Changed Utterly: recording and reflecting on the Rising 1916 –2016

The Proclamation TCD Papyrus Case 16 no.1
The Proclamation TCD Papyrus Case 16 no.1

The Library of Trinity College Dublin has launched a Long Room exhibition to commemorate the 1916 Easter Rising. Changed Utterly: recording and reflecting on the Rising 1916 –2016 will run from 1 March to the end of April.

The exhibition features exhibits of unique material from Trinity’s Manuscripts & Archives Research Library and Early Printed Books collections relating to the 1916 Easter Rising, including photographs, diaries, memorabilia as well as digital content. The display will trace methods of recording and reflecting on the Rising from the initial scramble to record the events as they happened in 1916; the commemorative activity of 1966 and through to the Library’s current project to capture and preserve the 1916 related websites produced in 2016.

Silver cup presented to Cadet R N Tweedy of the Dublin University Officer Training corps for service during 1916. TCD MUN/OBJ/25
Silver cup presented to Cadet R N Tweedy of the Dublin University Officer Training Corps for service during 1916. TCD MUN/OBJ/25

Highlights of the exhibition include:

  • The Library’s copy of the Proclamation, said to have been torn from the walls of the GPO, along with the World War I recruitment posters found pasted to the back
  • Photograph of British Troops in the Front Square of Trinity College Dublin
  • The scrapbook of Elsie Mahaffy, daughter of Trinity Provost John Pentland Mahaffy, and occupant of the Provost’s house during the Rising
  • Silver cup presented to a member of the Dublin University Officer Training corps for service during 1916
  • The casing of a bullet which pierced the roof of the Library during Easter week 1916.

    The casing of a bullet which pierced the roof of the Library of Trinity College Dublin during Easter week 1916
    The casing of a bullet which pierced the roof of the Library of Trinity College Dublin during Easter week 1916

The items displayed all appear on the Library’s popular 1916 blog project Changed Utterly – Ireland and the Easter Rising.

The exhibition also showcases the work of the Library’s 1916 Web Archiving project which sees the Library working in collaboration with the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford and the British Library to archive websites from both the Irish and UK web domains as they reflect on the 1916 Easter Rising.

Photograph of Troops in Front Square TCD/MUN/MC/207
Photograph of Troops in the Front Square of Trinity College Dublin TCD/MUN/MC/207

The exhibition and web-archiving project are part of the Library’s contribution to the Trinity College Dublin Decade of Commemoration.

 

Changed Utterly Update

TCD MS 5870 2v Henry Street from Nelson's Pillar May 1916 by TJ Westropp
TCD MS 5870 2v Henry Street from Nelson’s Pillar May 1916 by TJ Westropp

It is only three months since the Library launched its 1916 blog Changed Utterly – Ireland and the Easter Rising. In that time we have been delighted and surprised by the extent of the support for the project and the increase in the use of the Library’s 1916 collections.

In addition to the 600+ Twitter followers of @TCDLIB1916, the blog has also recently attracted the attention of the media with articles in TheJournal.ie, the Irish Independent and the Irish Post.

One of the unexpected outcomes of the project is that it has raised the profile of the Library as a repository that actively collects such archival material. This has resulted in the donation of new material to M&ARL including the original account of 1916 by Lillian Stokes, (donated by her grand-nephew); and the deposit of an autograph album from the Frongoch internment camp. Posts on these new accessions will appear on the blog shortly. Research Collections staff have also met with many different people and agencies working on their own 1916 projects, which include prospective theatre performances, visitor centres and other digital projects.

Most of our weekly posts are written by Library staff, with some contributions from Trinity academics and other experts, including a forthcoming post written by the relative of a 1916 internee.

TCD MS 5870 5r Chimneys of the Hotel Metropole May 1916 by TJ Westropp
TCD MS 5870 5r Chimneys of the Hotel Metropole May 1916 by TJ Westropp

This week’s post focusses on an album of 44 photographs of Dublin taken in the days immediately following the rising. Subscribers to the blog have already learned of the experience of Thomas Bodkin as a St John Ambulance stretcher bearer working out of Dublin Castle and the story of Eileen Corrigan, one of four female students to brave sniper bullets on her way into Trinity to sit exams.

Estelle Gittins

99 Years On: Ireland and the Easter Rising

The birth of the Irish Republic- 1916. Shelfmark: OLS Samuels Box 4 no.112a
The birth of the Irish Republic- 1916. Shelfmark: OLS Samuels Box 4 no.112a

Today, the 99th anniversary of the start of the Irish Easter Rising, sees the launch of a new project for the Library. ‘Changed Utterly- Ireland and the Easter Rising’ is a weekly blog from our Research Collections departments. The aim is to highlight a particular item or collection each week which has relevance to Ireland during this troubled period. As the countdown to the 100th anniversary of the Rising draws near we hope that the selections will interest our readers and stimulate debate whilst affording us the opportunity to promote our holdings. We are delighted to announce that we will have some guest contributors along the way culminating in an online exhibition of the 52 items of interest in time for Easter 2016.

Our site can be accessed via www.tcd.ie/library/1916 where you can read the first entry – ‘The Howth Gun Running’. To discuss the weekly posts and to keep up to date with the project you can follow us on Twitter – @TCDLib1916, #TCD1916.

Librarian and College Archivist, Helen Shenton with Shane Mawe and Estelle Gittins at the launch of 'Changed Utterly'
Librarian and College Archivist, Helen Shenton with Shane Mawe (EPB) and Estelle Gittins (M&ARL) at the launch of ‘Changed Utterly’

All Changed, Changed Utterly

TCD MUN MC 207
TCD MUN MC 207

Changed Utterly – Ireland and the Easter Rising is a new blog project from the Trinity College Library Research Collections Division. Launching today, the 99th anniversary of the start of the 1916 Easter Rising, the project aims to explore the Library’s collections relating to the Rising through a year of weekly blog posts.

The posts will draw on the rich and diverse collections of 1916 material held in the Manuscripts & Archives Research Library, the Department of Early Printed Books and Special Collections, the Glucksman Map Library and the Music Library. Posts will focus on one extraordinary item or collection each week, and will include diaries, letters, pamphlets, photographs, objects and even items of clothing.

The posts will draw on the rich and diverse collections of 1916 material held in the Manuscripts & Archives Research Library, the Department of Early Printed Books and Special Collections, the Glucksman Map Library and the Music Library. Posts will focus on one extraordinary item or collection each week, and will include diaries, letters, pamphlets, photographs, objects and even items of clothing.

By starting in April 2015 the aim is to showcase the breadth of the 1916 collections and to act as a catalyst for research ahead of the anniversary in April 2016.

Helen Shenton, Trinity College Librarian and College Archivist with project leads Estelle Gittins, M&ARL and Shane Mawe, Early Printed Books and Special Collections
Helen Shenton, Trinity College Librarian and College Archivist with project leads Estelle Gittins, M&ARL and Shane Mawe, Early Printed Books and Special Collections

Blog posts are written mostly by Library staff, with contributions from Trinity College academics and other experts in the period. Each blog post will contain further links to entries in Trinity College Library catalogues, and to digitised items on TCD Digital Collections, as applicable.

The site can be accessed via www.tcd.ie/library/1916 where you can read the first entry – ‘The Howth Gun Running’. You can also follow on Twitter – @TCDLib1916.

Estelle Gittins