Keywords/Subject (Partial Matches) (Displaying 36 Results)

    TitleNIGHT OF STORYTELLING
    Production companyRobert Flaherty
    Gaumont Studios, London
    SponsorDepartment of Education
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerFLAHERTY, Robert
    DirectorFLAHERTY, Robert
    CastTomas ODiorain, Maggie Dirrane, Tiger King, Patch Ruadh, Michaeleen
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Duration15
    Production date1934
    SummaryShort film featuring storyteller Tomás Ó Díorain relating a tale in Irish to members of the cast of MAN OF ARAN. Also known as STORYTELLERS NIGHT.
    NoteAka OIDHCHE SHEANCHAIS
    Genre/CategoryShort Documentary
    Government Sponsored

    TitleAWARD
    Production companyO'Connor-O'Sullivan Ltd
    Country of originIreland
    DirectorMcCLINTOCK, Paddy
    PhotographyDEASY, Seamus
    Sound recordingDEASY, Brendan
    EditingO'FARRELL, Rory
    Sound supervisorHAYES, Pat
    Music composerHorslips
    Music performanceHorslips
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration10
    Format16mm
    CopyIFA
    SummaryThis film shows the making of the GAA Allstars Trophies by sculptor Garry Trimble. Trimble recalls images of hurling action from which he models his figures in clay, capturing the 'immense artistry' of the players. The moulds are made by Frank Matthews and the bronze is cast by John Behan.
    PeopleGarry Trimble, Frank Matthews, John Behan, GAA, Gaelic Athletic Association.
    KeywordsGAA, Gaelic Athletic Association, Trophies, Sculptors, Sculptures, Hurling, Allstars, Moulds, Bronze Casting, Players.
    Production creditsp.c: O'Connor Sullivan Ltd, d: Paddy McClintock, c: Seamus Deasy, s: Brendan Deasy, dub: Pat Hayes, m: Horslips, ed: Rory O'Farrell. 16mm, col, 10 mins. Copy: IFA.
    Film can lenghts375ft
    Film can total lenghts375ft
    Pos/NegPositive
    Genre/CategorySport
    Arts

    Series/Newsreel titleAMHARC EIREANN
    Episode/Item titleTermonfeckin, Louth: Ica Congress Discusses Rural Water Supplies
    Malahide: Youngsters Star In Speedboat Race
    Co. Leix: Open-cast Mining With World's Largest Excavator
    Ruskey, Roscommon: Kerry Girl Wins National Beauty Contest
    Newsreel issue number74
    Production companyGael Linn
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerO'LAOGHAIRE, Colm
    Script/AdaptationO'hEITHER, Brendan
    O'CAIDHIN, Martin
    PhotographyCORCORAN, Vincent
    MULKERNS, Jim
    ENNIS, Val
    O'NEIL, Nick
    Sound recordingHUNT, Peter
    MARTIN, Gene
    O'SULLIVAN, Morgan
    GLEESON, Paddy
    CommentaryO'Raghallaigh, Padraig
    LanguageIrish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Format35mm
    Production date41960
    Release date1960
    CopyIFA
    SummaryThere are four items in this issue. 1. 'Termonfeckin, Louth: ICA Congress Discusses Rural Water Supplies.'; Congress of the Irish Countrywomens Association (ICA) at its headquarters, An Grianan, in Co. Louth; 2. 'Malahide: Youngsters Star In Speedboat Race', 3. 'Co. Leix: Open-Cast Mining With World's Largest Excavator.'; 4. 'Ruskey, Roscommon: Kerry Girl Wins National Beauty Contest.'
    NoteThe entire Amharc Eireann series was produced by Colm O'Laoghaire, the only person involved with an on-screen credit. Of the 36 monthly single item films, "Readlann Rath Fearnain" and "Gairdini Na Lus" were directed by George Morrison. The remaining 34 were directed by Colm O'Laoghaire. Between 1956 and 1964, the following individuals were part of the production team : Camera : Vincent Corcoran, Jim Mulkerns, Val Ennis and Nick O'Neill. Godfrey Graham worked for a short while as a trainee. Sound : Peter Hunt, Gene Martin, Morgan O'Sullivan and Paddy Gleeson. The commentary was written by Brendan O'hEither and Martin O'Caidhin, and was generally voiced by Padraig O'Raghallaigh. Eileen O'Brien of Gael-Linn would advise on what stories were to be covered. Gerard Victory wrote several pieces of music which were used throughout the series.
    PeopleICA, Irish Countrywomens Association, Paul Ecton, Rosemary Ni Chonaill, Muirfean Ni Choirigh, Maire Ni Dhubhthaigh, Maire Ni Nuamain, Paid O'Chuin, Quinnsworth.
    KeywordsIrish Countrywomens Association, ICA, Water Supply, Domestic Facilities, Services, Modernisation, Rural Life, Boats, Speedboat Racing, Watersports, Coastline, Industry, Boat Making, Boat Building, Hobbies, Children, Beauty Contests, Dance Halls, Dances, Bands, Music, Entertainment, Dancers.
    LocationCo Roscommon, Rooskey, Dublin, Malahide, Co Louth, Termonfeckin., Co Laois
    Notes and commentsAmharc Eireann was a series of Irish language newsreel films commissioned by Gael Linn, to be shown in Irish cinemas from 1959 to 1964. The series began with 36 issues, each containing a single item, which were distributed to cinemas monthly between 1956 and 1959. Each of these 36 films featured an individual subject; e.g."Aerphort Na Sionainne" focuses on Shannon Airport. In 1959 a trial issue, or eagran, was produced, followed by 269 weekly issues, of approximately four minutes duration, usually containing four items. The final newsreel was released in August 1964.
    RightsGael-Linn Teo, 26 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. Ph: 6767283
    Film can total lenghts200
    Genre/CategoryNewsreel

    Series/Newsreel titleAMHARC EIREANN
    Episode/Item titlePresident Presents Aga Khan Trophy
    Co. Wicklow: Rathdrum Sees Stars!
    Irish Boxers Train For South Africa
    Ulster Grand Prix
    Newsreel issue number11
    Production companyGael Linn
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerO'LAOGHAIRE, Colm
    Script/AdaptationO'hEITHER, Brendan
    O'CAIDHIN, Martin
    PhotographyCORCORAN, Vincent
    MULKERNS, Jim
    ENNIS, Val
    O'NEIL, Nick
    Sound recordingHUNT, Peter
    MARTIN, Gene
    O'SULLIVAN, Morgan
    GLEESON, Paddy
    CommentaryO'Raghallaigh, Padraig
    LanguageIrish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Format35mm
    Production date211959
    Release date1959
    CopyIFA
    SummaryThere are four items in this issue. 1. 'President Presents Aga Khan Trophy'. Show jumping at the Royal Dublin Society (RDS) annual Dublin Horseshow. Features Don Wapperton of the winning British team, and presentation of Aga Khan Trophy by President Eamon de Valera. (0min 35'); 2. 'Co. Wicklow: Rathdrum Sees Stars!'. Cast and crew at Rathdrum, County Wicklow for the filming of 'A Terrible Beauty'. (1min 10'); 3. 'Irish Boxers Train for South Africa'. Members of the Irish amateur boxing team in training at the National Stadium, Dublin. (0min 30'); 4. 'Ulster Grand Prix'. Annual motorcycle race at Dundrod, outside Belfast. (0min 25').
    NoteThe entire Amharc Eireann series was produced by Colm O'Laoghaire, the only person involved with an on-screen credit. Of the 36 monthly single item films, "Readlann Rath Fearnain" and "Gairdini Na Lus" were directed by George Morrison. The remaining 34 were directed by Colm O'Laoghaire. Between 1956 and 1964, the following individuals were part of the production team : Camera : Vincent Corcoran, Jim Mulkerns, Val Ennis and Nick O'Neill. Godfrey Graham worked for a short while as a trainee. Sound : Peter Hunt, Gene Martin, Morgan O'Sullivan and Paddy Gleeson. The commentary was written by Brendan O'hEither and Martin O'Caidhin, and was generally voiced by Padraig O'Raghallaigh. Eileen O'Brien of Gael-Linn would advise on what stories were to be covered. Gerard Victory wrote several pieces of music which were used throughout the series.
    PeoplePresident Eamon de Valera, Don Wapperton (Showjumper), Tay Garnett(Dir.), Dan O Herlihy, Raymond Stross (Producer), Anne Heywood (Actress), Cyril Cusack (Actor), Noel Purcell (Actor), Robert Mitchum (Actor), Richard Harris (Actor), (Boxers) Colm McGahey, Patrick O Lion (?), Charlie O'Duinn, Harry Perry (Boxer), * O'Cearrbhall (Manager), Frank Cooper (Trainer), Jeff Duke, John SuRTEes (Racing motorcyclist), Ralph Renson, Bob McIntyre (Racing motorcyclist).
    KeywordsDublin Horse Show, RDS Horse Jumping, Aga Khan Trophy, Prizes, Fences, Spectators, Crowds, Presidents, Prize Presentations, Parade of Competitors, Jockeys, Riders, Film Making, Location Shooting of "A Terrible Beauty", Cast and Crew, Actors, Films, Movies, Camera Crew, Directors, Stars, Producers, Boxing, Boxers, Sports, Training, Punchbags, Sparring, Managers, Trainers, Fighting, Ulster Grand Prix, Motorcycle Races, Stadium, Mechanics, Riders, Racing, Motorbikes.
    LocationDublin, Ballsbridge, RDS, Royal Dublin Society, Co Wicklow, Rathdrum.
    Notes and commentsAmharc Eireann was a series of Irish language newsreel films commissioned by Gael Linn, to be shown in Irish cinemas from 1959 to 1964. The series began with 36 issues, each containing a single item, which were distributed to cinemas monthly between 1956 and 1959. Each of these 36 films featured an individual subject; e.g."Aerphort Na Sionainne" focuses on Shannon Airport. In 1959 a trial issue, or eagran, was produced, followed by 269 weekly issues, of approximately four minutes duration, usually containing four items. The final newsreel was released in August 1964. This Edition: The first item in this edition covers what was the highpoint of the summer social scene in Dublin, the week long Horse Show, held during August. The Aga Khan competition (a team-based international showjumping event) is the premier contest of the Show. The Aga Khan, a major player in the Irish bloodstock industry, bestowed the trophy to the RDS. The second item on the reel covers the shoot of the film A Terrible Beauty (aka The Night Fighters). The film is a British production and was shot in on location and at Ardmore Studios. The cast includes Robert Mitchum, Dan O Herlihy, Richard Harris, Cyril Cusack and Anne Heywood. It was released in 1960. A Terrible Beauty is adapted from the novel of the same name by J Arthur Roth. The title is taken from the closing line of the WB Yeats poem commemorating the 1916 Rising - Easter 1916. The story is set in 1940s (i.e. WWII) Northern Ireland. It is a love story set against (fictional) IRA activity in wartime Northerrn Irish. A German-trained activist has been parachuted into Northern Ireland. He engages local sympathisers, establishes an IRA unit in a rural locality (County Derry) and proceeds to organise guerilla actions against the police and the British Army. A local man recruited eventually turns against the campaign. This is partly the result of his relationship with a young woman who presses him to join her in emigrating to England to escape the poverty of life in Ireland. He informs on the IRA. He is captured by them but escapes. At the end of the film they both take the boat to England. It may be noted that there was no wartime IRA campaign in Northern Ireland. There were attempts by the IRA (in Southern Ireland) and the Nazis to work together on the old adage, England's difficulty is Ireland's opportunity. Two prominant IRA leaders, Sean Russell and Frank Ryan, ended up in Germany and did work with the Nazi regime. There was an attempt by the Germans to insert them both into Ireland, however Russell died on borad the submarine bringing them back and Ryan returned to Germany. There were also attempts by the Abwehr to drop agents into Ireland and link up with the IRA. However it all proved abortive. The final item, the Ulster Grand Prix, is a premier event in the Northern Ireland sporting year, held during the summer on the Dundrod road circuit located outside Belfast.
    RightsGael-Linn Teo, 26 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. Ph: 6767283
    Genre/CategoryNewsreel

