History of the Book in the Early Modern Period: 1450-1800: Trinity’s Free Online Course

Following on from Trinity College Dublin’s highly successful FutureLearn course on the ‘Book of Kells’, this course on the ‘History of the Book in the Early Modern Period: 1450-1800’ aims to share the rich resources of the Long Room of Trinity College Dublin and the Edward Worth Library, Dublin, with learners interested in the history of the book. Many of these resources have been newly digitized for this course and uncover this fascinating time of innovation and social change.

Now members of the public around the world can explore how books were made, bought, sold, and read, in a four-week online course. The History of the Book in the Early Modern Period: 1450-1800 course starts on November 18th, 2019, and is run in partnership with FutureLearn, the social learning platform. The free online course is aimed at anyone with an interest in the history of the printed book, the early modern book trade, the history of reading, the history of bookbinding, and the interaction between print and social change in early modern Europe.

Librarian of the Edward Worth Library Elizabethanne Boran, and one of the course designers commented: “This MOOC course is our way of sharing our wonderful collections with as many people as possible. Trinity College Dublin and the Edward Worth Library have thousands of books which bring to life the early modern period in the West. For this course we have digitized images from these books so that learners will be able to explore this fascinating period from every corner of the world.”

Learners will investigate rare treasures such as the engravings of Anthony Van Dyck, early editions of Aesop’s Fables and the bestselling Nuremberg Chronicle. Frontispieces, title pages, annotations, printers’ devices, and many more parts of the book are examined from this period. At the end of the course, learners will be able to describe how the early modern book trade operated, and understand how the invention of the printing press changed religious, scientific, medical and political views of the world.

The Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) has been designed by academics from the School of Histories and Humanities, the School of English, and the Librarian of the Edward Worth Library, Dublin, with assistance from the staff of the Library of Trinity College Dublin and the Edward Worth Library, Trinity’s Digital Collections and Trinity Online Services CLG.

New Resource: SciFinder-n

Studying Chemistry, Biochemistry, Genetics, Pharmacy or Pharmaceutical Sciences?

The library has access to SciFinder-n, a new interface to SciFinder Scholar.

Current SciFinder users should login with their established SciFinder username and password.
Top Tip: Current users should migrate their saved answers and alerts (Keep Me Posted) from SciFinder to SciFinder-n. Click the Bookmark icon to access the migrate feature found on the Saved Answers page.

SciFinder answer files exported to an external drive in the .akx file format must be imported and saved to SciFinder before they can be migrated to SciFinder-n.
Note: Descriptions are not migrated and some answers may not fully migrate.

New Resource Trials: Papers of Sir Austen Chamberlain and Winston Churchill Archive

We announce trial access to two political archives.  View the papers of Sir Winston Churchill held at Cambridge University, and of Sir Austen Chamberlain, Chancellor of the Exchequer, Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and Leader of the House, held at Birmingham University. The Chamberlain archive provides access to documents covering domestic policies and the development of foreign affairs during the World Wars. With personal correspondence and Chamberlain family history in Wiltshire and London in 18th and 19th C. Correspondence of his siblings, his wife and with Mary Endicott Chamberlain Carnegie, 1864-1957.

The Churchill Archive can be explored by topic, place, people and period. View Churchill’s personal correspondence and official exchanges. See his first childhood letters, wartime speeches, historical writings. Themed document portfolios offer insight into the workings of the British Empire between, 1874 and 1965. Both archives are in the New/Trials panel on our A-Z database page. Login with your Trinity College credentials.

London, 1929 Austen Chamberlain, Stanley Baldwin, Winston Churchill

New Resource Trial: Early Modern Books

1648, coffee house reading, “Mistris Parliament her gossipping”..

Early modern books

We are delighted to have trial access to the database Early Modern books.  Material from over 225 source libraries worldwide.  Literature, history, religion, arts, music, physical science.  View early editions of Aphra Behn, Anne Killigrew and Margaret Cavendish as well as Newton, Boyle and Galileo  for the period 1450-1700. Content from Europe covers Early European Books Collections from 4 national libraries and London’s Wellcome Library.  Let our subject librarians know what you think !

Use your College login on the library database a-z page. See Trials.

 

 

 

 

eResources Trial: Pravda

The Library is currently hosting a trial of the online resource: Pravda

This eResource is also available Off-Campus until 9th August 2019.

Pravda (“Truth”) was the official voice of Soviet communism and the Central Committee of the Communist Party between 1918 and 1991. Founded in 1912 in St. Petersburg, Pravda originated as an underground daily workers’ newspaper, and it soon became the main newspaper of the revolutionary wing of the Russian socialist movement. Throughout the Soviet era, party members were obligated to read Pravda. Today, Pravda still remains the official organ of the Communist Party of the Russian Federation, an important political faction in contemporary Russian politics.

The publication of Pravda was completely suspended in 1915 and 1916, therefore no archival material can be found for those years.

You can find this resource on the Library’s Trial Databases page or on the A-Z of the Databases and E-Books section of the Library website.

During this trial period, any feedback is very welcome and can be sent to Monica Sanchidrian: sanchidm@tcd.ie.

eResources Trial: Archives of Sexuality and Gender part 3

The Library is  currently hosting a trial of the Archives of Sexuality and Gender digital archive, which you can try for yourself.

