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Undergraduate

French (TSM)

B.A.; 84 places

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What is French?

French is a major world language, with a rich cultural and intellectual heritage. Knowledge of the French language and its literature opens up a world of opportunities to those who study them. French is an official working language of many international organisations (UN, OECD, NATO, etc.) and as such plays a decisive role in world affairs. French studies also develop highly sought-after transferrable skills - excellent writing and oral communication abilities, critical thinking, extensive analytical skills - across a range of sectors (the creative industries, public service, tourism, publishing, interpreting, teaching, journalism, broadcasting, the Diplomatic Service, to name but a few). Not only is the study of French language, literature, history, politics and philosophy a hugely enriching intellectual experience, but it also leaves graduates very well placed to succeed in a wide range of professional contexts.

French: The course for you?

If you are fascinated by how other languages and cultures offer a different perspective on the world, the French Department in Trinity could well be the place for you. You will enjoy studying French here if you have a passion for novels, cinema, drama, poetry—literature in all its forms—and if you want to develop your ability to think critically. If you are interested in French and European history, politics and thought, and if you would like to have the opportunity to experience at first-hand French culture by living and studying in France, then Trinity’s degree programmes in French could be for you.

French @ Trinity

Studying French at Trinity is not just about experiencing the illustrious history of a Department that boasts the oldest Chair of French in the world (1776) and has, among its alumni, Nobel prize winner Samuel Beckett. Unlike at many other institutions, French in Trinity is a four-year course providing a breadth and depth of experience that makes our graduates among the most highly qualified in the field. In the French Department at Trinity, we adopt a holistic approach to the study of French language and culture by teaching the French language through the literatures, histories, politics and societies of the French-speaking world. You will also have weekly oral classes with native French speakers. In your final year, you will undertake a research project on a topic of your choice. At Trinity, we also encourage all students to take the opportunity to go abroad for a full academic year, or a term. There is no better way to learn French than to live and study through the language, and Trinity has a range of partner universities in France (see Study Abroad section). The result is that you will leave university with a high standard of fluency in the language, both written and spoken, and with a wide knowledge of major aspects of French literature, culture, history and society. You may also learn French in Trinity by opting for one of the four non-literary degree programmes: European Studies (with French and another language), Business Studies and French, Law and French, and Computer Science and Language (French).

Graduate skills and career opportunities

Language graduates in general have excellent written and oral communication skills. Graduates of French, in particular, acquire highly developed skills in textual analysis and critical thinking and are sought after by employers across a range of industries, from the creative sector to the public service. Trinity French graduates have worked or are currently working for Google, eBay, Christian Louboutin, The Abbey Theatre, Amazon, the British Institute in Florence, the Museum of Modern Art in New York or the Centre Culturel Irlandais in Paris. Recent graduates in French have gone on to work in areas as diverse as arts administration, translation and interpreting, diplomacy, tourism, publishing, and investment banking, as well as second-level teaching and the Civil Service. Increasing numbers of graduates go on to take further postgraduate courses in areas such as law, marketing and business for which a degree in arts and humanities provides an ideal and necessary background. The combination of an arts degree and a more vocational or professional programme of studies has proved to be highly attractive to prospective employers.

Your degree and what you’ll study

The development of reading, analytical, and critical skills, in the form of both oral tasks and written exercises in French, forms the bedrock of this course. Students are expected to progress to a high level of competence in the four basic linguistic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. This includes nurturing an ability to cope with different registers and styles of written and spoken French and to reflect critically on the way the language is used and structured. Examples of optional subjects available over the course of the four years include French linguistics, literature, ideas and politics.

FIRST AND SECOND (FRESHMAN) YEARS

The programme in first year includes an introduction to French language, literature, and history. First year subject areas include: (i) French grammar and grammatical analysis, (ii) comprehension of the written and spoken language and (iii) modern fiction, theatre, cinema and poetry.

In the first year (Junior Freshman), you will spend four contact hours each week working on French language and grammar, and three contact hours each week studying literature and contemporary French history and society.

In the second year (Senior Sophister), you will build on this foundation by following courses in the history of French ideas and politics, French literature, French linguistics and in the practice of the French language itself.