    Series/Newsreel titleAMHARC EIREANN
    Newsreel issue number47
    Production companyGael Linn
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerO'LAOGHAIRE, Colm
    Script/AdaptationO'hEITHER, Brendan
    O'CAIDHIN, Martin
    PhotographyCORCORAN, Vincent
    MULKERNS, Jim
    ENNIS, Val
    O'NEIL, Nick
    Sound recordingHUNT, Peter
    MARTIN, Gene
    O'SULLIVAN, Morgan
    GLEESON, Paddy
    CommentaryO'Raghallaigh, Padraig
    LanguageIrish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Format35mm
    Production date291960
    Release date1960
    CopyIFA
    SummaryThere are four items in this issue. 1.'Ballina, Co. Mayo: An Taoiseach Opens Ï3 Million Drainage Scheme.' Taoiseach (Prime Minister) Sean Lemass inspects soldiers, officially opens the scheme; dredging begins. (50') 2. 'Gormanstown College: Swimming Association Holds Coaching Course' Coaches tutor students in exercises, diving into pool, and swimming. (1min). 3.'Dublin: First Irish Boat Show' Boats on exhibition at Busaras, with canoes, motorboats and waterskiers in River Liffey. 4. ''Careless Love': Highlight Of National Ballet Season' Cast and a scene from 'Carmen' ballet. (2mins)
    NoteThe entire Amharc Eireann series was produced by Colm O'Laoghaire, the only person involved with an on-screen credit. Of the 36 monthly single item films, "Readlann Rath Fearnain" and "Gairdini Na Lus" were directed by George Morrison. The remaining 34 were directed by Colm O'Laoghaire. Between 1956 and 1964, the following individuals were part of the production team : Camera : Vincent Corcoran, Jim Mulkerns, Val Ennis and Nick O'Neill. Godfrey Graham worked for a short while as a trainee. Sound : Peter Hunt, Gene Martin, Morgan O'Sullivan and Paddy Gleeson. The commentary was written by Brendan O'hEither and Martin O'Caidhin, and was generally voiced by Padraig O'Raghallaigh. Eileen O'Brien of Gael-Linn would advise on what stories were to be covered. Gerard Victory wrote several pieces of music which were used throughout the series.
    PeopleTaoiseach Sean Lemass TD, Irish Amateur Swimming Association, Thomas O'Cullen (Swimming Coach), Christopher West (Ballet Dancer), Joan Wilson (Dancer), Donal McAlpine (Dancer), Padraigin Ni Ri (Dancer).
    KeywordsDrainage Schemes, Dredging Machinery, Boys Brass Band, Crowds, Taoiseachs, Prime Ministers, Soldiers, Military Inspections, Opening Ceremonies, Colleges, Schools, Swimming Coaches, Irish Amateur Swimming Association, Swimming Exercises, Swimming Pools, Sports, Coaching Courses, Diving, Boat Shows, Dingies, Exhibitions, Bridges, Rivers, Canoes, Motorboats, Water Skiing, Water Skiers, National Ballet Season, "Careless Love" Ballet, Dancers, "Carmen" Ballet, Performances, Cast, Orchestras, Ballet Dancin
    LocationCo Mayo, Ballina, Co Meath, Gormanston College, Dublin, Busaras, Butt Bridge, River Liffey, O'Connell Bridge.
    Notes and commentsAmharc Eireann was a series of Irish language newsreel films commissioned by Gael Linn, to be shown in Irish cinemas from 1959 to 1964. The series began with 36 issues, each containing a single item, which were distributed to cinemas monthly between 1956 and 1959. Each of these 36 films featured an individual subject; e.g."Aerphort Na Sionainne" focuses on Shannon Airport. In 1959 a trial issue, or eagran, was produced, followed by 269 weekly issues, of approximately four minutes duration, usually containing four items. The final newsreel was released in August 1964.
    RightsGael-Linn Teo, 26 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. Ph: 6767283
    Film can lenghts4min
    Film can total lenghts350
    Pos/NegPositive
    Genre/CategoryNewsreel

