Rosita Boland – Friends of the Library Lecture

The next event in the 2019 Friends’ Autumn Programme will be held on Thursday 21 November when Irish Times journalist and travel writer Rosita Boland will have an open conversation on ‘The Allure of Elsewhere’ – Rosita’s latest book Elsewhere was recently shortlisted for the An Post Irish Book Awards.

It will be held in the JM Synge Theatre, Arts Building, TCD, at 7:30pm. Admission is free. All welcome! Enquiries to 01 8961544 or LibraryFriends@tcd.ie.

Rosita Boland was born in County Clare in 1965 and lives in Dublin where she is Senior Features Writer at the Irish Times. She has published two collections of poems, Muscle Creek (Raven Arts, 1991) and Dissecting the Heart (Gallery, 2003). She has travelled extensively, most recently in South East Asia and her travel books include Sea Legs: Hitch-hiking the Coast of Ireland Alone (New Island, 1992), A Secret Map of Ireland (New Island Books, 2005) and, most recently, Elsewhere: One Woman, One Rucksack, One Lifetime of Travel (2019). Rosita won the Hennessy Award for First Fiction in 1997.

Estella Solomons Print Collection – Friends of the Library Lecture

The Friends of the Library – Trinity College Dublin are delighted to announce their next lecture. Admission is free. All welcome! Enquiries to 01 8961544 or LibraryFriends@tcd.ie.

Making her mark: the Estella Solomons print collection in the Library of Trinity College Dublin

Dr Angela Griffith

19:30, Thursday 19 September 2019

Thomas Davis Lecture Theatre, Arts Building Concourse, Trinity College Dublin

Angela Griffith is Assistant Professor in History of Art (TCD) and is joint principal investigator for the Drawn to the page: Irish artists and illustration collection, a Digital Humanities Forum (TCD) Innovative Digital Project. Her current research examines the artist and the printed image in 19th and 20th century in Britain and Ireland.

The Museum Building – Friends of the Library Lecture

The Friends of the Library – Trinity College Dublin are delighted to announce their next lecture. Admission is free. All welcome! Enquiries to 01 8961544 or LibraryFriends@tcd.ie.

Dr Patrick Wyse Jackson

Trinity College Dublin

The architectural gem of Victorian Dublin: Deane and Woodward’s Museum Building, Trinity College Dublin

19:30, Thursday 21 March 2019

Thomas Davis Lecture Theatre, Arts Building Concourse, Trinity College Dublin

Patrick Wyse Jackson is an Associate Professor of Geology, Curator of the Geological Museum, Fellow of Trinity College, Dublin, Tutor, Head of the School of Natural Sciences, and a former Head of Geology and Director of Post-Graduate Teaching and Learning in the School of Natural Sciences. His main research interests are on the taxonomy, functional morphology and biology of Palaeozoic bryozoans, particularly those from the Ordovician and Mississippian geological periods. Patrick has published one hundred papers and meeting abstracts on his bryozoan research and over 150 notes, papers, and books in other fields including the history and philosophy of geology and the use of building materials in Ireland. He is currently a co-PI on the innovative cross-disciplinary project ‘Making Victorian Dublin’ being carried out with colleagues in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture in Trinity. This project is focused on the extractive industries and building trades, and craftsmen who worked on the Museum Building and elsewhere, in the middle decades of the 1800s.

Unboxing Open Scholarship

Defining Open Scholarship

Open Scholarship is the practice of research, education and knowledge exchange in such a way that others can collaborate and contribute, where research publications, data, lab notes and other scholarly processes and works are properly and ethically managed and evaluated and, unless restricted for justifiable reasons, are freely available to all levels of society under terms that enable reuse, redistribution and reproduction of the work and its underlying data and methods.
Open Scholarship may also be referred to as Open Science or Open Research.

(Adapted from Foster’s Open Science definition)

Trinity Task Force on Open Scholarship

The Trinity Task Force on Open Scholarship was created by the Librarian & College Archivist and the Dean of Research with colleagues across the University. One of the first tasks is to define what is meant by Open Scholarship – is it Open Science, (in the broadest sense, incorporating all disciplines), Open Access or Citizen Science? – and work through where Trinity wants to be in this landscape, what is or will be mandatory, where to lead, where to actively follow, how best to support and help researchers etc.

