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IIIS Hosted Seminars, Public Lectures, Conferences & Special Events

The IIIS organises a large number of
seminars, conferences and other special events
which take place throughout the year.
To be kept informed of these events you can subscribe to the weekly IIIS Bulletin

 


Title: ‘White migrations: Gender, Whiteness and Privilege in Transnational Migration’
Speaker:
Catrin Lundstrom Associate Professor Linkoping University Norrkoping, Sweden

Date: 17th April 2014
Venue
: IIIS Seminar room, 6th floor of Arts Block
Time: 1-2pm
Lunch and coffee/tea provided


Title: Migrant labour and labour market intermediaries
Speaker:
Robert MacKenzie University of Leeds Professor of Work and Employment

Date: 1st May 2014
Venue
: IIIS Seminar room, 6th floor of Arts Block
Time: 1-2pm
Lunch and coffee/tea provided


 

PAST EVENTS

IIIS Seminar Series

Title: Opening The Box of knowledge in absorptive Capacity Development in the Context of Service Innovation
Speaker:
Dr Nuran Acur, Innovation Management, International Operations Strategy, Ozyegin University/ University of Strathclyde

Date:
Friday 21st March 2014
Time: 13.00 - 14.00 (sandwiches provided)
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
Chair: Professor Louis Brennan, School of Business, TCD

Abstract: How does the flow of different knowledge forms develop absorptive capacity in a service innovation? We interpret empirical findings from our five year longitudinal case of a business-to-consumer service through the multiple theoretical perspectives of absorptive capacity development, knowledge management and service innovation to address this question. We move beyond acknowledging the importance of the customer to understand how customers might more effectively assist in absorptive capacity development if a firm consciously shifts the focus of their customer engagement during the life of a service innovation. We characterize how alignment of a champion's motives with the interests of the firm can direct the path of knowledge during absorptive capacity development. We generate insight into how relational, experiential and structural elements develop absorptive capacity at a team level by forming a knowledge mosaic from individual employees. An emergent model is articulated to represent the path of knowledge processes that support the flow of different forms of knowledge between individuals, teams and the firm. The model is conceptualized as mutually reinforcing knowledge spirals, facilitating knowledge conversations and transformation between knowledge levels during absorptive capacity development.


 

Title: Migrant children in Ireland: questions of language and identity
Speaker:
Dr. Rachel Hoare French Department (Head of Department) TCD

This exploratory qualitative research uses a multi-method framework to gain insight into the lived experiences of migrant children in Ireland, in relation to their heritage language(s) and culture(s), their identity and their well-being. This research provides children with a number of different ways to share their own experiences and define their own realities. These include taking part in focus groups and engaging in the participatory approaches of journaling, photography, and oral accounts, all of which are designed to bring a greater level of understanding about the important aspects of their lives. The participants in this research are children of migrant parents, who are currently living in Dublin. The initial focus of the research has been on the experiences of two age groups: 6 to 7 year olds and 10 to 11 year olds. Preliminary analysis of the data reveals the following themes: the impact of bilingualism and dual identity on family and peer relationships; first language recognition in school; linguistic insecurity; and language brokering. In addition to looking at the background issues and some preliminary results, the focus of this seminar paper will be on the methodology, which is designed to present children with opportunities for engaging in an active and participatory process of reciprocal learning.

Date: 6th March 2014
Venue
: IIIS Seminar room, 6th floor of Arts Block
Time: 1-2pm
Lunch and coffee/tea provided


Economics Research Seminar Series

Title: Financial Integration and Growth in a Risky World
Speaker: Helene Rey (LBS)

Date: 5th March 2014
Time: 12.30-2 pm
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin

We revisit the debate on the bene ts of nancial integration by providing a unified framework able to account for gains from capital accumulation and risk sharing. We consider a two-country neoclassical growth model with aggregate uncertainty. We allow for country asymmetries in terms of volatility, capital scarcity and size. In our general equilibrium model, nancial integration has an effect on the steady-state itself. Because we use global numerical methods we are able to do meaningful welfare comparisons along the transition paths. We find differences in the effect of financial integration on growth, consumption and welfare over time and across countries. This opens the door to a much richer set of empirical implications than previously considered in the literature.

Helene Rey is Professor of Economics at London Business School. Until 2007, she was at Princeton University, as Professor of Economics and International Affairs in the Economics Department and the Woodrow Wilson School. Her research focuses on the determinants and consequences of external trade and financial imbalances, the theory of financial crises and the organization of the international monetary system. She demonstrated in particular that countries gross external asset positions help predict current account adjustments and the exchange rate. In 2005 she was awarded an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship. She received the 2006 Bernacer Prize (best European economist working in macroeconomics and finance under the age of 40). In 2012 she received the inaugural Birgit Grodal Award of the European Economic Association honoring a European-based female economist who has made a significant contribution to the Economics profession. In 2013 she received the Yrjo Jahnsson Award (European economist under 45 years old who has made a contribution in theoretical and applied research that is significant to economics in Europe), shared with Thomas Piketty. Professor Rey is a Fellow of the British Academy, of the Econometrics Society and of the European Economic Association. She is on the board of the Review of Economic Studies and associate editor of the AEJ: Macroeconomics Journa/. She is a CEPR Research Fellow and an NBER Research Associate. She is on the Board of the Autorite de Controle Prudentiel, a member of the Commission Economique de la Nation and of the Bellagio Group on the international economy. She was a member of the Conseil D'Analyse Economique until 2012. She writes a regular column for the French newspaper Les Echos. Helene Rey received her undergraduate degree from ENSAE, a Master in Engineering Economic Systems from Stanford University and her PhDs from the London School of Economics and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales.


 

Title: ‘Gender and migration on the labour market: Additive or interacting disadvantages in Germany?’
Speaker:
Dr. Fenella Fleischmann Assistant Professor Utrecht University, Holland

Despite substantial differences in labour market attainment according to gender and migration status, gender and ethnic differences in labour market behaviour are most often studied separately. In contrast, this study describes and analyses interactions between gender, ethnic background and immigrant generation with regard to labour market participation, part-time work, and occupational status. The double comparison aims to reveal whether gender gaps in these labour market outcomes among the majority population generalise to ethnic minorities. Moreover, we ask whether variation in gender gaps in labour market behaviour follows the patterns in migrants' origin countries, and whether gender gaps show signs of intergenerational assimilation. Our heterogeneous choice and OLS regressions of 2009 German Microcensus data reveal considerable variation in gender gaps in labour market behaviour between East and West Germany, across ethnic groups and across generations. Intergenerational comparisons show that most ethnic minorities assimilate towards German patterns of gendered labour market attainment.

 


Date: 20th February 2014
Venue
: IIIS Seminar room, 6th floor of Arts Block
Time: 1-2pm
Lunch and coffee/tea provided


 


Economics Research Seminar Series

Capital is Back: Wealth-Income Ratios in Rich Countries, 1700-2010
Gabriel Zucman (PSE)

How do aggregate wealth-to-income ratios evolve in the long run and why? We address this question using 1970-2010 national balance sheets recently compiled in the top eight developed economies. For the U.S., U.K., Germany, and France, we are able to extend our analysis as far back as 1700. We nd in every country a gradual rise of wealth-income ratios in recent decades, from about 200-300% in 1970 to 400-600% in 2010. In e ect, today's ratios appear to be returning to the high values observed in Europe in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries (600-700%). This can be explained by a long run asset price recovery (itself driven by changes in capital policies since the world wars) and by the slowdown of productivity and population growth, in line with the = s=g Harrod-Domar-Solow formula. That is, for a given net saving rate s = 10%, the long run wealth-income ratio is about 300% if g = 3% and 600% if g = 1.5%. Our results have implications for capital taxation and regulation and shed new light on the changing nature of wealth, the shape of the production function, and the rise of capital shares.

Date: Tuesday 11th February 2014
Time: 12.30-2 pm
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin


 

Importing Crime? The Effect of Immigration on Crime in the United States,1880-1930
Rowena Gray (UC Merced)

Date: Tuesday 4th February 2014
Time: 9-10 am
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin


My precious! The location and diffusion of scientific research: evidence from the Synchrotron Diamond Light Source
Henry Overman (LSE)

Abstract
We analyze the impact of the establishment of a GBP 380 million basic scienti c research facility in the UK on the geographical distribution of related research. We investigate whether the siting of the Diamond Light Source, a 3rd generation synchrotron light source, in Oxfordshire induced a clustering of related research in its geographic proximity. To account for the potentially endogenous location choice of the synchrotron, we exploit the availability of a `runner-up' site near Manchester. We use both academic publications and patent data to trace the geographical distribution of related knowledge and innovation. Our results suggest that the siting of the synchrotron in Oxfordshire created a highly localized cluster of related scienti c research.

Date: Tuesday 4th February 2014
Time: 12.30 - 2pm
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin



Title: Changes in the unfavourable attitude towards homosexuality among Polish migrants in Western Europe
Speaker:
Antje Roder and Marcel Lubbers

Abstract
This contribution investigates the attitudes towards homosexuality of newly arrived immigrants from Poland in two Western European countries, Ireland and the Netherlands, with a particular interest in how these attitudes develop over time after migration. Polish natives are on average less accepting of homosexuality than those of these two host countries. We will infer from comparisons between migrants and non-migrants residing in the countries of origin whether a selection effect of migrants with a more liberal attitude toward homosexuality exists. Using data collected shortly after arrival of immigrants and from a second wave one and a half year later in the host country, we will show whether immigrants adapt to the norms of the host country and to what extent they maintain the dominant attitudes of the origin country and region. We find that changes are affected by the level of social integration in the host country and religion. Date: 23rd January 2014
Venue
: IIIS Seminar room, 6th floor of Arts Block
Time: 1-2pm
Lunch and coffee/tea provided


ECONOMICS RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES

Volatility Risk Premia and Exchange Rate Predictability
Pasquale Della Corte (Imperial College)

We discover a new currency strategy with highly desirable return and diversification properties, which uses the predictive capability of currency volatility risk premia for currency returns. The volatility risk premium -- the difference between expected realized and model-free implied volatility -- reflects the costs of insuring against currency volatility fluctuations, and the strategy sells high-insurance-cost currencies and buys low-insurance-cost currencies. The returns to the strategy are mainly generated by movements in spot exchange rates rather than interest rate differentials, and the strategy carries a greater weight in the minimum-variance currency strategy portfolio than both carry and momentum. Canonical risk factors cannot price the returns from this strategy, which appear more consistent with time-varying limits to arbitrage.

Date: Tuesday 28th January 2014
Time: 12.30-2 pm
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin


 

 

Future Directions for the Irish Economy

European Commission

  • Date: Friday 10th January 2014
  • Hosted By: European Commission: Directorate General for Economic and Financial Affairs
    (in collaboration with Trinity College Dublin)
  • Venue: Gandon Suite South, Davenport Hotel, 2 Merrion Street Lower, Dublin 2


For more information and to download the programme please visit the Symposium Website
here

Programme Overview

European Commission

Future Directions for the Irish Economy
European Commission: Directorate General for Economic and Financial Affair
(in collaboration with Trinity College Dublin)
Gandon Suite South, Davenport Hotel, 10th January 2014

(20 minutes author, 15 minutes each discussant, 20 minutes Q&A)

08.00-08.45 Registration/Coffee

08:45-09:30
The Irish Experience: Lessions Learned for the Future
Chair: Sean Whelan (RTE)
Introduction: Philip R. Lane, Trinity College Dublin
Speakers: Patrick Honohan, Central Bank of Ireland

09:30-10:45 Growth Prospects for the Irish Economy

Chair: Frances Ruane (ESRI)
Speaker: Nicholas Crafts (University of Warwick),Ireland’s Medium-Term Growth Prospects: A Phoenix Rising?
Discussants: Kevin Daly (Goldman Sachs) 
John Martin (ex OECD, Bartelsmann Foundation)

10:45-11:00 Coffee Break

11:00-12:15 Future of the Irish Financial System
Chair: Margaret Doyle (Deloitte)
Speaker: Thorsten Beck (CASS Business School), Ireland’s Banking System - Looking Forward
Discussants: Nigel Nagarajan (European Commission)
Lars Frisell (Central Bank of Ireland)

12:15-13:30 Lunch

13:30-14:45 Ireland’s Fiscal Framework

Chair: John Moran (Department of Finance)
Speaker: George Kopits (Woodrow Wilson Center and Portuguese Public Finance Council) Ireland’s Fiscal Framework: Options for the Future
Discussants: John McHale (NUIG and Irish Fiscal Advisory Council) 
Antonio Garcia-Pascual (Barclays)

14:45-16:00 Roundtable: Policy Challenges for the Irish Economy
Chair: Philip R. Lane (Trinity College Dublin)
Panelists: Craig Beaumont (International Monetary Fund)
Zsolt Darvas (Bruegel)
Martin Larch (European Commission)
Diego Rodriguez Palenzuela (European Central Bank)

Back to top

 


A new publication from Trinity College Dublin's Institute for International Integration Studies offers a comprehensive analysis of the steady march of globalization over the last three decades. Enacting Globalization: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on International Integration was recently launched in the Trinity Long Room Hub, the Arts and Humanities Research Institute of Trinity read more


Enacting Globalization: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on International Integration
has just been published by Palgrave Macmillan. This volume contains the revised papers from the Institute's 10th anniversary conference which was held last December. It is edited by the Institute's Director Professor Louis Brennan and contains a rich set of diverse disciplinary contributions from Institute scholars and others. Details of the book can be found here


Symposium on the Financialization of Society

Recent decades have seen the growth in the financialization of societies in much of the Anglo-Saxon world. While seen by some as a source of economic growth and dynamism, it has more recently raised concerns with evidence emerging that excessive growth in the financial sector can have a negative impact on economic growth. It is an important factor in the growth of income inequality and instability. Cecchetti and Kharroubi of the Bank of International Settlements have argued in their recent paper that there is a negative relationship between the rate of growth of finance and the rate of growth of total factor productivity. This symposium will address some of the salient issues pertaining to the Financialization of Society with contributions from five renowned international authorities.
  • Date: Tuesday 17 December 2013
  • Hosted By: The Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)
  • Funded By: Trinity College Faculty of Arts Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Venue: The Neil Hoey Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub
  • The event is free but places are limited. Please register here (please note registration will close when full capacity is reached)
      For more information and to download the programme please visit the Symposium Website here

  • Programme Overview


    • 14.30 Welcome by Professor Louis Brennan, Director of the IIIS
      14.35-15.05 Session 1 Chaired by
      Padraig Carmody, Associate Professor in Human Geography
      The finance and point value concept
      Professor Julie Froud, Manchester University Business School, Manchester, U.K.
      15.05-15.35
      Can a Preference for Financial Investments Undermine Manufacturing?
      Preliminary Evidence from the US & UK
      Professor Susan Christopherson, Cornell University, U.S.A.
      15.35-16.05
      Equipping entrepreneurs: Consuming credit and credit scores
      Paul Langley, Reader in Economic Geography, Durhan University, U.K.
      16.05-16.30 Coffee Break
      16.30-17.00 Session 2 Chaired by Professor James Wickham, Dean of the Faculty of Arts Humanities and Social Sciences
      Babies, Bonds and Buildings: Did financialization affect fertility rates?
      Professor Herman Schwartz, University of Virginia, U.S.A.
      17.00-17.30
      The politics of financialization within the EU: conjunctures, alliances and conflicts
      Professor Hans-Jurgen Bieling, Department of Political Economy, Eberhard Karls University of Tubingen, Germany.
      17.30-18.00 General Discussion
      followed by a reception to mark the publication of the IIIS 10th Anniversary Volume 'Enacting Globalization: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on International Integration' with guest speaker, Francis Jacobs, Head of Office of the European Parliament Information Office in Ireland


'Migration and Employment Seminar Series'

'When East Meets West? The Crisis and Labour Market Institutions in Ireland and Romania'
Prof Michael Doherty, Dept of Law, NUI Maynooth & Dr Aurora Trif, Business School, DCU

Date: Thursday 5 December 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD


International Solidarity: Practices, problems, possibilities

About the conference

What do we mean by ‘international solidarity’ and what role do solidarity groups play domestically and internationally? This one day conference will bring together researchers and practitioners in solidarity groups in Ireland and abroad to discuss these questions. In an increasingly globalised world, social movements are becoming more transnational. However while research on the more established NGOs and aid agencies has grown in parallel to the growth of transnational movements, solidarity movements - despite their political significance - remain under-researched. This conference aims to close the gap and further research and discussion in this field.
The guiding questions for the conference are:

  • What do we mean by solidarity as a concept?
  • Is effective international solidarity possible?
  • What are the larger socio-political issues which international solidarity raises?
  • How meaningful is international solidarity in the domestic sphere - what relationships are created between solidarity groups, and domestic governments & publics?
  • How and why has the practice of international solidarity changed over time and between groups?

While these broad questions are often lost in the day-to-day challenges that solidarity groups face, they remain relevant issues for these groups. Thus one aim of the conference is to provide a space for practitioners as well as academics to participate and to discuss the wider issues surrounding international solidarity. The keynote speaker is Peter Waterman, author of the recent Recovering Internationalism, Creating the New Global Solidarity.

The cost of the conference is 40 euro for waged or 15 euro for unwaged/students
This includes the cost of lunch and tea/coffee throughout the day.

