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LIBRARY STUDY SPACE CAMPAIGN

A messy desk cluttered with laptop, notes, food, drinks, papers and personal belongings. Not leaving room for others.

On Monday 13th November, the Library will be launching its Study Space Campaign to address the issue of ‘desk-hogging’ (i.e., the practice of leaving books and personal belongings unattended for long periods of time at Library study spaces, thus preventing others from using those spaces). A dedicated team of stewards will be freeing up study spaces that have been left unoccupied for more than 60 minutes. Belongings are moved to clear plastic boxes to designated storage areas on the same floor.

Full details of the campaign are available on the Library regulations webpage: https://www.tcd.ie/library/about/regulations.php

The Library Study Space Campaign relies on the cooperation of all readers. We ask that you be respectful and support the Steward Team to ensure that everybody has a fair chance of finding a suitable study space during this stressful pre-exam period. You can also assist us by not leaving personal belongings (especially laptops, phones, USB drives or other valuables) unattended for any length of time, and by sticking to the 60 minute break rule.

Reminder to take breaks, stay hydrated and eat all snacks and meals outside of the Library, but do take your valuables with you.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at: library@tcd.ie.

Temporary Disruption of the Library’s UK Electronic Legal Deposit Service

Group of electronic device users logging onto their devices

Please be advised there is a temporary disruption of the Library’s UK electronic legal deposit service, due to a technical issue. Content including e-books, e-journals and the web archive are likely to be unavailable for a number of days. The Legal Deposit Libraries are working hard to resolve the situation as soon as possible. We will keep readers updated during this process. If you require urgent access to a title available on UK eLD only, please contact library@tcd.ie for assistance.

Our electronic Legal Deposit collection is a shared endeavour with the other UK Legal Deposit Libraries. Our access to this content is via the British Library. Unfortunately, they are experiencing a major technology outage following a cyber-attack. The outage is affecting their website, online systems and services, and includes electronic Legal Deposit. They anticipate restoring many services in the next few weeks, but some disruption may persist for longer. Please see their blog  https://blogs.bl.uk/living-knowledge/2023/11/cyber-incident.html

for updates from them.

Intermittent noise in the Ussher Library, 9-18 August

Due to ongoing construction works, there will be periods of noise during weekday office hours from Wednesday 9 to Friday 18 August in the Ussher Library – we apologise for any disruption caused. Due to the nature of the works these are likely to be quite loud and constant this week; next week should be more intermittent.

Students wishing to use reading rooms with less distraction may wish to temporarily move to the Lecky Library, former Berkeley Library, or indeed the Hamilton Library at the East End of College.

School of Education authors publish new book on Universal Design for Learning in Academia

Authors pictured are Mary Quirke, Patricia McCarthy and Gaston (Trusty bi-lingual Asst.) and Conor McGuckin.

The Routledge publication of “Adopting a UDL Attitude within Academia” was celebrated with authors, Mary Quirke, Conor McGuckin and Patricia McCarthy, together with Gaston (Patricia’s guide dog), Library staff and colleagues this week (July 12th) in the foyer of the Library.  The book is an interesting project whilst also an exciting contribution to the discourse on inclusion on campus.  The authors themselves are an interesting team in that Mary is completing her PhD, with Dr McGuckin and Dr McCarthy who are colleagues in the School of Education.

Authors, Mary Quirke, Patricia McCarthy and Gaston (Trusty bi-lingual Asst.) and Conor McGuckin joined by colleagues from the  School of Education, Library and wider College community: Michael Shevlin, Siobhan Dunne, Derina Johnson, Emer Murphy, Aoife Lynam, Emily Barnes, Marita Kerin, Carmel O’Sullivan, Conn McCluskey, Sarah Coughlan, Rebecca Cullen, Barbara Ringwood and Carol-Ann O’Sioráin.

While the book bridges the gap between the theory and practice of UDL (Universal Design for Learning), a design framework for inclusion, it very clearly sets out the “thinking” needed in our increasingly diverse learning environments.

