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Bruce Campbell

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Bruce Campbell, Queen's University, Belfast

Biography

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Bruce Campbell is Emeritus Professor of Medieval Economic History at The Queen’s University of Belfast, where he has taught since 1973. During that time he has belonged to the Departments of Geography, Economic History, History, and, now, the School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology. His research currently focuses upon the economic history of late-medieval Britain and Ireland, with particular reference to human-environment interactions during the fourteenth century and trends in agricultural output and productivity from the thirteenth to nineteenth centuries. Of particular interest are the close coincidence of both the European cattle panzootic of 1316-25AD and the human pandemic of 1346-53AD with marked short-term climatic anomalies and a general increase in environmental instability. He is the author of English seigniorial agriculture 1250-1450, Cambridge University Press 2000; (with Ken Bartley) England on the eve of the Black Death: An atlas of lay lordship, land, and wealth, 1300-49, Manchester University Press 2006; three collections of essays in the Ashgate Variorum Series, and the online database Three centuries of English crop yields, 1211-1491 (available here). He delivered the 2008 Tawney Memorial Lecture to the Economic History Society on the subject of “Nature as historical protagonist” (see here) and is a Member of the Royal Irish Academy and Fellow of the British Academy.

Contact

b.m.campbell@qub.ac.uk

University Homepage

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Research Interests

Economic history - late-medieval Britain and Ireland - human-environment interactions - agricultural history - short-term climatic anomalies.

Themes

Earth.

Selected Publications

Campbell, B. M. S. (2016) The great transition: Climate, disease and society in the Late-Medieval World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Broadberry, S. N., Campbell, B. M. S. and van Leeuwen, B. (2013) When did Britain industrialise? The sectoral distribution of the labour force and labour productivity in Britain, 1381-1851, Explorations in Economic History, 50 (1), 16-27.

Campbell, B. M. S. (2012) Grain yields on English demesnes after the Black Death, In: Bailey, M. and Rigby, S. H. (eds.), Town and countryside in the age of the Black Death: Essays in honour of John Hatcher. Turnhout: Brepols, 121-174.

Campbell, B. M. S. and Ó Gráda, C. (2011) Harvest shortfalls, grain prices, and famines in preindustrial England, The Journal of Economic History, 71 (4), 859-886.

Campbell, B. M. S. (2010) Nature as historical protagonist: Environment and society in pre-industrial England, Economic History Review, 63 (2), 281-314.

Campbell, B. M. S. (2008) Benchmarking medieval economic development: England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, c.1290, Economic History Review, 61 (4), 896-945.

Campbell, B. M. S. (2008) Corrigendum: Benchmarking medieval economic development: England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, c.1290, Economic History Review, 61 (4), 946-948.

Campbell, B. M. S. (2007) The medieval antecedents of English agricultural progress. Aldershot: Ashgate.

Campbell, B. M. S. and Bartley, K. (2006) England on the eve of the Black Death: An atlas of lay lordship, land, and wealth, 1300-49. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

Campbell, B. M. S. (2006) The land, In: Ormrod, M. and Horrox, R. (eds.), Social history of England, 1200-1500. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 179-237.

Campbell, B. M. S. (2005) The agrarian problem in the early fourteenth century, Past and Present, 188, 3-70.

Campbell, B. M. S. (2000) English seigniorial agriculture 1250-1450. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Campbell, B. M. S. (1983) Agricultural Progress in Medieval England: Some Evidence from Eastern Norfolk, Economic History Review, 36 (1), 26-46.

Campbell, B. M. S. (1980) Population Change and the Genesis of Commonfields on a Norfolk Manor, Economic History Review, 33 (2), 174-192.


Last updated 1 September 2016 by ludlowf@tcd.ie.