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Trinity Immigration Initiative

New Migrations, New Challenges: Trinity Immigration Initiative International Conference June 30 - July 3, 2010

In the 21st century new population movements and migration flows are shaping European societies, particularly in countries transformed from emigration to in-migration, including, since 2004, the EU's new member states.

This highly successful conference was organised by the Trinity Immigration Initiative, a novel interdisciplinary research programme located in one of Europe’s new migration destinations. The conference delivered on its aims to debate the global and national implications of these new migration flows for sending and receiving countries and for migrants themselves. The conference addressed questions such as what are the implications of these migrations for Europe?; what do these migrations mean for new immigrant societies?; and what lessons can be learnt from countries with longer immigration experience? 

All photos taken by Carl Czanik Photography.

 

Plenary speakers:

AnnaTriandafyllidou

Dr Anna Triandafyllidou is Professor at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, European University Institute in Florence and a Senior Research Fellow at the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP) in Athens.

 

Click here to download a copy of Anna's presentation.

 

 
   
AdrianFavell

 

 

 

 

Dr Adrian Favell, Professor of European and International Studies, Aarhus University.

   

 

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Keynote speakers:

 

 

 

Dr Umut Erel, RCUK Academic Fellow, Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance, The Open University, UK.

   
   
ConstantLeung

 

 

 

Professor Constant Leung, Professor of Educational Linguistics at King's College, London

   
   
EttoreRecchi

 

Ettore Recchi, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Florence and Co-Director, Mediterranean School on Migration and Development, European Unnivesrity Institute and University of Florence.

   
   
RubenRumbaut

 

 

Professor Rubén Rumbaut, University of California, Irvine.

   
   
RobertSampson

 

 

Robert J. Sampson, Chairman of the Department of Sociology and the Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences at Harvard University.

   
   
FrankvaTubergen

 

 

 

 

Frank van Tubergen, Professor, Department of Sociology / ICS, and Department of Interdisciplinary Social Science / ERCOMER, Utrecht University

   
   
DeborahReedDanahay

 

 

Deborah Reed-Danahay, Professor of Anthropoliogy at the State Univesrity of New York at Buffalo.

 

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CHILDREN, YOUTH AND IMMIGRATION

This strand asked what does migration mean for children and young people? Despite their being a major part of the migrant population and experience, children and youth as immigrants, ‘hosts’, trans-located migrants, or as young people ‘left behind’  receive comparatively little attention in the research on migration. Papers are invited which address issues such as the experience of immigrant young people in their adjustments to the institutional and other contexts in the new society; their position between the old and the new world, whether as intended ‘final’ immigrants, or as transient trans-located migrants spending substantial time in two worlds, or as the young people ‘left behind’; the experience of ‘host’ children and youth including those of earlier waves of immigration;  the character of relations between ‘host’ and ‘immigrant’ youth; the role of state and community institutions in influencing the character of these relations; the immigrant young person’s relationship to family and the mutual influences of young person and family around the migration experience

Keynote Speaker: Professor Rubén Rumbaut, University of California, Irvine.

 

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METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES IN LARGE SCALE MIGRATION RESEARCH

The conference hosted one session in each track for papers analysing large-scale datasets and a special session on methodological problems of immigrant surveys. Papers dealt with the following topics:

Keynote Speaker: Frank van Tubergen, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology / ICS, Utrecht University

 

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MIGRANT LED NETWORKS AND THEIR ROLE IN MIGRANT INTEGRATION

Establishing migrant networks is one response by migrants to the migration process. Networks are not only a rich metaphor, they are also a useful structural and conceptual way of theorising the overlapping forms of sociality and community formation processes engaged in by migrants.
Migrant networks are heterogeneous and fulfil a variety of functions from service provision to keeping in touch with kin in the countries of origin, the countries of settlement and in other countries, from education and the provision of religious and cultural services to political representation and advocacy. Networks serve as migrants’ own instruments of facilitating their integration in countries of settlement.
Papers are were given by researchers working on any aspect of migrant networks, including the variety of functions networks fulfil in the fields of religion, culture, gender, advocacy, media and political representation.

Keynote Speaker: Dr Umut Erel, RCUK Academic Fellow, Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance, The Open University, UK

 

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MIGRATION, EMPLOYMENT AND THE REGULATION OF THE LABOUR MARKET: THE EXPERIENCE OF NEW IMMIGRATION COUNTRIES IN EUROPE

Like Ireland, European countries as different as Greece, Spain and Finland have recently been transformed from countries of emigration to countries of immigration.  More recently still, some of the new member states of the European Union such as Poland have also become recipients of large scale immigration, even though emigration continues.  This strand asked the following questions: What does this new immigration mean for the nature of work and the organisation of the labour market in these countries?  What are the broader implications for work and employment in Europe as a whole?  And how has the current economic crisis changed migrants’ employment?  Papers in this strand addressed the following issues: Mass immigration and the institutional system of new immigrant countries; migrant employment and the regulation of migration; the employment experience of different groups of new migrants; the constitution of labour market ‘needs’; migration, mobility and employment within the European Union itselfWe welcome papers on these and other topics related to the overarching title of the stream.  There is no restriction in terms of methodological approach and papers with a comparative approach are especially welcome.

Keynote Speaker: Ettore Recchi, Associate Professor. of Sociology, Univesrity of Florence and Co-Director, Mediterranean School on Migration and Development, European Unnivesrity Institute and University of Florence.

 

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POLICY IMPLICATIONS FOR STATE INSTITUTIONS WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM AND HOUSING POLICIES

Migration, both fleeting and permanent, is a common feature of individuals’ life histories in the early 21st century. Dealing with the increased motion of people presents challenges to institutions and systems bounded by state frontiers, framed by national laws and shaped by local practices. It is essential that State institutions and systems adapt appropriately to deal with this ‘world in motion’ (Aas 2007), as otherwise the legitimacy of the State, and ultimately the stability of civil society could be undermined. Papers given reflected on all aspects of migration and State institutions and systems.

Keynote Speaker: Robert J. Sampson, Chairman of the Department of Sociology and the Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences at Harvard University.

 

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TEACHING THE LANGUAGE OF EDUCATION TO IMMIGRANT PUPILS AND STUDENTS

One of the biggest challenges currently faced by educational systems in Europe is the need to integrate large numbers of pupils and students whose first language is not the language of schooling.  Papers delivered at this conference included research that addressing many aspects of this challenge, including the role of pupils’/students’ first language, the empirical investigation of second language acquisition, needs analysis, curriculum design, materials development, pedagogy, learner assessment, and programme evaluation.

Keynote Speaker: Professor Constant Leung, Professor of Educational Linguistics at King's College, London.

 

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CONTACT INFORMATION

Conference Organiser: Linda Soriton

School of Business, Trinity College

 

TII Research Officer: Leslie McCartney

 

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