Government announces €25 million in funding for the Old Library Redevelopment Project

Government announced funding of €25 million for the restoration of one of Ireland’s foremost national heritage sites, the Old Library at Trinity College Dublin yesterday. The Old Library is home to the magnificent Long Room and precious manuscripts, including the 9th century Book of Kells.

An Taoiseach Micheál Martin said: “I am delighted to announce €25 million in Government funding for the Old Library, one of Ireland’s foremost heritage sites and a jewel in the nation’s crown. This landmark restoration project will use leading technology and preventive conservation, providing optimum environmental conditions for the 18th century building and its precious collections. With the aid of this Government funding we are safeguarding our heritage for generations to come.”

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The Fagels

A series of Videos about the Fagel Family and their Collections

The Library of Trinity College Dublin and the KB National Library of the Netherlands are collaborating on a video project about the Fagel family and their collections. The private library of the Fagels has been in Dublin since 1802, but traces of their working life and family history can still be found across The Hague. In a series of eight videos we visit the places, people, histories and collections that mattered to them most. After all, we should get to know the Fagels a little bit better before we can begin to understand the full significance of their private library. The first two videos have been released on the Dutch national holiday ‘King’s Day’ (27 April). Thereafter a new video highlighting a specific aspect of the history of the Fagels will be released every other week.

Fagel Collection

The Fagel collection has long been recognised as one of the jewels in the Library of Trinity College. It was built up over five generations of the Fagel family, many of whom held high public office in the Netherlands. Over the course of a century and a half they assembled 30,000 books and pamphlets, as well as an impressive collection of 10,000 maps. It is without doubt one of the most important still extant private libraries from the eighteenth century. The holdings in history, politics and law are particularly substantial, but virtually every other area of human endeavour is included such as philosophy, theology, geography and travels, natural history, the visual arts and much more.

The private library of the Fagels came to Dublin in 1802. Hendrik Fagel de Jonge had lost his position and income as a greffier and had few other options than to sell his collections. The governors of the Erasmus Smith Schools in Dublin put in a successful bid for the entire collection of books on behalf of Trinity College Dublin. In 2020 the Library of Trinity College and the KB National Library of the Netherlands started the project Unlocking the Fagel Collection, which aims to provide digital access to the collection. In the next two years, all books and pamphlets will be catalogued and made available through the online catalogue of the library of Trinity College, and the Short-Title Catalogue, Netherlands (STCN). It  forms part of the Virtual Trinity Library, a digitisation initiative of the Library of Trinity College Dublin’s most valued collections.

Connections in The Hague

The private library of the Fagels were transferred to Dublin over two centuries ago, but their archives, correspondence and a massive collection of state documents remained in the Netherlands. The prominent role of the Fagels in public life means that there are traces of the family all across The Hague. The house that François Fagel built in the early eighteenth century, is still standing next to the Noordeinde Palace, the administrative offices at the ‘Binnenhof’ are still at the political centre of the Netherlands, and the Fagel archives and correspondence cover over 60 metres in the National Archives today. Furthermore, there is a remarkable connecting between the end of the Fagel collection in The Hague in 1798 and the foundation of the National Library in the same year. One could say the KB came forth from the same revolution that drove the Fagels out of office.

The story of the Fagels is, in other words, goes beyond the Fagels’ private library at Trinity College. These videos aim to present an integrated story of the family, the collections and the collaborative project of the Library of Trinity College and the KB. These eight videos which  were made at significant and recognisable places in The Hague will be followed by a number of videos about the Fagel collection held in the Library of Trinity College Dublin later this summer.

Trinity Announces Brendan Kennelly Literary Archive to mark Poet’s 85th Birthday

Brendan Kennelly Private Collection

The Brendan Kennelly Literary Archive was launched today in Trinity College Dublin at a celebratory online event marking the poet’s eighty-fifth birthday later this week [April 17th, 2021].

Hosted by the Provost of Trinity College Dublin, the event featured a read message from the President of Ireland, Michael D. Higgins along with selected poems recited by celebrated singer, Bono, poet, Paula Meehan and Trinity student Lily O’Byrne.

Provost of Trinity College Dublin, Dr Patrick Prendergast said on the occasion of the launch:

“The Brendan Kennelly Literary Archive reflects all of the facets of Brendan Kennelly’s life, and his national and international role – as a poet and a professor, as a public figure and cultural commentator, and a mentor to many. It spans from his earliest poetry to his years in Trinity College. I am delighted to announce this unique collection will now be made available to students and scholars with the appointment of an archivist, made possible through philanthropic support.”  

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Virtual Trinity Library − A Major Digitisation Initiative of the Library of Trinity College’s Collections is Launched

Virtual Trinity Library, an ambitious digitisation initiative of the Library of Trinity College Dublin’s most valued collections was launched this week. It will conserve, catalogue, curate, digitise and research these unique collections of national importance, making them accessible to a global audience, from schoolchildren to scholars.

Using the most advanced technology the Library’s new Digital Collections platform will showcase the breadth of these collections, ranging from precious manuscripts to scientific papers. 

The Library of Trinity College Dublin is joining other world libraries that are collectively enabling access to patrimony and cultural heritage.

