A moving experience

Due to some necessary, very noisy, works being carried out in the Old Library building, the Early Printed Books and Special Collections reading room is moving to a temporary home in the Map Library, in the basement of the Ussher Library. The work is scheduled to begin on Monday 4th November and last for at least two weeks.

Gall.UU.3.53

We will take with us all material which is on hold, and there will be Stack and Santry deliveries to the Map Library, although the former may take slightly longer than usual. A small number of books may be unavailable for the duration but we hope this will not apply to many. If you have books on hold and will not want them again, we would be very grateful if you would let us know before 4th November, either by phone – 01 896 1172 – or email – epbooks@tcd.ie – to minimise the amount of material being moved.

Unfortunately, we will be unable to facilitate any classes during this time.

We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause and look forward to welcoming you back to our usual reading room when the noise has abated.

Contemporary Irish literary Culture…in Early Printed Books!

By Orlaith Darling, Ph.D. student, School of English

An oft forgotten aspect of the Department of Early Printed Books is its holdings of modern Irish and Anglo-Irish fiction, which can be consulted in the peaceful reading room in the Old Library. As a researcher of contemporary Irish short fiction, I was delighted to find the entire run of The Stinging Fly among the modern Irish holdings. As Shane Mawe, one of the friendly Early Printed Books librarians put it, a Sierra search for ‘Short stories, English Irish authors 20th century’ will return over 250 works held  by the Department , meaning that Early Printed Books is, in fact, a hotspot for contemporary Irish literary culture. Continue reading

A reader’s-eye view

By Maggie Masterson, Pollard Fellowship recipient

Without question, the highlight of my year in the M.Phil. in Children’s Literature has been time spent in the Early Printed Books reading room, researching the Pollard Collection of Children’s Books. The students on my course are lucky enough to have a tour arranged by our lecturer, but don’t let a lack of formal orientation stop you from finding your way up there. Marvelous things await your visit. Continue reading

New Exhibition: “On Speaking Terms: Eight centuries of communication disabilities”

Text by Dr Caroline Jagoe & Dr Deborah Thorpe

Florence Fenwick Miller, An atlas of anatomy, London, 1879. Gall.TT.32.9

Communication is at the heart of who we are as human beings and communication disorders reflect the diversity of our humanity. As the Department of Clinical Speech and Language Studies in Trinity College Dublin celebrates 50 years of educating speech and language therapists in Ireland, this exhibition in the Long Room provides a glimpse into eight centuries of communication disabilities. Continue reading

And when I looked … a book was therein

Sometimes it’s obvious that a book has a story to tell before you even look at the text. The volume at OLS X-1-60 is a good example. As soon as it is lifted from its protective storage box, the hand-made brown velvet case begs to be stroked. The initials TW are embroidered on the top; the pink felt lining protrudes; and the cardboard backing shows through where moths have made a meal of the felt. Continue reading

Launch of new exhibition ‘Drawing your Attention: Four Centuries of Political Caricature’

William Elmes’ John Bull Reading the Extraordinary Red Book, London: Thomas Tegg, [1816]. OLS CARI ROB 999

A new exhibition featuring four centuries of political cartoons opens today in the Library of Trinity College Dublin and runs throughout June and July 2019. Drawing your attention: Four Centuries of Political Caricature includes the Library’s own collections, with originals from its extensive 18th- and 19th-century collection gifted by Nicholas Robinson, alumnus, writer, lawyer and former cartoonist. The contemporary works in the exhibition are on loan from freelance artist Martyn Turner who is best associated with The Irish Times. Continue reading

Ireland in Late Georgian Caricatures

William Elmes, Irish Bogtrotters (published by Thomas Tegg, 1812). OLS CARI ROB 0132.

Our wonderful exhibition Ireland and the English Lake Poets continues for just one more week in the Long Room of the Old Library (final day to visit is Tuesday 4 June 2019). In this blog post, curator Dr Brandon Yen explores Ireland’s role in late Georgian Britain’s political cartoons, two of which are featured in the exhibition. Continue reading

Wordsworth’s Killarney

C. Hunt, after A. Nicholl, ‘Lower Lake, Killarney’, from Picturesque Sketches of Some of the Finest Landscape and Coast Scenery of Ireland (Dublin, 1835). V.g.29.

The exhibition Ireland and the English Lake Poets continues in the Long Room of the Old Library this month, running until the end of May. Amongst literary treasures on show, the exhibition features a rare print of Killarney’s Lower Lake by Charles Hunt (after Andrew Nicholl). In this blog post, curator Dr. Brandon Yen explores the impression Killarney made on Wordsworth and his fellow writers. Continue reading

300 years on a desert island!

First edition, 1719, shelfmark VV.i.31

Robinson Crusoe is 300 years old today! Actually, the gentleman himself is older than that, as he was already a young man at the start of the book, but The life and strange surprizing adventures of Robinson Crusoe of York, Mariner was first published on April 25th, 1719. It was followed, later the same year, by The farther adventures of Robinson Crusoe; being the second and last part of his life, and of the strange surprizing accounts of his travels round three parts of the globe. (Rather appropriately, the first edition of the latter was printed at the Ship in Pater-Noster-Row, London.) Continue reading