The book is not just intended for those leading classrooms and this is very evident from the variety of contributors across the publication.  Our very own subject librarian, is one of many international contributors.  Geraldine Fitzgerald shares her experience of developing inclusive practice in Chapter 8 and how in her role as subject librarian for Education, she regarded UDL as a useful personal learning concept. Geraldine has successfully applied UDL with colleagues resulting in positive inclusive change across the Library and has continued to collaborate on projects relating to improving the library’s sensory environment and improving accessibility to resources.

This book encompasses all the values of inclusion.  It pushes the boundaries and engages all on campus.  The inclusion of subject librarian, Geraldine, was integral as when we first think about information in a campus setting, our thoughts are never too far away from what we need to read.  Whilst the librarians and their expertise are important to the discussion of inclusion, these colleagues do not stand alone as the gatekeepers.  Each and every one of us has a role to play. 

That is the essence of the book − it shares the attitude necessary for inclusion, where inclusion is everyone’s business.

The book will have a broad appeal and is essential reading for anyone looking to understand and implement UDL across their learning environment.

There is a book launch planned Sept 7th 2023, so do put the date in your diary! Further details to follow.

Submitted by Author Mary Quirke

Closure of the 1937 Reading Room for Essential Works

Postgraduate-Reading-Room

There have been serious issues with leaks and damp in the 1937 Reading Room for some time. The Library has been working with Estates and Facilities to put together a programme of works to address these issues and ensure the long-term viability of the building. This will require the closure of the main reading room area from next Monday 22nd May for the coming months, and temporary closures of adjacent spaces, particularly in the early and late phases of the project. It is anticipated that the main reading room will fully reopen in September 2023 – an exact date will be communicated later in the summer when Estates & Facilities are in a position to confirm the project end point.

While the project is underway, alternative study spaces will be available on campus to ensure that our postgraduate students will always have somewhere comfortable to work, both during the day and overnight:

  • Monday 22nd May – Sunday 11th June
  • The Berkeley and Lecky libraries will be available from 09:30 to 17:00 (note: the Ussher Library will be closed during this time for essential works but you can request books held in the Ussher by emailing us at library@tcd.ie)
  • The Hamilton Library will be available on a 24/7 basis (here is a video to show you how to get there)
  • Monday 12th June to the end of the summer
  • The Berkeley, Lecky and Ussher libraries will be available from 09:30-17:00
  • Kinsella Hall (floors 1-3 of the Ussher Library), will be available on a 24/7 basis

Full details are available on the Library website’s Opening Hours section for the 1937 Reading Room.

While the kitchen, toilets, PC room, group study area, side corridors and lockers will need to be closed occasionally for short periods of time (usually just a day or two), they will remain generally accessible throughout the summer on a 24/7 basis. Postgraduate students will be given as much advanced notice as possible about these temporary closures.

Addressing leaks and damp in the 1937 Reading Room is an important health and safety measure that will improve the experience for those who rely on the various facilities within the building. But as with any historical protected structure, renovation works will be challenging. Estates and Facilities have advised that timelines, especially with regard to temporary closures of specific spaces, may be subject to change. The Library website and social media platforms will be used to keep the postgraduate community up to date on developments.     

The Library of Trinity College Dublin

Leabharlann Choláiste na Tríonóide

Trinity College Dublin to dename the Berkeley Library 

The Berkeley Library

Trinity College Dublin is to dename the Berkeley Library while adopting a retain-and-explain approach to a stained-glass window commemorating George Berkeley [26 April 2023].  

Portraits depicting Berkeley will be assessed in the future by a new overall College policy on artwork, while the academic Gold Medals memorialising Berkeley will be reviewed by the relevant academic department.  

These decisions represent a nuanced approach and are the result of careful consideration and detailed analysis. 

Opened in 1967, Trinity’s largest library was named in 1978 after George Berkeley, the world-renowned philosopher, and former Librarian at Trinity. Berkeley published some of his most important philosophical works while at Trinity in the 1700s. He bought slaves – named Philip, Anthony, Edward, and Agnes Berkeley – to work on his Rhode Island estate in 1730-31 and sought to advance ideology in support of slavery. 

Today’s decision was taken by the University’s Board following several months of research, analysis and public consultation overseen by the Trinity Legacies Review Working Group, which is considering legacy issues on a case-by-case basis. 