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The Library unveils Beckett archive of play Rockaby building on its world leading Beckett collections

The Library of Trinity College Dublin has acquired the Beckett archive of the play Rockaby building on its world leading Beckett collections. The Beckett material is being digitised and will be accessible online.

Marking the acquisition of  the 1981 play Rockaby, one of the iconic plays of the Beckett canon, an online exhibition  curated by Dr Jane Maxwell has been launched today. The entire archive will be made available later this year as part of the Library’s Digital Collections. It includes 30 items of correspondence from Beckett; copies of the original play and its French translation; productions notes; photographs; and a printed commemoration booklet of photographs from the premiere among other items.

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What did the Women do Anyway? – Friends of the Library Lecture

The next event in the 2020 Friends’ Spring Programme will be held on Thursday 13 February when Liz Gillis will discuss What did the Women do Anyway? 1916, the War of Independence and the Civil War.

It will be held in the Thomas Davis Theatre, Arts Building, TCD, at 7:30pm. Admission is free. All welcome! Enquiries to 01 8961544 or LibraryFriends@tcd.ie.

Liz Gillis is the author of ‘Women of the Irish Revolution’, ‘Revolution in Dublin’ and ‘The Fall of Dublin’. She has a degree in Irish History and works as a Curatorial Assistant in RTÉ. She has worked as a researcher on numerous publications, participated in many conferences focusing on the Irish revolution and has also developed a ‘Revolutionary’ walking tour of her native Liberties. Liz is co-organiser of the annual conference on the burning of the Custom House in 1921.

Rosita Boland – Friends of the Library Lecture

The next event in the 2019 Friends’ Autumn Programme will be held on Thursday 21 November when Irish Times journalist and travel writer Rosita Boland will have an open conversation on ‘The Allure of Elsewhere’ – Rosita’s latest book Elsewhere was recently shortlisted for the An Post Irish Book Awards.

It will be held in the JM Synge Theatre, Arts Building, TCD, at 7:30pm. Admission is free. All welcome! Enquiries to 01 8961544 or LibraryFriends@tcd.ie.

Rosita Boland was born in County Clare in 1965 and lives in Dublin where she is Senior Features Writer at the Irish Times. She has published two collections of poems, Muscle Creek (Raven Arts, 1991) and Dissecting the Heart (Gallery, 2003). She has travelled extensively, most recently in South East Asia and her travel books include Sea Legs: Hitch-hiking the Coast of Ireland Alone (New Island, 1992), A Secret Map of Ireland (New Island Books, 2005) and, most recently, Elsewhere: One Woman, One Rucksack, One Lifetime of Travel (2019). Rosita won the Hennessy Award for First Fiction in 1997.

Student Secondhand Booksale 2019

It’s almost time for the Student Secondhand Booksale!

The 2019 Student Secondhand Booksale will be held on Wednesday 16 October 2019 in Goldsmith Hall. This mini-booksale is aimed at cash-starved students in need of book bargains in history, law, the sciences, English lit., classics, business, etc. etc. and used text books. Books for students at student prices.

Goldsmith Hall from 10.00am to 3.00pm, Wednesday 16 October.

 

Estella Solomons Print Collection – Friends of the Library Lecture

The Friends of the Library – Trinity College Dublin are delighted to announce their next lecture. Admission is free. All welcome! Enquiries to 01 8961544 or LibraryFriends@tcd.ie.

Making her mark: the Estella Solomons print collection in the Library of Trinity College Dublin

Dr Angela Griffith

19:30, Thursday 19 September 2019

Thomas Davis Lecture Theatre, Arts Building Concourse, Trinity College Dublin

Angela Griffith is Assistant Professor in History of Art (TCD) and is joint principal investigator for the Drawn to the page: Irish artists and illustration collection, a Digital Humanities Forum (TCD) Innovative Digital Project. Her current research examines the artist and the printed image in 19th and 20th century in Britain and Ireland.

The Museum Building – Friends of the Library Lecture

The Friends of the Library – Trinity College Dublin are delighted to announce their next lecture. Admission is free. All welcome! Enquiries to 01 8961544 or LibraryFriends@tcd.ie.

Dr Patrick Wyse Jackson

Trinity College Dublin

The architectural gem of Victorian Dublin: Deane and Woodward’s Museum Building, Trinity College Dublin

19:30, Thursday 21 March 2019

Thomas Davis Lecture Theatre, Arts Building Concourse, Trinity College Dublin

Patrick Wyse Jackson is an Associate Professor of Geology, Curator of the Geological Museum, Fellow of Trinity College, Dublin, Tutor, Head of the School of Natural Sciences, and a former Head of Geology and Director of Post-Graduate Teaching and Learning in the School of Natural Sciences. His main research interests are on the taxonomy, functional morphology and biology of Palaeozoic bryozoans, particularly those from the Ordovician and Mississippian geological periods. Patrick has published one hundred papers and meeting abstracts on his bryozoan research and over 150 notes, papers, and books in other fields including the history and philosophy of geology and the use of building materials in Ireland. He is currently a co-PI on the innovative cross-disciplinary project ‘Making Victorian Dublin’ being carried out with colleagues in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture in Trinity. This project is focused on the extractive industries and building trades, and craftsmen who worked on the Museum Building and elsewhere, in the middle decades of the 1800s.