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TRINITY COLLEGE HERBARIUM

About


A herbarium is a preserved reference collection of plants and is vital to many different areas of science. Some of the TCD Herbarium’s main functions are to:
allow accurate identification of plants (not easy outside of Ireland as there are about 400,000 species of plant worldwide of which many thousands are unknown to science and there are relatively few available books)
certify that a plant name is correct (by providing a reference collection of authenticated material. This is often based on the original material used to frame the plant’s description and is called ‘Type material’).
act as a source of information about plants (e.g. on plant distribution, ecology or plant medicinal usage)
allow the validation of scientific observations (e.g. on climate change, genetics and conservation matters)
support the research and teaching activities of the Department of Botany
provide an internationally recognized source of plant systematic expertise.

The TCD herbarium houses fungi, algae, mosses and liverworts, ferns, conifers, cycads and flowering plants (Angiosperms) collected from all over the world and an associated large library. It is one of only two herbaria in Ireland (the other is that of the National Botanic Garden at Glasnevin) but one of many worldwide (currently, there are 3,990 herbaria in ca. 170 countries with an associated 10,000 staff). On a world-scale the TCD herbarium ranks as of exceptionally high importance because of the unique material it contains including collections of great historic importance amassed by Coulter, Harvey, Kerr and later workers..

The Herbarium's holdings are large (ca. 300,000 sheets) and significant by international standards (for example it holds the biggest collection of algae in Ireland and one of the biggest of any University herbarium anywhere in the world).

The TCD herbarium is a significant resource in Irish terms containing a significant part of the heritage of the country. Its collections and archives show the very large contribution Irishmen have made and continue to make to the exploration and study of the flora of the world. Its specimens are essential to base-line study of the Irish, European and tropical vegetation and flora.

A very useful web-site expanding on some of the above points is that of the Kew Herbarium Catalogue at http://www.kew.org/herbcat/gotoHomePage.do which has much extra information as well as links to useful, relevant sites.

History
The TCD herbarium was established in 1840; its nucleus was the personal collection of Thomas Coulter, the first curator. Coulter was a well-known early plant-collector/explorer best known for his work in Mexico and North America. From there come two of his best known finds, both of which were named in his honour; Coulter Pine (Pinus coulteri) and the highly attractive garden plant Romneya coulteri. However, the Herbarium is really the creation of William Henry Harvey who was curator from 1844 until his death in 1866. Harvey, the son of a Quaker merchant from Limerick, and the leading phycologist of his day, was incredibly hard-working. He writes, "I rise at five a.m. or before it and work until half-past eight on the Antarctic Algae. Directly after breakfast I start for the College and do not leave it till five o'clock in the evening".

His own hard-work combined with an ability to make and keep friends, including for example, Charles Darwin. This, together with his extensive exploration of Australia, North America and South Africa led to the accumulation of 100,000 specimens by the mid 19th Century. His achievements are all the more remarkable when it is recalled that at the same time as he undertook extensive plant-collecting Harvey wrote several books and that these were illustrated by over 900 of his own hand-drawn lithographic plates. After Harvey's death the herbarium continued to accumulate material, notably that of A.F.G. Kerr, a medical graduate of Trinity College from Co. Leitrim, who was the first (and is still the most important) plant collector to work in the tropical forests of Thailand.

The existing herbarium building was added as an annex to the School of Botany in 1910. Prior to that, the Herbarium had been housed in very unsatisfactory conditions in No. 5 Trinity College. Henry Dixon, a noted plant physiologist, was responsible for seeing the School of Botany completed in 1907 and although he had no serious taxonomic interests he ensured that the Herbarium was built in 1910 with a grant from Lord Iveagh. Dixon also worked hard on curating the herbarium in its early days although he often referred to it as "that collection of hay". Despite these disparaging remarks, he clearly recognised the significance of an active Herbarium to the Botany Department. Unfortunately, few other universities in Britain and Ireland have proved as enlightened as only two (Oxford & Cambridge) have herbaria of comparable significance.. Webb (1991) shows that the largest collections of material in the Herbarium are from Europe, South Africa, Australia, South-east Asia, South America and North America; though all regions of the world, including Antarctica are represented. Since Webb's paper considerable expansion of the Herbarium has taken place; it's library is even better and is amongst the best of its type in Europe; the collections have been considerably expanded with a large number of modern collections from Thailand incorporated.