This eResource is also available Off-Campus until 3rd August 2019.

This fully searchable digital archive spans the sixteenth to the twentieth century and is the largest digital collection of primary source material relating to the history and study of sex, sexuality and gender. Documentation covering social, political, health and legal issues impacting LGBTQ communities around the world is included, as well as rare and unique books on sex and sexuality from the sciences to the humanities, providing a window into how sexuality and gender roles were viewed and changed over time. Selection of materials for this milestone digital programme is guided by an advisory board consisting of leading scholars and librarians in Sexuality and Gender Studies. Documents include periodicals, newsletters, manuscripts, government records, organizational papers, correspondence, posters, and other materials.

Gale partners with a variety of organisations to digitally scan primary source materials from original documents, in some cases from archives that are difficult to access. The application of Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology makes the archives fully text-searchable, and the Gale Primary Sources platform allows these searches to be carried out across multiple archives simultaneously. Gale’s search technology allows you to expand on your search results, with Term Clusters showing direct links to other documents closely associated with your search, and Term Frequency showing the appearance of search terms over time.

You can find this resource on the Library’s Trial Databases page or on the A-Z of the Databases and E-Books section of the Library website.

During this trial period, any feedback is very welcome and can be sent to Monica Sanchidrian: sanchidm@tcd.ie.

eResources Trial: Manchester Gothic

The Library is currently hosting a trial of the online resource: Manchester Gothic

This eResource is also available Off-Campus until  the end of August 2019.

Manchester Gothic is an unrivalled collection of gothic literature including 49 books and the Gothic Studies (1999-2018) journal, written by leading names in the field and covering literature, film, television, theatre and visual arts, dating from the eighteenth century to the present day.

Manchester Gothic explores the reasons why Gothic Studies is so prevalent in the fields of art, film, literature and culture by providing easy access to digital texts, essays and studies in all things gothic. From the study of gothic and death to monsters, vampires, werewolves and ghosts, as well as studies on visionaries such as Terry Gilliam, Alan Moore and Terence Fisher. Manchester Gothic brings them all together in one easy-to-use resource.

You can find this resource on the Library’s Databases and E-Books section of the Library website.

During this trial period, any feedback is very welcome and can be sent to Monica Sanchidrian: sanchidm@tcd.ie.

eResources Trial: Edmond Huguet, Dictionnaire de la langue française du 16e siècle

The Library is currently hosting a trial of the online resource: Edmond Huguet, Dictionnaire de la langue française du 16e siècle (Edmond Huguet, Dictionary of the Sixteenth Century).

This eResource is available On and Off-campus, until the middle of August 2019.

This dictionary is the essential reference for the language of the Renaissance (the 15th and 16th centuries). Huguet’s Dictionary is also a dictionary of spelling and translation. It gathers under each entry all the orthographical forms taken by a word throughout the ages and gives its precise translation into modern French with a highly developed sense of nuance.

You can find this resource on the Library’s Databases and E-Books section of the Library website.

During this trial period, any feedback is very welcome and can be sent to Monica Sanchidrian: sanchidm@tcd.ie.

New online Resource – TAIR

 

The Library has recently acquired a subscription to TAIR, which can be accessed
via the A-Z Listing on LibGuides.

The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR) maintains a database of genetic and molecular biology data for the model higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana . Data available from TAIR includes the complete genome sequence along with gene structure, gene product information, gene expression, DNA and seed stocks, genome maps, genetic and physical markers, publications, and information about the Arabidopsis research community. Gene product function data is updated every week from the latest published research literature and community data submissions.

TAIR also provides extensive linkouts from our data pages to other Arabidopsis resources.

 

Unboxing Open Scholarship

Defining Open Scholarship

Open Scholarship is the practice of research, education and knowledge exchange in such a way that others can collaborate and contribute, where research publications, data, lab notes and other scholarly processes and works are properly and ethically managed and evaluated and, unless restricted for justifiable reasons, are freely available to all levels of society under terms that enable reuse, redistribution and reproduction of the work and its underlying data and methods.
Open Scholarship may also be referred to as Open Science or Open Research.

(Adapted from Foster’s Open Science definition)

Trinity Task Force on Open Scholarship

The Trinity Task Force on Open Scholarship was created by the Librarian & College Archivist and the Dean of Research with colleagues across the University. One of the first tasks is to define what is meant by Open Scholarship – is it Open Science, (in the broadest sense, incorporating all disciplines), Open Access or Citizen Science? – and work through where Trinity wants to be in this landscape, what is or will be mandatory, where to lead, where to actively follow, how best to support and help researchers etc.

There is much activity in this area. Internationally, Plan S is aimed at ‘accelerating the transition to full and immediate Open Access of Scientific Publications’. Nationally, NORF (National Open Research Forum) led by the Higher Education Authority and the Health Research Board is working towards a ‘National Statement on the Transition to an Open Research Environment’. From a European perspective, LERU (League of European Research Universities) is creating a pragmatic ‘Roadmap to Open Science’.

As part of collectively figuring this out, a series of events under the theme of ‘Unboxing Open Scholarship’ will take place over the coming months. The first will be an interactive event open to all members of the Trinity community and will take place at 12 noon, 8 February in the Trinity Long Room Hub.

Please contact us at openscholarship@tcd.ie with your views and suggestions for future events.