Date: December 6, 2013 (09.00-18.00)
Registration:
From 09.00
Venue:
The Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin
Hosted By: The Department of Sociology TCD in association with the Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS), Trinity College Dublin
Funded By: The Department of Sociology and the Arts and Social Sciences Benefactions Fund, TCD
CONTACT: solidarityconference2013tcd@gmail.com

For more information and to download the programme please visit the Symposium Website here

 


Insititute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) and Department of Geography, School of Natural Sciences Seminar

‘On the periphery of the European periphery or Eurasian re-consolidation? Ukraine after the financial crisis’
Prof Adam Swain, School of Geography, The University of Nottingham, UK

The EU Eastern Partnership summit to be held in Vilnius on 28th and 29th November 2013, during which it had been expected that an Association Agreement and Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Agreement (DCFTA) would be signed between the EU and Ukraine, will clarify at least temporarily Ukraine’s position within European/Eurasian geo-economic and geo-political structures. This paper is divided into two main substantive parts: the first considers the impact of what may be termed the  ‘American crisis’ on Ukraine up until the 2010 presidential election and the second examines whether it is possible to recognise a post-orange revolution development model arising out of the financial crisis. It concludes that Ukraine’s geopolitical location, in which the west and Russia compete with each other for influence, will ensure that the country’s path of development will likely remain conflicted. It is Ukraine’s tragedy that it finds itself located where two rival centres of power and authority collide which prevents the emergence of a strong democratic state. The paper ends by suggesting that whilst emotion and soft power pulls Ukraine westwards hard economic calculation should make it look to Eurasia too. The anticipated failure to sign the Association Agreement and DCFTA indicates that Ukraine’s current authorities understand this well.

Date: Monday 25 Novemeber 2013
Time: 12-1
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD


ECONOMICS RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES

Epidemic Trade
Battista Severgnini, Copenhagen Business School

This paper studies the spread of the Black Death as a proxy for the intensity of medieval trade flows between 1346 and 1351. The Black Death struck most areas of Europe and the wider Mediterranean. Based on a modified version of the gravity model, we estimate the speed (in kilometers per day) of transmission of the disease between the transmitting and the receiving cities. We find that the speed depends on distance, political borders, and on the political importance of a city. Furthermore, variables related to the means of transportation like rivers and the sea, religious seasons such as Advent, and geographical position are of substantial significance. These results are the first to enable us to identify and quantify key variables of medieval trade flows based on an empirical trade model. These results shed new light on many qualitative debates on the importance and causes of medieval trade.

Date: Tuesday 26 November 2013
Time: 12.30-2 pm
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin


 

IIIS/TIDI Seminar

The Global Rose: from Kenya to the Markets
Prof. Bernard Calas, Geographer & Professor, University of Michel de Montaigne, Bordeaux

Date: Wednesday 27 Novemeber 2013
Time: 1pm
Venue: Seminar Room B, Museum Building, TCD

ECONOMICS RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES

On the Determinants of International Equity Investment
Francis E. Warnock, Darden Business School, University of Virginia National Bureau of Economic Research

Date: Tuesday 19 Novemeber 2013
Time: 12.30-2 pm
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin

Previous work suggests that any study of international equity portfolio allocations must have two features: the dependent variable must be float adjusted and free of a country-size bias. A third requisite feature comes from U.S.-centric studies: analysis of U.S. international equity investment must properly account for cross-listing. We first summarize evidence supporting the importance of these three features, focusing on evidence amassed using data from one source country, the United States. While a presentation of the existing evidence is useful in its own right, our main innovation is to apply these features to the global matrix of cross-border equity positions. Preliminary evidence from this global analysis suggests cross-listing is an important omitted variable in previous studies that include "high standards" countries.


 

'Migration and Employment Seminar Series'

'Who are you calling an immigrant?' Various ways the term is understood in Ireland today and the implications for researchers
Martina Byrne, TCD

Date: Thursday 21 Novemeber 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD


POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH DAY

DATE: 15th November 2013
TIME: 9am - 5:30 pm
VENUE: IIIS Seminar Room, Sutherland Centre, TCD

This conference is being run by the Centre for Post-Conflict Justice at Trinity College Dublin conjunction with postgraduate research students. The day will consist of three themed panels (Law, Politics and Sociology, Peace Studies and Education) with student paper presentations lasting 10-12 minutes that will be followed by feedback from scholars working across relevant fields. We have invited respondents for our three panels: Colin Harvey (QUB), Law; Cath Collins (UU), Politics; and Iain Atack (TCD), Sociology, Peace Studies and Education.

The day is also intended to be an informal networking opportunity, bringing together students and faculty from different departments, colleges and universities. Unfortunately, we are unable to cover travel and accommodation costs; however, tea/coffee and lunch will be provided on the day.


 

ECONOMICS RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES

Sharecropping Contracts and Agricultural Productivity: Testing the Marshallian Hypothesis.(joint with Selim Gulesci).
Konrad Burchardi (IIES)

Date: Tuesday 12 Novemeber 2013
Time: 12.30-2 pm
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin

 


 

November 8th 2013

The Trinity Global Graduate Forum hosted more than 100 of the university's most successful alumni last weekend in a special event aimed at gathering their views on the development of Trinity College Dublin.

The two-day forum was the first time any university has invited its global graduates back to formulate plans to tackle some of the major challenges facing modern higher education, including funding, reputation, growth, technology and education.

Pictured on the occasion of the Trinity Global Graduate Forum are attendees Dr Patrick Prendergast, Provost of Trinity College, Prof Linda Hogan, Vice-Provost/ CAO, Iseult Ward, student entrepreneur and co-founder of Foodcloud, Prof Jane Ohlmeyer Vice President for Global Relations, Fergal Naughton, Deputy CEO at Glen Dimplex and Curtis Wong, Prinicipal Researcher in eScience at Microsoft Research.

The graduates came from 16 countries representing 19 professions.

The Provost of Trinity, Dr Patrick Prendergast, said: ‘The TGGF has shown that Trinity is at a crossroads. Now in our fifth century, Trinity faces a future that will fuse our traditional strengths in education and research with innovation and entrepreneurship in a world of relentless change. As leaders in their fields, our alumni know that Ireland can only meet this challenge by nurturing talent and creating opportunity. Our graduates have a stake in the future of our university. By extension, they have a stake in the future of the country because Trinity believes it can play a key role in creating a vibrant and successful society and economy.’

IIIS PhD Researchers presented

Potent Ingredients: Uncertainty, Volatility and Macroeconomic Performance International Evidence on Sovereign Bond Spread Volatility graph
Michael Curran TCD Department of Economics & Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)

On the Relationship between the Current Account and Real Exchange Rate: A Role for Nominal Exchange Rate Volatility?
Adnan Velic (IRC scholar) TCD Department of Economics & Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)

Assisting and Resisting the Racial State: Experiences of Young Pakistani Men in Dublin and Boston
Craig Considine TCD Department of Sociology & Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)

A Sliding Scale of Protection? Implementation of the Cessation Clauses in Article 1C(5) of the 1951 Refugee Convention
Jeff Walsh, PhD Candidate TCD School of Law & Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)

Global discourse, local change? Developing a women's agenda for peace in Armenia and Azerbaijan
Sinead Walsh, Government of Ireland PG Scholar, Irish School of Ecumenics & Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)

Bringing Globalisation to the Countryside: the Political Economy of Special Economic Zones in India
Mohammad Amir Anwar, TCD Department of Geography & Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)


ECONOMICS RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES

Labor Market Opportunities and Women's Decision Making Power within Households
Kaveh Majlesi (Lund)

Date: Tuesday 29 October 2013
Time: 12.30-2 pm
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin


 

Migration and Employment Seminar Series

'Financialization, new modes of value accumulation and the labour process'
Jean Cushen, DCU

Date: Thursday 24th October 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building


 

ECONOMICS RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES

Credit Conditions in a Boom and Bust Property Market
Yvonne Mc Carthy/Kieran McQuinn (Central Bank)

The interrelationship between house prices and mortgage credit has been one of the more compelling issues to warrant attention after the recent financial crisis. Considerable financial innovation and liberalisation of wholesale international funding markets over the past 20 years greatly increased the ability of banking sectors to extend credit to the real economy. Almost inevitably many countries experienced significant house price booms over this period. The rate of house price appreciation in Ireland outstripped that of most in the OECD. Availing of two new related databases of Irish mortgaged households, this paper, firstly, quantifies the respective contribution to house price movements of changing credit conditions and, secondly, estimates an index of mortgage credit availability in the Irish property market, (MMCI), over the period 2000 - 2010.

Date: Tuesday 22 October 2013
Time: 12.30-2 pm
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin

 


ECONOMICS RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES

"Capital Flows are Fickle: Anytime, Anywhere"
John Bluedorn (IMF)

Has the unprecedented financial globalization of recent years changed the behavior of capital flows across countries? Using a newly constructed database of gross and net capital flows since 1980 for a sample of nearly 150 countries, this paper finds that private capital flows are typically volatile for all countries, advanced or emerging, across all points in time. This holds true across most types of flows, including bank, portfolio debt, and equity flows. Advanced economies enjoy a greater substitutability between types of inflows, and complementarity between gross inflows and outflows, than do emerging markets, which reduces the volatility of their total net inflows despite higher volatility of the components. Capital flows also exhibit low persistence, across all economies and across most types of flows. Inflows tend to rise temporarily when global financing conditions are relatively easy. These findings suggest that fickle capital flows are an unavoidable fact of life to which policymakers across all countries need to continue to manage and adapt.

Date: Tuesday 15th October 2013
Time: 09.00-10.30 pm
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin


 


ECONOMICS RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES

What remains of Optimal Currency Area theory? 
by Kevin Daly (Goldman Sachs)

Date: Tuesday 15th October 2013
Time: 09.00-10.30
Venue: Aras an Phiarsaigh, room 3.19


ECONOMICS RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES

The Value of Connections: Evidence Based on the Italian-American Mafia
Giovanni Mastrobuoni (Collegio Carlo Alberto)

Date:Tuesday 1st October 2013
Time: 12.30 -2 pm

Venue: Aras an Phiarsaigh, room 3.19


ECONOMICS RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES

 ‘Explaining the Bubble: Credit Conditions, User Cost & House Prices in  Ireland, 1980-2012’
Ronan Lyons (TCD)

Date: Tuesday 24th September  2013
Time: 12.30 -2 pm
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin

 


 

You are warmly invited to the launch of

This book examines Polish migration to Ireland in the context of ‘new mobilities in Europe’. It includes detailed accounts of the working lives of a group of mainly skilled Polish migrants in Dublin. They were interviewed at regular intervals as part of a Qualitative Panel Study. Through this novel methodology, their careers and aspirations were traced as Ireland moved from ‘boom to bust’. What the research documents is a new experience of mobility which, it is suggested, is indicative of a broader trend in Europe. As ‘free movers’, Polish migrants were more mobile across countries and within national labour markets. Ireland’s ‘goldrush’ labour market created a seemingly demand for new labour. To understand how Irish firms utilised the new migrant workforce, the book also draws on interviews with employers. It thus locates the actions of both sides of the employment relationship in the particular socio-economic context in Ireland post-2004.
The book will be launched by His Excellency, Ambassador of the Republic of Poland to Ireland, Mr Marcin Nawrot
Monday 16 September 2013 at 5.30pm
European Commission Offices, 18 Dawson Street, Dublin 2
PLEASE RSVP
HERE

 


TIILOGO

 


 

 

SYMPOSIUM
New European mobilities: Education, migration and employment

About the symposium

Between 2004 and 2008, nearly half-a-million European nationals arrived in Ireland from the new member states (NMS) of the EU. Many of these were young Poles joining the Irish labour market at a time when economic opportunities were limited ‘at home’. Importantly though, a history of mobility is an historic part of the Polish story, with an established transnational record of migration. The story of movement for work overseas, to pursue lifestyle opportunity and to enhance professional goals is a familiar part of the Irish story, including amongst the Irish graduate population. The mobility evident amongst high-skilled Polish nationals in the 2000s and an Irish graduate cohort in 2008-2013, reveals an opportunity to capture movement within the broader context of intra-EU and transnational mobility. The Learning from Poland project examined the implications of Polish migration to Ireland for contemporary Irish emigration and the lessons for wider European and transnational mobility today

The symposium will address questions about this new mobility context discussing new forms of mobility including lifestyle migration; education and the relationship with employability and mobility, the need for portable social protections and the impact on national welfare systems. It will feature findings from the Learning from Poland project and international speakers to contextualise Irish and Polish experiences of mobility and ultimately evaluate national and European policy implications of the new mobilities.

Date: Monday 16th September 2013
Venue: Trinity College Dublin
For more information and to download the programme please visit the Symposium Website
here
Registration: The event is free but places are limited. Please register here (please note registration will close when full capacity is reached)
Hosted By: The Employment Research Centre ERC in association with the Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) 
Contact: iiis@tcd.ie 

 


International Working Party on Labour Market Segmentation 34th Annual Conference

'Austerity without end? European employment in the crisis'

Date: 12-14 September 2013

The International Working Party on Labour Market segmentation is an inter-disciplinary and informal network of scholars and researchers concerned with work, employment and the labour market. Members often work together on research topics of shared interest, However, our main activity as a group is the annual conference. Each year's conference has a broad theme and is organised by a local team. This year's conference is in Dublin.

For more information please visit the Conference Website here


 

12th ASEFUAN Annual Conference and General Meeting Feeding Asia and Europe in the 21st Century

ASEFUAN Annual Conference and General Meeting Hosted by the Institute for International Integration Studies at Trinity College Feeding Asia and Europe in the 21st Century: Cooperation and Challenges in Food Safety, Security and Sustainability

Date: 7- 9 August 2013
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub

Please download programme here


 

Symposium: Drivers of Regionalism and Integration in Europe and Asia:

Comparative Perspectives

 


 

About the conference

This Symposium brings together scholars, analysts and policy-makers in a dynamic and interactive setting to debate how and why regional bodies such as the European Union and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations are formed and sustained. The Symposium is distinctive in seeking to compare scholarly perspectives and engender new debates regarding the causes of regional integration.

Is there anything to learn from the EU or Asian experiences? Are Asian bodies interested in the European experience? How are regions conceptualised? How do we understand the drivers of integration and regionalism? What are the motivations of regional integration? What intellectual histories exist of regional integration? How are ideas spread? How do ideas, norms and visions shape region-building? What is the start-up of regional integration? Who and what are the drivers? What types of institution-building takes place? What type of community-building was/is required?

To what extent, if any, is there a balance between internal and external factors driving this phenomenon of regionalism? What factors are internal to the "region" and which are external to the "region"? What, if any, regionalism/regional integration is driven by opportunism or as a response to perceived threats (real or otherwise)? What impact do crises (the 1997 Asian crisis as well as the current crisis) have on regionalism in Asia and Europe? To what extent, if any, has the movement towards regional integration been driven by the goal of capitalizing on strengths/advantages or compensating for/overcoming weaknesses? What are the barriers to regional integration?

It is anticipated the major outcome of the Symposium will be an edited special issue of a journal, consisting of the revised version of the Symposium papers.

Date: 10th, 11th and 12th of July 2013
Venue: The Long Room Hub, Fellows Square, Trinity College Dublin
For more information please visit the Symposium Website
here
Registration: The event is free but places are limited. Please register here (please note registration will close when full capacity is reached)
Hosted By: The Institute for International Integration Studies, Trinity College Dublin and the School of Social and Political Sciences, the University of Melbourne.
Supported By: Jean Monnet grant from the European Commission (Agreement number 2012- 2728/001-001), with additional support from the Institute for International Integration Studies, Trinity College Dublin and the School of Social and Political Sciences, The University of Melbourne
Contact: iiis@tcd.ie

Relations between the EU and Asia were explored by policy makers, analysts and academics from Europe, Australia and Asia at a two-day symposium in Trinity College Dublin recently read more


 

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You are warmly invited to the launch of the Palgrave Handbook of EU-Asia Relations, edited by Thomas Christiansen, Emil Kirchner and Philomena Murray.

The launch is hosted by the European Parliament Information Office in Ireland

Thursday 11 July at 6.00pm
at the European Parliament offices, 43 Molesworth Street, Dublin 2.

This Handbook, the result of a large international collaborative research project, fills a gap in the analysis of EU-Asia relations. The European Union and Asia are two regions undergoing significant changes internally while at the same time developing stronger relations with each other. In the context of an emerging multi-polar world, Europe and Asia are seen as major actors, making their relations increasingly crucial for the understanding of global politics. The Handbook is distinctive because it constitutes a thoroughly comprehensive collection of 40 chapters from a variety of disciplines and perspectives, bringing together 50 leading authors. Contributors come from Europe, Asia, North America and Australia, providing a genuinely global perspective on this important topic. For further details regarding the book, please refer to
http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspxPID=549801

Leading scholars regard it as a ‘wide-ranging, comprehensive and authoritative volume’ (Prof Mark Beeson, University of Western Australia) and ‘a comprehensive volume that serves as an impressive introduction and indispensable resource for anyone interested in the inter-regional relations between Europe and Asia (Prof Van Langenhove, UN University Institute on Comparative Regional Integration Studies, Brugge). Prof Simon Duke (European Institute of Public Administration, Maastricht) sees this 'impressive Handbook’ as ‘destined to become the standard reference book for anyone with an interest in EU-Asia relations’ and Prof Ogawa, Hitotsubashi University praises it a ‘comprehensive and insightful studies regarding not only EU-Asia relations in the future but also their impacts on the globalized society’. A/Prof Reuben Wong, National University of Singapore sees it as ‘likely to be an invaluable reference for scholars and students of European integration, Asian regionalism, inter-regional cooperation and global governance for many years to come’. Dr May-Britt Stumbaum, Freie Universität Berlin praises the Handbook as an ‘exceptional compilation and a 'must-have' for any one dealing with EU–Asia relations’.