    TitleMAKING OF EXCALIBUR: MYTH INTO MOVIE, THE
    Production companyMerlin Films
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerJORDAN, Neil
    DirectorJORDAN, Neil
    PhotographyDEASY, Seamus
    VERMUELEN, Nico
    Sound recordingDEASY, Brendan
    EditingO'FARRELL, Rory
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration50
    Format16mm
    Production date1981
    CopyIFA
    SummaryA documentary about the making of John Boorman's 1981 film, Excalibur; it includes on-location interviews with the director and members of the cast and crew.
    ShotlistTitle: 'The Making of Excalibur' over shot of a knight wielding a sword in a misty wood. Voice off-camera issuing instructions. The knight raises his visor, lowers his sword and looks to camera. Subtitle: 'Myth into Movie'. Voice off-camera: 'OK, here we go, andöAction!' The knight lowers his visor and lifts his sword. John Boorman speaks over shots of Nigel Terry and Paul Geoffrey; Nicholas Clay on horseback, charging men in armour. Lights and camera visible during freeze frame of this scene. Boorman sits in the cutting room at a miviola. He reads out Caxton's closing words to Malory's book:" 'Thus endeth the noble and joyous book entitled the MoRTE d'Arthur'." Sequence showing Boorman, with Nigel Terry as Arthur, on the castle battlements. Terry with blood on his armour; a hairdresser fiddles with his hair. Shot of section of castle under siege: knights with torches; several warriors fallen on stakes, another standing on a ladder leaning against a giant torch. Over this Boorman reads more from Le MoRTE d'Arthur. A fireball shoots across the scene and explodes. Crew visible at bottom of screen. Sequence showing Boorman directing Paul Geoffrey as Percival: Geoffrey in armour and on horseback, holding a chalice; kneeling before Boorman who reads from his notes; riding on a beach. Boorman at the miviola reading more from Le MoRTE d'Arthur. He ends by saying 'and that's the story I want to tell, really.' Shot of Nichols Clay as Launcelot wielding a mace on horseback. Voice calls 'Action!' and as he charges other warriors and the frame freezes. Medieval, Pre-Raphaelite, early 20th Century and cartoon-strip depictions of chivalric figures. Boorman speaks in voiceover of the story's enduring and 'mysterious appeal and says that it is for him also a 'private professional occupation'. He hopes to join the mass appeal to his own obsession and 'invest the sword with some of the mystery that belongs to it.' Speaking in the cutting room Boorman says that the power of the story lies in the sense we have of a lost golden age, when man was in harmony with nature.' Shot of the sword flying over the water into the hand of the lady of the lake. Boorman in the cutting room: 'It's a story about people who have lost contact with this world of magic and this is half remembered by this figure, Merlin, who is more and less than a man.' Shots of Nicol Williamson at Merlin, back-lit in the mist. 'He can guide,' says Boorman. 'He can no longer engage in the affairs of the world, but he can promote a king like Arthurö in a new attempt to revive the lost times and bring them to fruition.' Boorman explains that his first feature, Catch Us If You Can, was a quest film, with an advertising executive as a Merlin figure, both wise and foolish. Sequence in which Boorman identifies the Merlin figures in some of his early films: Yost in Point Blank; Arthur Frayn in Zardoz; Lazlo in [?]. 'Film-making is in itself a kind of quest for Truth, for understanding, and my career is littered with a series of gross miscalculations and misjudgments and errors and hurt... but that's part of the legend too.' We cut from Sean Connery's hand raising a gun from a mound of grain to the hand of the Lady of the Lake emerging from the water with Excalibur. 'I began my own quest to make a film of the subject directly,' says Boorman, 'to make my version of this myth. It was a quest that took me into the tangled forest of Hollywood - banks and lawyers. It took many years.' Over illustrations from the storyboard and designs for costume, Boorman says that he 'wanted to set the story not in the Dark Ages or the 12th century, but in some dislocated time out of time. In the design of armour, costumes, setting, we tried to evoke the world of legend and imagination.' Sequence showing a design for a dragon; craftsmen at work on a clay model of the dragon, and carrying the piece onto the set. Panning shot of the set - the castle under construction. The dragon in position, with scaffolding either side. Boorman speaks of the myth's treatment of escape from the material world into the world of spirit and of the transformation of that myth into carpentry, tubular steel, plastic and plaster. This is the point, he says, at which he begins to panic and wonder if he's made the right decision. Sequence moving through the various sections of the Camelot set: bright chains, stairways, arcaded halls, scaffolding. Boorman says that his life 'is really about creating a series of impossible problems to solve, and failing. That's the life of a film-maker of any ambition.' A helicopter hovers a few feet from the ground while a man secures a rope to it. The helicopter rises, carrying a load of scaffold tubing to the top of a nearby hill. Panning shot of the Wicklow Hills, ending on a circle of 'standing stones' under construction on a low hill. Boorman says that there's a point at which a film finds its own voice, but that in this case they were trying to create something entirely out of their imaginations. Shot of interior of the Castle, pulls back to reveal crew working on the drawbridge. Boorman says that in this case it was a vision which meant a great deal to him and that he had a fear that he was not going to be able to communicate it to his fellow workers and thus to the audience. Boorman looking at Camelot through a view-finder. Dragon. Flag flying from battlements. Boorman with Helen Mirren, discussing the way she should be lit in a scene. Sequence showing Boorman in discussion with various actors on set; Nicol Williamson; Nicholas Clay on horseback. Niall O'Brien. Set designer discussing part of the set. Shot of long, checkered table, silver model of the castle, silver globes hanging from the ceiling, and a mound of scrolls resting on the table. Painter working on large black and white painting of Christ. Nicholas Clay and Liam Neeson fencing with staffs. Older actor in armour. Sequence showing armour being cut and shaped. Niall O'Brien being fitted with his breast-plate. Terry English, armourer, talks about tailoring, cutting patterns: 'If it's fitted properly there's nothing you can't do in it.' Boorman and Terry English discuss an actor's visor. Knights sword-fighting. Terry English fitting chain mail on an actor. He says that the knights tended to die less from their battle wounds than from infection caused by bits of rusty and dirty chain mail driven into the wound by the lance or arrow. Knight with wounded arm at battle scene. Nicol Williamson. Shots of the early battle scenes in the forest. Lights, red mist. Boorman says that they staRTEd filming in appalling weather; everyone was floundering, the early results were poor and the whole thing seemed destined for disaster. He speaks about 'the wonderful moment when other people start to argue about whether something is right or not. It's always a marvellous time, because they're beginning to own it - it no longer belongs to one person but to all the people who are working on it. There's a poignancy about that too.' Sequence showing Boorman and Nicol Williamson deciding on how he should hand Excalibur to Gabriel Byrne, who's on horseback. Gabriel Byrne decides on how he should receive the sword . Sequence with Boorman in argyle sweater coming through drifting smoke in the woods. Group watching high flames in a forest clearing. 'When you start to take such a personal vision and put it on film, first of all it's intensely disappointing.' Crew shooting of a scene involving Gabriel Byrne. Boorman says 'Cut!' There's a look of disappointment on his face. 'Every day was a soul death because I never got what I'd hoped to get.' Shooting of scene involving the mourning peasants who carry a child on a litter over a wooden bridge. AD calls for more volume in the keening. Nicholas Clay goes to camera and shouts, 'Famine, pestilence, death.' Boorman uses a megaphone to give directions to the peasants. Shot of icon, reliquary. 'I was seldom pleasantly surprised. It was always a disappointment. I always had to settle for something less than I had hoped for.' Make-up artists applying make up to Nicholas Clay. Paul Geoffrey having 'rust' applied to his armour. Boorman directing Nicholas Clay, Paul Geoffrey and the peasants in a confrontation scene. Green lights dotted about the set. Boorman shows the peasants how to strike Geoffrey with their staves. 'Other people take it over, slowly it becomes their world. You try to function like Merlin.' Crew visible in wide shot of wintry hillside wood. Paul Geoffrey's character attacked by Nicholas Clay and the peasants. Boorman says that he felt like Merlin in that it was as if some deeper darker power had taken control of the film and all he could do was give it his blessing and send it out into the world. Crew, cast, musicians at the scene of the feast in Cornwall's castle. Cornwall's wife dancing. Choreographer Anthony Van Laast counting the rhythm through a megaphone. Man behind him conducts the knights who are pounding their fists on the table. Van Laast discusses the kind of dance Boorman required. 'He wanted it to be very earthy... a touch of Indian, a touch of Spanish.... Seductive without being too raunchy. He didn't want it to be a medieval dance.' Boorman shows the dancer a particular move he'd like her to make. As the dance scene is filmed, Van Laast counts the beats through a megaphone. AD giving the knights the beat for their pounding fists. Van Laast counts to the climax of the dance. Helen Mirren and Cheri Lunghi, in costume, walk onto the castle set. Flags flying from battlements. A cart is pulled onto set; a man holds a frame of green beads. Boorman discusses a scene with some knights. Boorman says he decided that the Castle should be silver so that it would shine like a beacon from a distance, and that it should be gold on the inside because he wanted a bare look, with nothing hanging on the walls. Pans up from dragon (now gold) to silver battlements. Shot of Boorman lining up camera for a shot of the round table. Nicol Williamson twirling his staff. Russian wolfhounds at the head of stairwell. Crew stoking huge log fire. Gas jets being lit. Dragon-shaped fire irons being carried onto the set. Man on ladder fixing hanging beads. Boorman discussing a scene with Nicol Williamson. Shot of knights & ladies seated at round table. Man polishes a helmet and brings it to Nicol Williamson. Boorman settles the helmet on Nicol Williamson's head. Nicol Williamson says, 'Left a little, right a little, golden shot. Silver bullet.' Boorman signals OK. Nicol Williamson says, 'That's it, we're off to the moon.' Clapper board over man carving meat. Overhead shot of servants bringing drink to the round table. Camera and boom at centre of table. Woman's face reflected in the metal table. Boorman in the cutting room. He says that because the film is not set in a particular time, all designs for props have to be referred to himself or Tony Pratt because there are no reference books for the jugs, lamps and jewellery. Action in the main hall of Camelot, which is filled with minstrels, puppeteers, fire-eaters, clerics, alchemists, knights and ladies and children. Paul Geoffrey walking along with puppeteers. Dolly shot in progress. 'Percival came from the woods to Camelot and he's never seen anything like it before... This is to show that Arthur has cracked it as regards getting civilization together. Paul Geoffrey discusses Percival's character. Percival's been looked after by his mother who doesn't want him to become a knight, as his father and brother were (they were killed) but she eventually consents. Dolly shot in progress as Percival makes his way through the main hall. He bumps into Merlin who tells him he'll find the kitchen by following his nose. Sequence showing a dolly in progress. Boorman in the cutting room. He says that every time you cast a character you give away something. He found it difficult to cast his film because the style of acting he wanted 'just isn't part of the trend of modern actors [shot of Paul Geoffrey looking into some kind of ocular glass] to be bold and direct. English actors have lost confidence. They've lost power.' He says that it was particularly difficult to cast Merlin. He admired Nicol Williamson but he was skeptical about casting him. Yet within ten minutes he knew that he was the character. Shot of Boorman and Nicol Williamson on the roof of Camelot, discussing a scene. Nicol Williamson and Nigel Terry on the roof of the castle; camera and boom mic. Nicol Williamson discusses Merlin's character: 'a man of many lives... He is many people. There's a lot of my old English master in him too. Whimsey in his humour. A man of book lore.' Scene from finished movie: Arthur runs into Merlin in the wood. He's terrified. Merlin tells him that he was born to be king. 'You and the land are one.' Boorman, in cutting room, talks about the casting of Nigel Terry. He had 'the requisite energy and attractiveness.' Scenes from the storming of the castle in which Arthur is first seen by Guinevere. Boorman: 'I wanted the audience to encounter a world that was completely new' and so he told the actors to play it as though these things were happening for the first time... 'fresh, untrammelled emotions.. Cheri Lunghi talks about Arthur and Guinevere. 'They meet as children. He's just pulled the sword from the stone; everyone's mad about the boy. He's the man who saves her father's castle.' Nicholas Clay says that Lancelot and Guinevere are the crux of Arthur's problem. Cheri Lunghi describes Guinevere as 'a fresh flower plucked out of a field and brought into a huge cold castle. Arthur pursuing man-made things, laws and everything is becoming very materialistic. She's much simpler than that.' Scene from the film, in which Guinevere and Lancelot meet in the forest. Nicholas Clay: 'Lancelot runs away with his best friend and the king's wife and everything changes. The old codes fall aside in the face of love.' Scene from the film, in which [Arthur?] stands over the sleeping lovers and drives his sword into the ground beside them. Merlin with his flaming staff and red contact lenses: 'Look into the eyes of the dragon and despair.' Morgana screams in terror. Boorman says that Morgana is a witch, 'the woman who is going to explore the depth of passion to discover power'. Sequence from film showing Morgana's castle and Morgana giving birth to Mordred. Helen Mirren on Morgana: It's a character that crops up frequently in myth - the witch, seductress, sorceress. It represents men's fear of women.' She mentions the influence of St. Paul, 'the woman-hater'. Scene from the film in which Merlin questions the sleeping Morgana about the weakness of her powers now that she's used them to keep herself young. Nicol Williamson discusses Merlin's power of the mind, the look in the eye. He mentions the witch doctor in an African tribe who can fix an evil eye on a member of the tribe, who two days later is dead. 'In a way, Merlin has that kind of power.' On the set in the forest, technicians sorting out lights, screens, filters. Boorman and his director of photography, Alex Thompson discuss the lighting. Helen Mirren and Nicol Williamson in shot. Thompson explains that they need sunshine to match an earlier shot and how, because the sky has clouded over, they have to simulate shafts of sunlight with lights. Scenes from the wedding of Arthur and Guinevere. Alex Thompson talks about using colours to retain the magical feel of the film. 'I've stuck mainly with browns and greens and peacock blue... they complement black somehow.' Knights on horseback. Thompson with a light-meter in crowd scene. The lighting comes on. Thompson says 'okay'. Camera on crane starts to roll. Shooting of scene in which Morgana approaches Merlin to seek instruction in the art of magic. Boorman and the camera operator look on. Boorman directing Nigel Terry and Cheri Lunghi on the wedding altar. Boorman in voiceover, 'Film to me is a way of expressing an inner world. It's easier in black and white because most of us dream in black and white. When we introduce colour we introduce a problem which we're still trying to solve.' Paul Geoffrey, as Percival, approaches the Holy Grail but runs back to the drawbridge when the riddle is put to him. Geoffrey and Boorman rehearsing the scene. Geoffrey kneels; Boorman stands, holding the script. Boorman say that the Grail is the symbol of redemption. Geoffrey answers, 'But he doesn't get it until he drinks from it. "You and the land are one." 'Boorman asks, 'Do you think it should be simple and direct like that or should it be a process of discovery?' Cut away to big lights. Boorman rehearsing Paul Geoffrey. Scene from Excalibur in which Paul Geoffrey approaches the Grail without his armour. The Voice asks 'Who is the keeper of the Grail?' Geoffrey answers, 'You, my Lord.' 'Who am I?' 'You are my Lord and Master.' Boorman talking to camera, holding a Styrofoam cup of coffee. 'The problem is to match the themes with the setting.' He says that in this film, more than in any other, he's not sure what an actor should say or do until he can look through the camera and see him in the setting. Paul Geoffrey's stunt double walking up the drawbridge as it is raised. He climbs up and over. Boorman says that the Grail Castle set 'occupies only a moment in the film. It sounds wasteful to build so enormous a set for only one scene. The theme is vital: it's to do with the discovery the grail. It's right at the centre of the myth. Technology in the service of myth, I think is marvellous. Scene from Excalibur: Uther drives the sword into the stone. Merlin turns to watch. Boorman with Nigel Terry at the stone. Boorman quotes Merlin's description of Excalibur: 'Behold the sword of power...forged when the world was young...' etc. 'Tremendously important icon.' Boorman directs Nigel Terry on the right way to approach the sword in the stone. 'A slight hesitation.' Scene from Excalibur in which Arthur breaks both Lancelot's lance and his own sword, Excalibur. Sequence in Merlin's cave: a lizard in among stalagmites; snake handler with python; crew preparing the set; more lizards and snakes. Boorman says that film-making is 'converting money into light and back into money again, and parallels the myth which is an attempt to escape the physical world into the world of the spirit... which will produce a dream, a stream of light flowing onto a wall which will contain something of our spirit.' Another lizard shot. Lizard again. Boorman and Nicol Williamson's stand-in behind the 'ice' sheets in which Merlin is frozen. Crew and set people at work on the cave. Glass being polished in front of Nicol Williamson's stand-in. Shot of the lizard in among the rocks and snakes. Boorman: 'It's a tremendously arrogant thing to make a private vision.' He says that he used to feel guilty about it, that the craftsmen should have been building houses for people, that he was taking society's resources and destroying them, turning them into shadows, into nothing. Now, however, he thinks that we should convert our materialism into light. Knights wait around on foot and on horseback, as the set for the final battle is prepared. Men spray dry ice from canisters. Others carry armour for a dead knight; a grip points to where it should be placed. Boorman with camera on dolly, speaking into hand-held mic. Grip walks by 'dead' knight. Scene from Excalibur in which Arthur kills Mordred. Knights charging on horseback. Dolly shots in progress - camera moving along tracks past knights fighting furiously 'Everything that is published belongs to everyone,' says Boorman. 'The film began to have a life outside of me and... I am riveted.' Nicholas Clay on horseback, wielding a mace. Other knights fighting on foot. One actor gets his arm caught momentarily in the reins of a rearing horse. Nicholas Clay on foot, slaying knights with his mace. He trips twice over fallen knights and stomps towards Boorman's camera. Shot of miviola screen with Excalibur breaking the surface of the water in the hand of the Lady of the Lake. Boorman at work on miviola feeding film into it. He says that in the cutting room he's beginning to influence the film again. His relationship with it is better than it has been at any time. He's free of the obsession and is now regarding it as 'a friend, a pleasant companion - a vigorous, powerful, but not overwhelming companion. And we've achieved a balance, the film and I, between us.' Derrynane, Co. Kerry: looking down from headland to beach. Shot of the crew on beach and the funeral barque on the sea. Closer on the crew; the tripod being assembled. Boorman (?) says, 'We should be shooting.' He moves away from the rest of the crew and both he and the barque are in view. 'Can't believe it, he says. 'Twenty years I've been making this film. Still haven't got it yet.' Freeze Frame. Credits over O Fortuna from Carmena Burana by Carl Orff.
    PeopleRobert Addie

    John Boorman

    Gabriel Byrne

    Nicholas Clay

    Terry English

    Paul Geoffrey

    Cherie Lunghi

    Helen Mirren

    Liam Neeson

    Niall O'Brien

    Anthony Pratt

    Nigel Terry

    Alex Thompson

    Anthony Van Laast

    Nicol Williamson
    KeywordsFilmmaking
    Film Production
    LocationNational Film Studios, Ardmore Studios; Wicklow; Tipperary; Derrynane, Co. Kerry.
    Production creditsp.c.: Merlin Films, p/d: Neil Jordan, c: Seamus Deasy, s: Brendan Deasy, dub: Pat Hayes, graphic dsgn.: Hilliard Hayden, rostrum c: Nico Vermuelen, e: Rory O'Farrell, col, 50 mins, 1981, Copy: IFA.
    Dubbing mixHAYES, Pat
    RightsNeil Jordan
    Film can lenghts2000ft
    Film can total lenghts1800ft
    Pos/NegPositive
    GraphicsHAYDEN, Hilliard
    Genre/CategoryFeature Documentary
    Media

    Series/Newsreel titleMAGAZINE VIDEO
    Production companyNORTHERN IRELAND FILM AND VIDEO ASSOCIATION
    Country of originNorthern Ireland
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration25
    FormatVideo
    Production date1988
    SummaryThis pilot programme of an occasional video series looks at some of the issues and ideas which affect people in Northern Ireland. 1. Lignite Protest - a demonstration against open-cast lignite mining, 2. Language revival - the resurgence of the Irish language in the Belfast area, 3. Armagh Jail 1986 - International Women's Day picket outside Armagh jail, 4. Handful of earth - profile with a song from a Chilean band about the death of Victor Jara, 5. Supergrasses - statement by a member of the 'Stop the Showtrials Committee', 6. Sellafield - the nuclear reprocessing plant and the pollution of the Irish Sea.
    ReferenceBNFVC Vol 26, 1988:177
    DistributorThe Other Cinema
    KeywordsNorthern Ireland
    Lignite Mining Protest
    Language Revival
    Belfast
    Armagh Jail
    International Women's Day
    Supergrasses
    Sellafield
    Nuclear Reprocessing Plants
    Environment
    Pollution
    Production creditsp.c: Northern Ireland Film & Video Association, GB distr: The Other Cinema.