Trinity decided that the continued use of the Berkeley name on its library is inconsistent with the University’s core values of human dignity, freedom, inclusivity, and equality. The denaming does not deny Berkeley’s importance as a writer, philosopher, and towering intellectual figure. His philosophical work will still be taught at Trinity and remains of significant contemporary relevance. A separate process will determine what the new name for the library should be. 

Trinity’s Provost Dr Linda Doyle said:  

“The landscape of a university, especially one as old as Trinity, is not static. Each generation of students and staff deserves a chance to influence decisions. In this case, it was our students who called on us to address the issue. We welcome their engagement, and we thank the Trinity Legacies Review Working Group for its assistance in providing evidence-based information to underpin this decision. 

“George Berkeley’s enormous contribution to philosophical thought is not in question. However, it is also clear that he was both an owner of enslaved people and a theorist of slavery and racial discrimination, which is in clear conflict with Trinity’s core values.” 

Professor Eoin O Sullivan, Senior Dean and Chair of the Trinity Legacies Review Working Group, said: 

“I am grateful to all those who contributed their time and expertise to the consideration of this critical issue. We received close to 100 submissions from members of the public, alumni and our own students and staff on this matter. 

“Especially influential on our thinking has been the pioneering work at the universities of Glasgow, Dalhousie, Brown, and Harvard, all of which have faced similar issues to those we face at Trinity as we reckon with our past. We are committed to addressing issues around Trinity’s complex legacy, from an evidence-based perspective and on a case-by-case basis.” 
 
Helen Shenton, Librarian and College Archivist at Trinity College Dublinsaid: 

“Technological advances, societal changes and cultural evolutions shape the Library for each generation. Libraries are both fundamental constants in the university and simultaneously constantly in flux. 

“The Library building known today as the ‘Berkeley’ started out as the ‘New’ Library in 1967. As a 21st century Library, another name change prioritises the current generation of students’ experience of a welcoming and supportive Library space. There is the opportunity to be creative and imaginative in response to this change.  

“Trinity will continue to hold George Berkeley’s philosophical works in the Library collections and continue to teach and to research his works.” 

ENDS

Background on Trinity’s process:

Trinity’s Legacies Review Working Group (TLRWG), comprising Trinity students, professional staff, academic staff as well as external members, began an evidence-based review of the issues around the Berkeley last year.

This followed a call from the Trinity College Dublin Student Union to dename the library.

93 written submissions were received about George Berkeley by the end of January 2023.  These included submissions from current students and staff, emeritus staff, alumni and international experts on Berkeley and other associated subjects. Of these, 47 were in favour of de-naming the library, 23 suggested new names for the library and should be seen as broadly supportive of de-naming, even if renaming was outside the brief of this consultation. There were 16 submissions that supported retaining Bishop Berkeley’s name on the library.

All submissions made on the topic of George Berkeley can be downloaded and read here (https://www.tcd.ie/seniordean/legacies/).

For a working paper on Berkeley’s legacies at Trinity prepared for TLRWG, see here (https://www.tcd.ie/seniordean/legacies/berkeleyTLRWGworkingpaper.pdf).

The role of the TLRWG is to document the historical evidence on specific legacy issues, to seek evidence-based submissions from the College and wider community on each identified issue, and, based on the evidence collated, provide options for consideration to the relevant decision-making authority (College Board, Faculty Executive or School Executive) as is appropriate and determined by the Working Group. The Terms of Reference for the Group can be read here: https://www.tcd.ie/seniordean/legacies/TLRWGToR.pdf

 A brief biography of George Berkeley

George Berkeley was born at Dysart, Co. Kilkenny in March 1685. Educated at Kilkenny College, he entered Trinity College Dublin in March 1700, receiving his BA degree in February 1704. He took holy orders and became a fellow of Trinity by competitive examination in 1707. He subsequently held several college offices including Librarian (1709), Junior Dean (1710), junior Greek Lecturer (1712), senior Greek lecturer (1721), Divinity lecturer and preacher (1721) senior Proctor (1722) and Hebrew lecturer (1723) before relinquishing his fellowship in 1724 to become Dean of Derry. As Librarian in 1709 he was instrumental in overseeing the building of the then new library, now the Old Library.