The official designation of the herbarium in Index Herbariorum is TCD; this latter work also summarizes some of the information presented here.

Type specimens

The Herbarium contains thousands of type specimens which form an exceptionally large proportions of the collection. For this reason, there is, as yet, no on-line catalogue to this material.

Funding from the Mellon Foundation has enabled all type specimens and many others of historical interest to be imaged and a database to them created – see Imaging below.

Arrangement

It is imperative that each of the 300,000 specimens in the collection can be reliably and immediately accessed and slightly different systems are used for the different plant groups (algae, ferns, flowering plants etc.). However, for all these groups the same basic principles apply: all material in a group is arranged according to an established system which places related material close together and to which there is an index. The specimens are then further divided based on their geographic origin. Irish & British plant material has recently been reordered to follow the APGIII linear arrangement.

Some material remains unincorporated; often this consists of new collections or very difficult to identify older material; possibly, in both cases, comprising species new to science which, hence, cannot be identified until they are first described.

Imaging

A number of imaging projects have been, are and will be undertaken in order to make the material in the herbarium more easily accessible and usable for people worldwide and in partial fulfillment of the Herbarium’s commitment to data repatriation under the Convention in Biological Diversity.

Imaging has been completed of Harvey's Travelling Sets of Algae. These specimens are never sent on loan as they consist of bound volumes each containing historically valuable material of many species. General information on these collections is available to download here. As you will see from this document Harvey's Travelling Sets of Algae originate from Ceylon, the Friendly Islands and Australia. There are seven books of specimens from Australia and one each from Ceylon and the Friendly Islands. A searchable pdf table which details the collections in the Ceylonese book is available to download here. A searchable pdf table which details the collections in the Friendly Islands book is available to download here. A single searchable pdf table which details the collections in the seven Australian books is available to download here. Please email comments and corrections to these tables to jparnell@tcd.ie with the Heading 'Travelling Sets'. Note that these Indices are copyright and should be cited as follows.

Parnell, J. (2005). Index to Harvey's 'Travelling Sets' of Australian Algae in the TCD Herbarium. Web-page of the Herbarium, Department of Botany, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. https://www.tcd.ie/Botany/Herbarium.html/

Parnell, J. (2005). Index to Harvey's 'Travelling Sets' of Ceylonese Algae in the TCD Herbarium. Web-page of the Herbarium, Department of Botany, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. https://www.tcd.ie/Botany/Herbarium.html/

Parnell, J. (2005). Index to Harvey's 'Travelling Sets' of Friendly Islands Algae in the TCD Herbarium. Web-page of the Herbarium, Department of Botany, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. https://www.tcd.ie/Botany/Herbarium.html/

The images corresponding to the specimens cited in these indices will be available to download shortly THE IMAGES MUST BE LINKED IN HERE JENS

Funding from the Mellon Foundation has enabled all type specimens and many others of historical interest to be imaged and a database to them (PENELOPE) created. These images are available through JSTOR at (http://plants.jstor.org) or via a direct request to the herbarium.

References

There are a large number of papers relating to the Herbarium, its staff, collections and collectors - particularly W.H. Harvey. Webb's 1991 paper is the simplest overall summary.

Akeroyd, J.R. & Wyse Jackson, P.S. (1996). David Allerdyce Webb (1912-1994). Watsonia, 21: 3-6.

Ball, R. (1846). The Dublin University Museum. Dublin.

Bevan, J. (1984). Miss Ellen Hutchins (1785-1815) and the garden at Ardnagashel, Bantry, County Cork. Moorea 3: 1-10.

Blackler, H. (1977). Harvey’s Australian algae in the herbarium of Mrs. Gatty in the Department of Botany of the University of St. Andrew’s (STA), Scotland. Taxon, 26: 495-496.

Bryant, J., Plaisier, H., Irvine, L.M., McLean, A., Jones, M. & Spencer Jones, M.E. (2016). Life and work of Margaret Gatty (1809-1873), with particular reference to British sea-weeds (1863). Archives of Natural History, 43: 131-147.