Date: Thursday 11 July
Time:  6.00pm
Venue: The European Parliament offices, 43 Molesworth St., Dublin 2.
Contact: iiis@tcd.ie
If you wish to attend this event please RSVP here by 4th July
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IIIS Seminar Series

Title: Labour mobility and the construction of immigrant identity: Rumanians and Bulgarians in Spain
Speaker:
Dr Patricia Gonzalez Aldea, IIIS Visitor (May-July 2013), International Journalism, Carlos III University of Madrid
Date:
Wednesday 26 June 2013
Time:
1-2 (Sandwiches provided)
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD

Abstract
The aim of the presentation is to share part of the conclusions of the national funded research project titled: “Migrations from Eastern Europe to Spain in the Context of Geopolitical Borders: Circulation and Return”. The human condition of Rumanian and Bulgarian immigrants in Spain will be displayed, specifically by examining how they interact with the communities in which they live. This was done by analyzing how immigrants see their own experiences at work and how they regard the Spanish and their own fellow citizens, as well as how they compare themselves with other nationalities. Study was also made of the identittary features of the immigrants and the host country's perception of these immigrants by looking at the images of their group reflected in the media in order to measure to what extent mobility is affecting emigrants'(re)construction of identity.


Past Events
Academic Year 2012-13

 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: ‘The Eurovision Song Contest and the Performance of Europe'
Speaker: Prof Brian Singleton (TCD)
Date: Wednesday, 12 June
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

Abstract
Though heavily criticised for its camp staging and the simplistic lyrics of many of its songs, the Eurovision Song Contest has survived for 58 years to become the second most popular television show in the world. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and staged by national public service broadcasters from Iceland to Azerbaijan, the Contest offers annual competing national representations of Europeanness and performs transnationally contested politics of gender, race and sexuality that have resulted in street protests, Presidential interventions, and allegations of bribery and corruption. This lecture will analyse the political fall-out of the 2013 Contest and its representations and bring into focus competing conceptions of the national in relation to the notion of Europe as constructed by the EBU.


 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: ‘European Identities, Migration and Belonging: Perspectives from Critical Discourse Studies’
Speaker: Prof Ruth Wodak (Lancaster) ***WE REGRET THAT THIS LECTURE HAS BEEN CANCELLED***
Date: Wednesday, 5 June
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

Abstract

Ruth Wodak, PhD, Dr. Habil., is Distinguished Professor of Discourse Studies at Lancaster University, UK, since 2004; she has remained affiliated to the University of Vienna as Full Professor of Applied
Linguistics (since 1991). Besides various other prizes, she was awarded the Wittgenstein Prize for Elite Researchers in 1996 and an Honorary Doctorate from University of Örebro in Sweden in 2010.
She is past-President of the Societas Linguistica Europaea. 2011, she was awarded the Grand Decoration of Honour in Silver for Services to the Republic of Austria. Her research interests focus on discourse studies; gender studies; language and/in politics; prejudice and discrimination; and on ethnographic methods of linguistic field work. She is member of the editorial board of a range of linguistic journals and co-editor of the journals Discourse and Society, Critical Discourse Studies, and Language and Politics, and co-editor of the book series Discourse Approaches to Politics, Society and Culture (DAPSAC). She has held visiting professorships in University of Uppsala, Stanford University, University Minnesota, University of East Anglia, and Georgetown University; she is member of the British Academy of Social Sciences and member of the Academia Europaea. 2008, she was awarded the Kerstin Hesselgren Chair of the Swedish Parliament (at University Örebrö). She has published 8 monographs, 26 co-authored monographs, over 50 edited volumes and ca 300 peer reviewed journal papers and book chapters. Recent book publications include Qualitative Discourse Analysis in the Social Sciences (with M. Krzyżanowski, 2008); Migration, Identity and Belonging (with G. Delanty, P. Jones, 2011), The Discursive Construction of History. Remembering the Wehrmacht's War of Annihilation (with H. Heer, W. Manoschek, A. Pollak, 2008), The Politics of Exclusion. Debating Migration in Austria (with M. Krzyżanowski, 2009), The SAGE Handbook of Sociolinguistics (with Barbara Johnstone and Paul Kerswill, 2010), The discourse of politics in action: 'Politics as Usual' (Palgrave), revised edition (2011), Analyzing Facist Discourse. Fascism in Talk and Text (with John Richardson, 2013) and Rightwing Populism in Europe: Politics and Discourse (with Majid KhosraviNik and Brigitte Mral, 2013). See http://www.ling.lancs.ac.uk/profiles/Ruth-Wodak for more information on on-going research projects and recent publications.


 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: ‘Does Europe Need a New Memory’
Speaker: Prof Ann Rigney (Utrecht)
Date: Wednesday, 29 May
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome.Please download the full programme

Abstract
Nineteenth-century nation-building assumed that every nation had a collective memory and that this common narrative should be enshrined in the bricks and mortar of a central museum. Within the European project echoes of this assumed relationship between a common memory and a common identity are to be heard, among other things, in various plans to create a central museum in Brussels. This lecture analyses such debates, challenges their underlying assumption about the need for a common narrative, and proposes a more dynamic view of collective memory and its relationship to citizenship in tomorrow's Europe.

 


IIIS/ Economics Research Seminar

“Impact of Quantitative Easing in the US on emerging economies: An approach based on measuring exchange market pressure”
Ila Patnaik  (National Institute of Public Finance and Policy)

Date: 27th May 2013
Time: 12.30 - 13.15
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome


EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: The EU and the Peace Process in Northern Ireland
Speaker: Dr Etain Tannam (TCD) ***Please Note**** Due to unforseen circumstances this lecture has been cancelled. Apologies for any inconvernience caused.
Date: Wednesday, 22 May
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme

Abstract
The fortieth anniversary of Irish and British membership of the EU and the fifteenth anniversary of the Belfast Agreement imply that it is particularly timely to examine the EU's role in the peace process in Northern Ireland. The role of the EU in the peace process in Northern Ireland is examined by examining theoretical approaches to the EU and by assessing empirical evidence of its role. It is argued that the EU played an important role in the peace process and its concepts of shared sovereignty and post-war cooperation gradually influenced extreme nationalist and unionist parties in Northern Ireland. It also encouraged cooperation by providing economic incentives. However, the EU's normative and empirical role should not be exaggerated and the peace process was fundamentally caused by the evolution of British-Irish joint policy to Northern Ireland since the 1980s.


 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: ‘Collateral Roadkill: the Death of 'Central Europe' as a concept somewhere between Sarajevo and Brussels’
Speaker: Prof Clemens Ruthner (TCD)
Date: Wednesday, 15 May
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome.Please download the full programme

Abstract
This talk will critically examine four types of discourses constructing Central Europe ("Mitteleuropa") as a geo-political entity (Palacky, Naumann, Biro, Kundera and the revival of the concept in the 1980s), exposing the underlying (post-) imperial(ist) agenda. It will be claimed that Mitteleuropa discourses of any kind have come to a practical end in Sarajevo (with the city´s siege in the gory Yugoslav Succession wars of the 1990s) and to a politicial standstill in Brussels (with the EU enlargement 1995/2004). But is this the end of regional identities in the centre of Europe?


EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: "1 July 2013: Croatian EU membership and the perspectives for the Western Balkans''
Speaker: Prof Tvrtko Jakovina (Zagreb)
Date: Tuesday, 30 April
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme

Abstract
The Republic of Croatia is going to join the EU on July 1, 2013. At a time of deep crisis in many European countries and cynicism among many citizens in the South Eastern part of Europe, the EU still represents something desirable. Socialist Yugoslavia, after Tito split with Stalin in 1948, remained in-between two ideological blocks: West for the East, East for the West. The country was sometimes called "The American Communist Ally". Socialist, but non-aligned, not a member of any eastern associations, Yugoslavia was the most similar to the West of any socialist country, with open borders and a socialist market economy. However, Tito's Yugoslavia disappeared in a series of wars remaining a black hole of the Continent. In his lecture Prof Jakovina will try to give an overview of the Cold War history of SEE, try to describe why countries that were on the fast-track to join the West became the place of wars and still represent serious challenges for the world.


 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: ‘EU enlargement in Central and Eastern Europe: Happy Ever After?’
Speaker: Dr Vera Sheridan and Dr Sabina Stan (DCU)
Date: Wednesday, 24 April
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

Abstract
This talk will discuss the different journeys that brought ten new member states into the European Union from Central and Eastern Europe. These states undertook to meet the Copenhagen criteria for EU membership which set out the preconditions for their membership. Since 2004 there have been a range of outcomes for both new member states and ‘old Europe’ of the EU-15 as a direct result of the conditions of membership. There are also outcomes which reveal interesting perspectives by ‘old Europe’ on the new and which raise questions around integration and future enlargement.


 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Euro Crisis Roundtable
Speakers from the Economic Policy Panel
Chair:
Kevin O'Rourke Chichele Professor of Economic History, University of Oxford
Date: Thursday, 18th April
Time: 4.15pm
Venue: The J M Synge Theatre, Room 2039, Ground Floor Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome.


A discussion of the future of the euro area with leading experts.  Hans-Werner Sinn is Director of the CES-ifo Institute and one of Germany's chief economists. Richard Portes is Professor of London Business School and President of the Centre for Economic Policy Research.  Alan Taylor is Professor of Economics at the University of Virginia and an expert in financial economics and economic history.

Presentation:
The euro and its discontents by Richard Portes, London Business School and CEPR


IIIS Research Seminar
Fragmentation, Incomes and Jobs. An analysis of European competitiveness

Speaker: Professor Marcel Timmer, University of Groningen
Date: Thursday, 18th April
Time: 3pm-3.45pm
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This seminar will showcase new empirical work on the relation between the fragmentation of production across global value chains and income and employment dynamics in Europe.



Eurostat Seminar
Global value chains and economic globalization:

Date: 18th April 2013
Time: 9.00 - 14.45
Venue: The Trinity Long Room Hub,Trinity College
To register, please email corporate.support@cso.ie
Download Programme


 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Address by Vitor Gaspar "Adjusting in the euro area: the Portuguese case"
Date: Thursday, 11th April
Time: 9am - 10am
Venue: The Thomas Davis Theatre, Room 2043, Ground Floor Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin
Please download his presentation here

Portugal's Finance Minister Vitor Gaspar will deliver an address on "Adjusting in the euro area: the Portuguese case" at 9am on Thursday April 11. The lecture will be followed by a Q+A session. The event will be chaired by Philip Lane, Whately Professor of Political Economy. Previously, Mr Gaspar had a distinguished economics career at the European Central Bank, the European Commission and the Central Bank of Portugal.


 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: ‘The Cultural Environment: The Case of Germany and Ireland’
Speaker: Prof Mary Keating and Prof Gillian Martin (TCD)
Respondent: H.E. Dr. Eckhard Luebkemeier, German Ambassador to Ireland
Date: Wednesday, 3rd April
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

Abstract
Are globalization and ever closer business relationships between European countries resulting in convergence between management cultures or is there evidence to suggest that cultural divergence continues to shape management practice and behavior? This lecture will address the management-culture connection by taking the example of Ireland and Germany. It will draw on empirical research conducted by the authors over the last 15 years and explore the impact of societal culture on a range of themes including leadership, ethical leadership and integrity, decision-making, and business communication. It will also assess the implications emerging from this research for managing business relationships between the two countries.


'Learning from Poland'
Migration Seminar Series and Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)

Title: The Labour Market Position of Poles in Ireland
Speaker: Peter Muhlau, Asst Professor in Sociology, PI at SCIP, TCD
Date: 28 March 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD

Abstract

How has the recession affected the employment and job quality of Polish migrants in Ireland?  Based on the reconstruction of the employment histories of more than 600 Polish migrants in Dublin, the study demonstrates that employment levels, occupational status and earnings have been surprisingly stable at the macro-level of the Polish community in Dublin between 2008 and 2010. Underlying this macro-stability is a high degree of individual transitions in and out of employment and of vertical earnings and occupational mobility.  Up-to 50 percent of Polish migrants in 2008 may have seen a deterioration of their labour market position until 2010, while in the same period about 40 percent may have seen gains in terms of employment and occupational attainment. The position of Polish women improved strongly relative to Polish men in this period. The main reason is that men on particularly well-paid and prestigious jobs had a particular high risk of losing their job. Job losses among women were fewer and the quality of the lost jobs was poor relative to the average job women held in 2008. The study is the first longitudinal study of labour market and occupational attainment of immigrants in Ireland.


 

IIIS/ Economics Research Seminar

Sovereign risk and macroeconomic stability in the euro area.
Gernot Muller (Bonn)

Date: 26th March 2013
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

Abstract

Sovereign risk premia have risen sharply in several European countries, contributed to increased credit spreads in the private sector. If monetary policy cannot offset these credit spreads because it is constrained by the zero lower bound, sovereign risk threatens macroeconomic stability: private-sector beliefs of a weakening economy may become self-fulfilling. In this paper, we put forward a two-country model of a monetary union featuring a "sovereign risk channel" and analyze how sovereign risk affects macroeconomic stability. We explore to what extent a) fiscal austerity and b) measures to pool sovereign risk are suited to contain sovereign risk and restore macroeconomic stabilit

 


 

 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: ‘Europe in Search of Itself, in Search of the other’
Speaker: Prof Joep Leerssen (Amsterdam)
Date: Monday, 25th March
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

Abstract
Nation-states have a much more robust presence in citizens' identities and allegiances than "Europe",
which, as a result, is often represented as crisis-prone, faceless and infirm.
The mental image invoked by Europe lacks two elements which shore up the robust identity of nation-states: inner cohesiveness (a collective sense of shared culture) and outward distinctiveness (an outsider or "Significant Other" against whom the nation silhouettes itself).

In this lecture Prof Leerssen will draw on insights from cultural history to argue two points: [a] neither the "inner cohesiveness" nor the "outer distinctiveness" is as strong within the nation-state as we commonly assume; [b] neither the "inner cohesiveness" nor the "outward distinctiveness"  is as weak at the common-European level as the current media rhetoric would have us believe.

 


IIIS Seminar Series

Title: The World is Bumpy: Power, Uneven Development and the Impact of New ICTs on South African Manufacturing.
Speaker: Padraig Carmody

Date: Friday, 22 March
Time: 13.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th floor Arts Building, TCD

Abstract
Some now assert Sub-Saharan Africa's (SSA) marginalization in the global economy is being reversed by an information technology revolution. However, while many claims are made for new ICTs - and mobile phones in particular - very little research has been done on the precise ways in which firms use these technologies and their developmental impacts. Drawing on over fifty firm-level interviews, this paper examines evidence of the uses and impacts of new ICTs in the wood products industry in Durban, South Africa and its surrounding region. In contrast to assumptions in much of the literature, it finds that rather than primarily being used to connect to global markets, they are most commonly used as technologies of local labour control and inter-firm competition. Consequently the use of these technologies may deepen existing inequalities and uneven development, and in some instances disinformationalisation, rather than reduce or overcome them.


 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: "Born in YU: Performing, Negotiating, and Re-imaging an Abject Identity"
Speaker:Dr Silvija Jestrovic (Univ of Warwick)
and
Title: "Hurt Identities? The Postwar Bosnian narrative of Self-Victimization"
Speaker:Ms Ana Mijic (Univ of Vienna)

Date: Thursday, 21 March
Time: 13.00
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

Dr Silvija Jestrovic (Univ of Warwick):
"Born in YU: Performing, Negotiating, and Re-imaging an Abject Identity"

Born in YU opened in October 2010 in Yugoslav Drama Theatre one of the leading theatres in Belgrade with the long-standing tradition in the region. The show was directed by Bosnian director Dino Mustafic and performed and developed by Serbian dramaturges and actors. Following the opening, the local broadcasting company B92 facilitated a public dialogue involving some of the creators, as well as other artists and intellectuals from former Yugoslavia. After almost twenty years since the downfall of Yugoslavia and the war that ensued, this performance and the public dialogue were among the first attempts to ask: What did Yugoslavia mean to generations that survived it? How has Yugoslavia, not necessarily the nation state, but rather a shared cultural space, shaped various identities in the region? Why does Yugoslavian identity no longer have a place and why is it important to find it? Dr Jestrovic will explore how Born in YU, through tensions between personal and collective, foregrounds the notion of Yugoslavian identity as an abject and how it simultaneously opens a space for re-evaluating and re-negotiating of this abject identity. I will argue that Born in YU, and the dialogue that it has been inspiring potentially enable a process of understanding of the recent past; of how the current national and cultural identities in the region have been constructed; and how these identities could be reconciled with or subverted by the abject identity that keeps asking what has it meant to be born in YU?