    TitleBOYS FOR RENT
    Production companyLiam McGrath
    Dun Laoire College Of Art And Design
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerMcGRATH, Liam
    DirectorMcGRATH, Liam
    EditingMERRY DOYLE, Sé (Editing Supervisor)
    Music composerBOLAND, Tim
    CastBernard Deegan (boy 1), Ross Hamilton (boy 2), Patrick Brennan (boy 3), Eamon Rohan (man).
    AcknowledgementsThanks to: John Leinster, Rev Peter McVerry, Kieran McGrath, Liam Regan, Edmund Lynch, Dave Kelleher, Mark Lowry, Dan Donnelly. Special Thanks to: Declan Reddy, Anastasia Clafferty, Mick Quinlan, Sr Fiona Pryle. Film Stock sponsored by Kodak Ireland.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration16
    Format16mm
    Production date1993
    Release date1994
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryInterviews with male prostitutes in Dublin city are repeated on camera by actors nonetheless cast in shadow as if they were the people in question. This footage is interspersed with grainy hand held, slow motion images of actors playing out typical rent boy scenes.
    NoteThis film won the Best Irish Short at the Cork Film Festival 1993.
    ReferenceFI April/May 1994 p. 27
    KeywordsMale Prostitution
    Rent Boys
    Production creditsd: Liam McGrath, crew: Garry Keane, Conor O'Mahony, Liam McGrath, additional assistance: Linda Nartey, m: Tim Boland, processing: Ranks Laboratories Ltd., sound dubbing: RTE, tutorial supervison: Anne O'Leary, Philip Davison, Michael McNally, Maurice Healy, super. ed: Sé Merry Doyle. thanks to: John Leinster, Rev Peter McVerry, Kieran McGrath, Liam Regan, Edmund Lynch, Dave Kelleher, Mark Lowry, Dan Donnelly. special thanks to: Declan Reddy, Anastasia Clafferty, Mick Quinlan, Sr Fiona Pryle. film stock sponsored by Kodak Ireland. p/d: Liam McGrath. A Liam McGrath and Dun Laoghaire College of Art and Design Production. 1993, col, 16 mins, 1993.
    Dubbing mixRTE
    Production facilitiesRank Laboratories Ltd (Processing)
    Genre/CategoryShort Documentary

    TitleHORSEMAN, PASS BY
    Production companyBBC Northern Ireland
    Country of originNorthern Ireland
    NarratorO'CONNOR, Frank
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration52
    SummaryArts documentary profile of the poet, W.B. Yeats, based on his Epitaph: "Cast a cold eye, On life, on death, Horseman, pass by".

    Series/Newsreel titleUP AND RUNNING
    Production companyRadius Television Productions
    Ravel Productions
    Radio Telefís Eireann/RTE
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerCOLLINS, David
    PALFREY, Brian
    DirectorMcCOLGAN, John
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration30
    TX channelRTE 1
    TX date16/06/1992
    SummaryA new series of programmes focusing on the success of small businesses in Ireland, and featuring four companies from different regions of the country. Tonight: Dublin businesses - Cylon Controls, Flight label, Cast Ltd, and Hibernia Food Supplies.
    RTE guide vol16
    RTE guide issue25

    TitleBEAUTY QUEEN OF BROADWAY, THE
    Production companyRadio Telefís Eireann/RTE
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerBLEAHEN, Caroline
    Presenter/ReporterFAHY, Jim
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration26
    TX channelRTE 1
    TX date04/06/1998
    CopyRTE
    SummaryThe cast and crew of Martin McDonagh's 'The Beauty Queen of Lenane' in New York for the Broadway premiere.
    RTE guide vol22
    RTE guide issue23

    Series/Newsreel titleBRITISH MOVIETONE GAZETTE
    Episode/Item titleKaye Don Breaks Speed Record
    Newsreel issue number52
    Production companyBritish Movietone
    Country of originGreat Britain
    Release date1931
    SummaryMOVIETONE CARD TITLE: Kaye Don Breaks Speed Record. SHOTLIST: The only sound pictures of Miss England II trial when a hundred and seven mph was reached on Lough Neagh. Shots of Kaye Don introducing his crew and they all climb into Miss England II, they cast off same from rowing boat, close shot of the cockpit, views of her in the water making the record breaking run.
    NoteMonday, 26 January 31
    KeywordsSpeed Boat Racing; Ships and Boats; Lakes; Water Speed Records; Personalities - Records; Ulster
    Newsreel footage sourceBMN
    Genre/CategoryNewsreel

    Series/Newsreel titleBRITISH MOVIETONE NEWS
    Episode/Item titleKaye Don Breaks Speed Record
    Newsreel issue number86
    Production companyBritish Movietone
    Country of originGreat Britain
    Release date1931
    SummaryMOVIETONE CARD TITLE: Kaye Don Breaks Speed Record. SHOTLIST: The only sound pictures of Miss England II trial when a hundred and seven mph was reached on Lough Neagh. Shots of Kaye Don introducing his crew and they all climb into Miss England II, they cast off same from rowing boat, close shot of the cockpit, views of her in the water making the record breaking run.
    NoteMonday, 26 January 31
    KeywordsSpeed Boat Racing; Ships and Boats; Lakes; Water Speed Records; Personalities - Records; Ulster
    Newsreel footage sourceBMN
    Genre/CategoryNewsreel

    Series/Newsreel titleLEARGAS
    Episode/Item titleThuas Seal, Thíos Seal
    Production companyRadio Telefís Eireann/RTE
    Country of originIreland
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration25
    TX channelRTE 1
    TX date20/02/2003
    CopyRTE
    SummaryReport on Carlisle Grounds, home of Bray Wanderers. San eagrán seo den tsraith 'Léargas' caitear súil thuisceanach ar Chlub beag sacair agus dícháiliú ó Phríomhroinn an FAI i ndán dóibh. Baile beag cois cuain is ea Bré i gContae Chill Mhantáin. Faoi bhainistíocht Pat Devlin, bhuaigh Bray Wanderers Corn an FAI faoi dhó sna nóchaidí. Ach seo é a dtríú babhta i Roinn a hAon den tSraith. Thuas seal, thíos seal, ach maireann spiorad 'Na bhFaoileán' agus iadsan go léir sna Carlisle Grounds a thugann tacaíocht iomlán don Chlub agus gach a mbaineann leis! In this week's programme, we cast a look on a small club which has relegation from the premier league of the FAI in store for them. Bray is a small seaside town, in Co. Wicklow. Under the Pat Devlin's management Bray Wanders won the FAI Cup twice in the nineties. But this is the third time for them in the first division. Good days, bad days but the spirit of the 'Seagulls' and those in the Carlisle grounds who love the club, is still at a high.
    RTE guide vol27
    RTE guide issue8
    Genre/CategoryTV Documentary Series

    Series/Newsreel titleRí Rá
    Production companyAdare Productions
    Country of originIreland
    LanguageIrish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration24
    TX channelTG4
    TX date19/03/2002
    CopyRTE
    SummaryTaispeánfar mar a éiríonn le Ben atá ag scannánaíocht don chéad uair riamh agus é líofa ag iarraidh an chéad oll-scannán Gaeilge a dhéanamh. Sa chéad eipeasód, tugann Ben an chliar le chéile agus caithfidh sé cabhair airgid a chinntiú ó fhoinsí amhrasacha. A fly on the wall mockumentary follows the fortunes of Ben, a first time film maker desperate to create the first great Irish language movie. In this first episode, Ben gets his cast together and must secure financial backing from dubious sources.

    Series/Newsreel titleGLÓR TÍRE
    Production companyGael Media
    TG4
    Country of originIreland
    LanguageIrish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration25
    TX channelTG4
    TX date05/09/2004
    CopyRTE
    SummarySraith Nua: Tosóidh sraith nua, 'Glór Tíre', agus rachtfar sa tóir ar ghlór nua tíre in Éirinn. Achlár na hoíche anocht beidh trialacha oscailte. New Series: Tonight sees the start of a new and exciting series 'Glór Tíre' where we search for the new country voice of Ireland. Tonight's programme features the open audition with a cast of many.

    Production companyGael Media
    TG4
    Country of originIreland
    LanguageIrish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration25
    TX channelTG4
    TX date14/09/2005
    CopyRTE
    SummaryTosóidh sraith nua, 'Glór Tíre', agus rachtfar sa tóir ar ghlór nua tíre in Éirinn. Achlár na hoíche anocht beidh trialacha oscailte.
    Second series of 'Glór Tíre' where we search for the new country voice of Ireland. Tonight's programme features the open audition with a cast of many.

