Reopening of the Physical Library

As part of Trinity College Dublin’s overall plans for the resumption of activities the reopening of the physical Library and services will be phased and gradual. The safety of our staff and students will at all times remain our priority throughout this process.

“When we had to close the library buildings, we kept the Library open online and continued to provide students and staff with our Library services throughout COVID-19, including online services and virtual consultations. I am delighted that the reopening of the physical Library will now begin, starting on a modest scale, from the end of this month, culminating with virtually full access in August (with social distancing and other safety measures in place.) All of this will be complemented by a range of new online services starting on June 29th through to August. The overarching goal is the safe resumption of activity within the Library in a phased manner that enables access whilst protecting the health and safety of our readers and our Library staff.  We very much look forward to opening our doors once again to our readers,” says Librarian and College Archivist, Helen Shenton.

Continue reading “Reopening of the Physical Library”

Celebrating Irish Artist Harry Clarke

One of Ireland’s most renowned artists, Harry Clarke, is celebrated in the first of a series of Library online exhibitions which will be showcased in this extended period of self-isolation during the Covid-19 pandemic. The Clarke Stained Glass Studios Collection is for anyone interested in 20th-century Irish art and craft as exemplified by the creative genius of the leading exponent of stained glass work, Harry Clarke.

Continue reading “Celebrating Irish Artist Harry Clarke”

History of the Book in the Early Modern Period: 1450-1800: Trinity’s Free Online Course

Following on from Trinity College Dublin’s highly successful FutureLearn course on the ‘Book of Kells’, this course on the ‘History of the Book in the Early Modern Period: 1450-1800’ aims to share the rich resources of the Long Room of Trinity College Dublin and the Edward Worth Library, Dublin, with learners interested in the history of the book. Many of these resources have been newly digitized for this course and uncover this fascinating time of innovation and social change.

Now members of the public around the world can explore how books were made, bought, sold, and read, in a four-week online course. The History of the Book in the Early Modern Period: 1450-1800 course starts on November 18th, 2019, and is run in partnership with FutureLearn, the social learning platform. The free online course is aimed at anyone with an interest in the history of the printed book, the early modern book trade, the history of reading, the history of bookbinding, and the interaction between print and social change in early modern Europe.

Librarian of the Edward Worth Library Elizabethanne Boran, and one of the course designers commented: “This MOOC course is our way of sharing our wonderful collections with as many people as possible. Trinity College Dublin and the Edward Worth Library have thousands of books which bring to life the early modern period in the West. For this course we have digitized images from these books so that learners will be able to explore this fascinating period from every corner of the world.”

Learners will investigate rare treasures such as the engravings of Anthony Van Dyck, early editions of Aesop’s Fables and the bestselling Nuremberg Chronicle. Frontispieces, title pages, annotations, printers’ devices, and many more parts of the book are examined from this period. At the end of the course, learners will be able to describe how the early modern book trade operated, and understand how the invention of the printing press changed religious, scientific, medical and political views of the world.

The Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) has been designed by academics from the School of Histories and Humanities, the School of English, and the Librarian of the Edward Worth Library, Dublin, with assistance from the staff of the Library of Trinity College Dublin and the Edward Worth Library, Trinity’s Digital Collections and Trinity Online Services CLG.

New Resource Trials: Papers of Sir Austen Chamberlain and Winston Churchill Archive

We announce trial access to two political archives.  View the papers of Sir Winston Churchill held at Cambridge University, and of Sir Austen Chamberlain, Chancellor of the Exchequer, Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and Leader of the House, held at Birmingham University. The Chamberlain archive provides access to documents covering domestic policies and the development of foreign affairs during the World Wars. With personal correspondence and Chamberlain family history in Wiltshire and London in 18th and 19th C. Correspondence of his siblings, his wife and with Mary Endicott Chamberlain Carnegie, 1864-1957.

The Churchill Archive can be explored by topic, place, people and period. View Churchill’s personal correspondence and official exchanges. See his first childhood letters, wartime speeches, historical writings. Themed document portfolios offer insight into the workings of the British Empire between, 1874 and 1965. Both archives are in the New/Trials panel on our A-Z database page. Login with your Trinity College credentials.

London, 1929 Austen Chamberlain, Stanley Baldwin, Winston Churchill

New Resource Trial: Early Modern Books

1648, coffee house reading, “Mistris Parliament her gossipping”..

Early modern books

We are delighted to have trial access to the database Early Modern books.  Material from over 225 source libraries worldwide.  Literature, history, religion, arts, music, physical science.  View early editions of Aphra Behn, Anne Killigrew and Margaret Cavendish as well as Newton, Boyle and Galileo  for the period 1450-1700. Content from Europe covers Early European Books Collections from 4 national libraries and London’s Wellcome Library.  Let our subject librarians know what you think !

Use your College login on the library database a-z page. See Trials.