Ms Ana Mijic (Univ of Vienna):
"Hurt Identities? The Postwar Bosnian narrative of Self-Victimization"

During the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina (1992-1995) the identities of the conflicting parties were characterized by intensive and powerful ethnic in-group/out-group differentiations and inseparably linked with the belief in one’s own moral superiority.
After the end of war the Bosnian people were confronted with a novel situation; due to new and externally induced normative standards that delegitimize ‘hierarchical ethnicity', and due to the fact that they have to continue living as neighbours in one nation-state, they are forced to perform new definitions of ethnic boundaries, or to frame it with a sociological classic - a new “definition of the situation”. Ms Mijic will explore how people react to these challenges to their identity, both on an individual and on a collective level. Her research has focused on a qualitative empirical analysis of the genesis and the persistence of self-attribution and the attribution of others in the context of the accelerated social transformation processes in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The reconstructive analysis of narrative interviews conducted in different regions of the country shows that the construction of personal identity is to a large extent affected by the identification with the ethnic in-group, which is typically perceived as the greatest victim of war and the post-war constellation. Self-victimization seems to be an evident solution of the post war crisis, since it enables people to handle the dilemma between the old war-shaped identities with their in-group centred normativity and universal ethical standards.

 



IIIS Seminar Series

Data Protection and the European Development
By Prof. Dr. Heinrich Amadeus Wolff, Europa-Universitat Viadrina, Frankfurt (Oder) and IIIS Visiting Academic

Date: Wednesday, 20 March
Time: 19.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building

Abstract

The theme or the topic is called: The data protection and the European development through a German view. The presentation will be divided into further three parts:
The Basics of the data protection law
the description of the European data protection and its reform
An evaluation or assessment of the reform from the German perspective


IIIS/ Economics Research Seminar


Financial Regulation, Credit and Liquidity Policy and the Business Cycle
George Bratsiotis (Manchester)

Date: 19th March 2013
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

Following the global financial crisis that started in 2007, US and Europe have ex- perienced increased volatility in both nominal and real variables and massive swings in the stock markets. This has prompted global financial regulation committees and national monetary authorities to seek better ways of monitoring and regulating the financial and credit markets, so as to reduce economic volatility in times of financial shocks. In this paper we set up a DSGE model, with credit market frictions and an endogenous probability of default, where the risk of borrowers, (intermediate goods firms), is carried by commercial banks and their bank equity holders. We examine how financial regulation and macro-prudential monetary policy (including Basel, II and III, countercyclical bank capitals rules and liquidity rules) may affect the business cycle in times of demand, supply and financial shocks (collateral and credit shocks).


 

Recruiting and Funding Post-doctoral Fellows through the Marie Curie Programme

Friday 15th March, 1-2PM
Neill-Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub

This lunchtime session will focus on EU-funded opportunities to recruit high-quality post-doctoral fellows into your school or research area, as well strategies for identifying Fellows and maximising their input to the School or discipline.

The next deadline is in August 2013, so now is the time to identify young researchers to come to TCD in 2014!

Please Note: Marie Curie programme has the potential to be very supportive of our flagship research areas in the Institute and other research activity more generally

Speakers

Professor Ron Davies (Economics, UCD)  - Marie Curie Mentor
Jennifer Edmond, TCD Director of Strategic Projects
Oonagh Kinsman, TCD Research Development Office

 


 

Title: "Early-life Causes and Later-life Consequences of Migration: Evidence from Older Irish Adults"
Speaker: Alan Barrett, ESRI
Date: 14th March 2013
Time: 1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD

Abstract

Between 2009 and 2011, fieldwork was undertaken for the first wave of the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA). Extensive information was collected on about 8,500 individuals aged 50 and over and living in Ireland, covering topics such as economic circumstances and health. One of the features of Ireland's older population is the remarkably high proportion of returned migrants, that is, former emigrants who have returned to live in Ireland. This is reflected in the TILDA sample with over 20 % being returned migrants. Given the large number of returned migrants in the TILDA sample and the fact that the respondents are older, it has been possible to use the data to provide insights into different dimensions of migration at different points in the life-cycle. This paper provides a review of this work to date. Three issues are addressed. First, what circumstances contributed to the decision to emigrate? Second, was there evidence that living away produced psychological stress? Third, do return migrants suffer from social isolation on their return? The data suggest that the return migrants were more likely to have suffered abuse as children, to have been more prone to alcohol problems and to be more socially isolated currently.


 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: ‘The ESM and its Constitutionality’
Speaker: Prof. Dr. Peter M. Huber, Justice of the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany
Date: Wednesday, 13th March
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU.

The series will run from January to June.
PLEASE NOTE:All are welcome and admission is free however there is limited capacity so we request you to RSVP to
iiis@tcd.ie
Please download the full programme.

Abstract
There has been no fundamental change in the Federal Constitutional Court’s view on the division of competence between the EEC (later EU) and the Member States since it first started dealing with the European integration at the beginning of the 1970s. There may have been a change in tone over the past 40 years. The cornerstones of the FCC’s approach, however, remain unchanged. The Maastricht judgement (12th October 1993), the Lisbon judgement (30th June 2009), the judgement concerning supporting measures for Greece and the euro rescue package (7th September 2011) and the judgment on the ESM and the fiscal compact (12th September 2012) are the main landmarks on this way.

At the base of this long line of case law is a concept of the EU as an association of sovereign states (Staatenverbund) in which the Member States are ‘masters of the treaties’ and cannot be deprived of this role but for an act of the constituent power i.e. a referendum according to Article 146 Basic Law.

Accordingly, the European Union possesses only such competences conferred upon it by the Member States (principle of conferral). The activities of the EU are democratically legitimate only insofar as they keep within the scope of this programme of integration. The programme of integration, however, grants EU law precedence over national law, which in principle applies to national constitutions as well.

The conceptual basis of precedence is in all Member States - although they differ in its concrete design - an act of national ratification (Rechtsanwendungsbefehl), in Germany the Act Approving the EEC Treaty and its subsequent amendments. Taking this into account, it seems inevitable that limits to pecedence should arise from national law. Over the past 20 years, the national constitutional identity and the programme of integration have proven to be relevant limits.

The Basic Law sets substantial requirements for the division of competence between the EU and the Member States and, as a necessary consequence, for the democratic legitimation and control of EU decisions as well, which happens primarily through the German Bundestag. These requirements are also valid for other supranational organizations such as the ESM.

In a more specific way the democratic principle as it is laid down in art. 20 par 1 and 2 of the Basic law entails the requirement that the Bundestag remains the place where decisions on the amount of loans and guaranties which Germany may give for other countries, their duration and their conditions have to be decided on in order to make a public debate and accountability possible.

During the ongoing crisis, this may slow down responses to the financial marketsÌ• actual or perceived demands. This means, as the president of the IMF, Christine Lagarde, stated in an interview, that democracy is indeed proving to be an impediment to overcoming the crisis. Yet, this is a price we must be willing to pay for the sake of our and our children’s freedom and self determination. 


IIIS/ Economics Research Seminar


Trade liberalization, supply chains and productivity.
Carol Newman (Trinity College Dublin)

Date: 12th March 2013
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

This paper investigates the impact of trade liberalization on productivity in Vietnam. The gradual opening up of markets to trade over the course of the last decade culminating with the WTO accession in 2007 makes Vietnam an ideal case for exploring this issue. We use microdata on the population of manufacturing enterprises for the period 2001 to 2010 and match these to data on exports and imports at the 4-digit sector level. We examine the direct and

indirect effects of exposure to trade within sectors and along the supply chain by linking the trade data to Supply Use Tables (SUT). Pure efficiency effects are identified by comparing the impact of increased trade exposure on the productivity of firms in competitive and concentrated sectors. We also disentangle the pure within-firm efficiency effects from spillover and learning effects. Our results reveal that productivity gains associated with trade liberalization through the export channel are limited to competitive high-tech sectors but with some evidence of learning-by-exporting effects in competitive low-tech sectors. We also find evidence of productivity gains associated imported intermediate goods through cost reductions for all downstream firms. Finally, efficiency improvements for downstream high-tech firms that import intermediates are also found to be an important feature of trade liberalization.


 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: ‘Between the 'Blue Card' and Circular Migration: Crisis of EU's Immigration Policy for the Third-country Nationals’
Speaker: Prof Binod Khadria (Jawaharial Nehru University)
Date: Wednesday, 6th March
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

Abstract
Barring United Kingdom and Ireland, rest of Europe has traditionally been known as the ‘fortress Europe’ so far as its links of migration with the outside world is concerned. Europe has however moved away from this position of being closed to immigrants, apparently borrowing from the experience of the UK and Ireland in being open to migration to and from the third-countries. The post-9/11 transition in the US immigration policy, which became restrictive, provided an immediate impetus to the switch in the European stance. With the consolidation of the EU, , there have been two diametrically opposite trends in the homogenization of the EU immigration policy towards third-country nationals, mainly for those coming from the developing countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America. Whereas, the so-called Blue-card was floated to compete with the American Green-card by way of promising settlement rights to the highly skilled immigrants and their families from countries of these continents, the circular migration policy was to give precedence to temporary immigration over permanent. Whereas the Blue card was perceived to be an instrument for unification and reunification of families, circular migration, which silently discouraged families to accompany the migrants, led to the splitting and nomadization of the family. This contradiction is reflected in the range or the spread of diversity in the visa issuance policies of the countries of the EU. In fact, the contradictions are subtle and hidden in the practices of visa issuances as compared to the explicitly laid down policies. The contradiction provides the EU countries a convenient handle of selectiveness for choosing the highly skilled scarce workers for their most productive part of life cycle and to rotate the unskilled and the low-skilled at shorter intervals. Transitory nature of the immigration policy, arising from frequent and unanticipated changes therein, has become the hallmark of sovereignty over border control of EU’s unified boundaries. This raises some pertinent questions regarding the age-old issues of brain drain and brain gain in the context of EU’s current fixation with circular migration.


 

IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Short-term, long-term, social and spatial effects of incentives for pro-social behaviour: micro evidence from a natural field experiment
Mario Macis (Johns Hopkins University)

Date: 5th March 2013
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

We conducted a natural field experiment with the American Red Cross to study the effects of economic incentives on pro-social behavior. The experiment was designed to assess the total effects of incentives on prosocial behavior including local and short-term effects, but also spatial and temporal substitution, heterogeneity and social spillovers. Subjects offered $5, $10, and $15 gift cards to donate blood were more likely to donate and more so for the higher reward values. The incentives also led to spatial displacement and a short-term shift in the timing of donation activity, but no long-term effects. The effects were heterogeneous; subjects with lower donation costs and less reputational concerns responded more to the rewards. We also detected a social spillover
effect whereby subjects who were not informed of the incentive offers by the American Red Cross nonetheless learned about the offers and were more likely to donate. These responses imply that the total genuine effect of incentives on pro-social behavior includes not only the immediate local effects, but also spatial displacement, social spillovers and dramatic heterogeneity. Overall, economic rewards can be used to increase donations and smooth them over time and space in response to seasonal shortages and local and temporal shocks.


EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: ‘Performing European Memories: Trauma, Ethics, Politics'
Speaker: Prof Milija Gluhovic (Warwick)
Date: Wednesday, 27th February
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub


This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

Abstract

The end of the forty-year Cold War that split the postwar European continent provided the impetus for rethinking the past all over Europe as well as for the study of “European memory.” A commitment on the part of European countries to “work through the past” as individual nations and often contentious negotiations about what to remember and what to forget ran parallel with the search for a transnational memory of the conflicts, contentions, complexity and ambiguity of Europe’s past. This lecture explores the intersections between contemporary European theatre and performance, the interdisciplinary field of memory studies, and current preoccupations with the politics of memory in Europe.  It discusses different ways in which European artists engage with the traumatic experiences of the Holocaust, the Stalinist Gulags, colonialism, and imperialism, challenging their audiences’ historical imagination, and renewing their affective engagement with Europe’s past.  Milija Gluhovic is Associate Professor of Theatre and Performance at the University of Warwick. His research interests include: contemporary European theatre and performance, memory studies, and discourses of European identity, migrations and human rights. His monograph Performing European Memories: Trauma, Ethics, Politics and an edited collection Performing the ‘New’ Europe: Identities, Feelings, and Politics in the Eurovision Song Contest (with Karen Fricker) are forthcoming with Palgrave in 2013. Milija is also the director of an Erasmus Mundus MA in International Performance Research, an EU sponsored program taught collaboratively at the University of Warwick, the University of Amsterdam, the University of Helsinki and the University of Arts in Belgrade.


 

 IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Job Polarization and Structural Change
Zsofia Barany (Sciences Po)

Date: 19th February 2013
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

The polarization of employment and wages in recent decades both in the US and many European countries has generated a lot of interest in empirical labor economics (Autor, Katz and Kearney for the US (2006), Goos and Manning for the UK (2007), and Goos, Manning and Salomons (2009)). This phenomenon, besides the relative growth of wages and employment at the top end of the earnings distribution, also entails the relative growth of wages and employment at the bottom. Two popular explanations suggested in the empirical literature are the routinization hypothesis, and the consumption hypothesis. The routinization hypothesis relies on the assumption that middle-skill and hence middle-earnings occupations are more easily substitutable by machines (Autor, Levy and Murnane (2003), Autor, Katz and Kearney for the US (2006), Goos, Manning and Salomons (2011), Autor and Dorn (2012)). The consumption hypothesis suggests that as the income of high-earners increases, their demand for low-skilled service jobs increases as well, leading to a spillover to the low-end of the wage distribution (Manning (2004), Mazzolari and Ragusa (2012)). We propose an explanation for this phenomenon based on structural change. In our model potentially both of the suggested mechanisms are at work, which helps us to quantify their relative importance.


 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: ‘European Identity and the Crisis’
Speaker: Prof Ettore Recchi (UNICH)
Date: Monday, 18th February
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

Abstract
Is EU identity affected by the Euro-crisis? To answer this question on the basis of available evidence, I draw on a conceptual distinction between the ‘identity of the EU’, understood as its public image formed by many images of many different social groups, and ‘identification with the EU’ or the sense of attachment perceived by individuals who formally (via citizenship) belong to the EU. These two concepts tap different dimensions of identity that I expect to be more and less volatile, reflecting their differing ‘identity salience’. To test this hypothesis I use Eurobarometer data for the last decade. Data analysis reveals a deterioration of the EU image and a relative stability of identifications with the EU in the context of the Euro-crisis.


 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: ‘'How to think of Ethno-Linguistic Nationalism in Central Europe’
Speaker: Prof Tomasz Kamusella (St Andrews)
Date: Thursday, 14th February
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

Abstract
Most classical works on the phenomenon of nationalism draw examples from Central Europe and generalize on their basis for the entire globe. But the region's nationalisms are strongly steeped in language as their ideological cornerstone, which makes Central Europe quite unique in this respect. Elsewhere in the world, nation-states are not built on languages. I propose to flesh out and analyze the difference by focusing on the practises of Central Europe's ethnolinguistic nationalisms, as observed during the last two centuries. Arguably, pinpointing the salient features of this kind of nationalism makes it possible to define what and where Central Europe is, and why generalizing on the region's nationalisms is not viable on a global scale.



IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Necessity is the Mother of Invention: Input Supplies and Directed Technical Change
Walker Hanlon (UCLA)

Date: 12th February 2013
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

The leading theory of directed technical change, developed by Acemoglu (2002), offers two main predictions. First, when inputs are sufficiently substitutable, a change in relative input supplies will generate technical change that augments inputs which become relatively more abundant. Second, if this effect is sufficiently strong, the relative price of the relatively more abundant inputs will increase { the strong induced-bias hypothesis. This paper provides the first empirical test of these predictions using the shock to the British cotton textile industry caused by the U.S. Civil War (1861-1865). Using detailed new patent data, I show that the shock increased innovation in Britain directed towards taking advantage of Indian cotton, which had became relatively more abundant. The relative price of Indian cotton first declined and then rebounded, consistent with strong induced-bias. Given my elasticity of substitution estimates, these findings are consistent with the predictions of the theory.


IIIS Migration Flagship - Learning From Poland Seminar Series

Migration and the Life course: Polish nationals in Ireland.Migration and the Life course: Polish nationals in Ireland.
Justyna Salamonska, Researcher, University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy

Date: 7th February 2013
Time:
1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD


IIIS Public Lecture Series

Title: Diaspora Matters
Speaker: Kingsley Aikins, CBE
Date: 6th February 2013
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub

Abstract
Kingsley Aikins' talk will focus on how countries are now increasingly looking to put in place strategies to connect with their Diasporas and how the concept of 'Diaspora Capital' is developing. He will look at how different countries have tackled the challenges and opportunities in this area. He will highlight successes and failures in the field and why he believes Ireland can become a world leader and act as an exemplar for other countries." 

Biography
Kingsley Aikins was born and brought up in Dublin and educated at The High School, Dublin and Trinity College Dublin, from which he graduated with an honors degree in economics and politics.  He also has a post-graduate Diploma in International Marketing and has studied and worked extensively in France and Spain.  For five years he was the Sydney, Australia based representative of the Irish Trade Board and the Industrial Development Authority (IDA) of Ireland. 

He was a founding director of The Australian Ireland Fund and for two years served as Executive Director responsible for the growth of the Fund in Australia and setting up The Ireland Fund of New Zealand. He established the Lansdowne Club in Sydney which is an extensive Irish business network.