    TitleRAFFERTY'S RISE
    Production companyFilm Company of Ireland
    Country of originIreland
    DirectorKERRIGAN, J.M.
    Script/AdaptationKERRIGAN, J.M. (from the play The Rise
    of Constable Rafferty by Nicholas Hayes)
    PhotographyMOSER, William
    CastFred O'Donovan (Constable Rafferty), Kathleen Murphy (Kitty Hogan), Brian Magowan (Sergeant Hogan), Arthur Shields (Kitty's successful lover). Valentine Roberts (Farmer McCauley), Queenie Coleman (Peggy McCauley), J Storey (the tinker), Brenda Burke (the tinker's wife).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsil
    Footage2535
    Format35mm
    Release date1917
    SummaryAn ambitious but bumbling Royal Irish Constabulary Constable, Rafferty, suspects his sergeant is the thief of Farmer McCauley's dog. His investigation leads him to seek a pair of the sergeant's boots to compare with a footprint left at the scene of the crime, not knowing that the sergeant's daughter. Kitty, had given a pair of the sergeant's cast-off boots to the real thief, a tinker. During his investigation, Rafferty is discovered in the sergeant's daughter's bedroom as he seeks a pair of the sergeant's boots to prove his case. Mistakenly accusing the sergeant of theft, Rafferty gets his rise, and 'the sergeant's boot was the medium of his elevation'. (Adapted from IL Nov 1917:6).
    Note3 reels. IR Rel 12/11/1917. Filmed in the Dublin Mountains. 'It is a mark of the originality of the company that it is bold enough to go beyond the stereotyped two reels in the production of a humour story... The whole production proves that the Irish producers are not going to be imitators, but aim to lead... It is a good-natured, laughable Irish story without malice, and replete with amusing situations.' (DEM 10/11/1917:4).
    ReferenceIL May 1917:4-5; EL July 1917:14; IL Nov 1917:6. Gifford 06539: Apr 1918.
    Production creditsp.c: Film Company of Ireland, d: J M Kerrigan, sc: from the play The Rise
    of Constable Rafferty by Nicholas Hayes, c: William Moser.
    Genre/CategoryComedy
    Drama
    Feature Film Drama
    Theatrical Adaptation

    TitleCAOINEADH AIRT UÍ LAOIRE
    Production companyCinegael
    SponsorSinn Fein
    Worker's Party, the
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerQUINN, Bob
    DirectorQUINN, Bob
    Script/AdaptationQUINN, Bob
    O'CUAIG, Seosamh (Script Coordinator)
    MAC DONNCHA, Mairtín (Additional Material)
    PhotographyCOMERFORD, Joe
    Sound recordingO'CUINN, Riobard
    EditingQUINN, Bob
    Production assistantRICHARDSON, Helen
    Ó COISDEALBHA, Mairtín
    Music composerFINN, Mickey
    O'FATHARTA, MairtÍn
    O'hAINLE, Gearoid
    MAC SUIBHNE, Micheal
    O'CUINN, Riobard
    CastSean Ban Breathnach (Art Ó Laoire), Caitlfn Ní Dhonnchu (Eibhlín Ní Chonaill), John Arden (director), Tomas Mac Lochlann (narrator), Siobhan Ní Shuilleabhain (Eibhlfn's mother), Maire Ni Dhrisceoil (Eibhlfn's sister), Joe Clancy (Morris' henchman), Bemadette Ní Fhlatharta (barmaid), Padraic Bradley (dancer), Gumey Campbell (old woman), Colm B Ó Finneadha, Bairbre Bolustrum, Mairtfn Mac Fhlannchada, Mairtm Davy, Siobhan Ní Dhabharain, Coilfn Tuathail (drama group), Kieran Lawton, Mairtm Ó Cofaí Tommy Healy (soldiers), Pascal Finnan, Sean Maclomhair, Margaretta D'Arcy, Julie Cummins, Sarah McKenzie-Bary, George Narramore (voices of conventional wisdom).
    LanguageIrish
    English
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration56
    Format16mm
    Release date1975
    CopyIFA/RTE
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryIn the Connemara Gaeltacht, an English-speaking director is producing a stage presentation of the life of Art O'Laoire with a group of Irish-speaking actors. He decides on a format of live action with filmed inserts. Quickly, though, there is a blurring between the present and the 18th-century events being depicted in the play/film. This is emphasised in the personality clash between the director and the actor playing Art O'Laoire. The blurring of past and present is reinforced with the modem-day director playing Morris, the 18th-century landlord who was given the O'Laoire family's ancestral lands when O'Laoire was forced to flee to Continental Europe as one of the Wild Geese. Unlike most of those who fled, O'Laoire returned to Ireland, in 1767, and until his death six years later by soldiers mobilised at the behest of Morris, he remains in constant conflict with Morris. Morris uses one of the almost defunct Penal Laws, by which a Catholic could not own a horse worth more than five pounds, to pressurise the proud O'Laoire into giving up his valuable horse or facing legal retribution. Art marries Eibhlín Ni Chonaill and they have two children. The director/Morris roles become conflated when the director is seen changing into 18th-century clothing in the present. As the play is being rehearsed, the actors, especially the one playing O'Laoire, challenge both the English-language text of the play and the interpretation of the historical events by the English-speaking outsider. In the end the cast and the defeated director celebrate at a ceili (dance). (V).
    NoteIR Rel 14 June 1975 (Cork Film Festival); GB TX Channel 4, 1983; USA Rel ca. 23/1/1976 (New York). Note: This film was made entirely in Connemara by Cinegael. The original suggestion for making the film came from Eamonn Smullen. The killing of Art O'Laoire near Carraig an Ime/Carriganimy in Co Cork in May 1773 is commemorated in the lament composed by his widow, and which is quoted throughout the film. 'CAOINEADH AIRT UI LAOIRE is the breakthrough I, at least, have been waiting for - the first completely native-produced movie that seems capable of holding its own with the best of the world's new cinema. It is a timely reminder that the future of Irish movies need not lie in the stereotyped cliches of the American and British commercial system which currently dominates what the cinemas show. QAOINEADH AIRT UI LAOIRE shows that movies in Ireland are possible without any Government support and without studio facilities. It shows that the future of cinema for us may well be a matter of looking at ourselves rather than in trying to ape Hollywood by manipulating the preconditioned responses of audiences with contrived formulae.' (SI 9/11/1975). "The director of the show is English, or at least English- speaking, whose haughtiness in front of the "natives" is underlined at every possible occasion. The principal actor rebels against this and the others respond, immediately establishing between screen and scene an ideological and narrative osmosis which shows how the eighteenth-century situation far from having been resolved, repeats itself, even if in different terms, still today. And the film ends in an ancient dance in which all take part, even the nasty but humiliated director.' (II Messagero 18/9/1976). The 'caoineadh' was a traditional, largely extemporised yet highly formalised and structured type of lament or dirge commemorating the life of an individual on the occasion of the wake and funeral. The lament (keen or keening from the Irish language verb caoin/caoineadh: to cry or wail) was usually performed by female members of the family. There were also professional keeners. The story of Art O Laoire: After the fall of Limerick and Treaty of Limerick (October 1691), ending the Williamite wars, the Irish army evacuated to France and entered the French service. Those involved came to be referred to as the 'Wild Geese'. The custom developed of Irish men emigrating to continental Europe to serve as mercenaries in many of the armies of the continent. They also came to be referred to as Wild Geese. Art O Laoire was one such, serving in the Hungarian Hussars. He was unusual in that he returned to Ireland, settled down in Kerry and married Eibhlin Dubh Ni Chonaill. O Laoaire was shot in 1773 arising from a dispute with the High Sheriff of Cork Abraham Morris. The dispute was over O Laoire's horse, which Morris wanted to buy - and under the (anti-Catholic) Penal Laws was entitled to insist upon owning - and O Laoire refused to sell. The lament upon which this film is based and the story behind it comes down through the oral tradition. The composer - Eibhlin Ni Chonaill - was a member of the O'Connell clan of Kerry and an aunt of the nineteenth century politician Daniel O'Connell (known as the Liberator in memory of his leadership of Catholic Emancipation, the repeal of those elements of the Penal Laws still in force during the early nineteenth century). The Penal Laws: The Penal Laws operated as a code restricting the civil, political and property rights of Catholics in Ireland from the end of the seventeenth century (the conclusion of the Williamite wars). Ireland at that stage had its own parliament, which began in 1695 to enact the Laws. There was parallel legislation in England and in Ireland and Britain Dissenters also, who in Ireland were particularly concentrated in the province of Ulster, suffered severe restrictions and penalties. Broadly the corpus of legislation (in Britain and in Ireland) was intended to advance the Episcopalian/Established Church cause and discriminate against Popery and Dissent. By the end of the eighteenth century however some significant proportion of the discriminatory laws had actually been repealed. The widespread expectation of Irish Catholics was that the Act of Union would occassion the end of the policy. However it took until 1829 for the Catholic Emancipation Act to be passed. To a considerable degree the delay in enacting the legislation was the result of an internal dispute (known as the Veto Controversy) within Irish Catholicism about the terms on which emancipation would operate. The poem: Eibhlin Ni Chonaill's lament for her dead husband has become a key work in the Irish literary cannon. It has come in this context to function as a lament for an age gone by, that of Gaelic Irish, and a culture and people defeated and conquered. It has been translated into English on a number of occasions. Among those who have translated it is Frank O'Connor (in his work 'Kings, Lords and Commons'). On the composer and the 'caoineadh' see entries in The Oxford Companion to Irish Literature (editor Robert Welch, Oxford University Press, 1996). The film: This film was made with Sinn Fein. However the organisation with which it was made was that of 'official' Sinn Fein. The Sinn Fein organisation split after the events of 1969 in Northern Ireland. The split reflected and was preceded by a split in the IRA. One wing of the party continued to style itself Sinn Fein in its claim to represent continuity but came to be known as the 'officials'. The other wing, which came to be the majority tendency, initially styled itself Provisional Sinn Fein, came to be known as the 'provisionals' and is now again simply Sinn Fein. Reflecting their leftist/communist (Moscow) orientation, the officials renamed themselves in 1975 Sinn Fein the Workers Party (SFWP) and in 1982 simply the Workers Party (WP). Eventually (1994?) the Workers Party split with Democratic Left (DL) emerging as an essentially social democratic element from that split. In 1999 DL was dissolved and merged with the Labour Party. The Workers Party remains in existence as a small, left political organisation. This film was made during a period of active development of the officials' education department, their research department, their propagandising, publishing, agitation on left-wing issues and increasingly strident opposition to nationalism and militant Irish republicanism. A key figure in these developments was Eamon Smullen. Another film produced during this period is the 1977 film 'Going, going, gone', on which Smullen is credited as the producer. It also is held in the Irish Film Archive. The film makers: Joe Comerford (on this production the lighting cameraman) is also a film-maker of note. Works include 'Withdrawal' (1974), 'Down the Corner' (1978), 'Traveller' (1981) and 'Reefer and the Model' (1988), all in the Irish Film Archive holding. Bob Quinn (producer/director) is a most prolific film maker (having made more than 60 films). Among his other films are his documentaries 'Cloch' (1975) and 'Atlantean' (1983), the fiction works 'Poitin' (1978), Budawanny (1987) and 'The Bishop's Story' (1994), which are also in the Irish Film Archive. He has also based himself in the Gaeltacht (Irish speaking) district of Connemara in County Galway. aka: LAMENT FOR ARTHUR LEARY
    ReferenceIrish News (Belfast) 17/9/1975:8; IT 26/1/1976:7; SI 7/11/1976:2; SI 4/12/1977, Film Directions Vol. 1, No. 1, 1977:18-19.

    Film Directions Vol. 1, No. 1, 1977:18-19, review of film and plot synopsis by Kevin Rockett.

    ‘A Movie we can be proud of’. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the IFI.

    National Film Theatre programme, ‘A Sense of Ireland: Irish cinema’. Historical background, James Connolly quote, brief plot synopsis. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the IFI.

    Cine Action: 3-10, ‘The films of Bob Quinn: Towards an Irish cinema’, Quinn's background and films, references (Jerry White).