Bryant, J., Plaisier, H., Irvine, L.M., McLean, A., Jones, M. & Spencer Jones, M.E. (2016). Life and work of Margaret Gatty (1809-1873), with particular reference to British sea-weeds (1863). Supplementary Material. Available online only at: http://www.euppublishing.com/doi/suppl/10.3366/anh.2016.0352

Butler, P. (2000). William Henry Harvey, M.D., F.R.S., F.L.S. Pp. 108-111 in Irish botanical illustrators and flower painters. (portr.). P. Butler (Ed.). Antique Collectors' Club, Woodbridge.

Coville, F.V. (1895). The botanical exploration of Thomas Coulter in Mexico and California. Botanical Gazette, 20: 519-531.

Doogue, D. (1998). History of the study of the Flora of County Dublin. Pp. 27-39 and Plates 1 & 18 in Flora of County Dublin. D. Doogue, D. Nash, J. Parnell, S. Reynolds and P. Wyse-Jackson (Eds.). Dublin Naturalists Field Club, Dublin. VII + 558pp.

Doogue, D. & Parnell, J. (1992). Fragments of an eighteenth century herbarium - possibly that of Caleb Threlkeld in Trinity College, Dublin (TCD). Glasra, 1 (NS): 99-109.

Ducker, S. (1988). The contented botanist: letters of W.H. Harvey about Australia and Pacific, Melborne University Press. (portr.). 413pp.

Fisher, L. (1869). Memoir of W.H. Harvey, M.D., F.R.S. London.

Funk, V. (2004). 100 uses for an Herbarium (well at least 72). http://www.peabody.yale.edu

Geary-Cooke, R. (1975). William Henry Harvey. Veld and Flora, 61: 8-10.

Gordon, R.B. (1975). A Collection of Wm. H. Harvey's Australian Algae at West Chester, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Taxon, 24: 628.

Guiry, M.D., Boalch, G.T. & Peters, A.F. (2010). William Henry Harvey’s grave rediscovered. The Phycologist, 79: 14-15.

Gunn, M. & Codd, L.E. (1981). William Henry Harvey. Botanical exploration of Southern Africa. AA. Balkema, Cape Town. 416pp.

Hermans, C. & Hermans, J. (2016). 127 years of the RHS Orchid Committee Part four. Orchid Review, 124:18-27.

Hutchins, M. (2016). Rediscovering the story of Ellen Hutchins of Ballylickey, Bantry Bay (1785-1815): Ireland’s first female botanist. Local History Journal, 21: 50-59.

Long. D.G. (1985). The Musci Indici: its authors, types and localities. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 119: 1-33.

MacCarthy, C.J.F. (1993). An Antiquary's Note Book 14. Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, 98: 145.

McGilvray, D.J. (1975). Johann August Ludwig Preiss (1811 - 1883) in Western Australia. Telopea, 1: 1-18.

McVaugh, R. (1942). The travels of Thomas Coulter 1824-1827. Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences, 33: 65-70.

May, V. (1977). Harvey’s Australian algae at the National Herbarium of New South wales (NSW), Australia. Taxon, 26: 496.

Mitchell, M.E. (1999). Early observations on the Flora of Southwest Ireland. Selected letters of Ellen Hutchins and Dawson Turner 1807-1814. National Botanic Gardens Glasnevin, Occasional Papers 12, Dublin.

Nelson, E.C. (1992). William Henry Harvey as Colonial Treasurer at the Cape of Good Hope: a case of depression and bowlderised history, Archives of Natural History, 19: 171-180.

Nelson, E.C. (1996). William Henry Harvey A portrait of the artist as a young man. Curtis’s Botanical Magazine, 13: 36-41.

Nelson, E.C. (1997). Dr Thomas Coulter's cacti from Zimapán, Hidalgo, Mexico. Bradleya, 15: 48-64.

Nelson, E.C. (1998). Caleb Threlkeld’s family. Glasra 3: 161-166.

Nelson, E.C. & Batten, A. (1995). 281. Harveya pulchra Scrophulariaceae. Curtis’s Botanical Magazine, 12: 202-206.

Nelson, E.C. & Parnell, J. (1988). John Bradbury (1768 -1823) - some letters and his Irish connections. Bartonia, 54: 107-115.

Nelson, E.C. & Parnell, J. (1992). Flora Hibernica (1836): its publication, and aftermath as viewed by Dr.Taylor. Taxon, 41: 35-42.

Nelson, E.C. & Parnell, J. (2002). An annotated bibliography of the Irish botanist William Henry Harvey (1811-1866). Archives of Natural History, 29: 213-244.

