It crushes its prey to the finest pulp in its massive jaws

TCD MS 10516 folio 74 verso

TCD MS 10516 folio 74 verso

[12th October 1916] vibrations, can, for example, become aware of the buzz of a passing insect. The spider works by night capturing flies, beetles and crickets. It loves to take its station near a light round which insects are collecting. It crushes its prey to the finest pulp in its massive jaws; but, unlike many other spiders, it injects no poison. Its bite is harmless; nothing is felt but the pressure of its fangs. Nevertheless it is difficult to persuade the onlooker that this repulsive spider is not a malignant and 10poisonous creature.
Furious battles are fought by this spider in the dark of night as it roams over the desert in search of prey. It struggles with its own kind and engages in a deadly contest with the scorpion. Female fights savagely with female. One dashes in upon the