eResources Trial: Pravda

The Library is currently hosting a trial of the online resource: Pravda

This eResource is also available Off-Campus until 9th August 2019.

Pravda (“Truth”) was the official voice of Soviet communism and the Central Committee of the Communist Party between 1918 and 1991. Founded in 1912 in St. Petersburg, Pravda originated as an underground daily workers’ newspaper, and it soon became the main newspaper of the revolutionary wing of the Russian socialist movement. Throughout the Soviet era, party members were obligated to read Pravda. Today, Pravda still remains the official organ of the Communist Party of the Russian Federation, an important political faction in contemporary Russian politics.

The publication of Pravda was completely suspended in 1915 and 1916, therefore no archival material can be found for those years.

You can find this resource on the Library’s Trial Databases page or on the A-Z of the Databases and E-Books section of the Library website.

During this trial period, any feedback is very welcome and can be sent to Monica Sanchidrian: sanchidm@tcd.ie.

eResources Trial: Archives of Sexuality and Gender part 3

The Library is  currently hosting a trial of the Archives of Sexuality and Gender digital archive, which you can try for yourself.

This eResource is also available Off-Campus until 3rd August 2019.

This fully searchable digital archive spans the sixteenth to the twentieth century and is the largest digital collection of primary source material relating to the history and study of sex, sexuality and gender. Documentation covering social, political, health and legal issues impacting LGBTQ communities around the world is included, as well as rare and unique books on sex and sexuality from the sciences to the humanities, providing a window into how sexuality and gender roles were viewed and changed over time. Selection of materials for this milestone digital programme is guided by an advisory board consisting of leading scholars and librarians in Sexuality and Gender Studies. Documents include periodicals, newsletters, manuscripts, government records, organizational papers, correspondence, posters, and other materials.

Gale partners with a variety of organisations to digitally scan primary source materials from original documents, in some cases from archives that are difficult to access. The application of Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology makes the archives fully text-searchable, and the Gale Primary Sources platform allows these searches to be carried out across multiple archives simultaneously. Gale’s search technology allows you to expand on your search results, with Term Clusters showing direct links to other documents closely associated with your search, and Term Frequency showing the appearance of search terms over time.

You can find this resource on the Library’s Trial Databases page or on the A-Z of the Databases and E-Books section of the Library website.

During this trial period, any feedback is very welcome and can be sent to Monica Sanchidrian: sanchidm@tcd.ie.

eResources Trial: Manchester Gothic

The Library is currently hosting a trial of the online resource: Manchester Gothic

This eResource is also available Off-Campus until  the end of August 2019.

Manchester Gothic is an unrivalled collection of gothic literature including 49 books and the Gothic Studies (1999-2018) journal, written by leading names in the field and covering literature, film, television, theatre and visual arts, dating from the eighteenth century to the present day.

Manchester Gothic explores the reasons why Gothic Studies is so prevalent in the fields of art, film, literature and culture by providing easy access to digital texts, essays and studies in all things gothic. From the study of gothic and death to monsters, vampires, werewolves and ghosts, as well as studies on visionaries such as Terry Gilliam, Alan Moore and Terence Fisher. Manchester Gothic brings them all together in one easy-to-use resource.

You can find this resource on the Library’s Databases and E-Books section of the Library website.

During this trial period, any feedback is very welcome and can be sent to Monica Sanchidrian: sanchidm@tcd.ie.

eResources Trial: Edmond Huguet, Dictionnaire de la langue française du 16e siècle

The Library is currently hosting a trial of the online resource: Edmond Huguet, Dictionnaire de la langue française du 16e siècle (Edmond Huguet, Dictionary of the Sixteenth Century).

This eResource is available On and Off-campus, until the middle of August 2019.

This dictionary is the essential reference for the language of the Renaissance (the 15th and 16th centuries). Huguet’s Dictionary is also a dictionary of spelling and translation. It gathers under each entry all the orthographical forms taken by a word throughout the ages and gives its precise translation into modern French with a highly developed sense of nuance.

You can find this resource on the Library’s Databases and E-Books section of the Library website.

During this trial period, any feedback is very welcome and can be sent to Monica Sanchidrian: sanchidm@tcd.ie.

New online Resource – TAIR

 

The Library has recently acquired a subscription to TAIR, which can be accessed
via the A-Z Listing on LibGuides.

The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) maintains a database of genetic and molecular biology data for the model higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana . Data available from TAIR includes the complete genome sequence along with gene structure, gene product information, gene expression, DNA and seed stocks, genome maps, genetic and physical markers, publications, and information about the Arabidopsis research community. Gene product function data is updated every week from the latest published research literature and community data submissions.

TAIR also provides extensive linkouts from our data pages to other Arabidopsis resources.

 

Unboxing Open Scholarship

Defining Open Scholarship

Open Scholarship is the practice of research, education and knowledge exchange in such a way that others can collaborate and contribute, where research publications, data, lab notes and other scholarly processes and works are properly and ethically managed and evaluated and, unless restricted for justifiable reasons, are freely available to all levels of society under terms that enable reuse, redistribution and reproduction of the work and its underlying data and methods.
Open Scholarship may also be referred to as Open Science or Open Research.