While at Trinity he published the three books upon which his fame and reputation as a philosopher rests. The first of these, An essay towards a new theory of vision was published in 1709 and developed his ideas on vision which would later support his more famous immaterialist hypotheses. His Treatise concerning the principles of Human Knowledge followed in 1710 and is regarded as his masterpiece. It developed his full-blown philosophy of materialism or subjective idealism and continues to have a major influence on modern philosophical scholarship. Finally, the third of these pioneering works, Three dialogues between Hylas and Philonous was published in London in 1713. His reputation established; Berkeley embarked on two extensive grand tours of Europe from 1714-20 before eventually returning to his fellowship.

While Dean of Derry, he developed his idea for establishing a university in the American colonial territory of Bermuda. This eventually involved Berkeley moving to Rhode Island in 1729 where he purchased a farm at Whitehall worked by enslaved people.

Upon his return from America and following a period living in London with his growing family, Berkeley was appointed to the provincial bishopric of Cloyne, in which role he remained until his death. During this period, he wrote his influential work on Irish political economy, The Querist (1735-37), as well a series of other pamphlets.

More detail on Berkeley’s memorialisation at Trinity

Berkeley Memorial Window

The Berkeley Memorial window is one of three major pieces of stained glass sited in the chancel of the College Chapel and dates to 1866. It is not well-known – even within the College – and the only scholarly article written about it is a 1972 piece by E.J. Furlong in Hermathena, from which the bulk of the following description is taken. The idea of a window dedicated to Bishop Berkeley emerged alongside suggestions for windows in honour of Archbishop Ussher and Richard Graves, Dean of Armagh and was approved by Board in 1867. It was funded by the gift of £300 from Richard R. Warren, then MP for Trinity, and a further gift of £72 from the incoming Provost Humphrey Lloyd – both given in 1867. Designs were considered for the window in February 1868, and the London firm of Clayton and Bell were successful.

Bishop Berkeley’s Gold Medals

 On 8 May 1752, ‘the Provost and Senior Fellows agreed to give annually, forever, two Gold Medals for the encouragement of Bachelor of Arts in the Study of the Greek language: having received a Benefaction of one hundred and twenty guineas, besides a die, from the Right Rev. Dr. George Berkeley, Lord Bishop of Cloyne for that purpose.’ These medals are still listed in the College Calendar today but have not been awarded by the Dept. of Classics since 2011.

The Department of Classics has a preference to dename Bishop Berkeley’s Gold Medals.

Portraits

There are three portraits of George Berkeley in the College art collection. One, by Robert Home (1782), is hung in the Examination Hall, another, by Francis Bindon (1733), is in the Senior Common Room, and the last is by James Latham (1743).

Library Study Space Campaign

On Tuesday 11 April the Library launched a Study Space Campaign to address the issue of ‘desk-hogging’ (i.e., the practice of leaving books and personal belongings unattended for long periods of time at Library study spaces, thus preventing others from using those spaces). A dedicated team of stewards are freeing up study spaces that have been left unoccupied for more than 60 minutes. Belongings are moved in boxes to designated storage areas on the same floor.

Full details of the campaign are available on the Library regulations webpage: https://www.tcd.ie/library/about/regulations.php

The Library Study Space Campaign relies on the cooperation of all readers. We ask that you support the Steward Team to ensure that everybody has a fair chance of finding a suitable study space during this stressful pre-exam period. You can assist us by not leaving personal belongings (especially laptops, phones, USB drives or other valuables) unattended for any length of time, and by sticking to the 60 minute break rule.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at: library@tcd.ie.

Legal deposit libraries of Ireland and the UK celebrate 10th anniversary of digital collecting

The six legal deposit libraries of Ireland and the UK, comprising  the Library of Trinity College Dublin, the British Library, the National Library of Scotland, the National Library of Wales, the Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford and Cambridge University Library,  are celebrating 10 years of collecting and preserving digital publications today [6 April, 2023].

The Library of Trinity College Dublin is the only library on the island of Ireland that enjoys UK Legal Deposit status which entitles it to receive a copy of every item published in Ireland and the UK. It has enjoyed this status since 1801, enabling the Library to build an unparalleled record of our intellectual and cultural heritage for the benefit of students, researchers and visitors from near and far.