There is much activity in this area. Internationally, Plan S is aimed at ‘accelerating the transition to full and immediate Open Access of Scientific Publications’. Nationally, NORF (National Open Research Forum) led by the Higher Education Authority and the Health Research Board is working towards a ‘National Statement on the Transition to an Open Research Environment’. From a European perspective, LERU (League of European Research Universities) is creating a pragmatic ‘Roadmap to Open Science’.

As part of collectively figuring this out, a series of events under the theme of ‘Unboxing Open Scholarship’ will take place over the coming months. The first will be an interactive event open to all members of the Trinity community and will take place at 12 noon, 8 February in the Trinity Long Room Hub.

Please contact us at openscholarship@tcd.ie with your views and suggestions for future events.

The History of the South Dublin Union – Friends of the Library Lecture

The Friends of the Library – Trinity College Dublin are delighted to announce their next lecture. Admission is free. All welcome! Enquiries to 01 8961544 or LibraryFriends@tcd.ie.

Dr Davis Coakley

The History of the South Dublin Union

19:30, Thursday 14 February 2019

Thomas Davis Lecture Theatre, Arts Building Concourse, Trinity College Dublin

Davis Coakley is a doctor and writer who graduated from University College Cork in 1971. He served as a consultant physician at St James’s Hospital, Dublin (1979-2011) and was professor of medical gerontology in Trinity College Dublin (1996-2011). He was dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences from 1993 to 1999. He was co-chairman of the Centre for Ageing Research and Development in Ireland (CARDI), a body which promoted research on ageing across the island of Ireland. He is a Trustee of the Edward Worth Library and has served as its chairman. He has also served as Dun’s Librarian in the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland. He is chairman of the steering group of the Mercer’s Institute for Research on Ageing (MIRA). He is cofounder of The Mercer’s Institute for Successful Ageing at St James’s Hospital, a state of the art facility embracing health care, education and research. He has published over 150 scientific papers in relation to ageing in peer-reviewed journals. He is the author of books on medicine, medical history and Irish literature. His most recent books include Medicine in Trinity College Dublin: An illustrated History and The History and Heritage of St James’s Hospital Dublin which he co-authored with his wife Mary. He is an honorary fellow of Trinity College Dublin and a fellow of the Irish, London, Edinburgh and Glasgow Colleges of Physicians.

Rachel Moss – Friends of the Library Lecture

The Friends of the Library – Trinity College Dublin are delighted to announce their next lecture. Admission is free. All welcome! Enquiries to 01 8961544 or LibraryFriends@tcd.ie.

Dr Rachel Moss

Buildings and books in monastic Ireland

19:30, Thursday 22 November 2018

Thomas Davis Lecture Theatre, Arts Building Concourse, Trinity College Dublin

Dr Rachel Moss is an Associate Professor in the Department of History of Art and Architecture at Trinity. The principal focus of her research is medieval Ireland. She was Principal Investigator of the IRC-funded ‘Monastic Ireland’ project and recent publications include Art and Architecture of Ireland. Volume 1. Medieval c.400-1600AD (Yale University Press, 2014) and The Book of Durrow (Thames and Hudson, 2018).

The Librarian Presents: Stimulating Educational Innovation (9 October, 15:00)

What approach fits best when implementing change in university teaching?
How do we know if we improve the quality of our education by using technology?

Tue 9 October 2018
15:00 – 16:30
North Training Room, Berkeley Library Basement
Trinity College Dublin
Register for talk

The Librarian and College Archivist of Trinity College Dublin, Helen Shenton, invites you to a presentation delivered by Jan Haarhuis, University of Utrecht (UU), who will discuss UU’s strategy for education innovation and how they have implemented the Educate-it programme.

The UU educational model is one of engaged learning which aims to stimulate students to be responsible for their own personal development and academic progress.

