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School of English Visiting Professor Richard Ford reads in Trinity

School of English students in the Departmental Library

Chris Morash is appointed to the
Seamus Heaney Professorship
of Irish Writing

Editors of Icarus present the Journal's latest issue

The School of English hosts a public reading by Sam Shepard

Seamus Heaney at the School of English 'Paradise Lost' charity readathon

School Administrator Orla McCarthy welcomes new students

Renowned crime fiction writer P.D.James is hosted by the School of English

Welcome to the School of English at Trinity College, placed 25th in the world and 7th in Europe by the 2014 QS University Rankings by Subject.

Welcome to the School of English at Trinity College. The School is one of the oldest in the world and in 1867 founded the first ever Chair in English Literature, named after Trinity Professor Edward Dowden. On this website you will find information on courses for undergraduate, international, post-graduate and research students. The site also provides details of our current Faculty and Administration staff, with links to our research, publications, public lectures and events. There are also links to the Oscar Wilde Centre for Irish Writing (below) and to the School of English Facebook page. For information on how to apply to the School of English, please see www.tcd.ie/Admissionswww.tcd.ie/Graduate_Studies or  www.tcd.ie/international

News & Announcements

  • Eire IrelandThe special issue of the interdisciplinary journal Éire-Ireland for Spring/Summer 2014 is dedicated to ‘Irish Crime since 1921’. Guest-edited by Fellow Emeritus Professor Ian Campbell Ross from the School of English and historian Professor William Meier (TCU), the special number contains essays on subjects ranging from Brendan Behan’s little-known crime novel, The Scarperer; contemporary crime fiction; the Blueshirts; cross-border smuggling during World War II; unlawful carnal knowledge of teenage girls, the Dirty Protest in the Prison War of 1979-81; the ‘Post-Troubles’ films of Neil Jordan, and reflections on the links between policing and journalism by Conor Brady, former editor of the Irish Times and commissioner of the Garda Síochána Ombudsman Commission.
  • global-shakespeare"The Merchant of Venice in the Jewish Diaspora in German, Hebrew, and Yiddish" will take place on Thursday, 10 July 2014 | 18:00 | Trinity Long Room Hub.
    The lecture by Dr. Dror Abend-David (University of Florida) is organized by the School of English as part of a lecture series on Global Shakespeare and funded by the Visiting Fellowships
    Benefactions Fund. Bio: Dr. Abend-David is a lecturer in Hebrew in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures at University of Florida. He is the author of ‘Scorned my Nation:’ A Comparison of Translations of The Merchant of Venice into German, Hebrew, and Yiddish (Peter Lang, 2003) and Media and Translation: An Interdisciplinary Approach (Bloomsbury Academic, 2014). In addition to his work on Hebrew and Yiddish Literatures, he has published articles on media, cultural studies, translation theory, modern poetry, and drama. Free and open to the public. For more information contact Dr. Ema Vyroubalova (vyroubae@tcd.ie).
Places & SpacesBetween Places and Spaces: Landscapes of Liminality will take place in the Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin on 5-6 June 2014. Keynotes speakers: Prof. John Wylie (University of Exeter) andDr. Bernice M. Murphy (Trinity College Dublin).
Opening Address: Prof Chris Morash, Seamus Heaney Professor of Irish Writing (Trinity College Dublin) For more information, see pacesbetweenplaces.wordpress.com
  • The Ulysses Custom Case: a talk by Professor Robert Spoo, Chapman Distinguished Professor, University of Tulsa College of Law:  Wednesday 11 June, 6.00, Davis Theatre, Arts building. 
    In this important lecture on the relationship between literature and law, Professor Robert Spoo will examine the complexities of Judge John Woolsey’s landmark 1933 ruling allowing the American publication of Joyce's Ulysses, in the context of the social, legal, and institutional constraints on judicial approaches to obscenity in the 1930s.  Free and open to all. 

    For more news and events please click here

Last updated 18 July 2014 School of English (Email).