In January of 1993, he moved to Boston to take over as Executive Director of The American Ireland Fund.  The Fund was set up in 1976 and since then The Worldwide Ireland Funds have raised over $300 million for projects of Peace, Culture, Community Development and Education throughout the island of Ireland. In June 1995 he was appointed Chief Executive of the Worldwide Ireland Funds now active in 13 countries including Ireland.  He is a member of the Institutes of Marketing, Export and Linguists.  He was also responsible for the successful five-year Hope and History Campaign to raise $100 million. After 21 years he left The Ireland Funds and runs a consultancy company based in Dublin called Diaspora Matters which gives advice on diaspora issues to governments, corporates and individuals. He writes and speaks extensively on Philanthropy, Diaspora and Networking and in 2011 produced a Global Diaspora Strategies Toolkit and in 2012 was the keynote speaker at the Hillary Clinton Global Diaspora Forum in Washington.

He is married with 3 children and lives in Dublin


EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: ‘Does Europe need an Asia Strategy'
Speaker:Prof Philomena Murray (Melbourne)
Date: 5th February
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

In the context of tectonic shifts in Asia in terms of power, democracy, trade and security, does the EU now need an Asia Strategy? The US has a determined pivot towards the Asia Pacific. Does the EU now need its own pivot to Asia? The EU is not recognized as a key actor in Asia. It has come under criticism for its lack of coherence and consistency in its foreign policy and external relations with Asia. This negative perception has been compounded by rivalries and disagreements among member states and EU institutions. The twin challenges of coherence and consistency of approach remain crucial, as the EU seeks to have a greater presence and impact in Asia. This Lecture will explore the EU's experiences to date and its options in Asia, with particular reference to East Asia


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

The Incentive to invest in thermal plants in the presence of wind generation
Valeria Di Cosmo (ESRI)

Date: 5th February 2013
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

In a deregulated market, the decision to add generation rests with private investors. This paper evaluates how generator profits area effected by increasing wind. Using hourly historical data for the Irish Single Electricity Market, we simulate future series of electricity prices, representative plant bids and wind generation. We estimate a negative correlation between electricity prices and wind generation. This allows us to determine that increasing wind generation capacity causes a larger decrease in profits for baseload gas plants and a smaller decrease for less flexible coal-fuelled plants, suggesting that investment incentives might not be aligned with stated environmental goals.


EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: Multiculturalism and Muslims in Europ
Speaker: Dr Erkan Toguslu (KU Leuven)
Date: 30th January
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

The presence of Islam is felt deep within Western society, along with Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism and a host of other religions and beliefs. The integration of Islamic beliefs into European life has been increasingly visible to the naked eye, whether it be scarf clad women on the streets, Muslim pupils at schools, the halal food industry, housing, employment or social life itself. The ever increasing presence of Muslim communities have prompted the recognition of the issue of compatibility between Islamic values and the values of the host country. Previously it was a common tendency to believe that public life is plural and that secular laws are put in place to manage cultural-religious diversity in publicly occupied domain. At the same time, there has been a rising wave of doubt towards multiculturalism, and more recently its death has been hailed in several political speeches concentrating on the supposed non-compatibility of Muslim communities. The debates on multiculturalism embody the concern of Islamic identity issues and their often tarnished reflection within the public sphere.
Using the debates on multiculturalism in Europe, Dr Toguslu will explore the ways how religion and culture rise above transnational and transcultural boundaries and how transnational and transcultural Muslims can be formulated in public life.


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Stimulating the impact of austerity on the Irish economy using a Stock-Flow Consistent model
Vincent Sterk (University College London)

Date: 29th January 2013
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

We study a heterogeneous agents model which combines matching frictions in the labor market with incomplete asset markets and nominal rigidities. Workers can experience job terminations that send them into short term unemployment or more serious job terminations that require a more difficult search process, a state we call for mis-match. We show an increase in job uncertainty decreases aggregate demand which lowers hiring and therefore produces even more job uncertainty and potentially a deep recession. The amplification mechanism is small when asset markets are complete, prices are flexible or unemployment is predominantly short term. Quantitatively, with a moderate and empirically plausible amount of mis-match, the model can account for the amplitude of the increase in unemployment during the Great Recession, for the increase in unemployment duration, and for much of the shift and movement along the Beveridge curve.


EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: Do We Need Growth to Emancipate Vulnerable People?’
Speaker: Prof Jean Philippe Platteau (Namur)
Date: 24th January
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

The persistence of oppressive or inequitable social norms in many developing countries is an obstacle to the emancipation of significant sections of their population. To end these norms represents a big challenge because they are typically supported by deep-rooted customs and values. It is often assumed that statutory laws are ineffective in the presence of such customs. In this lecture, however, I suggest that the interaction between the modern law and the custom may give rise to several outcomes, and in one of these outcomes the custom evolves in the direction of the law. Moreover, the controversy between radical and moderate reformers can be usefully revisited when an interactive approach between law and custom is followed. In those cases where the law is ineffective, it needs to be complemented by other actions that add internal to external empowerment of the disadvantaged groups of the population. If this cannot be done, economic growth is the only way to help emancipate vulnerable groups by improving their outside opportunities and, thereby, enhancing their bargaining strength.


IIIS Migration Flagship - Learning From Poland Seminar Series

The Labour Market Position of Poles in Ireland            
Dr Kathy Burrell, Senior Lecturer in Social and Cultural Geography, University of Liverpool

Date: 24th January 2013
Time:
1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD

First, the paper will consider the significance of material culture in these personal migration projects. The things which are packed, carried back and forth, displayed and used at home are all windows into different expectations and experiences of migration. They speak volumes about the sorts of lives Polish migrants are leading and the transnational/translocal ties they continue to nurture. Second, the paper will discuss the wider economic contexts of these material experiences. Courier services, for example, are fundamental in material exchanges between migrants and their families. Shops selling Polish goods, have a similar economic significance locally. Supporting the mobility of Polish migrants material lives is also big business. This paper, then, will reassert the significance of the material for appreciating the dynamics and disruptions of contemporary Polish migration


EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: How to fix the Euro Area
Speaker: Professor Charles Wyplosz (Geneva)
Date: 23rd January
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

Since its creation, the Euro Area has sought to enforce fiscal discipline in member states by imposing constraints on sovereign governments and their parliaments. This approach, inspired by the German model of fiscal federalism, has failed spectacularly. And yet, the reforms adopted in 2011 and 2012 rest on the same approach. They are equally doomed. A better approach would start by recognizing that Euro Area member states are sovereign in budget matters and adopt the US model of decentralized discipline, which is both more successful than the German model and better adapted to the European situation


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Eurozone Crisis: It’s About Public Debts, not Competiveness
Charles Wyplosz (Geneva)

Date: 23rd January 2013
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

Correctly interpreting the Eurozone sovereign debt crisis matters a great deal. It is an important historical natural experiment, one of those events that may eventually change our theories. In addition, solving the crisis requires having first reach a diagnosis. Surprisingly, perhaps, the diagnosis is not yet agreed upon. In fact, the official interpretation, backed by some academic research, is likely to be severely mistaken. This paper is an attempt at correcting the mistake.


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Job Uncertaintly and Deep Recessions
Stephen Kinsella (University of Limerick)

Date: 21st January 2013
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

This paper uses an empirically grounded stock-flow consistent macroeconomic model to assess the impact of a sudden drop in government expenditures in the Irish economy. We are able to use the model to trace the development of the shock through the economy. We show that a sharp, one period reduction in public expenditure by 11.5% would lead to a decrease in the liabilities of Irish government securities other than shares of about 14%, with other effects like a decrease in household income, reductions in consumption and a slowdown of growth.


IIIS-Policy Institute Semina

Title: The National Inerest: Evangelist of Democracy
Speaker:
David Rieff, Sciences-Po
Date:
Monday 21 January - 13.00 to 14.15pm
Venue:
Long Room Hub, Trinity

Bio:
Internationally acclaimed author and journalist David Rieff will deliver a talk titled The National Interest: Evangelists of Democracy. David Rieff currently teaches History of Humanitarian Action at the Paris School of International Affairs, Sciences-Po.   Now a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine, and a contributing editor for the New Republic, he has written extensively about Iraq, and, more recently, about Latin America. He is a Senior Fellow at the World Policy Institute at the New School for Social Research, a Fellow at the New York Institute for the Humanities at New York University, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Additionally, he is a board member of Central Eurasia Project of the Open Society Institute and of Independent Diplomat. He is the author of eight books, including At the Point of a Gun: Democratic Dreams and Armed Intervention; A Bed for the Night: Humanitarianism in Crisis; and Slaughterhouse: Bosnia and the Failure of the West.This lecture is organised jointly by TCD’s Institute for International Integration Studies and Policy Institute


 

EURO-VISIONS Lecture Series

Title: Expulsions: The Fifth Circle of Hell
Speaker: Professor Saskia Sassen (Columbia University and LSE)
Date: 15th January
Time: 18.15
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub
This is a jointly organised lecture by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub. This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. The series will run from January to June. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

In the last two decades there has been a sharp growth in the numbers of people that have been ‘expelled’, numbers far larger than the newly ‘incorporated’ middle classes of countries such as India and China. I use the term ‘expulsion’ to describe a diversity of conditions: the growing numbers of the abjectly poor, of the displaced in poor countries who are warehoused in formal and informal refugee camps, of the minoritized and persecuted in rich countries who are warehoused in prisons, of workers whose bodies are destroyed on the job and rendered useless at far too young an age, able-bodied surplus populations warehoused in ghettoes and slums. One major trend is the repositioning of what had been framed as sovereign territory, a complex conditions, into land for sale on the global market – land in Sub-Saharan Africa, in Central Asia and in Latin America to be bought by rich investors and rich governments to grow food, to access underground water tables, and to access minerals and metals. My argument is that these diverse and many other kindred developments amount to a logic of expulsion, signaling a deeper systemic transformation in advanced capitalism, one documented in bits and pieces but not quite narrated as an overarching dynamic that is taking us into a new phase of global capitalism. The talk is based on the author’s forthcoming book Expulsions.


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

What Drives Target 2 Balances? Evidence from a Panel Analysis
Raphael Auer (Swiss National Bank)

Date: 15th January 2013
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

 

 


 

IIIS Seminar Series

The Leadership Transition in China and Sino-American Relationships
Professor Xiong Zhiong, China Foreign Affairs University

China is facing a complicated situation both at home and abroad. It is a serious challenge for the leadership. The new one has good educational background and a plenty of experience on various levels of government, particularly their life in the countryside. The current structure of the leadership is more efficient for policy making. They have started to show their new policies: anti-corruption, continuous economic reform, pro-people approach and so on. However, they will have to overcome several tough difficulties: bureaucratism, badly divided society, and shortage of tradition of continuous reforms and democratic approach to problems. A high expectation of achievements is not realistic. In order to focus on the domestic issues, the new leadership will try to have a stable international environment. They offered their hands to the American leader in order to establish a new model of relations between the powers immediately after they came to power. The response is positive.

DATE: December 17th 2012
TIME: 1-1.50 (sandwiches provided)
VENUE: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD


The 10th Anniversary Conference of the
Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)

Opening Address By  
Professor Linda Hogan
Vice-Provost /Chief Academic Officer


The Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) was formally established in December 2002.
This Conference marks the 10th Anniversary of the Institute's establishment.
Since its establishment the Institute has been to the forefront of scholarly enquiry pertaining to the myriad facets of International Integration.
The public debate on the merits and demerits of global and European Integration has been extremely vigorous in recent years.
This conference makes a valuable contribution to this ongoing debate with members of the Institute contributing on topics ranging from globalisation flows, development, migration, rules & law, industries & enterprises and Europe.

Date & Time: Thursday 13th December 2012 (13.30-19.30)
                        Friday 14th December 2012 (8.45-16.30)

Venue:            Trinity Long Room Hub, Fellows Square, Trinity College
RSVP:              iiis@tcd.ie by Friday December 7th 2012

The 10th Anniversary Conference of the Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)

Please download full programme

Programme Overview

DAY 1: Thursday December 13th 2012 (13:30-19:30)

13:30-13:45 Opening Remarks: Professor Linda Hogan, Vice-Provost /Chief Academic Officer
13:45-15:15 Presentations Theme: Development
15:15-15:30 Break
15:30-16:45 Presentations Theme: Migrant activism
16:45-17:00 Break
17:00-18:15 Presentations Theme: Rules & Law
18:15-19:30 Reception

DAY 2: Friday December 14th 2012 (08:45-16:30)


08:45-09:00 Coffee on arrival
09:00-10:15 Presentations Theme: Perspectives on immigration and emigration
10:15-10:45 Break
10.45-12.15 Presentations Theme: Industries & Enterprises
12:15-13:15 Lunch
13:15-14:45 Presentations Theme: Globalisation Flows
14:45-15:00 Break
15:00-16:00 Presentations Theme: Europe
16:00-16:30 Closing Remarks Professor Jane Ohlmeyer, Vice President for Global Relations

 


'Learning from Poland'
Migration Seminar Series and Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)

Title: Union Availability, Union Membership and Immigrant Workers: Empirical and Theoretical Considerations
Speaker: Dr Tom Turner
, Lecturer, Personnel and Employment Relations, UL
Date:
13 December 2013
Time:
1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD
Download Presentation


“The World Bank and its Work in Africa - Opportunities and Challenges for the Future”
with guest speaker World Bank Vice President for Africa Makthar Diop.


TIDI, the DSAI, IIIS and Irish Aid will collaborate to host a seminar on the 7th of December with guest speaker, World Bank Vice President for Africa Makthar Diop on “The World Bank and its Work in Africa - Opportunities and Challenges for the Future”. This seminar will be opened by Prof. Philip R. Lane, TCD.  

Date: 7th December 2012
Time: 12.00-1.15
Venue: Paccar Theatre, Science Gallery, Trinity College Dublin
Please RSVP to this event at tidi@tcd.ie


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Equilibrium Distributional Impacts of Government Emplyment Programs: Evidence from India’s Employment Guarantee
Clement Imbert (Oxford)

Date: 4th December 2013
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

This paper presents evidence on the equilibrium labor market impacts of a large
rural workfare program in India. We use the gradual roll out of the program to estimate changes in districts that received the program earlier relative to those that received it later. Our estimates reveal that following the introduction of the program, public employment increased by .3 days per prime-aged person per month (1.3% of private sector employment) more in early districts than in the rest of India. Casual wages increased by 4.5%, and private sector work for low-skill workers fell by 1.6%. These effects are concentrated in the dry season, during which the majority of public works employment is provided. Our results suggest that public sector hiring crowds out private sector work and increases private sector wages. We use these estimates to compute the implied welfare gains of the program by consumption quintile. Our calculations show that the welfare gains to the poor from the equilibrium increase in private sector wages are large in absolute terms and large relative to the gains received solely by program participants. We conclude that the equilibrium labor market impacts are a first order concern when comparing workfare programs with other anti-poverty programs such as a cash transfer.


 

'Learning from Poland'
Migration Seminar Series and Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)

Title: Moving and staying: pathways of migration to and from Ireland
Speaker: Dr Mary Gilmartin
, Senior Lecturer, Department of Geography, NUIM
Date:
29th November 2013
Time:
1-2
Venue:
IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Bldg, TCD

This presentation considers the intersections between mobility and immobility in contemporary Ireland. It focuses on the lived experiences of 39 people from EU member states living in Ireland, and explores the different pathways by which EU migrants move to Ireland and become part of Irish society. The presentation outlines three key pathways - cultural, social, and economic - and discusses how and why the relationship between these pathways changes over time. While focusing on EU migrants in Ireland, the presentation has broader relevance for understanding why migrants decide to move or stay, and the difficulties they encounter as a consequence of these decisions.


 

IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

The impact of debt levels and debt maturity in inflation
Elisa Faraglia (Cambridge)

Date: 27th November 2012
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

In the context of a sticky price DSGE model subject to government expenditure
and preference shocks where governments issue only nominal non-contingent bonds we examine the implications for optimal inflation of changes in the level and average maturity of government debt. We analyse these relationships under two different institutional settings. In one case government pursues optimal monetary and fiscal policy in a coordinated way whereas in the alternative we assume an independent monetary authority that sets interest rates according to a Taylor rule and where the fiscal authority treats bond prices as a given. We identify the main mechanisms through which inflation is affected by debt and debt maturity (a real balance effect and an implicit profit tax) and also study additional channels through which the government achieves fiscal sustainability (tax smoothing, interest rate twisting and endogenous fluctuations in bond prices). In the case of optimal coordinated monetary and fiscal policy we find that the persistence and volatility of inflation depends on the sign, size and maturity structure of government debt. High levels of government debt do lead to higher inflation and longer maturity debt leads to more persistent inflation. However even in the presence of modest price stickiness the role of inflation is minor with the majority of fiscal adjustment achieved through changes in taxes and the primary surplus. However in the case of an independent monetary authority where debt management, monetary policy and fiscal policy are not coordinated then inflation has a much more substantial and more persistent role to play. Inflation is higher, more volatile and more persistent especially in response to preference shocks and plays a major role in achieving fiscal solvency.


