Peter Fox, Honorary Fellow of Trinity College Dublin

We’re delighted that Peter Fox, former Librarian & Archivist of Trinity College Dublin (and then Librarian of the University of Cambridge) has been been awarded Honorary Fellowship. Peter is the author of the fantastic “Trinity College Library Dublin: A History”, an amazingly useful and comprehensive book we use constantly (not least, to settle arguments amongst Library staff members about the history of the Library).

Blowing our own Trumpet (Redux)

Those of you with an interest in music may remember that we were the recipients of the International Association of Music Libraries, Archives and Documentation Centres (UK and Ireland Branch) Excellence Award, back in 2016. This is awarded every three years… and we won it again this year.  The Library of Trinity College Dublin was the only Irish winner of the 11 prizes awarded.

The award focuses on outstanding music services to the library’s user community, using the following criteria:

  • Sustained good work and good practice which has the potential to be adopted and adapted by others.

and if relevant:

  • Serious development of a service.
  • Innovation of obviously lasting value.

They had the following nice things to say about us:

“An impressive legal deposit library led by a distinguished music librarian [that’d be Roy Stanley – Ed.] who works closely with staff, students and other music librarians and whose engagement with performers has stimulated research and resulted in radio programmes, concerts, CDs, and publications.”

and:

“The leading role of TCD Music library in the sector in Ireland cannot be overstated. The collaboration and co-operation is a good example to others.”

and finishing up with:

“As a Legal Deposit Library, holdings of printed books and printed music are bound to be comprehensive, and thus we are looking at the way these are accessed, and other, special, aspects of the Library’s holdings. In my view, the access arrangements for the printed collections are generous and all-embracing; and the special collections are of national importance for Ireland. Development through purchase of non-legally deposited items is also impressive. I was interested to read of the Music Library’s participation in the Research Collections Division, and the integrated approach that has resulted from this.”

Well done – again – to our dedicated Music Librarian, Roy Stanley. Anyone want to place bets for 2022?

New online Resource – TAIR

 

The Library has recently acquired a subscription to TAIR, which can be accessed
via the A-Z Listing on LibGuides.

The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) maintains a database of genetic and molecular biology data for the model higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana . Data available from TAIR includes the complete genome sequence along with gene structure, gene product information, gene expression, DNA and seed stocks, genome maps, genetic and physical markers, publications, and information about the Arabidopsis research community. Gene product function data is updated every week from the latest published research literature and community data submissions.

TAIR also provides extensive linkouts from our data pages to other Arabidopsis resources.

 

Unboxing Open Scholarship

Defining Open Scholarship

Open Scholarship is the practice of research, education and knowledge exchange in such a way that others can collaborate and contribute, where research publications, data, lab notes and other scholarly processes and works are properly and ethically managed and evaluated and, unless restricted for justifiable reasons, are freely available to all levels of society under terms that enable reuse, redistribution and reproduction of the work and its underlying data and methods.
Open Scholarship may also be referred to as Open Science or Open Research.

(Adapted from Foster’s Open Science definition)

Trinity Task Force on Open Scholarship

The Trinity Task Force on Open Scholarship was created by the Librarian & College Archivist and the Dean of Research with colleagues across the University. One of the first tasks is to define what is meant by Open Scholarship – is it Open Science, (in the broadest sense, incorporating all disciplines), Open Access or Citizen Science? – and work through where Trinity wants to be in this landscape, what is or will be mandatory, where to lead, where to actively follow, how best to support and help researchers etc.

There is much activity in this area. Internationally, Plan S is aimed at ‘accelerating the transition to full and immediate Open Access of Scientific Publications’. Nationally, NORF (National Open Research Forum) led by the Higher Education Authority and the Health Research Board is working towards a ‘National Statement on the Transition to an Open Research Environment’. From a European perspective, LERU (League of European Research Universities) is creating a pragmatic ‘Roadmap to Open Science’.

As part of collectively figuring this out, a series of events under the theme of ‘Unboxing Open Scholarship’ will take place over the coming months. The first will be an interactive event open to all members of the Trinity community and will take place at 12 noon, 8 February in the Trinity Long Room Hub.

Please contact us at openscholarship@tcd.ie with your views and suggestions for future events.

Alternative routes to scholarly articles and research outputs

Many scholarly and peer-reviewed articles can be read for free on the Web. A number of tools exist to help discover research output more easily: through installing a browser extension or plug-in; by using academic search engines and archives; or, by contacting the author directly.

Some articles will however remain elusive – but the Library can help. The Library offers an Inter-Library Loan service which provides access to scholarly articles which are not available via the Library’s print or online collections, are not open access and cannot be found via plug-ins, search services or repositories.

Find articles using plug-ins

There are a number of browser extensions or plug-ins for Chrome, Firefox, and Safari which can be installed to facilitate finding articles which are open access. Some examples:

Unpaywall makes finding OA-articles easy for the individual user by installing a plug-in on Chrome or Firefox.

 

You can search Open Access Button directly on their website or download an extension for Chrome which makes finding open access articles easy. When OA Button hits a paywall, the service also sends off requests to authors asking them to deposit their articles in a subject or institutional repository in order to make their research open. Open Access Button is a non-profit organisation.

Google Scholar Button is a browser extension available for Firefox, Chrome, and Safari. The extension makes finding full-text open access articles in Google Scholar easier.

