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Webinar Resources

Celebrating ISE at 50 Webinar Series, Floreat ut Pereat


On this page you can find recordings and event information for the ISE at 50 Webinar series.

1. Ecumenical Movement and Reconciliation in Ireland and Beyond


Information and Speakers

This webinar, Ecumenical Movement and Reconciliation in Ireland and Beyond is part of the webinar series to celebrate Irish School of Ecumenics – ISE at 50. The School was founded in 1970 by Fr. Michael Hurley SJ. Inspired by the ground-breaking ecumenical vision of the Second Vatican Council (1962), he opened a new window of ecumenical understanding, overcoming prevailing suspicion of ecumenism in Ireland, and other wider challenges, to see that ISE was established as a graduate institute of ecumenical teaching and scholarship, as well as dialogue and service in society. Fr. Hurley’s vision was of a place where people from diverse backgrounds and disciplinary perspectives could explore the meaning and possibilities of peace and reconciliation together.

From seeds sown and nurtured in times of challenge and change, ISE has spread in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland and beyond, shaping initiatives of reconciliation and partnerships for transformation throughout the period of violent conflict and in the making of peace through research and teaching programmes at every level, and community-based projects of intercultural and ecumenical understanding, interreligious encounter and engagement in peacebuilding. Living up to its founding motto, ISE has flourished, now recognised nationally and globally through the work of its staff, students and graduates. Within the School of Religion in Trinity College Dublin, ISE continues to make its mark in research collaboration and in ecumenical and social renewal worldwide: ‘Like wheat that springs up green.’

As Michael Hurley observed in 2008, “All the institutions of the ecumenical movement are not only born to die” but “they live to die as soon as ever possible, as soon as the task is completed.” Although now 10 years since Michael Hurley passed away, challenges remain soul-sized in multiple and resurgent divisions not alone in Ireland, but geopolitically, and across the planet earth, demonstrating that the ecumenical task is not yet complete. ISE continues to reflect, theologically, politically, and socially, on the role of the ecumenical movement for reconciliation within the wider Oikumene (the whole inhabited earth), engaging in inter-Church reconciliation, inter-religious dialogue and partnership, and promoting justice, peace, and the integrity of creation.

In the webinar, we are fortunate to be able to draw on the depth of wisdom and range of expertise embodied in our contributors:

Prof. Linda Hogan, Professor of Ecumenics, School of Religion, Trinity College Dublin

Dr. Salters Sterling, ISE Trust Steering Committee; formerly Academic Secretary, Trinity College Dublin

Rt Rev. Trevor Williams, Bishop Emeritus of Limerick and Killaloe; formerly Leader of Corrymeela Community

Dr. Damian Jackson, Programme Officer, Irish Council of Churches and the Irish Inter–Church Meeting

Rev. Dr. Simone Sinn, Professor of Ecumenical Theology, the Ecumenical Institute in Bossey, Geneva; Programme Executive of the Faith and Order Commission, World Council of Churches

The roundtable discussion will be chaired by:

Prof. Geraldine Smyth OP, Adjunct Associate Professor, School of Religion, Trinity College Dublin; formerly Head of Irish School of Ecumenics.

Mr. Dermot McCarthy, Chair of ISE Trust Steering Committee, will open the ISE at 50 Webinar.

Prof. Siobhán Garrigan, Head of School of Religion, Trinity College Dublin, will offer a congratulatory message.

Ecumenical Movement and Reconciliation in Ireland and Beyond

Webinar, 28 January 2021

2. Centenary of Partition and a Shared Island


Information and Speakers

One hundred years ago, the island of Ireland went through a process of partition creating a 26 county Irish state and Northern Ireland that remained in the UK. Although the Irish Peace Process has been considered one of the most successful cases in the world since the 1998 Belfast Agreement/Good Friday Agreement, the conflicting opinions of partition remain alive in the rhetoric of the politics, economies, cultures, and societies on the island. This ISE at 50 webinar, ‘Centenary of the Partition and a Shared Island’ explores the challenges and opportunities for greater mutual understanding, reconciliation, and peaceful coexistence of people living on the island.