 

 

 

 

Your Library, Your Views

Library Pop Art

We’re running a short survey to help us understand your experiences of the Library. As a thank you, we will enter you into a draw to win prizes including Trinity Ball tickets, TCard credit and more.

Your views will help us to better appreciate all of our users’ needs and provide valuable insights to enable us to develop responsive services for the future. The survey will take about fifteen minutes to complete. The closing date is 14 December.

Get started here!

The Library Life Pulse survey is being administered by an independent research agency called Alterline, you can view their GDPR policy online.

If you have any queries about this survey, please contact us at library@tcd.ie.

All personal data collected by the University will be processed according to the College Privacy Notice.

 

International Digital Preservation Day – 30 November #idpd17

‘Save the Date’: On the 30th of November 2017, to mark International Digital Preservation Day, the Library invites Trinity students, researchers and interested members of the public to explore the challenges of preserving digital cultural heritage.

A pop-up Museum of Technology in the Berkeley Library will showcase obsolete computer hardware and software, which will be extended into an online exhibition. The exhibit includes computers and storage media from the 1980s right up to the present day. The display is intended to prompt the audience to think about the importance of digital preservation as an active rather than a passive activity, by demonstrating the rapid evolution of hardware and software, the transience of formats, and the dangers of obsolescence.
Some of items on display are from the Library’s own collection; others form part of the John Gabriel Byrne Computer Science Collection, and have been generously loaned by the School of Computer Science for the duration of the exhibit.

In collaboration with the Digital Repository of Ireland, the Library will host a ‘Wikithon’ Workshop (facilitated by Rebecca O’Neill, Project Coordinator of Wikimedia Community Ireland) with representatives from several cultural institutions will collate little-known information about current digital preservation activities.

Register for Wikithon Workshop

The day will culminate in an evening public lecture with a panel of scholars and publishers of digital content, investigating the limits of digital preservation, from the content itself to the experience of using it.

Register for Digital Cultural Heritage and the Limits of Preservation lecture

Speakers:

Anna Gerber and Britt Iverson, who run Visual Editions, a London-based “creative studio and reading lab”

Dr Amber Cushing, assistant professor at the School of Information and Communication Studies, University College Dublin

Programme:

6:15 p.m. – Welcome

6:30 p.m. – Keynote Speeches

7:30 p.m. – Questions from the Audience

8:00 p.m. – Closing Words

Venue: Robert Emmet Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin main campus

Image credit: Afrank99 – Own work, CC BY-SA 2.0,https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3723573

Berkeley50 – A Year of Celebrations

Berkeley Library, Trinity College, Dublin: the entrance front and raised forecourt

Our iconic Berkeley Library is 50 years old this year – and we need your help to celebrate!

Every week, we will release a new post on the Berkeley50 website – check out the first ones there already. We need your photos and stories to make this work. Can you help?

Some of the stories will be about the time before the opening, when Trinity was pulling together the funds and deciding on the design. This is a snippet from the film that was released in 1958 to help fundraise:

We will be hosting a series of events to celebrate the anniversary. Follow the events and stories on Twitter using #berkeley50.

 

Putting Your Humanities Content Online – Workshop 12 December 2016, 10:00 – 13:00

Tim Keefe and Marta Bustillo of the Library’s Digital Resources and Imaging Services Team, are delivering a workshop on Digital Humanities Projects, in the Long Room Hub on Monday 12th December. The workshop is aimed at humanities researchers and is part of the Long Room Hub ‘Telling our Story’ 2016-2017 Programme of Events.
This workshop will introduce methods of planning and organisation to ensure successful online publication and archiving of digital projects. The session will also include several lightning talks to help support the overall theme of online engagement with your scholarly humanities content:

Dermot Frost, the head of Research IT will discuss available Trinity resources for digitally facing humanities work.

Mark Sweetnam, Assistant Professor of English, on the topic of Scholarly communications with digital humanities project work

Ciaran O’Neill, Ussher Lecturer in 19th Century History, on the topic of public engagement with archive/historical sources and citation

Dr. Jennifer Edmunds, Director of Strategic projects, will discuss her ongoing work on the CENDARI Project

Theses Digitisation Project 2016

Jane Ohlmeyer's PhD thesis
Jane Ohlmeyer’s classic PhD thesis on Randal MacDonnell. Click to read!

We are delighted to announce that the Library is embarking on a large digitisation project of PhD theses (selected from date range 2000-2016) and will be uploading more than 2,000 as open access e-theses to TARA as 2016 progresses. You can see the ones already added in Stella.

Check if your thesis has been selected for scanning in 2016.

If your thesis is on the list and you require some restrictions on access to the electronic copy then please get in touch to discuss the options.

If you are not on the 2016 scan list but would like to contribute a PDF copy of your thesis, we would love to hear from you!

Contact us at: rssadmin@tcd.ie.