Nelson, E.C. & Probert, A. (1994). A man who can speak of plants: Dr Thomas Coulter (193-1843) of Dundalk in Ireland, Mexico and Alta California. Dublin.

Ollerton, J., Chancellor, G. & van Wyhe, J. (2012). John Tweedie and Charles Darwin in Buenos Aires. Notes and records of the Royal Society, doi:10.1098/rsnr.2011.0052

Parkes, H.M. (1953). Some notes on the Herbarium of University College Cork. Irish Naturalists' Journal (Old Series), 11: 102-105.

Parnell, J. (1982). Some remarks on the bryophyte herbarium of H.W. Lett in Trinity College Dublin. Irish Naturalists' Journal, 5: 489.

Parnell, J. (1982). The Lichen Herbarium of Trinity College Dublin (TCD). The Lichenologist, 14: 280-281.

Parnell, J. (1985). The pteridophyte herbarium of Trinity College Dublin (TCD). The Fern Gazette, 13: 47-48.

Parnell, J. (1992). Isaac Carroll's 'Cryptogam Flora' of County Cork - the fragments in Trinity College, Dublin. Glasra, 1: (NS):135-159.

Parnell, J. (1992). Isaac Carroll's Cryptogram Flora of County Cork. Occasional Papers from the National Botanic Gardens Glasnevin, 6: 1-42.

Parnell, J. (1992). 'William cares for nothing but weeds'; W.H. Harvey (1811-1866) and systematic Botany in Trinity College Dublin. Pp. 79-88 in Treasures of the Mind. D. Scott, (Ed.). Sotheby's, London, 176 + XVI pp.

Parnell, J. (1995). A man who can speak of plants. Dr. Thomas Coulter (1793-1843) of Dundalk in Ireland, Mexico and Alta California. by E.C. Nelson & A. Probert. A review. Moorea, 13: 35. [Published 1996].

Parnell, J. (1996).The Spruce Collections in Trinity College Dublin. Pp. 281-286 in Richard Spruce (1817-1893) - Botanist and Explorer. M.R.D. Seaward & S.M.D. Fitzgerald (Eds.). R.B.G. Kew. 359pp.

Parnell, J. (1996). The monetary value of herbarium collections. Pp. 33-34 in Systematics and Biological collections. Abstracts of Papers and posters. B.S. Rushton, (Ed.). Ulster Museum. 56pp.

Parnell, J. (2001). The Monetary value of herbarium collections. Pp. 271-286 in Biological Collections & Biodiversity. Rushton, B.S., Hackney, P. & Tyrie, C.R. [Eds.]. Linnean Society of London Special Publication No 3. 326pp.

Parnell, J. (2004). Mackay, James Townsend. Pp. 1296-1298 in Dictionary of Nineteenth-Century British Scientists. Ed. B. Lightman. Thoemmes Continuum Press. 4 volumes.

Parnell, J. (2004). Harvey's 'Travelling Sets' of Algae in the TCD Herbarium. Web-page of the Herbarium, Department of Botany, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. https://www.tcd.ie/Botany/Herbarium.html/

Parnell, J. (2005). Index to Harvey's 'Travelling Sets' of Australian Algae in the TCD Herbarium. Web-page of the Herbarium, Department of Botany, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. https://www.tcd.ie/Botany/Herbarium.html/

Parnell, J. (2005). Index to Harvey's 'Travelling Sets' of Ceylonese Algae in the TCD Herbarium. Web-page of the Herbarium, Department of Botany, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. https://www.tcd.ie/Botany/Herbarium.html/

Parnell, J. (2005). Index to Harvey's 'Travelling Sets' of Friendly Islands Algae in the TCD Herbarium. Web-page of the Herbarium, Department of Botany, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. https://www.tcd.ie/Botany/Herbarium.html/

Parnell, J. (2009). W.H. Harvey. In Dictionary of Irish Biography. Volume 4: 513-514. Eds. McGuire, J. & Quinn, J. Cambridge University Press & Royal Irish Academy. Ca. 7,000pp.

Parnell, J.A.N. & Huisman, J. (2006). Typification of species based on specimens in the herbarium of W.H. Harvey (TCD). Pp. 112-115 in Algae of Australia. Nemaliales. Huisman, J.M. Ed. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne.