In the roundtable webinar, chaired by Etain Tannam (Trinity College Dublin), we are fortunate to be able to draw on the depth of wisdom and range of expertise embodied in our contributors: Johnston McMaster (Irish School of Ecumenics), Cate Turner (Healing Through Remembering), Niall Ó Dochartaigh (National University of Ireland Galway), Mary Murphy (University College Cork), and Duncan Morrow (University of Ulster).

This webinar, ‘Centenary of the Partition and a Shared Island’ is part of the webinar series to celebrate Irish School of Ecumenics – ISE at 50. ISE was founded in 1970 by Fr. Michael Hurley, with a vision of a place where people from diverse backgrounds and disciplinary perspectives could explore the meaning and possibilities of peace and reconciliation together. ISE continues to uphold Fr. Hurley’s vision within the School of Religion in Trinity College Dublin

SPEAKERS

Johnston McMaster, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Irish School of Ecumenics; School of Religion, Trinity College Dublin

Cate Turner, Director of Healing Through Remembering; ISE Trust Steering Committee

Niall Ó Dochartaigh, Professor of Political Science and Sociology, National University of Ireland Galway

Mary Murphy, Jean Monnet Chair in European Integration, Senior Lecturer in Politics, University College Cork

Duncan Morrow, Professor of Politics, Director of Community Engagement, University of Ulster

Chaired by Etain Tannam, Associate Professor in International Peace Studies, Trinity College Dublin

Centenary of Partition and a Shared Island

Webinar, 25 March 2021

3. Emerging Irish Identities – Intercultural and Intergenerational Conversations


Information and Speakers

Ireland, under the pressures and pearls of global movements, international agreements (and disagreements), and mixing of tribes, is rapidly becoming a culturally and religiously diverse society. As an island, Ireland is in the process of moving from a past identity of division to a newer identity formed out of sharing of values of respect and openness, richness and diversity, and better social outcomes for all citizens. Different identities, some forged in the past, others newly incorporated into the island, create diversity. Diversity has already begun to define the new Irish identity.

This new reality of diversity not only brings about many challenges, it also brings about different possibilities for how we may envisage and shape a new inclusive and pluralist society. To that end it is of paramount importance to engage in inter-generational, as well as in intercultural, conversations. We must take seriously the wisdom of the older generation which has experienced many changes, lived through many mis-steps and seen too many hopes dashed. We must also take no less seriously the hopes and aspirations of the young who have visions of an inclusive plurality because they have already begun to live it in myriad ways. Within and between these cultures and generations, there is diversity within a longed-for envisioning of a plurality that accepts others as ‘the new norm’.

This webinar seeks to contribute to this envisioning by bringing together both established and emerging intercultural experts and practitioners to create a platform for intercultural and intergenerational conversations. This webinar on ‘Emerging Irish Identities’ is part of the webinar series to celebrate Irish School of Ecumenics – ISE at 50. ISE was founded in 1970 by Fr. Michael Hurley, with a vision of a place where people from diverse backgrounds and disciplinary perspectives could explore the meaning and possibilities of peace and reconciliation together. ISE continues to uphold Fr. Hurley’s vision within the School of Religion in Trinity College Dublin.

SPEAKERS

Fadilah Salawu, Law Student and Former Chairperson of the Muslim Students Association, Trinity College Dublin

Jobin Joseph Prince, Youth Board, Dublin City Interfaith Forum

Nadette Foley, Intercultural & Refugee Programme Manager, Glencree Centre for Peace & Reconciliation

Alice Vignoles-Russell, Associate Lecturer in Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology, Meditation & Yoga teacher, Filmmaker

Derick Wilson, Reader Emeritus in Education, Ulster University

Chaired by Jude Lal Fernando, Assistant Professor in Intercultural Theology and Interreligious Studies, School of Religion, Trinity College Dublin

Emerging Irish Identities – Intercultural and Intergenerational Conversations

Webinar, 27 May 2021

4. Ireland - Island of Peace


Information and Speakers

The history of the island of Ireland, which suffered colonisation, conflict, famine and mass migration, resonates in many countries affected by protracted conflict, and yet signals hope that a peace process is possible. The ongoing position of Irish neutrality, commitment to international peacekeeping, and the current role as a member of the UN Security Council, also contribute to the potential for Ireland to be put forward as an island of peace. However, there are significant internal and external challenges for the island to reach this potential. This ISE at 50 webinar, ‘Ireland - Island of Peace’, explores the challenges and opportunities for Ireland to become an island of peace.

