Trinity academics win prestigious Royal Society University Research Fellowships

5 July 2017

Two Trinity academics, Dr David Wilson and Marius de Leeuw, both of the Trinity School of Mathematics, have won prestigious awards under the Royal Society - Science Foundation Ireland University Research Fellowship scheme.

Minister of State for Training, Skills, Innovation, Research and Development, John Halligan TD, joined Science Foundation Ireland today in welcoming the announcement of three new awards under the Royal Society-Science Foundation Ireland University Research Fellowship scheme. Pictured were Sinead O'Keeffe (University of Limerick), David Wilson (Trinity College Dublin), Fraser Morgan (University College Dublin) and Dr. Ruth Freeman, Director of Strategy and Communications, Science Foundation Ireland, with Minister of State for Training, Skills, Innovation, Research and Development, John Halligan TD, and Lynette Keeney (Tyndall National Institute) with her four month old baby Sophie. Picture: Jason Clarke.

The scheme is funded by Science Foundation Ireland and is aimed at outstanding early researchers to provide them with the opportunity to build an independent research career and become future leaders in their field.

The fellowship provides for five years of funding with the possibility to apply for a competitive renewal of an additional three years.

Research Fellow in the Trinity School of Mathematics Dr David Wilson said: “My research project will investigate the strong force, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), which along with gravity, electromagnetism and the weak force, is one of the four fundamental forces of nature.

 “Personally, I feel extremely fortunate and privileged to have been awarded this fellowship, and I am very excited to have this opportunity to conduct this research.”

De Leeuw aims to understand systems of strongly interacting particles by studying models, which are highly symmetrical -- so-called 'integrable models'. His research will also play a role in new research insights in the area of algebra.

De Leeuw said: “I am very happy to be awarded a Royal Society – Science Foundation Ireland University Research Fellowship to carry out this project at Trinity. The School of Mathematics at Trinity has a very active group of experts in my field of mathematical physics.  I am looking forward to working with the people here, which will help provide important insights and new directions in my research. It is also an important step in my career progression to carry out a project which I have developed over the years.”

Tánaiste and Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, Frances Fitzgerald TD, and Minister for State for Training, Skills, Innovation, Research, and Development, John Halligan TD, joined Science Foundation Ireland in welcoming the announcement of the three awards under the Royal Society – Science Foundation Ireland University Research Fellowship Scheme.

Welcoming the announcement, Tánaiste Frances Fitzgerald said: “I am delighted to congratulate the researchers who have been awarded Royal Society-Science Foundation Ireland University Research Fellowships. The achievement of this award from the Royal Society is recognition of their talent and creativity, and clearly demonstrates that they can compete alongside the best in the world.”

The fellowship scheme covers all areas of life and physical sciences, including engineering and mathematics, but excluding clinical medicine and direct biomedical research.

Science Foundation Ireland funds research in areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics to promote and assist the development and competitiveness of industry, enterprise, and employment in Ireland.  

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