Parnell, J. & Webb, D.A. (1991). The Flora Hibernica herbarium of J.T. Mackay. Irish Naturalists' Journal, 23: 359-364.

Parnell, J.A.N., Womersley, H.B.S., Sinkora, D., Vaughan, A. & Huisman, J.M. (2010). W.H. Harvey’s Australian Travelling Sets of Algae in the Herbarium of Trinity College Dublin (TCD) and the National Herbarium of Victoria (MEL). Biology and Environment: Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy,110B: 119-161..

Parnell, J.A.N., Simpson, D.A., Chayamarit, K., Boonthavikoon, T., Boyce, P.C., Chantaranothai, P., de Wilde, B., Jebb, M.H.P., Muasya, A.M., Paton, A.J., Pendry, C.A., Pooma, R., Suddee S. & Wilkin. P. (2005). The Bangkok Forest Herbarium, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew and Trinity College Dublin plant collecting trips in Thailand 1995-2002. Thai Forest Bulletin, 33: 145-156. [issued 2006].

Parnell, J.A.N., Pilla, F. & The Thai Biogeography Group (comprising Simpson, D.A., van Welzen, P.C., Chayamarit, K., Chantaranothai, P., Boyce, P.C., Bygrave, P., Byrne, C., Chen, S., Couch, C., Curtis, T., Dransfield, S., Duyfjes, B.E.E., Eianthong, W., Esser, H.J., Grote, P.J., Hua, Z., Jebb, M.H.P., Kirkup, D.W., Ke Loc, P., Larsen, S.S., Macklin, J., Madern, A., Meade, C., Merklinger, F., Middleton, D.J., Moat, J., Muasya, A.M., Nakmuenwai, P., Pederson, H., Pendry, C.A., Prajaksood, A., Pooma, R., Preusapan, K., Puglisi, C., Sathapattayanon, A., Sukkharak, P., Staples, G., Strijk, J., Suddee, S., Sungkaew, S., Tangjitman, K., Teerwatananon, A., Tovaranonte, J., Ung, T., Trias Blasi, A., de Wilde, W.J.J.O., Wilkin, P. & Yahara ,T.) (2015). A re-examination of the life and work of A.F.G. Kerr and of his colleagues and friends, Thai Forest Bulletin, 43: 111 – 131.

Parsall, N. & Millar, A. (2008). Botanical Time capsules. The William Henry Harvey Exsiccatae Volumes. http://www.aussiealgae.org/HarveyColl/manuscript.php

Pereira, L. (2011). Corallines and other macroalgae collected during the Beagle voyage of the Beagle. In: Darwin, evolution, evolutionisms. A.L. Pereira, J.R. Pita & P.R. Fonseca (eds.) ,Imprensa da Universidade de Coimbra.

Porter, D.M. (1987). Darwin notes on Beagle plants: coralline and other algae. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History), Historical Series, 14: 186-217.

Praeger, R.L. (1913). 'W.H. Harvey' Pp. 204-224 in Makers of British botany. A collection of biographies by living botanists. F.W. Oliver. (Ed.). (portr.).

Praeger, R.L. (1949). Thomas Coulter. Pp. 68 in Some Irish Naturalists. A biographical Notebook. W. Tempest (Dundalgan Press), Dundalk. 208pp.

Praeger, R.L. (1949). W.H. Harvey. Pp. 98 in Some Irish Naturalists. A biographical Notebook. W. Tempest (Dundalgan Press), Dundalk. 208pp.

Praeger, R.L. (1949). David Allerdyce Webb. Pp. 175 in Some Irish Naturalists. A biographical Notebook. W. Tempest (Dundalgan Press), Dundalk. 208pp.

Price, J.H. (1988). 'Goody two-shoes or a monument to Industry? Aspects of the Phycologica Brittanica of William Henry Harvey (1811 to 1866)'. Bulletin of the British Museum Natural History (Historical Series), 16: 90-216.

Robinson, T.R. (1844). Biography of Dr Coulter. Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, 2: 553-557.

Ross, J.H. (1976). The collection of W.H. Harvey’s Australian Algae at the National Herbarium of Victoria (MEL), Melborne, Australia. Taxon, 25: 525-526.

Simpson, D.A., Parnell, J., Chantaranothai, P., & Middleton, D. (1995). The Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Khon Kaen University and Trinity College Dublin expeditions to Thailand 1990 and 1993. Thai Forest Bulletin, 23: 50-61. [Published 1996].