    Caoineadh Airt Ui Laoire (1975), publicity, James Connolly quote, cast list, brief plot synopsis, The Lament for Art O'Leary. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the IFI.
    KeywordsIrish History
    Irish Language
    Connemara
    Galway
    Theatre
    Theatrical Productions
    Amateur Drama
    Landlords
    1800s
    Airt O'Laoire
    Production creditspc: Cinegael. Sinn Fein, The Workers Party, p/d/ed: Bob Quinn, sc: Quinn, inspired by 'Caoineadh Airt Uf Laoire' by Eibhlm Bean Ui Laoire nee Ó Conaill (Caoineadh Airt Ui Laoghaire, ed, Sean O'Cuiv, Dublin: Brown and Nolan, 1923; ed, Sean Ó Tuama, Dublin: Clochomhar, 1961) sc co-ord: Seosamh Ó Cuaig, a. material: Mairtin Mac Donncha, light, c: Joe Comerford, m: Mickey Finn Martin Ó Fatharta, Gearoid Ó hAinle, Micheal Mac Suibhne, s: Riobard O'Cumn, s mix/dub: Pat Hayes, elec. super: Seosamh O Tuainsc, p.a: Helen Richardson, Mairtfn Ó Coisdealbha.
    Dubbing mixHAYES, Pat
    Electrical supervisorÓ TUAIRSC, Seosam
    LightingCOMERFORD, Joe
    Script sourceInspired by 'Caoineadh Airt Uí Laoire' by Eibhlm Bean Uí Laoire nee Ó Conaill Caoineadh Airt Ui Laoghaire, ed, Sean Ó Cuiv,
    Dublin: Brown and Nolan, 1923; ed, Sean Ó Tuama, Dublin: Clochomhar,1961)
    Genre/CategoryHistorical Drama
    Literary Adaptation
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleCATECHIST OF KELARNI
    Production companyParis Foreign Mission Society
    Country of originFrance
    DirectorPRAKASH, Raghupathy
    Script/AdaptationDUFFY, Rev. Thomas Gavin
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsil
    Release date1923
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryA film produced with the idea of fund-raising in the U.S. It is a drama which tells the story of an Indian beggar and thief who reforms and becomes a lay missionary. Thomas Gavin Duffy (1888-1941), son of the Charles Gavin Duffy, who was involved with the missions in India, wrote the script. The film was produced by the Paris Foreign Mission Society, a group of secular priests in Asia who were progressive educationalists. It was shot with a native cast and was screened on East Coast U.S. and in Dublin.
    KeywordsMissionaries
    Religion
    LocationIndia
    Production creditsp.c.: Paris Foreign Mission Society, d: Raghupathy Prakash, sc: Rev. Thomas Gavin Duffy.

    Series/Newsreel titleBALLYKISSANGEL
    Episode/Item titleFor One Night Only
    Production companyBBC Television
    Country of originGreat Britain
    DirectorHARRISON, Paul
    Script/AdaptationPRENDIVILLE, Kieran
    CastStephen Tompkinson, Dervla Kirwan, Niall Toibin, Tony Doyle, Tina Kellegher, Stephen Brennan, Bosco Hogan
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration40
    TX channelBBC
    TX date05/01/1997
    CopyBBC
    SummaryAssumpta Fitzgerald (Dervla Kirwan) does not hold a high opinion of the church. In the annual slave auction she is sold to Fr. MacAnally (Niall Toibin ) who does not hold a high opinion of Assumpta. As a result she has to provide accommodation for two visiting parish priests and a Bishop. Father Mac is less than impressed when he finds Fr Peter Clifford (Stephen Tompkinson) pulling pints as Assumpta's slave. A musician, Enda O'Sullivan (Stephen Brennan), moves into Ballykissangel and is subsequently cast as Assumpta's love interest in the village play. Niamh is thrilled and thinks Assumpta should go out with him. Enda's ankle is injured during rehearsals and Fr. Clifford is brought in to replace him, which leads to a compromising situation witnessed by Father Mac. Brian Quigly (Tony Doyle) refuses to fund the play unless Enda plays the lead role. With a little help from Dr. Ryan, (Bosco Hogan) Enda is back on his feet by the opening night... much to Father Clifford's disappointment. (BBC Publicity Notes)
    Note1st episode of 2 series.
    KeywordsRural Ireland
    Pubs
    Villages
    Priests
    Genre/CategoryTV Drama Series
    Rural Drama

    TitleTA NA BAID
    Production companyNational Film Institute
    SponsorBIM
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerMORRISON, George
    O'LAOGHAIRE, Colm
    DirectorO LAOGHAIRE, Colm
    LanguageIrish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Format16mm
    Production date1958
    CopyIFA
    SummaryFishermen set out to sea in three square-rigged boats. After weathering a storm, the men cast their nets, which fill up with fish. The boats, laden with the catch, head back to port.
    NoteThe Irish Film Archive holds only a rough edit of this film. The IFA Catalogue notes: "The copy held in the Irish Film Archive is incomplete. Ta na Baid was commissioned by BIM in 1958, and made on 16mm Kodachrome by George Morrison and Colm O'Laoghaire. First shown in The Shelbourne Hotel in September, 1958, the print went missing shortly afterwards. George Morrison says that he was busy with Mise Eire and didn't keep track of Ta na Baid. He suggested in a phone call (4/1/2005) that it could have been returned to the offices of Bord Iascaigh Mhara [BIM]. Manus McManus e-mailed Mairead Mallon of BIM in an effort to locate the missing print. She is circulating that e-mail among her colleagues. Conradh na Gaeilge was also contacted. Currently (5/1/2005) awaiting their responses. The animation process employed in Ta na Baid is completely original, making the film one of a kind. Developed by George Morrison, this technique allows the filmmaker to create scenes in real time by moving sheets of refractive glass over illustrations. and double-overlay cells. The incomplete print, the offcuts and the print test are held in the same can in the colour vault. This material was found in viewing vault (25.3/S5), by Sunniva O'Flynn on 30/11/04. It had not been entered anywhere on the database. At the time it was found, the can-label read, ' "Ta na Baid" Colm O'Laoghaire 6x16mm colour reels. 1 off-cuts. Sep Pic & Sep Sound. Animation." ' "
    KeywordsFishing
    Boats
    Production creditsp.c.: National Film Institute, p: George Morrisson, Colm O Laoghaire, d: Colm O Laoghaire, illustrations: Eamon Costello
    Genre/CategoryGovernment Sponsored

    Series/Newsreel titleFRAMEWORKS
    Episode/Item titleFrom The Deep
    SponsorBórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    Radio Telefís Éireann/RTE
    Comhairle Ealaoin/Arts Council of Ireland
    Country of originIreland
    Northern Ireland
    DirectorTWOMEY, Nora
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    SoundDolby Digital
    Duration5
    Format35mm
    Release date2001
    SummaryIn this retelling of an Inuit folktale, Skeleton Woman, a woman who has been cast into the sea returns in a guise that is frightening, but provides an opportunity for regeneration and union with the lonely fisherman who encounters her.
    NoteIn 1995, the Irish Film Board, RTE and the Arts Council, in association with the Northern Ireland Film Council, invited applications for a new animation scheme. Frameworks aims to encourage imaginative animation from new animators, but also from established animators who may wish to realise more personal and creative projects.
    RTE guide vol23
    RTE guide issue21
    KeywordsMyths
    Folktales
    Fishermen
    Sea
    Genre/CategoryShort Film Drama
    Animation

    TitleMAN OF NO IMPORTANCE, A
    Production companyMajestic Films
    BBC Films
    Little Bird Productions
    Country of originGreat Britain
    Ireland
    ProducerCAVANDISH, Jonathan
    MURRAY, Craig
    DirectorKRISHNAMMA, Suri
    Script/AdaptationDEVLIN, Barry
    Sound recordingSTEPHENSON, David
    EditingFREEMAN, David
    Executive producerMITCHELL, James
    Music composerWILSON, Allan
    Music performanceLondon Filmworks Orchestra
    Songs'Let's Do It (Let's Fall in Love)' by Cole Porter, perf. by
    Eartha Kitt; 'Make the World Go Away' by Hank Cochraan, perf by
    Ray Price; 'Love Letters' by Edward Hayman, Victor Young, perf.
    Kitty Lester; 'Mambo Italiano' by Bob Men-ill, perf. by Rosemary
    Clooney; 'Can't Get Used to Losing You' by D Pomus, M Schuman
    perf. by Andy Williams; 'Theme for Young Lovers' by/perf. by Percy
    Faith; 'Till' by C Sigman, C Danvers, perf. by Percy Faith.
    CastAlbert Finney (Alfie Byrne), Brenda Fricker (Lily Byrne), Michael Gambon (Camey), Tara Fitzgerald (Adele Rice), Rufus Sewell (Robbie Fay), Patrick Malahide (Carson), Anna Manahan (Mrs Grace), Joe Pilkington (Ernie Lally), Brendan Conroy (Rasher Hynn), Pat Killalea (Phil Curran), John Killalea (Jack Curran) Joan O'Hara (Mrs Crowe) Eileen Conroy (Mrs Curtin), Eileen Reid (Mrs Rock), David Kelly (Baldy), Mick Lally (Father Kenny), Stuart Dunne (John), Joe Savino (Breton-Beret), Paudge Behan (Kitty), Dylan Tighe (landlady's son), Enda Oates (garda). Jimmy Keogh (treasurer), Catherine Byrne (woman at canal), Maureen Egan (Mrs Dunne), Paddy Ashe (Mr Ryan), Pascal Perry (Mr Gorman), Ingrid Craigie (waitress), Damien Kaye (Foley), Jonathan Rhys-Myers, Vincent Walsh, Paul Roe (young men).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourEastmancolor
    SoundDigital Stereo
    Duration99
    Footage8890
    Format35mm
    Release date1995
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryIn Dublin in 1963, Alfie Byme, a bus conductor, is staging a production of Oscar Wilde's Salome in a church hall. He asks Adele Rice, a passenger on the no. 34 bus on which he works, to play the title role, and bus driver Robbie to play opposite her. At rehearsals, Camey, a butcher, objects to being cast as King Herod and tells Alfie's sister. Lily, that he regards the play as blasphemous. She agrees to help him sabotage the production. Alfie's friend, Baldy, tells him that Camey is leading a campaign against the play, but Alfie insists on continuing with the production. During rehearsals, Adele collapses in tears and tells Alfie that she is pregnant. Alfie asks in confession what Adele's boyfriend should do. The priest identifies Alfie from his voice and wrongly assumes that Alfie is the child's father. Annoyed, Alfie leaves the church to go to see Adele. He arrives as Adele and her boyfriend are making love. That night, Alfie puts on make-up and dresses in a cape and goes to a gay bar. He asks a young man. Kitty, for an embrace, but Kitty and his friends attack and rob him. Camey and Lily see Alfie being brought home by a policeman. Alfie's homosexuality becomes publicly known and he attempts suicide by jumping into the canal, but there isn't enough water in it to drown him. At work the next day, Carson, Alfie's homophobic boss, tells him that Robbie asked to be transferred to another route. While Camey is also hostile to him, his passengers give him their support. Adele, who is migrating to England, wishes him well as she says goodbye to him. When he returns to the church and is contemplating events there, Robbie suddenly arrives and declares that he wants to re-join the production. He tells Alfie that Carson removed him from the bus route against his will. The two men read a poem by Oscar Wilde. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 23/3/1995 (premiere Dublin); 21/4/1995 (general release).
    ReferenceFl No. 45:30, Feb-Mar 1995:30; IT 21/4/1995:15; SP 26/3/1995:31.
    DistributorClarence Pictures/Winston Film Distributors (GB)
    Clarence Pictures (IE)
    Keywords1960s
    Bus Conductors
    Amateur Dramatics
    Theatre
    Oscar Wilde
    'Salome'
    Homosexuality
    LocationDublin City
    Production creditsp.c: Majestic Films. In association with BBC Films presents A Little Bird Production, p: Jonathan Cavendish, Craig Murray (London), exec p: James Mitchell, d: Suri Krishnamma, sc: Barry Devlin, sc. super: Catherine Morris, a.d: Lisa Mulcahy, Suzanne Nicell, Mary Gough steadicam op: John ward, ed: David Freeman, art d: Frank Flood dresser: Fiona Daly, m.c: Allan Wilson, orch: Nic Raine, m. co-ord: Denis Fine, m.p: The London Filmworks Orchestra, songs/music extracts: 'Let's Do It (Let's Fall in Love)' by Cole Porter, perf. by Eartha Kitt; 'Make the World Go Away' by Hank Cochraan, perf by Ray Price; 'Love Letters' by Edward Hayman, Victor Young, perf. Kitty Lester; 'Mambo ItalianO'by Bob Men-ill, perf. by Rosemary Clooney; 'Can't Get Used to Losing You' by D Pomus, M Schuman perf. by Andy Williams; 'Theme for Young Lovers' by/perf. by Percy Faith; 'Till' by C Sigman, C Danvers, perf. by Percy Faith, dub ed: Nick Adams, dial. ed: Tim Hands, ADR mix: Mick Boggins, Ted Swanscott, Foley ed: Mary Finlay, s. mix: David Stephenson, re-rd. mix: Paul Hamblin, p. co-ord: Fran Byrne, p.m: Kathy Sykes, loc m: Howard Gibbins, Jill Dempsey, cast: Michelle Guish, cost super- Annie O'Halloran, Ger Scully, make-up: Ken Jennings, hair: Bernie Dooley, sp. effs: Gerry Johnson, title dsgn: Chris Allies, titles/opticals: Peerless Camera Co Ltd, Foley art.: John Fuel, Julie Ackerton stunt co-ord: Martin Grace, GB distr: Clarence Pictures through Winston Film Distributors; IR distr: Clarence Pictures.
    Art directionFLOOD, Frank
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Comedy