In the roundtable webinar, chaired by Iain Atack (Trinity College Dublin), we are fortunate to be able to draw on the depth of wisdom and range of expertise embodied in our contributors: Noel Dorr (Former Permanent Representative of Ireland to the United Nations and Former Secretary General of the Department of Foreign Affairs); John Maguire (Professor Emeritus of Sociology, University College Cork and Board Member of Action from Ireland); Shona Bell (Programme Manager – Sectarianism, Corrymeela); David Mitchell (Assistant Professor in Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation, School of Religion, Trinity College Dublin at Belfast); and Lisa Clark (Co-President of the International Peace Bureau (IPB) and the IPB Representative to the World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates).

This webinar, ‘Ireland - Island of Peace’ is part of the webinar series to celebrate the Irish School of Ecumenics – ISE at 50. The ISE was founded in 1970 by Fr. Michael Hurley, with a vision of a place where people from diverse backgrounds and disciplinary perspectives could explore the meaning and possibilities of peace and reconciliation together. The ISE continues to uphold Fr. Hurley’s vision as an academic institute in Trinity College Dublin.

SPEAKERS

Noel Dorr, Former Permanent Representative of Ireland to the United Nations and Former Secretary General of the Department of Foreign Affairs

John Maguire, Professor Emeritus of Sociology, University College Cork and Board Member of Action from Ireland (Afri)

Shona Bell, Programme Manager – Sectarianism, Corrymeela

David Mitchell, Assistant Professor in Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation, School of Religion, Trinity College Dublin at Belfast

Lisa Clark, Co-President of the International Peace Bureau (IPB) and the IPB Representative to the World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates

Chaired by Iain Atack, Assistant Professor, Peace Studies, School of Religion, Trinity College Dublin

Ireland - Island of Peace

Webinar, 1 July 2021

5. Gender and Peacebuilding on a Shared Island


Information and Speakers

UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security emphasises the importance of women’s perspectives and gender mainstreaming in peacebuilding. The peace process on the island of Ireland has been known for the role of women at the negotiation table as well as in community relations. Women’s civil society organisations North and South of the border have been consulted in the creation of the Irish government’s successive National Action Plans on Women, Peace and Security. However, there are ongoing significant challenges for greater representation of diverse perspectives, such as gender, to be part of the key agenda for sharing this island. The consociational settlement in Northern Ireland has emphasised ethnicity over gender in politics, women continue to be underrepresented in the politics of peace across the island and current mainstreaming approaches neglect the perspectives of people of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities.

This ISE at 50 webinar explores the challenges and opportunities for gender and peacebuilding on a shared island. In the roundtable webinar, chaired by Gillian Wylie (Trinity College Dublin), we are fortunate to be able to draw on the depth of wisdom and range of expertise embodied in our contributors: Bronagh Hinds (DemocraShe); Georgia Knapp (Irish Secretariat in Belfast, DFA); Salome Mbugua (Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission); Niall Gilmartin (Ulster University); Katherine Meyer (Christ Church, Sandymount).

This webinar, ‘Gender and Peacebuilding on a Shared Island’ is part of the webinar series to celebrate Irish School of Ecumenics – ISE at 50. ISE was founded in 1970 by Fr. Michael Hurley, with a vision of a place where people from diverse backgrounds and disciplinary perspectives could explore the meaning and possibilities of peace and reconciliation together. ISE continues to uphold Fr. Hurley’s vision as an academic institute in Trinity College Dublin.

SPEAKERS

Bronagh Hinds, DemocraShe, co-founder of the Northern Ireland Women’s Coalition

Georgia Knapp, Irish Secretariat in Belfast, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Salome Mbugua, Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission; AkiDwA -The Migrant Women’s Network

Niall Gilmartin, School of Applied Social and Policy Sciences, Ulster University

Katherine Meyer, Christ Church, Sandymount

Chaired by Gillian Wylie, Peace Studies, School of Religion, Trinity College Dublin

Gender and Peacebuilding on a Shared Island

Webinar, 7 October 2021