Kopernio offers a browser plug-in that makes it easier to find both open access versions of articles and articles which users have access to via institutional subscription. The service is free but belongs to Clarivate Analytics and you need to register in order to use the extension.

Find research articles using search engines, academic repositories or archives 

Some examples:

  • arXiv is a preprint archive mainly for physics, mathematics, computer sciences and related sciences. Run by Cornell University.
  • bioRxiv is an archive for open access preprints in the life sciences operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.
  • DOAJ is a list of open access journals and a search service finding peer-reviewed and scholarly journals and articles.
  • The Humanities Commons CORE repository is intended for open access articles, monographs and other publications and resources in the humanities. Humanities Commons is a nonprofit operation run by the MLA.
  • OpenDOAR is a searchable global directory of open access repositories and their policies.
  • OSF Preprints is a platform with openly accessible preprints, or submitted manuscripts which are publically distributed before acceptance and peer-review in a traditional scientific journal. OSF Preprints is developed by Centre for Open Science (COS), a non-profit organisation with the goal of greater openness and reproducible research.
  • SocArXiv is an open archive of the social sciences for preprints, working papers and other outputs. It is operated by the University of Maryland and developed by the Center of Open Science (COS).

Contact the author

Researchers may share articles between themselves if this is permitted by agreements with their publishers, so-called ‘scholarly sharing.’ Please refer to Sherpa/Romeo to check current terms for the journal in question. When using the plug-in Open Access Button and hitting paywalled articles, requests to authors are sent asking them to deposit their articles in an open institutional or subject repository. There are also a number of social platforms for researchers, e.g. ResearchGate and  Academia.edu.

(Adapted with thanks from: https://openaccess.blogg.kb.se/2018/07/01/alternative-routes-to-scholarly-articles-and-research-outputs/)

What does the mobile, academic eBook of the future look like? Call for Participants for User Experience Testing

We are running user testing sessions, to help us understand how you might want to use new types of digital publications in our collections. We are interested in understanding what your needs are for books published as apps or written specifically for use on mobile devices. If you use such publications in your studies, research or in reading for pleasure, we’d really like to hear from you.

  • The testing will take place on the 7th and 8th of February
  • The one hour session will comprise an interview and interaction with devices pre-loaded with content
  • In return you will receive €50 in cash

Continue reading

Your Library, Your Views

Library Pop Art

We’re running a short survey to help us understand your experiences of the Library. As a thank you, we will enter you into a draw to win prizes including Trinity Ball tickets, TCard credit and more.

Your views will help us to better appreciate all of our users’ needs and provide valuable insights to enable us to develop responsive services for the future. The survey will take about fifteen minutes to complete. The closing date is 14 December.

Get started here!

The Library Life Pulse survey is being administered by an independent research agency called Alterline, you can view their GDPR policy online.

If you have any queries about this survey, please contact us at library@tcd.ie.

All personal data collected by the University will be processed according to the College Privacy Notice.

 

Student Secondhand Booksale 2018

It’s almost time for the Student Secondhand Booksale! A wide selection and great value in books on History, Law, Business, Science, English Literature & Drama, Social Science, etc., & incredible bargains in secondhand textbooks. For one day only on Wednesday 17 October, from 10-3 in Goldsmith Hall. Students can’t afford to miss it!

The Librarian Presents: Stimulating Educational Innovation (9 October, 15:00)

What approach fits best when implementing change in university teaching?
How do we know if we improve the quality of our education by using technology?

Tue 9 October 2018
15:00 – 16:30
North Training Room, Berkeley Library Basement
Trinity College Dublin
Register for talk

The Librarian and College Archivist of Trinity College Dublin, Helen Shenton, invites you to a presentation delivered by Jan Haarhuis, University of Utrecht (UU), who will discuss UU’s strategy for education innovation and how they have implemented the Educate-it programme.

The UU educational model is one of engaged learning which aims to stimulate students to be responsible for their own personal development and academic progress.

In order to create their vision for education and IT, the university needed to determine awareness and acknowledgement of cultural change with specific emphasis on quality and research. To find out which implementation strategy was best and in order to measure the effects of innovations with blended learning, the Educate-it programme team collaborated with colleagues in the university’s School of Governance, School of Education and School of Social and Behavioural Sciences.

What to expect from this talk

  • Explanation of the ‘why, what and how’ of the Educate-it programme
  • Results of the implementation of educational innovation so far and how this is being scaled up
  • Best practice and collaboration in longitudinal research of educational innovation programmes

Audience Participation

If you have a question you would like Jan to address as part of his talk, please email: library@tcd.ie with the subject heading ‘The Librarian Presents’.

Speaker Biography

Jan Haarhuis is an educationalist and since 2014, the programme manager of Educate-it at the University of Utrecht. In 2005 he became Head of the Department of Education and Student Affairs. From 2009 until 2013 he was responsible for the implementation of a new three year Masters programme in Veterinary Medicine, part of which included the implementation of programmatic/longitudinal assessment.

In 2016, Jan received the ‘change maker’ award in the ICT and Education Professionals category in the Netherlands’ SURF education awards.

Jan is the Chair of the Digital Education Group of the League of European Research Intensive Universities (LERU), which brings together experts from across the LERU network to focus on e assessment, academic development, e certificate open source programmes and collaborative research. The group is organising a blended ‘Digital Higher Education Summit’ in November 2018.

‘The Librarian presents’ is an occasional series of talks by thought-provoking speakers curated by the Librarian and College Archivist of Trinity College Dublin, Helen Shenton.