(Adapted from Foster’s Open Science definition)

Trinity Task Force on Open Scholarship

The Trinity Task Force on Open Scholarship was created by the Librarian & College Archivist and the Dean of Research with colleagues across the University. One of the first tasks is to define what is meant by Open Scholarship – is it Open Science, (in the broadest sense, incorporating all disciplines), Open Access or Citizen Science? – and work through where Trinity wants to be in this landscape, what is or will be mandatory, where to lead, where to actively follow, how best to support and help researchers etc.

There is much activity in this area. Internationally, Plan S is aimed at ‘accelerating the transition to full and immediate Open Access of Scientific Publications’. Nationally, NORF (National Open Research Forum) led by the Higher Education Authority and the Health Research Board is working towards a ‘National Statement on the Transition to an Open Research Environment’. From a European perspective, LERU (League of European Research Universities) is creating a pragmatic ‘Roadmap to Open Science’.

As part of collectively figuring this out, a series of events under the theme of ‘Unboxing Open Scholarship’ will take place over the coming months. The first will be an interactive event open to all members of the Trinity community and will take place at 12 noon, 8 February in the Trinity Long Room Hub.

Please contact us at openscholarship@tcd.ie with your views and suggestions for future events.

Alternative routes to scholarly articles and research outputs

Many scholarly and peer-reviewed articles can be read for free on the Web. A number of tools exist to help discover research output more easily: through installing a browser extension or plug-in; by using academic search engines and archives; or, by contacting the author directly.

Some articles will however remain elusive – but the Library can help. The Library offers an Inter-Library Loan service which provides access to scholarly articles which are not available via the Library’s print or online collections, are not open access and cannot be found via plug-ins, search services or repositories.

Find articles using plug-ins

There are a number of browser extensions or plug-ins for Chrome, Firefox, and Safari which can be installed to facilitate finding articles which are open access. Some examples:

Unpaywall makes finding OA-articles easy for the individual user by installing a plug-in on Chrome or Firefox.

 

You can search Open Access Button directly on their website or download an extension for Chrome which makes finding open access articles easy. When OA Button hits a paywall, the service also sends off requests to authors asking them to deposit their articles in a subject or institutional repository in order to make their research open. Open Access Button is a non-profit organisation.

Google Scholar Button is a browser extension available for Firefox, Chrome, and Safari. The extension makes finding full-text open access articles in Google Scholar easier.

Kopernio offers a browser plug-in that makes it easier to find both open access versions of articles and articles which users have access to via institutional subscription. The service is free but belongs to Clarivate Analytics and you need to register in order to use the extension.

Find research articles using search engines, academic repositories or archives 

Some examples:

  • arXiv is a preprint archive mainly for physics, mathematics, computer sciences and related sciences. Run by Cornell University.
  • bioRxiv is an archive for open access preprints in the life sciences operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.
  • DOAJ is a list of open access journals and a search service finding peer-reviewed and scholarly journals and articles.
  • The Humanities Commons CORE repository is intended for open access articles, monographs and other publications and resources in the humanities. Humanities Commons is a nonprofit operation run by the MLA.
  • OpenDOAR is a searchable global directory of open access repositories and their policies.
  • OSF Preprints is a platform with openly accessible preprints, or submitted manuscripts which are publically distributed before acceptance and peer-review in a traditional scientific journal. OSF Preprints is developed by Centre for Open Science (COS), a non-profit organisation with the goal of greater openness and reproducible research.
  • SocArXiv is an open archive of the social sciences for preprints, working papers and other outputs. It is operated by the University of Maryland and developed by the Center of Open Science (COS).

Contact the author

Researchers may share articles between themselves if this is permitted by agreements with their publishers, so-called ‘scholarly sharing.’ Please refer to Sherpa/Romeo to check current terms for the journal in question. When using the plug-in Open Access Button and hitting paywalled articles, requests to authors are sent asking them to deposit their articles in an open institutional or subject repository. There are also a number of social platforms for researchers, e.g. ResearchGate and  Academia.edu.

(Adapted with thanks from: https://openaccess.blogg.kb.se/2018/07/01/alternative-routes-to-scholarly-articles-and-research-outputs/)

eResources Trial: Edmond Huguet, Dictionnaire de la langue française du 16e siècle

The Library is currently hosting a trial of the online resource: Edmond Huguet, Dictionnaire de la langue française du 16e siècle (Edmond Huguet, Dictionary of the Sixteenth Century).

This eResource is available On and Off-campus, until the middle of August 2019.

This dictionary is the essential reference for the language of the Renaissance (the 15th and 16th centuries). Huguet’s Dictionary is also a dictionary of spelling and translation. It gathers under each entry all the orthographical forms taken by a word throughout the ages and gives its precise translation into modern French with a highly developed sense of nuance.

You can find this resource on the Library’s Databases and E-Books section of the Library website.

During this trial period, any feedback is very welcome and can be sent to Monica Sanchidrian: sanchidm@tcd.ie.

Your Library, Your Views

Library Pop Art

We’re running a short survey to help us understand your experiences of the Library. As a thank you, we will enter you into a draw to win prizes including Trinity Ball tickets, TCard credit and more.

Your views will help us to better appreciate all of our users’ needs and provide valuable insights to enable us to develop responsive services for the future. The survey will take about fifteen minutes to complete. The closing date is 14 December.

Get started here!

The Library Life Pulse survey is being administered by an independent research agency called Alterline, you can view their GDPR policy online.

If you have any queries about this survey, please contact us at library@tcd.ie.

All personal data collected by the University will be processed according to the College Privacy Notice.