roots of Radicalis (niversity of Chicago Press, 2012). Describing his own approach to academic work, Professor Calhoun says: 'We must set high standards for ourselves, but in order to inform the public well, not to isolate ourselves from it".


Centre for Contemporary Irish History Research Seminar

This seminar is a forum open to all with relevant interests inside and outside TCD. Proposals for papers can be directed to any of the four convenors: Dr Michael Kennedy (RIA, difp@iol.ie), Dr Deirdre McMahon (Mary
Immaculate College, University of Limerick, mcmahon_deirdre@yahoo.co.uk), Professor Eunan O'Halpin (TCD, eunan.ohalpin@tcd.ie), and Dr Anne Dolan (TCD, adolan@tcd.ie). Presenters are asked to speak for a maximum of 45 minutes, followed by a general discussion. Seminar details are also posted at http://www.tcd.ie/history/ccih/seminars/index.php

'The boys': youth, maturity, generations and the Irish republican tradition
Dr Niall Whelehan, Marie Cure Fellow, University of Edinburgh

Date: 8 October 2014
Time: 4pm
Venue: Neill Hoey Seminar Room, Trinity Long Room Hub


Thank you Ireland'
Ten years of Polish post-accession migration

This public lecture is part of a series of events organised to celebrate ten years since Polish EU accession. It will give an overview of research on migration from Poland since its accession to the European Union in 2004 and outline current trends and likely future developments. Ireland was one of the main receiving countries of post-accession migration, and - despite the severe economic downturn in the meantime - is now home to a large community of Poles. Research to date has investigated reasons and motivations for migrating, staying or returning, the impact this wave of migration has had on Ireland and Poland, as well as the experiences of Polish immigrants in the labour market and beyond, highlighting successes as well as challenges that still need to be addressed.

Date: Thursday October 30th
Time: 6.30pm
Venue: The Tinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin
Hosted By: Migration and Employment Research Centre (MERC) and Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS), Trinity College Dublin in association with Forum Polonia

 



Programme Overview

  • 18.30 - 18.40 Opening by the Polish Ambassaador
  • 18.40 - 18.50 Introducing 'Forum Polonia'
  • 18.50 - 19.40 Ten years of Polish post-accession migration to Ireland (Dr Antje Roeder, TCD)
  • 19.40 - 20.00 Q&A

Biographies

Forum Polonia is a cooperative platform established in 2008 that brings together representatives of various Polish community organisations, the media, and individuals involved in projects relating to the Polish minority and its links to Irish society as a whole.
The Forum is a non-profit organisation operates through information exchanges, mutual supports, social integration, and promoting and developing the interests of the Polish community in the Republic of Ireland.
The Forum aims to:
  • plan cooperative activities to promote and enhance the image of the Polish community  in Ireland and facilitate integration,
  • exchange information about the Polish community and about the life of the Polish community in Ireland,
  • reach a common policy stance on issues relevant to the Polish community

Antje Roeder is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Trinity College and a founding member of the Migration and Employment Research Centre (MERC). Her main research interests are mobility and migration, with focus on migrants' integration in European societies. She is currently conducting the Irish Research Council funded ‘New Irish Families’ project investigating the emerging second generation and their families in Ireland. She was also recently involved in the European collaborative project SCIP ‘Causes and Consequences of Early Socio-Cultural Integration Processes among New Immigrants in Europe’, which surveyed over one thousand Polish migrants living in Dublin.

 

 

IIIS Discussion Papers

 

PLEASE NOTE: We have introduced some changes to the process for submitting a paper to the Discussion Paper Series. I would be grateful if you could please refer to  How to submit a paper? before submitting your next paper, thank you.


Last updated 22 September 2014 by IIIS (Email).