In 2013 these powers were extended from printed publications to include non-print (electronic) legal deposit, allowing readers to access websites, e-books, and online journals, creating an unprecedented collection of digital and online publishing which captures contemporary living. The commitment to electronic legal deposit has also provided access to the UK Web Archive, which holds millions of websites and over 100 curated collections including Brexit and the global Covid-19 pandemic, to name but a few.

Ranging from the most contemporary electronic collections to 19th century print collections, the impact of both print and non-print legal deposit for the island of Ireland has been significant.

  • In 2016, marking the centenary of the 1916 Easter Rising in Ireland, the Library of Trinity College Dublin collaborated with the Bodleian Library and British Library to archive websites from both the Irish and UK web domains as they reflected on this pivotal moment in modern Irish history in the 1916 Web Archiving Project.
  • The Library of Trinity College Dublin has one of the most significant collections of Northern Irish publications published on the island of Ireland, including books, pamphlets and local history, especially relevant as we mark the 25th anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement also this week.
  • By the 1930s, the number of newly published books banned in Ireland each year was between 100-150, denying the Irish public the right to important Irish and international literature. Under Legal Deposit, the Library of Trinity College Dublin continued to receive these books and was able to provide access, albeit under very restricted conditions.
  • Legal Deposit enabled the collection of books by women authors from the 19th century onwards, both from Ireland and the UK. This helped to counteract collection bias and improved representation.

Commenting on its significance, Librarian & College Archivist, Helen Shenton said:

“Today, the Library of Trinity College Dublin together with our five legal deposit libraries in the UK, celebrate 10-years of digital collecting, which has enabled the creation of a seventh, transnational digital library for the benefit of all. It is also an opportunity to look back on the significant impact Legal Deposit has had over centuries, building an unparalleled record of our intellectual and cultural heritage.”

About Legal Deposit Libraries

There are six legal deposit libraries across in Ireland and the UK. They are:

The legal deposit libraries work together to ensure the long-term preservation of Irish and UK publications. They ensure that publications are held securely and that they can be discovered and accessed by readers. For further details on the 10th anniversary celebrations on digital collecting see British Library announcement.

Library Study Space Stewards in the Library of Trinity College Dublin

Applications for Library Study Space Stewards are now being accepted for the pre-exam period in April and the exam week in early May. Stewards will work 10-20 hours per week in the Berkeley, Lecky, Ussher and Hamilton Libraries. Their primary role is to ensure that study spaces left unattended for long periods of time are made available for other readers to use.

Click here for a full job description

Please ensure you read this in detail before completing the application form.

The closing date for receipt of applications is 12 noon, Friday 24 March, 2023.

Please Note: Interviews for these positions are likely to take place in the week beginning 27 March 2023. Successful candidates will be notified by e-mail of their interview time.

If you have any questions please contact Derek Birney, Reading Room Maintenance Executive, by e-mail: djbirney@tcd.ie

Digitising Cultural Heritage Collections: Lessons Learned and Forging Ahead

A seminar organised by the Library of Trinity College Dublin and the Consortium of European Research Libraries (CERL).

The Library of Trinity College Dublin and Trinity Centre for the Book Research Seminar will host the Consortium of European Research Libraries (CERL) Annual Seminar on Tuesday October 4, 2022 (9:30am – 5pm), at the Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute. Ten years since digitisation was last the subject of a CERL Seminar, we wish to bring people together to discuss the varied challenges research libraries face in the planning and realising of internal and collaborative programmes of digitisation for cultural heritage materials. 

Speakers from various international and Irish libraries will comment on the state of the art of digitisation and the role of research libraries therein, presenting a variety of recent and ongoing projects. These include the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Folger Shakespeare Library, John Rylands Library, and the libraries of the National University of Ireland Galway and Royal Irish Academy. Through the seminar we hope to instigate a community-focused discussion to problematise the maturing field of cultural heritage digitisation. 

The full programme is available here for the event
Registration is open to all. Please register before September 26 by emailing secretariat@cerl.org.

Campus LocationTrinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute
For further information contact Unlocking the Fagel Collection Project Manager, Dr Ann-Marie Hansen, anhansen@tcd.ie