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Banking Across Borders
Friderike Niepmann (NYFED)

Date: 20th November 2012
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

This paper develops and tests a theoretical model that allows for the endogenous decision of banks to engage in international and global banking. International banking, where banks raise capital in the home market and lend it abroad, is driven by differences in factor endowments across countries. In contrast, global banking, where banks intermediate capital locally in the foreign market, arises from differences in country-level bank efficiency. Together, these two driving forces determine the foreign assets and liabilities of a banking sector. The model provides a rationale for the observed rise in global banking relative to international banking. Its key predictions regarding the cross-country pattern of foreign bank asset and liability holdings are strongly supported by the data.


 

'Learning from Poland'
Migration Seminar Series and Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)

'Elite schooling, equality of opportunity and meritocracy: the case of Ireland
Dr Aline Courtois, Research Associate, UCD

Her work looks at social mobility and the correlation between high fees and academic results within the Irish education system. She considers the emphasis that fee-paying schools place on economic capital in recruitment processes, their particular mechanisms of closure, and their unchallenged symbolic domination. Thus, as elite schools, they carry out their mission to protect privilege, to reproduce - and to some extent also, to rationalize - the social hierarchy; all of which have important implications for the character of social inequality in Ireland.


DATE: Thursday November 15th 2012
TIME:
1-1.50 (sandwiches provided)
VENUE:
IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
Download Poster
Full list of Migration Seminar Series


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

What matters for learning in East Africa? Comparing education production functions between and within countries 
Sam Jones (University of Copenhagen)

Date: 13th November 2012
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

East African education systems have undergone rapid transformation over recent decades. Nonetheless, little is known about what matters for learning across the region. Based on a unique micro-dataset incorporating test scores for almost 350,000 school-aged children in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda (enrolled and not enrolled), this paper provides reducedform estimates of educational production functions at the regional, country and sub-group levels. The possibility of parameter heterogeneity is admitted at the outset and motivates development of a sample-weighted mean-group estimator that ensures consistent estimation
of average marginal effects across heterogeneous groups, such as geographical units. The findings confirm that parameter heterogeneity is substantial. For instance, the average child in Uganda acquires basic skills much later than in Kenya and Tanzania, holding all other inputs constant. However, there are also regularities. The contribution of family background factors to learning is most crucial. School inputs are statistically significant but play a moderate role on average. Amongst these, teacher-pupil ratios and the size of schools are both associated with the largest positive gains in learning.

 

 


 

'Learning from Poland'
Migration Seminar Series and Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)

“Contemporary trends in Irish and European (e)migration”
Dr Piaras MacEinri, Lecturer in Migration Studies, UCC

 

DATE: Thursday November 1st 2012
TIME: 1-1.50 (sandwiches provided)
VENUE: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
Download Poster
Full list of Migration Seminar Series


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Impact of microcredit in rural areas of Morocco: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation
William Parienté (Louvain)

Date: 30th October 2012
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

Microcredit has rapidly expanded in the past years, providing access to financial services to a large population previously excluded from the financial system. However, whether it helps the poor has been a subject of intense debate on which, until very recently, there was no rigorous evidence. This paper reports the results of a randomized experiment designed to measure the impact of microcredit in rural areas of Morocco. Within the catchment areas of new MFI branches opened in areas that had previously no access to microcredit, 81 pairs of matched villages were selected. The treatment villages, randomly selected within each pair, were offered microcredit just after Al Amana opened the branch, while the control villages were offered access only two years later. Al Amana program increased access to credit significantly. Its main effect was to expand the scale of existing self-employment activities of households, for both non-livestock agriculture and livestock activities. We find little or no effect on average consumption as well as on other outcomes such as health, education, etc. However, treatment effects are heterogeneous depending on whether the households had an existing self-employment activity at baseline. Households that had a pre-existing activity decrease their non-durable consumption and consumption overall, as they save and borrow to expand their activities. Households that had not a pre-existing activity increase food and durable expenditure and no effects on business outcomes are observed.


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Culture, Individuals and the Response to Incentive
Greg Fischer (LSE)

Date: 23rd October 2012
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Where are the Productivity Gains from Foreign Investment? Evidence on Spillovers and Reallocation from Firms, Industries and Countries
Carolina Villegas-Sanchez (ESADE)

Date: 16th October 2012
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

We identify the effect of foreign direct investment (FDI) on host economies by separating positive productivity (TFP) effects of knowledge spillovers from negative effects of competition. We use a unique new firm/establishment-level data set covering the last decade for a large set of countries with information on economic activity, ownership stake, type, sector, and country of origin of foreign investors. Controlling for foreigners potentially selecting themselves into productive firms and sectors, we show that the positive effect of FDI on the host economy's aggregate productivity is a myth. Foreigners invest in high productivity firms and sectors, but do not increase productivity of the acquired firms nor enhance the productivity of the average domestic firm. In emerging markets, we find that the productivity of acquired firms increases but thee effect is too small to significantly affect the aggregate economy. For domestic firms, a higher level
of foreign investment in the same sector of operation leads to strong negative competition effects in both developed and emerging countries. In developed countries, we find evidence of positive spillovers through knowledge transfers only for domestic firms with high initial productivity levels operating within the same broad sector as the multinational investor but in a different sub-sector. Our results confirm the predictions of the new new trade and FDI literature, in that more productive firms select themselves into exporting and FDI activities. Similarly to this literature, we highlight the importance of firm-level heterogeneity in productivity as well as in foreign investment.


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Spread the News: How the Crisis Affected the Impact of News on the European Sovereign Bond Markets
Massimo Giuliodori (University of Amsterdam)

Date: 9th October 2012
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

We investigate how “news” affected domestic interest spreads vis-à-vis Germany and how it propagated to other countries during the recent crisis period, thereby distinguishing between the so-called GIIPS countries and other European countries. We make original use of the Eurointelligence newsflash to construct news variables based on the amount of news that is released on a country on a given date. We find that more news on average raises the domestic interest spread of GIIPS countries since September 2009. In addition, we find that it leads to an increase in the interest spreads of other GIIPS countries. The magnitude of this effect is related to cross-border bank holdings. A split of news into bad and good news shows that the upward pressure on domestic and foreign interest spreads is driven by bad news. We also find spillovers of bad news from GIIPS countries onto non-GIIPS countries. However, the magnitude of these spillovers is substantially smaller than that to other GIIPS countries.

 


L-R Louis Brennan, Frank Barry

The Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) recently recognized the authors of the 400th Discussion Paper to be added to the Institute’s Discussion Papers series. This represents a significant milestone in the research output of the Institute and its members.


Discussion Papers are the product of the Institute’s scholarly endeavors and cover a range of topics pertinent to the College’s research of International Integration. They are accessible from the Institute’s website at www.tcd.ie/iiis

The 400th Discussion Paper “Venture Capital in Ireland in Comparative Perspective” was co-authored by Frank Barry, School of Business, Trinity College Dublin, Clare O'Mahony, Dublin Institute of Technology and Beata Sax, Investors TFI Fund Management, Warsaw.

The attached photo shows the Director of the Institute Professor Louis Brennan presenting one of the authors
Professor Frank Barry with the Institute’s certificate of recognition.

 


IIS CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO A
PUBLIC LECTURE

"1950s Ireland and the Birth of the Modern Economy: A Tale of Two Liberalisations"

By
Professor Frank Barry, Trinity College School of Business and IIIS Research Associate

To be followed by a reception at which the authors of the 400th published Discussion Paper of the Institute
Venture Capital in Ireland in Comparative Perspective”
Frank Barry, Trinity College Dublin
Clare O'Mahony, Dublin Institute of Technology
Beata Sax, Investors TFI Fund Management, Warsaw
will be recognised

DATE: Friday October 5th 2012
TIME: 7 PM
VENUE: Thomas Davis Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin
PLEASE RSVP: Colette.Keleher@tcd.ie by Tuesday October 2nd
Please Note: Parking is not available on campus


 

IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

The Output Effect of Fiscal Consolidations
Francesco Giavazzi (Bocconi)

Date: 1st October 2012
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

This paper studies whether fiscal corrections cause large output losses. We find that it matters crucially how the fiscal correction occurs. Adjustments based upon spending cuts are much less costly in terms of output losses than tax-based ones. Spending-based adjustments have been associated with mild and short-lived recessions, in many cases with no recession at all. Tax-based adjustments have been associated with prolonged and deep recessions. The difference cannot be explained by different monetary policies during the two types of
adjustments. Studying the effects of multi-year fiscal plans rather than individual shifts in fiscal variables we make progress on question of anticipated versus unanticipated policy shifts: we find that the correlation between unanticipated and anticipated shifts in taxes and spending is heterogenous across countries, suggesting that the degree of persistence of fiscal corrections varies..Estimating the effects of fiscal plans, rather than individual fiscal shocks, we obtain much more precise estimates of tax and spending multipliers.


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Risk-on/risk-off, capital flows, leverage and safe assets
Robert McCauley (BIS)

Date: 25th September 2012
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

 

This paper describes the international flow of funds associated with calm and volatile global equity markets. During calm periods, portfolio investment by real money and leveraged investors in advanced countries flows into emerging markets. When central banks in the receiving countries resist exchange rate appreciation and buy dollars against domestic currency, they end up investing in medium-term bonds in reserve currencies. In the process they fund themselves (or "sterilise" the expansion of local bank reserves) by issuing safe assets in domestic currency to domestic investors. Thus, calm periods, marked by leveraged investing in emerging markets, lead to an asymmetric asset swap (risky emerging market assets against safe reserve currency assets) and leveraging up by emerging market central banks. In declining and volatile global equity markets, these flows reverse, and, contrary to some claims, emerging market central banks draw down reserves substantially. In effect emerging market central banks then release safe assets from their reserves, supplying safe havens to global investors.


IIIS/Economics Research Seminar Series

Judging the DSGE model by its forecast
Refet Gurkaynak (Bilkent))

Date: 5th September 2012
Time: 12.30 - 14.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD
All welcome

 


Past Events
Academic Year 2011-12

 

Joint ESRI/IIIS Research Seminar: "A Fresh Look at the Link between Corporate Taxation and Inward Foreign Direct Investment"

Venue: The ESRI, Whitaker Square, Sir John Rogerson's Quay, Dublin 2.
Date: Thursday28/06/2012.
Time: 4 pm.
Speaker: Professor Holger Gorg, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, and the Kiel Institute for the World Economy. More information on Prof Gorg.

The authors use unique exogenous corporate tax policy changes in the Republic of Ireland to investigate how corporate taxation affects foreign direct investment at the extensive and intensive margin. To this end the authors construct exhaustive sectoral and plant level panel data and use difference-in-differences strategies. The results indicate that the increase in corporate tax rates for exporters did not affect the entry or exit of foreign plants in Ireland, even though foreign firms use Ireland as an export platform. However, at the intensive margin there is evidence that foreign plants in Ireland reduce the size of their operations in response to the tax change.
All welcome. No registration required.
The Economic and Social Research Institute
Whitaker Square, Sir John Rogerson's Quay, Dublin 2.
Tel: +353 1 8632000; Fax: +353 1 8632100; www.esri.ie;
press@esri.ie; admin@esri.ie.


IIIS Seminar Series

Professor Hinrich Julius of the university of Hamburg will lead a discussion on 26th June Tuesday at 1630 in the IIIS seminar room, Arts Building top floor, on the opportunities for faculty in the China Europe Law School (cesl.edu.cn) (research grants, publications, visiting positions, generation of PhDs, "flying faculty") and on cooperation with Chinese Academic institutions.

Professor Julius is the lead academic coordinator of the European consortium, of which Trinity College is a member, involved in the establishment and running of this law school, based in Beijing.
Various faculty members of the Law School, and of the Department of Politics, and of the profession and the judiciary, have travelled to China (all expenses paid plus per diems) to be involved, all to date reporting well on their experience. Positions have also been available for "flying tutors" which have been filled from time to time by Trinity College research students.


IIIS Seminar Series

Business-foundation partnerships as an instrument of Corporate Responsibility: Do their effects extend beyond the charitable donor-recipient role?

By Maria Jose Sanzo, IIIS Visiting Academic and Professor of Marketing, University of Oviedo, Spain

Date: 21st June 2012
Time: 1 o'clock (Sandwiches Provided)
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin
Download Presentation

This research analyzes the effects of partnerships between firms and nonprofit organizations (specifically, foundations) on the foundations' development of two critical capabilities, namely, human resource management and information and communication technology competence. The study proposes that the stronger the firm-foundation relationship, in terms of perceived value, communication, reduced conflict, trust, and commitment, the greater the transfer of resources and know-how should be from the firm to the foundation, and therefore the greater the foundations' development of key capabilities needed to achieve their social aims. Empirical research is based on a survey of a random and representative sample of 325 Spanish foundations selected according to the basic descriptors of the Spanish foundation sector provided by the Spanish Institute for Strategic Analysis of Foundations, INAEF. Structural equation techniques with EQS 6.2 served to analyze the data. The results confirm that this type of firm-foundation relationship positively influences the extent to which a foundation develops both competences, although the intensity of this effect depends on the type of firm's contribution (monetary versus non-monetary support).


 

 

IIIS Seminar Series

Chasing Ghosts: Rumours and Representations of the Export of Chinese Convict Labour to Developing Countries

YAN Hairong, Anthropolgist, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Barry SAUTMAN, Political Scientist and Lawyer, Hong Kong University of Science & Technology

Date: 30th May 2012
Time: 12 o'clock
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin

Abstract
A recent addition to the global discourse of China's interaction with developing countries has been the claim that the Chinese government exports prison labour to these countries. While no evidence is ever presented to support this claim, it has been widely circulated in international and local media, as well as on the internet. This article examines the origins of the rumour and the mechanisms of its transmission. It shows that while the rumour often originates at the grass roots in developing countries, it is promoted locally and globally by political, economic and media elites with distinct agendas that often involve building support for opposition parties, competition in obtaining contracts, or geo-strategic and ideological rivalry. We analyse the rumour's circulation in light of the larger discourse on China and developing countries, and discuss why Chinese official responses to the claim have proved to be ineffective.

 


 

Celebrate Africa Day 2012

TIDI, in collaboration with IIIS, UCD, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, will host TCD’s annual Africa Day celebration on the theme
‘Scaling Up Agriculture: Sharing challenges and experiences of modernising agriculture in Ireland and Africa’.

This conference will be addressed by keynote speakers:
Simon Coveney, T.D
., Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine
Joe Costello, T.D., Minister of State for Trade and Development
H.E. Catherine Muigai Mwangi, Kenyan Ambassador to Ireland.

There will be a panel discussion with Prof. Patrick Paul Walsh, School of Politics and International Relations, University College Dublin, Dr. Philip Damas, Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania, Ms. Lara Ladipo, Director, Partner Africa, Kenya, Dr. Carol Newman, Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin and a Senior Representative from the Irish Dairy Board. This event will be chaired by Prof. David Taylor, Department of Geography and Chair of TIDI, TCD.

Date:
Wednesday 23rd May 2012
Time: 9.30am-12.30pm
Venue: Synge Lecture Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin
Please Download Invitation here
Please Download Poster here
Please RSVP to rsvptidi@tcd.ie by Friday 18th May to secure a place.
All are welcome to attend so please feel free to circulate this notice. 

Media coverage of Africa Day conference:

 


 

******************************EVENT POSTPONED*********************

IIIS PUBLIC LECTURE

Title: GLOBAL FINANCE: BREAKING THE MOULD

Professor Bob Holton

*********EVENT POSTPONED******************
Date: 17th May 2012
Time: 5pm
Venue: Neil Hoey Theatre, Long Room Hub, TCD
*********EVENT POSTPONED******************

The global financial crisis has revealed deep-seated problems in the ways in which global finance markets, financial regulators and public policies operate. Robert Holton, drawing on his recent book Global Finance, will explore the profound legitimation crisis finance now finds itself in. He will argue that economic thinking is inadequate in explaining market dynamics and market failure. Recent sociological research will be used instead to investigate the social and cultural bases of financial trading and of macro-prudential regulation by central bankers. Market failure to correctly price risk has destroyed trust and confidence. Some implications for financial reform are then discussed, including normative re-regulation of capital markets.

 

 

 


IIIS PUBLIC SYMPOSIUM

The Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) at Trinity College Dublin
is pleased to invite you to the following Public Symposium

 "Whither Ireland and the Fiscal Treaty?"
The fiscal stability treaty referendum takes place on May 31st. There is a need for an informed discussion of the issues. The Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) has a long standing focus in the area of European Integration. With the goal of informing the discussion on the Treaty, the Institute is hosting a public symposium. The event will involve contributions from specialists in Economics, Law and Sociology with expertise in relation to the European project. Their contributions will be followed by an opportunity for a broad ranging discussion of the issues related to the treaty.