    TitleDAUGHTER OF ERIN, A
    Production companySelig Polyscope Co
    Country of originUSA
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsil
    Footage9501000
    Format35mm
    Release date1908
    SummaryKitty, daughter of an Irish peasant, Patrick O'Connor, is courted by many lads in hervillage, especially Miles O'Mally. The opening shows the young couple in Miles' boat on the lakes of Killamey. Charles Hardacre, O'Connor's landlord and the Master of Kenmare, who is riding on the lakeshore is attracted to Kitty. Smitten by Kitty, Hardacre decides to visit the O'Connors and seek friendship with Patrick. The next day, accompanied by his haughty mother, he visits the O'Connors, and much to their surprise enters the house and accepts their hospitality. While there, he succeeds in conveying his love to Kitty, and places a ring on one of her fingers. Dazed but delighted. Kitty stammers thanks before Hardacre has gone. Realising what has happened, Mr O'Connor admonishes Kitty for her action and for being disloyal to Miles. Patrick then seeks out Miles with the news. Miles, distraught, goes to see Hardacre, who treats him with disdain. Reacting to his upper-class arrogance. Miles knocks him down with a blow. Rushing to Kitty's house. Miles finds her caught between her desire for an ambition and her duty to her father. Miles reads her decision in her eyes and in her silence, and leaves downcast. Two years pass. Kitty is married to Hardacre. Suffering from the neglect of her husband, scorned because of her lowly birth, and by the treatment of her cruel mother-in-law, she feels imprisoned in the Hardacre household. One day, while gazing out of the window she is startled by Miles' appearance. He has decided, despite the dangers, to establish whether reports of Kitty's unhappiness are true. Without considering the consequences she calls Miles into her drawing room and begins questioning him. Before long Hardacre enters with a friend, a dissolute English army officer. Concealing Miles behind the curtains, Kitty calmly greets the two, but Hardacre orders her from the room. He then proceeds to outline a plot, which is overheard by Miles, to rid himself of Kitty and marry someone else. Leaving his hiding place Miles rushes to tell Kitty's father of the plot to kill Kitty. Meanwhile, Hardacre visits a paid assassin and his two accomplices who leave to carry out the murder. They break into Hardacre's house and set upon Kitty whom they wrap in a heavy cloak. A butler, aroused by the unusual noise, is set upon and knocked out. The three murderers take Kitty to a nearby river where Hardacre awaits them. Just as they are about to cast her into the river. Miles, Mr O'Connor and another man appear by boat and a fight ensues. All three potential murderers are thrown into the river and, Hardacre, thinking the fight has been the struggle to throw Kitty in the river, goes to the river bank and runs into Miles. Drawing a sword, Hardacre rushes at Miles, but Miles forces the weapon upon Hardacre who is then seriously wounded. Hardacre is left to the care of his military friend while the three rescuers take Kitty back to the O'Connors' cottage. Weeks later, after Kitty has recovered and the law has freed her from her marriage to Hardacre, Kitty tells Miles when they will marry. (Selig Supplement No 122, 1/10/1908).
    NoteUSA Rel 1/10/1908. The story has such close affinities to Dion Boucicault's The Colleen Bawn (1860) that the film is almost certainly derived from that play. For example, 'peasant' 'Eily O'Connor' in the play becomes attached to 'Hardress Cregan', the upper-class son of the unpleasant 'Mrs Cregan', while 'Myles-na-Coppaleen' saves 'Eily's' life from a similar watery fate to that in the film. The fact that the film is set in part on the lakes of Killamey, where the famous Colleen Bawn Rock is situated, probably confirms the film's origin. If this film were made in whole or in part in Killamey it would predate the arrival of the Kalem film company in Irish by two years and displace Kalem as the previously acknowledged American film company to make the first fiction film in Ireland.
    ReferenceMPW 3/10/1908:265-6; NYC 3/10/1908:841. AFI Cat 1893-1910:247.
    DistributorSelig Polyscope Co
    KeywordsAnglo-Irish
    Class Conflict
    Rural Ireland
    Production creditsp.c/distr: Selig Polyscope Co.
    Genre/CategoryShort Film Drama
    Theatrical Adaptation

    TitleWIDOW MALONEY'S FAITH
    Production companyDomino Film Co
    Country of originUSA
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsil
    Footage2070
    Format35mm
    Release date1913
    SummaryWidow Maloney lives with her son, Dan. He is in love with Mary O'Connor, as is Mike Dooley. Mike's father owns a fleet of whalers, and Mike gives a dance in the Sailors' Home, to which Dan and Mary are invited. Mike and his friends plan to pick a fight with Dan at the dance but they meet with disappointment as Dan comes out victorious. Mike then bribes Dougherty, the saloonkeeper, to put chloral in Dan's whiskey and he and his friends shanghai Dan on one of the whalers which belong to Mike's father. His mother does not miss Dan as she had advised him after the fight to leave the country until the Dooleys cooled off. The whaler is wrecked and Dan is cast on a desert island where he finds a large lump of ambergris. He is finally rescued by a passing ship. To obtain money he sells the ambergris to a firm of perfumers and receives a large sum. In the meantime the Dooleys demand the rent from Mrs Maloney. She is not able to pay it so there is an auction. Dan arrives home in time to buy his mother's goods through a lawyer at the auction. One night Dan and his sailor friends seize Dooley and Dougherty and shanghai them on a boat which Dan has bought. Revenge completed, Dan now makes himself known to his mother and to his girlfriend, Mary O'Connor. (Adapted from MPW 25/10/1913:424).
    NoteUSA Rel 30/10/1913; GB Rel 16/2/1914.
    ReferenceBio l/l/1914:xxvi (ad); Bio 5/2/1914:xxxv.
    KeywordsIrish America
    Whaling
    Mothers
    Sons
    Production creditsp.c: Domino Film Co.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitlePAT HOGAN, DECEASED
    Production companyVitagraph Co of America
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorBAKER, George D.
    Script/AdaptationCARPENTER, Elizabeth R.
    PhotographyPLYMPTON, George
    CastWilliam Shea (Pat), Flora Finch (Mary), Hughie Mack (Mike), Kate
    Price (Kate), Templer Saxe (wild man).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsil
    Format35mm
    Release date1915
    SummaryShipwrecked and believed dead. Pat returns home to find his wife,
    Kate, counting the insurance money and preparing to marry his friend,
    Mike, who had faked the report of his death. Pat breaks up the party, with
    Mike cast aside and only saved from a beating by Kate, who then scorns
    his love. (Vitagraph Life Portrayals Vol. 5, No. 5, Aug 1915:9).
    Note2 reels. USA Rel 7/8/1915.
    ReferenceBio 23/9/1915:1356, ix; MPW 31/7/1915:877; Vitagraph Life Portrayals Vol. 7, No. 4, Nov 1915:3.
    KeywordsShipwrecks
    Marriage
    Production creditsp.c: Vitagraph Co of America, d: George D Baker, sc: Elizabeth R
    carpenter, c: George Plympton.
    Genre/CategoryShort Film Drama

    TitlePADDY'S POLITICAL DREAM
    Production companyVogue
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorDILLON, Jack
    CastJack Dillon (Paddy).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsil
    Format35mm
    Release date1916
    SummaryPaddy, a labourer, goes to sleep during his lunch break and dreams that he has been elevated to political boss. His first official act is to enter a saloon where he is the centre of an admiring company of hangers-on. Going down the street he encounters a widow who is in straitened circumstances and he gives her money. Nearby, his political rival. Eddy Simpson, is making a speech to a crowd of factory workers. He immediately calls his henchmen, the police amongst them, and starts a riot which results in breaking up the political meeting. At police headquarters, Paddy secures the release of his own men while ensuring the imprisonment of his opponents. Paddy's office is located next door to the police station and there is constant communication between the buildings via a chute through which donations from those seeking political favours come. Local merchants send various gifts or produce in lieu of cash. The local butcher, from whom money is expected, makes the mistake of sending Paddy a side of beef. Consequently, Paddy's 'meat inspector' calls on the butcher, decides that his meat is unfit, and closes the shop. Paddy also receives a coffin containing a dead man as graft from an undertaker. The supposedly dead man, however, comes to life and smokes Paddy's cigar. Before Paddy can overcome his confusion the man escapes. When an important election comes up Paddy has a strong organisation who stuff the ballot boxes with voters' papers. When a voter in a booth starts to mark his opponent's side of the ballot paper, the curtains are drawn and Paddy appears with a large mallet forcing the voter to change his mind. As a result, few votes are cast against him and he is gloating over his success when the one o'clock whistle blows. Paddy wakes up to find that his political triumphs have only been a dream. (Adapted from MPW 26/2/1916:1360).
    NoteUSA Rel 10/2/1916.
    ReferenceBio 20/7/1916:6; MPW 10/2/1916:1151.
    KeywordsLabourers
    Irish-Americans
    Dreams
    Politics
    Production creditsp.c: Vogue, d: Jack Dillon.
    Genre/CategoryShort Film Drama
    Comedy

    TitleROGER IMHOF IN RURAL HOSPITALITY
    RURAL HOSPITALITY
    Production companyVitaphone Corp
    Country of originUSA
    CastRoger Imhof, Marcello Costello.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsil
    Format35mm
    Release date1927
    CopyLC
    SummaryAn uproarious comedy of the comforts and discomforts of a suburban hotel. An errant peddler miles from home registers at a decrepit inn. Antique furniture, tumble-down beds, and a trick bureau are just a few of its laughable features. Roger Imhof, star of vaudeville, burlesque and musical comedy, is delightfully funny with his dry Irish wit and humor. Marcello Costello, his vaudeville partner, is also in the cast. (Vitaphone Catalog, p. 193).
    Note1 reel. Aka RURAL HOSPITALITY. The date is not confirmed, and may
    be as late as 1930.
    DistributorWarner Bros Pictures Inc (USA)
    KeywordsVaudville
    Irish-Americans
    Burlesque
    Production creditsp.c: The Vitaphone Corp, USA distr: Warner Bros Pictures Inc.
    Genre/CategoryShort Film Drama
    Comedy