THIRD AND FOURTH (SOPHISTER) YEARS

In third and fourth year, a wide variety of optional subjects leading on from courses previously undertaken in first and second year are available. These range from Renaissance and Enlightenment writing to Romantic and Modern French literature; from French language, politics, society and identity to French critical theory, philosophy, history and cinema. If you elect to study French in your final year, you will research and write a dissertation in English or French on a subject of your choice in consultation with a supervisor.

ASSESSMENT

Written, oral and aural examinations, in addition to essays and continuous assessment of your coursework, all contribute to assessment. Senior Sophisters (fourth-year students) will also be required to research and write a final-year dissertation.

Study abroad

A minimum stay of two months in a French-speaking country is required over the duration of your course. Some students opt to spend their second or part of their third year at a university in France within the framework of an Erasmus+ exchange programme. There are exchange agreements between Trinity and Paris 3 - Sorbonne Nouvelle, Lyon 2, Bordeaux-Montaigne and Orléans universities.

GET IN TOUCH!

www.tcd.ie/French

Tel: +353 1 896 1553 / 1333

Email: french@tcd.ie

Twitter: @tcdfrench


What our graduates say

Gary Hartigan, TSM French and Sociology, 2015 graduate, Collections Analyst

“Studying French at Trinity has been invaluable to my personal and professional development. With the support and guidance from excellent lecturers within the Department, I studied French language, culture, linguistics and literature. Studying French allowed me to work in Paris for the summer months and study on Erasmus in Lille for the first semester of my Junior Sophister year. Studying on such a vibrant campus has enabled me to work as a Collections Analyst with French for a large multinational company, liaising and building strong relationships with French-speaking clients on a daily basis.”

What our current students say

Ciara Greene, TSM French and Modern Irish, Junior Sophister, Castleknock, Dublin

“The combination of the historic setting and knowledgeable lecturing staff provides the perfect basis to study French in Trinity. Studying a foreign language like French is an excellent basis for any career path, especially when one is given the opportunity to perfect one’s spoken and written proficiency in the language itself, and discover such diverse subjects as literature, sociolinguistics, politics and history. What I found extraordinary about studying French at Trinity is that although the course caters for the student who is career focused, the talented lecturing staff are unique in that one of their main priorities is to offer a progressive environment focused on learning for their students, which I believe is unique to this university. French at Trinity has inspired a different way of thinking in me, an awareness of different aspects of international culture and also a desire to learn more.”

Course Options

Award

B.A.

Number of Places

84

CAO code (Central Applications Office code) is

TR001
This is a Two-Subject Moderatorship (TSM) course please read TSM

Options

French (TSM) cannot be studied as a single honor course. It must be combined with one other subject within the two-subject moderatorship (TSM) programme. TSM is a joint honor programme. An honors degree is awarded in both subjects.

For subjects that combine with French see TSM: possible combinations

See also:

TR011: Computer science and language TR018: Law and French TR024: European studies - French with German/Italian/Polish/Russian or Spanish TR085: Business studies and French


Admission Requirements

For general admission requirements please click here

Leaving Certificate H3 French Advanced GCE (A-Level) Grade C French Other EU examination systemsSee www.tcd.ie/Admissions/undergraduate/requirements/matriculation/other/


Apply

Click on the links below to see the available options

+ EU Applicants

Read the information about how to apply, then apply directly to CAO

+ Non-EU Applicants

+ Mature Student – Supplementary Application Form

+ Advanced Entry Applications

Read the information about how to apply for Advanced Entry, then select the relevant link below to apply.

CAO code (Central Applications Office code) is

TR001
This is a Two-Subject Moderatorship (TSM) course please read TSM

Options

French (TSM) cannot be studied as a single honor course. It must be combined with one other subject within the two-subject moderatorship (TSM) programme. TSM is a joint honor programme. An honors degree is awarded in both subjects.

For subjects that combine with French see TSM: possible combinations

See also:

TR011: Computer science and language TR018: Law and French TR024: European studies - French with German/Italian/Polish/Russian or Spanish TR085: Business studies and French