Your Library, Your Views

Library Pop Art

We’re running a short survey to help us understand your experiences of the Library. As a thank you, we will enter you into a draw to win prizes including Trinity Ball tickets, TCard credit and more.

Your views will help us to better appreciate all of our users’ needs and provide valuable insights to enable us to develop responsive services for the future. The survey will take about fifteen minutes to complete. The closing date is 14 December.

Get started here!

The Library Life Pulse survey is being administered by an independent research agency called Alterline, you can view their GDPR policy online.

If you have any queries about this survey, please contact us at library@tcd.ie.

All personal data collected by the University will be processed according to the College Privacy Notice.

 

Open Day Library Tours Saturday 9th December 2017

As part of Trinity Open Day the Library would be delighted if you could join us for a short tour of the Berkeley, Lecky and Ussher Libraries. Students and their families are all very welcome – teachers too!

Please meet us in the foyer of the Berkeley Library. If you can see this…

Pomodoro Sphere

…then you are at the right place.

Tours will run every 15 minutes from 10:15 to 13:00 and will last about 10 minutes.  They will be led by Trinity students so it’s a chance to talk to them about life at Trinity and they might even show you their favourite spot to study in the Library!

We apologise to current users of the Library for any disruption.

Celebrating Research at the Library

probe-research-night-landscape-posterThis year’s event promoting Trinity’s role in research took place on Friday 30 September at locations across campus – and the Library was well represented by involvement in four of the talks and presentations.

Probe was a free evening of music, talks, performance, films, food, experiments and workshops that explored the fascinating research that is shaping our world.

The Library was involved in the following events:

Hidden Histories: Researching the Treasures of the Library

Exhibition Area, Old Library, 5 – 7pm every half hour

Join Library experts in the exhibition area to discover how they research, interpret and conserve the treasures of the Library. Get an insight into the imagery, materials and techniques that were used to produce our most precious early manuscripts, such as the Book of Kells. Take a look down a microscope at the tell-tale characteristics of parchment and leather, and handle some of the raw materials used to create, and to conserve, the early book structures. Take a closer look at the detail and learn about the meanings hidden in the decoration.

Research in the Everything Library

Blackstone LaunchPad, Berkeley Library Foyer, 5 – 8pm every half hour

What does it mean to have the entire published universe of two jurisdictions, the UK and Ireland, at your fingertips? What kind of research is needed in order to help researchers navigate this universe? Come join us to experience the weird and wonderful depths of the Library’s modern collections. See how a book ends up in the catalogue; how researchers can read Library materials without ever setting foot in a library building; how electronic publications are collected; and how even transient web pages are captured for posterity. Friendly Library staff will be on hand to show and tell, to explore questions about the (digital) future and to discuss some of the possible answers.

Digital Repository and Imaging Service

Trinity Long Room Hub, 5 – 8pm

Explore the work of Trinity’s DRIS (Digital Resource & Imaging Service), a department dedicated to the development of digital library collections to support research, teaching and scholarship. The team at DRIS, in collaboration with Computer Science researchers, will be demoing a software app which displays resources about the Harry Clarke Studios from the DRIS Digital Collections database, provides geolocation information about the churches where the related stained glass windows can be  found (based on Ordinance Survey data), and maps out how to get there.

Reconstructing the Past

The Long Room, Old Library,  7 – 8pm

From meteor impacts to ancient scrolls, join us for a storytelling event in Trinity’s iconic Long Room that reveals the different ways researchers look to the past.

Featuring geologist Ian Sanders on reconstructing our planet’s ancient past, zoologist Nicola Marples on understanding the evolution of life, geneticist Dan Bradley on decoding humanity’s past by looking at our DNA, and our own Manuscripts & Archives Research Library curator Jane Maxwell on uncovering and protecting the artefacts of human culture.

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Podcast & Slides from “Meeting the Challenges of Preserving the UK Web” Lecture

Trinity College Library Dublin hosted a public lecture entitled Meeting the Challenges of Preserving the UK Web on Wednesday, 6th of May at 1:15pm in the Neill Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute.

Slides

The talk was delivered by Helen Hockx-Yu, Head of Web Archiving, British Library.
The British Library has taken on the challenge of collecting and providing continued access to UK’s digital heritage. An important element of this is the World Wide Web, fast evolving since its advent in 1980, and fundamentally changing the way we live, work and communicate. The British Library started a programme of work in 2003, to build from scratch the capacity to eventually preserve the entire UK web domain. The UK Legal Deposit Libraries, including Trinity College Library Dublin, are now on the front line of the most ambitious expansion of heritage responsibilities in more than 300 years. This is required and enabled by the UK Non-Print Legal Deposit regulations which came into force in April 2013, charging us with capturing, among a wide range of digital publications, the content of every site carrying the .uk suffix (and more), preserving the material and making it accessible in the Legal Deposit Libraries’ reading rooms.
This talk provided an overview of the key curatorial, legal and technical challenges related to archiving the UK web, and the approaches the British Library has taken to meet these challenges. It covered interaction and engagement with researchers, using the Big UK Domain Data for Arts and Humanities (http://buddah.projects.history.ac.uk/) as an example, and summarised the learning, including some research outputs and how scholarly interaction changed the way the British Library collects websites, and stores and makes available web archives.
Helen Hockx-Yu is Head of Web Archiving at the British Library (BL). She has led the BL’s web archiving activities since 2008, building the Library’s capability for archiving the UK web at scale and implementing legal deposit of over 4 million UK websites since April 2013. She has published and spoken extensively about web archiving, addressing national and international audiences at various academic and professional conferences. Previously, Helen was Project Manager of the Planets project, a four-year project co-funded by the European Union under the Sixth Framework Programme to address core digital preservation challenges. Before joining the British Library, she worked as a Programme Manager at the UK Joint Information Systems Committee, overseeing JISC’s research and development activities in the area of digital preservation.

Event Details:
Date: Wednesday, 06 May 2015
Time: 13.15 (approximately 1 hour)
Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute, Neill Lecture Theatre.

RDS ‘Great Libraries of the World’ Lecture – Peter Fox on Trinity College Library Dublin 15/04/15

Trinity College Library Dublin: a History

Peter Fox’s ‘Trinity College Library Dublin: a History’, launched in 2014

This free (but booking essential!) lecture will examine some familiar aspects of the history of Trinity College Library Dublin from a less familiar perspective. Much of what we now take for granted: the foundation of the Library in the 16th century, the building of what we now call the Old Library in the 18th, the New Library (now the Berkeley) in the 20th, and Trinity’s continuing right to claim new books published in both Britain and Ireland – all of these involved complex negotiations, the outcome of which was far from certain. The story of the Library was directly affected by the intervention of major historical figures – monarchs: Elizabeth I, Queen Anne and Charles II; archbishops: James Ussher, William King and John Charles McQuaid; politicians: Oliver Cromwell, Eamon de Valera and Seán Lemass. These all feature in the lecture, which will cover the political background to the development of Ireland’s greatest library and its relations with church and state over four centuries.

Full details and how to book can be found on the RDS website.

Peter Fox worked at Trinity College for 15 years, first as Deputy Librarian and then as Librarian and College Archivist. He edited Treasures of the Library: Trinity College Dublin, published by the Royal Irish Academy in 1986, and the commentary volume to the Book of Kells facsimile. His history of Trinity College Library Dublin was published in 2014 by Cambridge University Press. From 1994 to 2009 he was the Librarian of the University of Cambridge, and he is a Fellow of Selwyn College Cambridge.