Invited speakers
Dr. Gavin Barrett, School of Law, UCD
Prof. Terrence McDonough, J.E.Cairnes School of Business & Economics, NUIG
&
Trinity's Head of School of Social Sciences and Philosophy, Prof. James Wickham

Date: 16th May 2012
Time: 6pm
Venue: Thomas Davis Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin
Please Note: Access to the event is free but we would kindly ask you to please register your participation

 



 

IIIS & DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND PHILOSOPHY TRINITY COLLEGE DUBLIN

You are cordially invited to:

 

Integration from below - half day seminar and book launch of Migrant Activism and Integration from Below in Ireland (edited by Ronit Lentin and Elena Moreo, Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)
Based on the Migrant Networks project, Trinity Immigration Initiative

Date: Friday 4 May 2012
Time: 10.00-15.00
Venue: Seminar room, Institute of International Integration Studies, 6th floor, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin

Programme:
100.00 Registration Welcome: Prof James Wickham, Head of School of Social Sciences and Philosophy, TCD Chair: Ronit Lentin, Department of Sociology, TCD
10.30 Liz Fekete, Institute of Race Relations, London: 'The threat to integration: Racism, authoritarianism and the far-Right in Europe'.
11.15 Mark Maguire, Dept of Anthropology, NUI Maynooth: 'Suspect Identities: Integration and security from below'.
11.45 Elena Moreo, IIIS, TCD: 'On visibility and invisibility: Migrant practices between regimes of representation and self-determination'
12.15 David Landy, Department of Sociology, TCD: 'How do you negotiate power? A social movement perspective for migrant associations'
12.45 Discussion
13.15 Lunch
14.15 Book launch: Gavan Titley, Centre for Media Studies, NUI Maynooth Admission is free but reservation is required.

Please RSVP by Friday 20 April, to Elena Moreo

 


 

Enjoy Spain, Dublin

Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)

International Creative Entrepreneurship and New Opportunities

Date: 26th April 2012
Time: 6-8pm
Venue: Neil Hoey Theatre, Long Room Hub, TCD

"Immigrant Artists, Entrepreneurialism and the Dublin City Art Scape"
Monica Sapielak

"Introduction on the need for entrepreneurialism in the Humanities"
Dr Marisa Ronan, Dublin intellectual Director

"Clues for Being a Successful Entrepreneur"
Domingo Sanchez-Zarza, European PhD Candidate
Nebrija University, Madrid, Spain & Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS), TCD Visiting Research Student

"European Union Cooperation projects in cultural policy"
Professor Juan Prieto-Rodriguez
Department of Economics, Oviedo University Spain & Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS), TCD Visiting Researcher

"Connector"
Mr Conor Lynch
Owner of Connector Social Media, Ireland



 

IIIS Seminar Series

Paradigm lost? The ‘Aid for Trade’ agenda and the European Union’s trade and development policies towards Sub-Saharan Africa

Dr Patrick Holden

Date: Wednesday April 25th 2012
Time: 1-2 (Sandwiches Provided)
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building

The WTO Task Force report on Aid for Trade/AfT outlined broad principles for this form of aid. Crucial questions as to the degree of intervention required to ‘make trade work’, the merits of bilateral versus multilateral assistance, and the relationship between export-led growth and poverty reduction, are left to individual donors and partners to resolve. This paper investigates how the EU’s policies towards Africa have evolved in the light of these tensions. Said policies have also been shaped by emerging global norms, heightened global economic competition and financial constraints. The research combines a critical discourse analysis of key texts, and a content analysis of policy documents, with an analysis of funding patterns and legal/institutional developments. All of which is supplemented by interviews with aid officials and civil society. A complex picture emerges in which the EU’s clearest strategy is its support for inter-regional integration, which it now admits has stalled. The EU is currently forging a new trade and development policy which draws a sharper distinction between least developed states and developing economic partners. ‘Pro-poor AfT’ is a vital concept here but there is little evidence of it actualising this.

Dr Patrick Holden, Politics & International Relations, University of Plymouth is visiting the IIIS from Feb 2012 - April 2012. He is researching the politics of the global ‘Aid for Trade’ agenda. In his time at the IIIS he will be concentrating on how the European Union and other European donors have adopted the global Aid for Trade norms. This involves a study of their policy discourse, as well as policy implementation in a more concrete sense. Aid for Trade is an increasingly important element of international development policy. It came to prominence due to disagreements between developed and developing countries in the WTO on the merits of further trade liberalization. It embodies different forms of aid, which reflect different perspectives on international development (in relation to the responsibility of the developed towards the developing world, and the degree of intervention in the market system that is deemed appropriate). As such ‘the politics of AfT’ is a microcosm of broader debates regarding the future of global capitalism and global governance. Patrick will also be using his time at the IIIS to do work on temporality and the crisis of the European Union.

This research agenda is building on previous work he has done on international aid and trade. (His work is grounded in political science/international relations theory combined with concepts from political economy, organisational theory and other cognate disciplines).
www.plymouth.ac.uk/staff/pholden1



 

TIDI and the IIIS will host a lunchtime seminar with visiting speaker Howard Stein, Professor in the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan who also teaches in the Department of Epidemiology.

The Neoliberal Policy Paradigm and the Great Recession
By Professor Howard Stein

Date: Monday 16th April 2012
Time: 1-2pm
Venue: Long Room Hub, Fellows Square, Trinity College
Contact: tidi@tcd.ie, Website: www.tcd.ie/tidi

All are welcome to attend, lunch will be provided.

 


 

Please Download: Asian Development Outlook 2012: Confronting Rising Inequality in Asia


INVITATION
Asian Development Outlook 2012
Confronting Rising Inequality in Asia

The Institute for International Integration Studies at Trinity College Dublin & the Asian Development Bank (ADB)
cordially invite you to the launch of the Asian Development Outlook 2012

The growing size and financial power of developing Asia is transforming the global economic landscape. ADB’s flagship economic publication Asian Development Outlook 2012 (ADO) provides a comprehensive analysis of macroeconomic issues in developing Asia, with growth projections by country and region. The ADO special theme chapter on confronting rising inequality in Asia examines how policy makers in Asia can respond to growing inequality.


ADB’s Asian Development Outlook 2012 provides insights on very current questions:

  • What are the immediate economic prospects for developing Asia and what risks lie ahead?
  • Will the sovereign debt crisis in Europe and slow growth in the US undermine developing Asia’s prospects?
  • Why is there growing inequality in many Asian countries despite impressive development gains?
  • What consequences would Asia face if these disparities were allowed to widen further?
  • How can developing Asia ensure the gains of economic growth are shared broadly?

Mr. Joseph Zveglich, ADB’s Assistant Chief Economist, will present the key findings of the Asian Development Outlook 2012, including this year’s special theme chapter on Confronting Rising Inequality in Asia. In addition, the Asian Development Outlook 2012 includes analysis of 45 economies in developing Asia and the Pacific, including People’s Republic of China and India. The report also examines the medium-term prospects for developing Asia, by country and by sub region: East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, Central and West Asia, and the Pacific. Mr. Joseph Zveglich's presentation may be downloaded here

Date: Friday, 13 April 2012
Time: 11.30 - 1.30 pm
Venue: Thomas Davis Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin
Access to the event is free but we would kindly ask you to please register your participation by 11 April 2012.
Contact: Colette Keleher
Please Note: Parking is not available on campus

Programme

11.30 - 11.40 Welcome & Opening Remarks
Professor Louis Brennan, Director Institute for International Integration Studies, Trinity College
Ms. Naomi Chakwin, Resident Director General, European Representative Office, Asian Development Bank

11:40 - 12.30 Presentation “Asian Development Outlook 2012: Confronting Rising Inequality in Asia
Mr. Joseph Zveglich, Assistant Chief Economist, Asian Development Bank

12.30 - 13.00 Panel Discussants:

Colin LawlorProfessor Bernadette Andreosso Director, Euro-Asia Centre at University of Limerick and holder of the Jean Monnet Chair of Economics at University of Limerick.

Dr. Paul Gillespie, former Foreign Policy Editor, The Irish Times and lecturer in European politics and comparative regionalism, School of Politics and International Relations, University College, Dublin

H.E. Mr. Chang Yeob Kim, Ambassador of the Republic of Korea

Mr. Colin Lawlor, Chair Asia Trade Forum, Vice President, Irish Exporters Association and Commercial Director, BiancaMed Ltd.

Dr Paul Ryan, Assistant Secretary, IFI/EU Budget Section, Department of Finance, Ireland

13.00 - 13.30 General Discussions, Questions & Answers

 


 

IIIS PUBLIC LECTURE

"Never Waste a Good Crisis - Why Europe will prosper"

Dr. Eckhard Lubkemeier, Ambassador to Ireland of the Federal Republic of Germany

DATE: Thursday January 26th 2012
TIME: 17.00
VENUE: THOMAS DAVIS THEATRE, ARTS BUILDING, TCD
RSVP: By Friday Jan 20th to Colette.keleher@tcd.ie

 

Dr. Eckhard Lubkemeier has been Ambassador to Ireland of the Federal Republic of Germany since August 2011. Prior to that he served as Deputy Head of Mission at the German Embassy in London. From 2006 to 2007 he was a Senior Research Fellow at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs in Berlin. Over the period 2003 to 2006, Dr. Lubkemeier was Deputy Director General for European Affairs at the Federal Chancellery in Berlin. He was Special Commissioner for Conflict Prevention and Crisis Management as well as Head of Section for European Security and Defence Policy in the Federal Foreign Office in Berlin from 2000 to 2003.

Dr. Eckhard Lubkemeier received his PhD in Political Science from the Free University of Berlin in 1980 and worked at the Foreign and Security Policy Research Institute at the Friedrich-Ebert-Foundation from 1980 to 1999. He was a Research Fellow at the Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University from 1986 to 1987.

 


 

International Integration  Town Hall Meeting
Time/Date:  Wednesday 18th January 2012,  3-5pm followed by networking reception
Location: Long Room Hub see map
Champion: Louis Brennan

“This meeting is directed towards those already involved in research related to International Integration within the IIIS as well as those wishing to become active and those with an interest in the theme

Benefits for you as a researcher

  • An opportunity for you to shape the research agenda for International Integration
  • Avail of research funding support  
  • Personal affilliation with an internationally recognised strategic research theme
  • An opportunity to engage with colleagues in other fields and capitalise on the potential for inter-disciplinary research in this area. 

Background
IIIS  was established in 2002.  It currently has over 50 TCD research associates and another 25 external research associates involved in European and international integration in the social sciences, business, law and those aspects of the humanities which explore the processes of cultural identity formation, encounters and change.  The Institute also addresses the flows and exchange of ideas, values and peoples which serve to buttress international integration.

Ten years later, we now launch the International Integration Theme as part of the implementation of the College’s Research Strategy. 

Our aims

  • Consolidate and grow the research community in Trinity in this area
  • Develop an innovative strategy in response to the changing environment in which everyone involved has a part to play
  • Provide a framework and structure for new and emerging research activity, identifying new funding sources, partners and collaborators
  • Secure funding to bring in additional supports in terms of research development officers and policy advisers,  etc.
  • Expand the current network and research activity to ensure that IIIS maintains its premier status as a Trinity Research Institute
  • Establish a steering committee to advance the theme strategy

Agenda
3.00-3.15  Prof Vinny Cahill, Dean of Research – Implementation of the College Research Strategy
3.15-3.30  Prof Louis Brennan, (Theme lead) – Shaping the future of IIIS
3.30-4.30  Open forum – participants will speak for 2 min *
Question 1   What research are you doing which could contribute to the International Integration theme?
Question 2  Your ideas for the theme’s research strategy?
4.30-5.00 Discussion

Followed by networking reception
*If you would like to provide 2 slides answering Questions 1 & 2above please email to dean.of.research@tcd.ie by 17th Jan
Please RSVP to dean.of.research@tcd.ie confirming your attendance on 18th Jan @ 3pm in Long Room Hub.

 


 

"The UN Convention against Corruption: What it means for Ireland and the World"

Transparency International Ireland (TII) and the Institute for International Integration Studies at Trinity College will host a roundtable seminar on Thursday 8 December 2011, to discuss the potential impact of the United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) at both a domestic and international level. 

Ireland's ratification of the UNCAC this year was the final step to adopting a framework of international law aimed at stopping corruption at home and abroad. Although Ireland is already party to regional conventions against corruption, UNCAC is the first global convention and obliges state parties to implement a wide and detailed range of anti-corruption measures affecting their laws, institutions and practices. The convention also provides for a comprehensive international co-operation framework between law enforcement agencies and greater civil society participation in stopping corruption. 

The seminar will bring together public officials, academics and practitioners to share perspectives on the potential impact of UNCAC on Irish and international legal and institutional frameworks, and how governments, business and civil society can work together in fulfilling the potential of the Convention.

Venue: The Seminar Room, Institute for International Integration Studies, Trinity College Dublin
Date: Thursday, 8 December 2011
Time: 9.30 to 1pm,

Agenda  
9.00-9.30: Registration
9.30-9.35: Introductions
9.35-11.00: Presentations on the UNCAC Framework: What it means at home and abroad    
A brief history of UNCAC and international anti-corruption conventions: John Devitt, Chief Executive, Transparency International Ireland
Anti-Corruption Legislation in Ireland-Key Developments: Imelda Higgins BL
Private Sector Initiatives-Speaker:  Siemens  
10.35-11.05: Panel Q&A  
11.05-11.20: Coffee Break  
11.20-12.30: Facilitated roundtable discussion on what steps government, business and civil society must take to meet the demands of UNCAC in Ireland  
12.30-13.00: Conclusions

 

The IIIS was established in 2002 with a grant from the Irish government's Programme for Research in Third-Level Institutions (PRTLI) and a philantrophic donation from Peter Sutherland. It is dedicated to promoting and disseminating research and learning about the myriad dimensions of global and regional integration.

Founded in 2004, Transparency International Ireland (TII)  is the Irish chapter of the worldwide movement against corruption.  Its National Integrity Study (NIS) programme identifies weaknesses in how Ireland is governed and offers recommendations for systemic reform. Its new Speak Up helpline (www.speakup.ie) offers information and guidance to potential whistleblowers, witnesses and victims of corruption."

 

 


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Financing for Development: Tobin Taxes, National Tax Systems and International Tax Transparency

IIIS and TIDI Seminar
Date: Tuesday 8th November 2011
Time: 5.30-7pm
Venue: The Long Room Hub, Fellows Square, TCD
Contact: Email: tidi@tcd.ie; Website: http://www.tcd.ie/tidi/development-research-week/2011.php
This session considers the challenges associated with the need for developing countries to identify and develop sustainable revenue sources which can be used to finance their development.
Speakers: Sorley McCaughey, Policy and Advocacy Officer, Christian Aid Ireland and Micheal Collins, Senior Research Officer at the Economic Research Unit. Chaired by Frank Barry, School of Business/IIIS, TCD. Co-hosted with IIIS. RSVP for this event to: tidi@tcd.ie


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'Democracy, Development, and Economic Justice'

IIIS and TIDI Seminar with Nitasha Kaul, Economist and Writer

Date: Monday 7th November 2011
Time: 1-2pm 
Venue: Swift Theatre, Arts Building, TCD.
Contact: Email: tidi@tcd.ie; Website: http://www.tcd.ie/tidi/development-research-week/2011.php
Nitasha Kaul is a Kashmiri novelist, academic, artist who inhabits many lives in the UK, Bhutan, India. Her first book was ‘Imagining Economics Otherwise’. Her debut novel ‘Residue’, about Kashmiris outside of Kashmir, was shortlisted for the Man Asian Literary Prize in 2009. Chaired by Dr. Rosemary Byrne, Centre for Post-Conflict Justice. Co-hosted with IIIS. Lunch provided.


CENTRE FOR POST-CONFLICT JUSTICE
Trinity College Dublin
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The Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) The Trinity International Development Initiative (TIDI) &
The Centre for Post-Conflict Justice,
Invite you to a Seminar

By
 David Rieff

THE SILENT PLAGUE: HUNGER, JUSTICE, AND MONEY IN THE 21ST CENTURY

VENUE:                       Long Room Hub, TCD
DATE:                          Tuesday November 1st 2011
TIME:                           4.30-5.30 p.m.


Internationally acclaimed author and journalist David Rieff currently teaches History of Humanitarian Action at the Paris School of International Affairs, Sciences-Po. During the 1990s, he covered conflicts in Africa (Rwanda, Burundi, Congo, Liberia), the Balkans (Bosnia and Kosovo), and Central Asia. Now a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine, and a contributing editor for the New Republic, he has written extensively about Iraq, and, more recently, about Latin America. He is a Senior Fellow at the World Policy Institute at the New School for Social Research, a Fellow at the New York Institute for the Humanities at New York University, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Additionally, he is a board member of Central Eurasia Project of the Open Society Institute and of Independent Diplomat. He is the author of eight books, including Slaughterhouse: Bosnia and the Failure of the West and A Bed for the Night: Humanitarianism in Crisis.


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Speaker: Denis O’Brien, Chairman, Digicel Group
Chair: Professor Louis Brennan, Director of the Trinty College Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)
Title: TBC
Date: 28th October 2011
Time: 8.30-9.30
Venue: Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin.
Note: RSVP tidi@tcd.ie

 


The European Sovereign Debt Crisis

This public lecture discussed the European Sovereign Debt Crisis one year on from Ireland's 85 billion euro bail out by the European Union-International Monetary Fund. This lecture is part of the 2011-2012 Henry Grattan Lecture Series which will address the theme of The Debt Crisis: Causes, Consequences, Controls.

Peter BooneThe lecture, which was jointly organised by the Policy Institute and the Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS), was chaired by Professor Philip Lane, Head of the Economics Department, Trinity College Dublin.