In order to create their vision for education and IT, the university needed to determine awareness and acknowledgement of cultural change with specific emphasis on quality and research. To find out which implementation strategy was best and in order to measure the effects of innovations with blended learning, the Educate-it programme team collaborated with colleagues in the university’s School of Governance, School of Education and School of Social and Behavioural Sciences.

What to expect from this talk

  • Explanation of the ‘why, what and how’ of the Educate-it programme
  • Results of the implementation of educational innovation so far and how this is being scaled up
  • Best practice and collaboration in longitudinal research of educational innovation programmes

Audience Participation

If you have a question you would like Jan to address as part of his talk, please email: library@tcd.ie with the subject heading ‘The Librarian Presents’.

Speaker Biography

Jan Haarhuis is an educationalist and since 2014, the programme manager of Educate-it at the University of Utrecht. In 2005 he became Head of the Department of Education and Student Affairs. From 2009 until 2013 he was responsible for the implementation of a new three year Masters programme in Veterinary Medicine, part of which included the implementation of programmatic/longitudinal assessment.

In 2016, Jan received the ‘change maker’ award in the ICT and Education Professionals category in the Netherlands’ SURF education awards.

Jan is the Chair of the Digital Education Group of the League of European Research Intensive Universities (LERU), which brings together experts from across the LERU network to focus on e assessment, academic development, e certificate open source programmes and collaborative research. The group is organising a blended ‘Digital Higher Education Summit’ in November 2018.

‘The Librarian presents’ is an occasional series of talks by thought-provoking speakers curated by the Librarian and College Archivist of Trinity College Dublin, Helen Shenton.

Jimmy O’Dea – Friends of the Library Lecture

The Friends of the Library – Trinity College Dublin are delighted to announce their next lecture. Admission is free. All welcome! Enquiries to 01 8961544 or LibraryFriends@tcd.ie.

Conor Doyle

Theatre Historian

Jimmy O’Dea: Life & Times of the Dublin Actor and Comedian

19:30, Thursday 20 September 2018

Thomas Davis Lecture Theatre, Arts Building Concourse, Trinity College Dublin

Jimmy O’Dea (d. 1965) was a much-loved Dublin actor and comedian. Long associated with the Gaiety Theatre, he regularly performed with his apprentice Maureen Potter. His character Biddy Mulligan – a Dublin street vendor – is still remembered in the song ‘Biddy Mulligan the pride of the Coombe’. He appeared in many films and on the fledgling RTE, notably in ‘Darby O’Gill and the Little People’ (1959). Conor Doyle is a god-son of Jimmy O’Dea.

“Keeping the Books” – Daily Talks in the Long Room

A Preservation Assistant at work

A Preservation Assistant at work

What challenges and risks do the books in the Old Library face every day and how do we ‘keep’ the books? What is red rot and what does foxing and acid books mean?

What measures do we take so that library visitors can continue to enjoy and use special collections in the future? Why do we clean books, and what is the dirt? What are Smoke Sponges, Backuums and unbleached cotton tape?

How has the Old Library building changed over the years since 1712? What type of books do we have in the Long Room and when were they made? How many books are there and how have the collections grown over the years?

To learn the answers to all of these questions and more, come to the Long Room in the Old Library to hear about keeping the collection of early printed books. The Preservation Assistants are part of an ongoing project, started in 2004, to systematically clean the 220,000+ books of the Old Library. The Preservation Assistants will explain the challenges of preserving an historic collection in a historic setting and explain how the books are cleaned and preserved for the future. Examples of books from the collection, dating from the 15th century to the 19th century will be shown.

Occasionally, other staff from the Preservation & Conservation Department may speak about preservation activities in the Old Library.

Talks run Monday to Friday at 3pm until 28 June 2019 and last 15-20 minutes.

Want to know more? Sarah Timmins, one of our former Preservation Assistants, has written a great piece on how our precious books in the Long Room are repaired.

Alumni and current students can see the Book of Kells, access the Long Room, and attend these talks for free, with up to three guests.

Other visitors who have paid for entry to the Old Library are welcome to attend the Keeping the Books talks for no additional charge.