Smith, D.A.S. (2006). The William Hincks herbarium at Eton College: Botany in early nineteenth Century Yorkshire. Naturalist, 131: 23-36.

Walters, S.M. (1996). David Allerdyce Webb (1912-1994). David Webb's contribution to the Distribution Maps Scheme. Watsonia, 21: 7.

Webb, D.A. (1966). William Henry Harvey (1811-1866) and the tradition of systematic botany. Hermanthena (Dublin), 103: 32-45.

Webb, D.A. (1988). The Irish and British plants in the Herbarium of Trinity College Dublin. I. The vascular plants. Irish Naturalists' Journal, 22: 482-485.

Webb, D.A. (1991). The herbarium of Trinity College, Dublin: its history and contents. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 106: 295-327.

Webb, D.A. (1992). The Irish and British plants in the Herbarium of Trinity College Dublin. II. The non-vascular plants. Irish Naturalists' Journal, 24: 69-72.

Womersley, H.B.K. (1956). A critical Survey of the Marine Algae of southern Australia. 1. Chlorophyta. Australian Journel of Marine and Freshwater Research, 7: 343-383.

Womersley, H.B.K. (1984), The Marine Benthic Flora of Southern Australia. Part 1. D.J.Woolman, South Australia. 329pp.

Wright, E.P. (1896). The herbarium of Trinity College: a retrospect. Notes from the Botanical School of Trinity College, Dublin, 1: 1-14.

Wyse Jackson, M.B. (1996). David Allardyce Webb (1912-1994). Bibliography. Watsonia 21: 7-13.

Current Activity

The TCD herbarium is the only one in Ireland currently active in systematic research and it is very well-equipped. Nearly all of the equipment and much of the library has been accumulated by the present curator through his research grants.

Work is focussed on two geographic areas Europe and S.E. Asia. Until recently, the Herbarium under the curatorship of Professor D.A. Webb, was heavily involved in the study of the flora of Europe. Indeed Trinity became one of the focal points of one of the (possibly the) most important taxonomic projects yet completed; the five volume flora of Europe - Flora Europaea. Work still continues on European taxonomic problems: for example the herbarium played a leading role in the recently published revision of the first volume of Flora Europaea, and the new 7th edition of an Irish Flora is the work of its staff and an ex-student. Nevertheless, the focus of research has broadened, under the current curator Prof. J. Parnell, to include S.E. Asia, especially Thailand.

Accessions + Loans Policy

All material which has been brought into Ireland and newly acquired by the TCD Herbarium follows strictly the procedures established by International treaties such as the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Convention on Trade in Endangered species. All material sourced from within Ireland and newly acquired by the TCD Herbarium has, naturally, been collected in conformity with National Legislation.

When founded, the TCD Herbarium had a very wide-ranging acquisitions policy and this resulted in the Herbarium accumulating much material which has subsequently proved of considerable importance. It also resulted in the TCD Herbarium containing at least one representative of nearly every single genus of flowering plant. Nowadays, the Herbarium’s acquisitions are more carefully targeted to more closely reflect the interests of the staff of the Department of Botany.

Taxonomic, floristic and systematic research necessitates the identification and preservation of type specimens when any new species are discovered. The staff of the School of Botany undertake field collecting, especially in Ireland, Thailand, Pitcairn and Henderson Islands and British Guyana. The resulting specimens are lodged in the country of origin and also in the Herbarium of TCD.

Equally, researchers studying many other aspects, such as DNA analyses, need to deposit vouchers of the source material they have used for future reference. Researchers working in Trinity College also deposit these voucher specimens in the Herbarium.

The TCD Herbarium accepts donations; however only when the accompanying material is useful when documented with collection details.

The Herbarium therefore acquires:
Type specimens and voucher material from scientific research
Personal donations of properly documented material
Bequests.

These sources yield an annual accession rate of ca. 1,700 specimens per year.

All material in the herbarium is available for short-term loan to designated herbaria following written or emailed application to the Curator Professor J. Parnell (jparnell@tcd.ie) or the Assistant Curator Dr. T. Hodkinson (hodkinst@tcd.ie). Some material, notably from Harvey's travelling set of algae, is not available for loan.


Last updated 10 February 2017 nisheois@tcd.ie.