 

Date: 25th of October 2011
Time: 4-5.45 p.m.
Venue: Tercentenary Hall, Biomedical Sciences Institute, TCD, Pearse Street
The event is free - all welcome. RSVP  

Mike Dooley

    • Before the public policy event, there will also be a IIIS research workshop with presentations by
    • Mike Dooley
    • Alan Ahearne and Guntram Wolff, “The Debt Challenge in Europe” Download Presentation
    • Kristin Forbes and Frank Warnock, “Capital Flow Waves: Surges, Stops, Flight and Retrenchment Download Presentation
    • Philip R. Lane and Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, “External Adjustment and the Global Crisis” Download Presentation

    Date: 25th of October 2011
    Time: 12-3 p.m.
    Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin

 

 

 

 



The Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS), TCD Department of Economics & The Trinity International Development Initiative (TIDI)
invite research students, academics, members of the development community and other interested parties to a seminar by

Veronica Cacdac Warnock, Darden Business School, University of Virginia, Senior Lecturer and Batten Fellow
“Mobile Banking Initiatives in South Asia: Preliminary Thoughts”

Title: Mobile Banking Initiatives in South Asia: Preliminary Thoughts
Speaker: Veronica Cacdac Warnock, Darden Business School, University of Virginia, Senior Lecturer and Batten Fellow
Date: Monday 24th of October 2011
Time: 1-2pm
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor of the Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin


SHORT BIO:
Veronica Cacdac Warnock is Senior Lecturer and Batten Institute Fellow at the Darden Business School of the University of Virginia (UVA).  Her research focuses on housing finance and inclusive banking. She has served as academic consultant for organizations including the National Association of Realtors, the World Bank, and the Bank for International Settlements, and has held visiting positions at the Asian Institute of Management and the Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research. She is currently advisor to “Housing Finance in Latin America and the Caribbean”, a research project at Inter-American Development Bank, and to ShoreBank International’s consulting projects supporting new Mobile Banking for the Poor ventures of commercial banks in Pakistan and Bangladesh.  At Darden, she co-teaches Markets in Human Hope, a course in which students form private ventures to directly address global development problems.  She has also taught urban economics and development courses at UVA. Previously, she was Director/Senior Economist at the Mortgage Bankers Association (of America) and Research Associate at Haver Analytics.  Dr. Warnock received her Ph.D. in Economics from Fordham University and her A.B. in Economics from Ateneo de Manila University.


 

IIIS and Centre for Post Conflict Justice

Against Remembrance
by David Rieff

Date: Friday October 21st, 2011
Time: 16.00-18.00
Venue: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, Trinity College

David Rieff will discuss his recent book Against Remembrance, followed by comments on healing through remembering in Northern Ireland by Geraldine Smyth and memory and the Palestinian Nakba by Ronit Lentin.
Iinternationally acclaimed author and journalist David Rieff currently teaches History of Humanitarian Action at the Paris School of International Affairs, Sciences-Po.During the 1990s, he covered conflicts in Africa (Rwanda, Burundi, Congo, Liberia), the Balkans (Bosnia and Kosovo), and Central Asia. Now a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine, and a contributing editor for the New Republic, he has written extensively about Iraq, and, more recently, about Latin America. He is a Senior Fellow at the World Policy Institute at the New School for Social Research, a Fellow at the New York Institute for the Humanities at New York University, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Additionally, he is a board member of Central Eurasia Project of the Open Society Institute and of Independent Diplomat. He is the author of eight books, including Slaughterhouse: Bosnia and the Failure of the West and A Bed for the Night:Humanitarianism in Crisis. His memoir of his mother's final illness, Swimming in a Sea of Death, appeared in January 2008. His most recent book is entitled  Against Remembrance (2009).Currently he is working on a book about the global food crisis.


Past Events
Acadeic Year 2010-11

 

The New Scramble for Africa by Padraig Carmody, IIIS Research Associate (author)

Mary Fitzgerald and Dr Padraig Carmody

Dr. Padraig Carmody, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin has recently published the book, “The New Scramble for Africa”.This book explores the nature of resource and market competition in Africa and the strategies adopted by the different actors involved be they world powers or small companies. Focusing on key commodities, the book examines the dynamics of the new scramble and the impact of current investment and competition on people, the environment, and political and economic development on the continent. New theories, particularly the idea of Chinese "flexigemony" are developed to explain how resources and markets are accessed. While resource access is often the primary motive for increased engagement, the continent also offers a growing market for lower priced goods from Asia and Asia owned companies. Individual chapters explore old and new economic power interests in Africa; oil, minerals, timber, biofuels, food and fisheries; and the nature and impacts of Asian investment in manufacturing and other sectors. The New Scramble for Africa will be essential reading for students of African studies, international relations, and resource politics as well as anyone interested in current affairs.

Read More

 

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From L-R. Professor Tadhg Foley, NUI Galway, Professor Louis Brennan, Director of IIIS, Dr Chandana Mathur (author), NUI Maynooth and Professor Tom Foley, President of NUI Maynooth

THE IIIS CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO THE LAUNCH OF
Communalism and Globalisation in South Asia and its Diaspora (2011: Routledge, London and New York)
Edited by Deana Heath and Chandana Mathur
SPEAKERS
Professor Tom Collins, President, NUI Maynooth
Professor Tadhg Foley, Professor Emeritus of English, NUI Galway
Professor Louis Brennan, Director of the Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS)
Dr Chandana Mathur (Co-editor), Department of Anthropology, NUI Maynooth and IIIS Research Associate

 

Taking as its premise the belief that communalism is not a resurgence of tradition but is instead an inherently modern phenomenon, as well as a product of the fundamental agencies and ideas of modernity, and that globalization is neither a unique nor unprecedented process, this book addresses the question of whether globalization has amplified or muted processes of communalism. It does so through exploring the concurrent histories of communalism and globalization in four South Asian contexts - India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka - as well as in various diasporic locations, from the nineteenth century to the present.

Including contributions by some of the most notable scholars working on communalism in South Asia and its diaspora as well as by some challenging new voices, the book encompasses both different disciplinary and theoretical perspectives. It looks at a range of methodologies in an effort to stimulate new debates on the relationship between communalism and globalization, and is a useful contribution to studies on South Asia and Asian History.

DATE: Tuesday June 14th 2011
TIME: 6.30 p.m
VENUE: Long Room Hub, Fellows Square, TCD

Download Invitiation
Download Details Of Book

RSVP By Tuesday June 7th to Colette.keleher@tcd.ie
Please Note: Parking is not available on campus

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IIIS Public Lecture

The Korean Economic Crisis:The Road to Recovery

Korean Ambassador H.E. Mr. Chang Yeob Kim.

DATE: Wednesday May 18th 2011
TIME:
17.00
VENUE:
Long Room Hub, Fellows Square, Trinity College Dublin

RSVP: By Friday May 13th to Colette.keleher@tcd.ie
Please Note: Parking is not available on campus

 

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AFRICA DAY 2011

Africa Day Celebration “Investing in Africa: Society, Agriculture and Enterprise”

Africa Day is an initiative of the African Union, which celebrates African diversity and success and the cultural and economic potential of the continent. Africa Day allows us to celebrate the relationship that exists between Africa and Ireland. Events to mark the occasion will this year include a conference examining the role that trade and agriculture have in Africa's future economic development. Trinity College, University College Dublin and Self Help Africa collaborate with the African embassies in Ireland to present an impressive roster of international speakers to discuss the topic "Investing in Africa - Society, Agriculture & Enterprise" at an afternoon conference to be held at Trinity College Dublin.

Participating speakers will include:

The conference will be chaired by Charlie Bird, Chief News Correspondent, RTE and will be opened by Minister of State for Trade and Development, Jan O'Sullivan and H.E. Catherine Muigai Mwangi, Kenyan Ambassador. This event is proudly supported by Irish Aid.

Date: May 25th
Time: 2.30 - 4.30pm
Venue: Davis Theatre, TCD
RSVP to tidi@tcd.ie by Wednesday 18th May

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IIIS Public Lecture

Daniel Kaufmann (Brookings Institution)

New Frontiers and Challenges on Governance:  
How the Evidence Challenges Orthodoxy about Corruption and Governance around the World

                                           

Date: Friday, 11th March, 2011
Time: 10/00 a.m.
Venue: Long Room Hub, Fellows Square (located in front of the Arts Building), Trinity College Dublin.
Contact: Eoin McGuirk, Institute for International Integration Studies and Department of Economics, TCD
Please note that there is no RSVP for this event. Please arrive on time to ensure a place.
Download Poster
Directions to Trinity College Campus

Daniel Kaufmann is a world-renowned writer on governance, corruption, and development, who, with colleagues, has pioneered new approaches to diagnose and analyze country governance.

Kaufmann is a Senior Fellow in the Global Economy and Development Program at the Brookings Institution. He carries out policy analysis and applied research on economic development, governance, regulation and corruption around the world. Previously he served as a director at the World Bank Institute, where he pioneered new approaches to measure and analyze governance and corruption, helping countries formulate action programs.

At the World Bank, Kaufmann also held senior positions focused on finance, regulation and anti-corruption, as well as on capacity building for Latin America. He also served as lead economist both in economies in transition as well as in the World Bank's research department, and earlier in his career was a senior economist in Africa. In the early nineties, Kaufmann was the first Chief of Mission of the World Bank to Ukraine, before taking up a visiting position at Harvard University.

Kaufmann is also a member of the Global Agenda Council at the World Economic Forum, as well as a member of advisory boards at Revenue Watch Institute, Transparency International, and the Mo Ibrahim Foundation. His research on economic development, governance, the unofficial economy, macro-economics, investment, corruption, privatization, and urban and labor economics has been published in leading journals, and his writings are frequently cited in the international media.

Kaufmann is a Chilean national who received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics at Harvard, and a B.A. in Economics and Statistics from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His blog on Governance is at www.thekaufmannpost.net

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IIIS with CRANN, TCIN and the Long Room Hub invite you to an open debate with the Provost Candidates

Research Institutes and Centres are a key element to deliver the TCD mission on research excellence. As such the four TCD Institutes (CRANN, TCIN, IIIS and the Long Room Hub) would like to invite you to an open debate with the Provost candidates addressing the issues of running inter-disciplinary research units within College. The debate will take place on:

Date: Tuesday, March 8th
Time: 7pm
Venue: Long Room Hub theatre.

The format of the meeting will be a simple question and answer one, and the debate will be moderated by Prof. Petros Florides, TCD Pro-Chancellor. An on-line blog on Research at TCD has been set up at

http://outreach.tchpc.tcd.ie/vanilla/index.php?p=/vanilla/discussions

and all the TCD community is invited to post questions to the Provost candidates.

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The Policy Institute and the Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) at TCD are pleased to announce that Andres Velasco (ex Minister of Finance for Chile) will give a seminar at TCD on Monday March 14 on “The Fiscal Framework: Lessons from Chile”.  As has been flagged on this blog before, Chile was able to run very sizeable surpluses in the pre-crisis period, such that it could enjoy a big fiscal swing during the crisis without threatening fiscal sustainability.  This seminar provides an opportunity to learn how Chile was able to achieve this counter-cyclical fiscal policy.

Andres Velasco

Date: Monday, March  14
Time: 8.30am-10am
Venue:  Jonathan Swift Theatre (Room 2041A), Arts Block, TCD
Admission: Free, All welcome

Andrés Velasco: Short Bio

Andrés Velasco was the Minister of Finance of Chile between March 2006 and March 2010. During his tenure he was recognized as Latin American Finance Minister of the Year by several international publications. His work to save Chile´s copper windfall and create a rainy-day fund was highlighted in the Financial Times, the Economist, the Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg, among many others.

Mr. Velasco is currently a Fellow at the Center for International Development at Harvard University.

He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Columbia University and was a postdoctoral fellow in political economy at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He received an B.A. in economics and philosophy and an M.A. in international relations from Yale University.

Prior to entering government, Mr. Velasco was Sumitomo-FASID Professor of Development and International Finance at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, an appointment he had held since 2000. Earlier he was Associate Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at New York University and Assistant Professor at Columbia University.

Mr. Velasco was a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts, an International Research Fellow at the Kiel Institute for World Economics in Kiel, Germany, and the President of Expansiva, a think-tank in Santiago, Chile. He has been a consultant to the International Monetary Fund, the Inter-American Development Bank, the World Bank and ECLAC.

He was president of the Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association (LACEA) from 2005 to 2007. In February 2006 he received the Award for Excellence in Research granted by the Inter-American Development Bank.

In addition to ninety academic papers and three academic books, he has published two works of fiction in Spanish: Vox Populi (Editorial Sudamericana, 1995) and Lugares

 

 

IIIS Public Lecture

Professor Paul Collier
Director, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford

Date: Friday, 4th February.2011
Time: 11:00 – 12:30
Venue: Long Room Hub, Fellows Square (located in front of the Arts Building), Trinity College Dublin.
Contact: Eoin McGuirk, Institute for International Integration Studies and Department of Economics, TCD. Email:
Directions to Trinity College Campus

Long Room Hub, Fellows Square, TCD

Research students, academics, members of the aid community and other interested parties are invited to a public lecture by Professor Paul Collier, Director of the Centre for the Study of African Economies at Oxford University. Prof Collier is one of the world’s foremost authorities on economic development. He was Director of the Research Development Department of the World Bank from 1998 – 2003, and is currently Advisor to the Strategy and Policy Department of the IMF, Advisor to the Africa Region of the World Bank, and he has advised the British Government on its recent White Paper on economic development policy. He is the author of The Bottom Billion, which in 2008 won the Lionel Gelber, Arthur Ross and Corine prizes and in May 2009 was the joint winner of the Estoril Global Issues Distinguished Book prize. His second book, Wars, Guns and Votes: Democracy in Dangerous Places was published in March 2009; and his latest book, The Plundered Planet: How to Reconcile Prosperity with Nature was published in May 2010. He is a regular contributor to the Independent, the New York Times, the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post. Prof Collier has published extensively on the causes and consequences of civil war, the effects of aid, and the problems of democracy in low-income and natural-resources rich societies. In 2008 he was awarded a CBE ‘for services to scholarship and development.’


Past Events
Academic Year 2010-11

 

 

  • "Factors shaping EU external economic policy"

  • By Dr Stephen Woolcock, London School of Economics

Date: Monday July 5th 2010
Time: 2.30 - 3.30
Venue:
TCD-UCD Innovation Academy, 3-4 Foster Place, Dublin 2

 


Alan Matthews

IIIS Public Lecture

  • 'EU Agricultural Policy and it's Effects on Developing Countries: What do we know?'

  • By Professor Alan Matthews, Professor of European Agriculture Policy

Date: Wednesday, 5th May 2010
Time: 6.00 pm
Venue:
Synge Theatre, Arts Building


Linda Hogan

IIIS Public Lecture

Date: Wednesday, 7th April 2010
Time: 6.00 pm
Venue:
Synge Theatre, Arts Building

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Michael Marsh

IIIS Public Lecture

  • Referendums on the EU: Deja Vu (Again)'

  • By Professor Michael Marsh, Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Date:: Wednesday 2nd December 2009
Time
: 6.00 pm
VENUE:
J M Synge Theatre, Arts Building ALL WELCOME
Abstract:
This talk is about Ireland's relationship with the EU as evidenced in the recent history of referendums on NIce and Lisbon. In particular it looks at survey evidence on these two pairs of votes and asks what we can learn from this, with respect both to referendums and to the nature of our attitudes to Europe and our political system.

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IIIS hosts Dublin Political Economy Workshop 2009

Friday November 20th 2009

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IIIS Public Lecture

'Is globalization reversible?'

By Professor Robert Holton

DATE: Wednesday October 28th 2009
TIME: 7.00pm
VENUE: J M Synge Theatre
(Formerly the Walton Theatre)

Abstract: Analyses of globalization have moved beyond the earlier hype about a borderless world inhabited by mobile capital and confident cosmopolitans. Many now speak of limits to globalization, while a few see its death as imminent. In this paper I explore the underlying question ‘is globalization reversible?’ This question has no simple answers. This is partly because of profound ambiguities about the key features of globalization. The line of analysis to be pursued here examines six dimensions upon which questions of reversibility may be assessed. The analytical tone is one of sceptical dis-aggregation rather than system-building. This draws upon a sociological model of differentiation and problems of integration, which may be linked to the idea of cycles of globalization and de-globalization.

Biography: Robert Holton is Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Fellow of Trinity College. His research interests include globalization and global networks, historical sociology, and social theory. His most recent book is Cosmopolitanisms: New Thinking and New Directions, Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.Global Networks was also published by Palgrave MacMillan in 2008. Professor Holton is a member of the international editorial boards of the Journal of Classical Sociology, The European Journal of Sociology, and the Journal of Sociology. He was also part of the editorial team that compiled The Encyclopaedia of Globalization, published by Routledge in 2006. In 1995 he was elected to a Fellowship of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia.

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Africa Day1

IIIS celebrates Africa Day

As part of the Africa Day celebrations on May 25th. The IIIS hosted a conference titled Africa - Moving Forward

 

The invited speakers included Dr Louis Kasekende, Chief Economist of the African Development Bank and Ambassador Dr Tunji Olagunju, Special Adviser to the President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria on the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD),as well as Minister of State with responsibility for Overseas Development, Peter Power. The event was organised by the IIIS and the Trinity International Development Initiative (TIDI), in collaboration with the group of African Ambassadors in Dublin (South Africa, Lesotho, Kenya, Ghana, Egypt, Ethiopia, Morocco and Nigeria) with the support of Irish Aid as part of the Africa Day celebrations nationwide

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Past Special Events

 

 

 


Last updated 15 April 2014 by IIIS (Email).