    TitlePORTRAIT OF JENNIE
    JENNIE
    Production companySelznick Studio
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerSELZNICK, David O.
    DirectorDIETERLE, William
    Script/AdaptationOSBORN, Paul
    BERMEIS, Peter
    PhotographyAUGUST, Joseph
    EditingWILSON, Gerald
    Associate producerHEMPSTEAD, David
    Music composerTIOMKIN, Dimitri
    CastJoseph Gotten (Eben Adams), Jennifer Jones {Jennie Appleton}, Ethel
    Barrymore (Spinney), Lillian Gish (Mother Mary of Mercy), Cecil
    Kellaway (Mr Matthews), David Wayne (Gus), Albert Sharpe {Moore},
    Henry Hull (Eke), Florence Bates (Mrs Jekes), Felix Bressart, Clem
    Bevans, Maude Simmons.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Technicolor
    Soundsound
    Duration86
    Footage7771
    Format35mm
    Release date1948
    SummaryIn New York City in 1934, penniless landscape painter Eben Adams sells one of his paintings to dealers Matthews & Spinney. Later in Central Park, Eben meets a young girl, Jennie, but he has the feeling he is in another time period. Jennie tells him that her parents, Irish trapeze performers Mary and Frank Appleton, are at Hammerstein's Victoria, but Eben tells her that it was torn down years earlier when he was a boy. He shows her paintings of Land's End, Cape Cod which frighten her and she surprises him when she tells him a lighthouse is missing from the paintings of Land's End. Later, Eben tries to recreate the feeling of Jennie. While having lunch at Moore's saloon the next day with a friend, car mechanic Gus, he reads a newspaper dated 1910 left behind by Jennie which advertises her parents' act at Hammerstein's. Gus tells Moore that a painting of Irish leader Michael Collins should be painted to brighten up the place. Eben is commissioned to paint the mural of Collins in the saloon. Eben sells a sketch of Jennie and later in the park he meets her again. He realises that there is a further time difference during his meeting with her. Spinney arrives in the park, but he doesn't see Jennie. Jennie fails to turn up at the park the next time Eben is there. Eben goes to the site of the Victoria where he meets an old man who remembers Jennie's parents' act. An African-American woman, Clara Morgan, who worked in wardrobe with the Appletons, shows Eben a photograph of Jennie as she was before her parents died when a trapeze wire broke. In the park that night, Eben meets a sobbing Jennie who is upset at the death of her parents in the fall from the trapeze. Jennie tells Eben that she is to be sent to a convent. Eben becomes depressed at Jennie's absence and concerned at the way his memory is playing tricks on him. He decides to paint a portrait of Jennie when she reappears. At Moore's, Eben unveils his painting of Collins as the patrons sing 'Seanbhean Bhocht', though he regards the mural as worthless. He wanders to the park and then goes home where Jennie is waiting for him. Jennie enquires when he will marry her. He shows her another painting of Land's End, this time with the lighthouse. She says that the painting makes her unhappy. He paints her portrait. At the convent he meets Jennie and they watch an initiation ceremony for the nuns. After graduation, Jennie appears again. She says she has to spend a few months with her aunt. He finishes her portrait as she reflects on the future. When Jennie fails to reappear, Eben goes back to the convent. He meets Sister Mary of Mercy, who recalls that while Jennie was not a Catholic she was part of their community. Sister Mary tells him that Jennie died years earlier and that after graduation she went to stay with her aunt in New England. Sister Mary reads Jennie's last letter, which is dated October 5th, four days later. She tells Eben that it was at Land's End where she was swept to sea. He decides to go there, which is the area reproduced in the paintings which frightened Jennie. An old mariner recalls the hurricane in the 1920s at Land's End and the great wave which engulfed the area. When Eben takes a boat to Land's End it is broken on the same rocks where Jennie was cast ashore. At the lighthouse, Eben cries for Jennie. As the storm rages, a boat arrives at the lighthouse with her on board. They embrace and she tells him they have transcended time. The great wave strikes Land's End as they try to get to the lighthouse. The wave overwhelms them and Jennie is lost to the sea. Captain Cobb nurses Eben back to health, and Spinney comes to visit him. Eben sees Spinney wearing Jennie's scarf and is reassured that he hasn't lost Jennie. In a museum, young women admire the portrait of Jennie and Spinney compliments them on their observation. (V).
    NoteThis film contains a Technicolor sequence. GB title JENNIE.
    ReferenceMFB 1951:246.
    DistributorBritish Lion Film Corporation (GB)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Production creditsp.c: The Selznick Studio, p: David O. Selznick, assoc. p: David Hempstead, d: William Dieterle, sc: Paul Osborn, Peter Bemeis from an adaptation by Leonardo Bercovici of the book by Robert Nathan, dop: Joseph August, p.dsgn.: J McMillan Johnson, assoc. p.dsgn.: Joseph B Platt, ed: Gerard Wilson, art d: J McMillan Johnson, Joseph B Platt, set dec: Claude carpenter, sp. effs: Clarence Slifer, m/m.c: Dimitri Tiomkin based upon themes of Claude Debussy, cost: Lucinda Ballard, a. cost: Anna Hill Johnstone, GB distr: British Lion Film Corporation.
    Costume designBALLARD, Lucinda
    HILL JOHNSTONE, Anna
    Production designMcMILLAN JOHNSON, J.
    PLATT, Joseph B.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Literary Adaptation

    TitleJACK THE GIANT KILLER
    Production companyEdward Small Productions-Zenith Pictures
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerSMALL, Edward
    DirectorJURAN, Nathan
    Script/AdaptationHAMPTON, Orville H.
    JURAN, Nathan
    PhotographyHORSLEY, David S.
    Sound recordingMYERS, Buddy
    EditingMCWHYTOCK, Grant
    Associate producerKENT, Robert E.
    Music composerSAWTELL, Paul
    SHELTER, Bert
    CastKerwin Mathews (Jack), Judi Meredith (Princess Elaine), Torin Thatcher (Pendragon), Walter Burke (Gama), Roger Mobley (Peter), Barry Kelley (Sigurd), Don Beddoe {imp in bottle/leprechaun}, Dayton Lummis (King Mark), Anna Lee (Lady Constance), Helen Wallace (Jack's mother), Tudor Owen (chancellor), Robert Gist (Captain McFadden), Ken Mayer (boatswain).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    Soundsound
    Duration94
    Format35mm
    Fantascope
    Release date1962
    SummaryPendragon, Master of Demons, is banished from ancient England and strives to regain his power by having one of his giants abduct King Mark's daughter, Princess Elaine. She is saved by Jack, a farmer's son, who kills the giant with his axe. The grateful king appoints Jack as Elaine's protector and entrusts him to spirit her to the safety of a convent across the sea. Their ship is intercepted by Pendragon's ghouls and witches, and Elaine is captured, while Jack and twelve-year-old Peter are cast overboard. They are rescued by an old Viking, Sigurd, who possesses a magic imp imprisoned in a bottle. With the help of his new friends. Jack rescues Elaine, but she has been bewitched and betrays him. Jack escapes though, and Sigurd is transformed into a dog and Peter into a chimpanzee. Jack breaks the evil spell the sorcerer has cast over the princess, but as they return to the boat Pendragon sends a two-headed giant against them. The imp calls up a many-tentacled sea monster, who kills the giant in a fierce battle, aided by Jack, the dog and the chimpanzee. As they sail from the island together, Pendragon transforms himself into a flying dragon and attacks their small craft. Jack is carried off but slays the dragon in mid-air. As Pendragon plunges into the sea, his magic and creatures of evil die with him. The imp, who is really a leprechaun, is freed from his bottle and permitted to walk a rainbow to his home in Ireland. Jack and the princess are now free to live happily ever after. (Adapted from API Cat 1961- 1970:551).
    NoteUSA Rel 13/6/1962. Filmed partly on location at Santa Catalina Island.
    DistributorUnited Artists Corp
    KeywordsLeprechauns
    Production creditsp.c: Edward Small Productions-Zenith Pictures. An Edward Small Production, p: Edward Small, assoc. p: Robert E Kent, d: Nathan Juran, sc: Orville H Hampton, Juran from an original story by Hampton, dop: David S Horsley, sp. c. effs: Jim DaNíorth, Davis Pal, a.d: Dick Moder, art d: for Fernando Carrere, Frank McCoy, set dec: Edward G Boyle, ed: Grant Mc Whytock, m: Paul Sawtell, Bert Shelter, choreo: Jon Gregory, s. mix: John Kean, s: Buddy Myers, p.m: Ralph Black, p. super: Ben Hersh, ward: J. Bucky Rous, Sabine Manela, cost: David Berman, make-up: Charles Gemora, hair: Louise Miehle, tech. dsgn/sp. c. effs. in Fantascope: Howard A Anderson, distr: united Artists Corp.
    Art directionCARRERE, Fernando
    McCOY, Frank
    Costume designBERMAN, David
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Fantasy
    Adventure

    TitleDOWN THE CORNER
    Production companyBallyfermot Community Arts Workshop Productions
    SponsorArt Council of Ireland
    British Film Institute Production Board
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerO'BRIAIN, Art
    DirectorCOMERFORD, Joe
    Script/AdaptationMcFARLANE, Noel
    PhotographyBARKER-MILL, Adam
    Sound recordingDOYLE, Roger
    Cinegael
    EditingCOMERFORD, Joe
    QUINN, Bob
    Assistant photographyBLACK, Cathal
    Production assistantRICHARDSON, Marian
    Music composerWELDON, Liam
    DOYLE, Roger (Additional)
    Music performanceWELDON, Liam
    SongsSongs from the album 'Dark Horse on
    the Wind' by Liam Weldon (Mulligan)
    CastJoe Keenan (Buller), Declan Cronin (Pedro), Kevin Doyle (Joeboy), Christy Keogh (Jennings), Michael Joyce (Micko), Liam Weldon (Micko's Da). Monica Murray (Mrs Pettigrew), Alec Grassick (Mr Pettigrew), Joe Kenny (Christy), Esther Leaden (Granny), Marian Richardson (young Granny), Tony Keating (Larry), Michael Kiernan (teacher), Gerard O'Byrne (doctor), Mary Holland (Buller's mother), Marian Whelan (Patty), Eileen Robinson (Mrs Lynch), Eileen Cleary (Mrs Crinion), Kathleen Norton (Mrs Dunn), Mary Farrell, Catherine Bowe (nurses), Fidelma Cronin, Deirdre Cronin, Joan Norton, Dolores McDonell (girls), Mathew Halpin, Larry Doran, Brendan Weldon (soldiers).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration60
    Format16mm
    Release date1977
    TX channelRTE 1
    TX date15/03/1979
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryA loosely-constructed narrative about the activities of five boys, aged between twelve and fourteen, who live in the West Dublin working-class estate of Ballyfermot. The boys' experiences, ideas and relationships are cast against the background of their family life, school, and after one of the boys is injured while they rob an orchard, in a hospital. The work and social life of adults is also seen when a man is made redundant and then, unemployed, seems to take to drink. The past impinges through a grandmother's recollections of the 1916 Rising. (V).
    NoteIR Rel Nov 1977 (Curzon Cinema, Dublin).
    Filmed on location in Ballyfermot, Dublin. The British release
    version of this film has English-language sub-titles.
    Shown on RTE's THURSDAY PLAY DATE Slot on 15th March 1979.
    ReferenceEH 30/12/1977; EP 3/12/1977; EP 24/3/1979:6; Film Directions Vol. 1, No. 2, 1978:18-20; Hibernia 9/12/1977; IP 2/12/1977; Irish People 9/12/1977; Irish Socialist/1/1978:8; Irish Socialist Jul 1978:4; IP 2/12/1977; IT 1/12/1977; IT 5/12/1977:8; SI 4/12/1977; SI 1/1/1978:21; SP 4/12/1977:22; United Irishman, Dec 1977. Cowie, ed, 1978:21-23; Films and Video Library Catalogue, 1978.
    In Dublin Dec 1977: 4-5; Account of production from short story idea to screening in cinemas of Down The Corner, David Simmons.
    BFI Productions Catalogue, 1977-8: 21-23, crew and cast lists,views, synopsis, production details and reviews of Down The Corner, ed: Gill Davies.
    Monthly Film Bullitin, 1977: 157, crew and cast lists, brief synopsis and review of Down The Corner, John Pym
    Film Directions, Vol 1, No 3, 1978: 15, letter from Michael Kelly in reaction to Kevin Rockett's review of Down The Corner.
    'The Realism Debate and Down The Corner', Film Directions Vol. 1, No. 2, 1978:18-20, Essay discussing the portrayal of life in Down The Corner, Kevin Rockett.
    RTE guide vol3
    RTE guide issue10
    KeywordsChildhood
    Working Class Communities
    Domestic Life
    Housing Estates
    Alcoholics
    Education
    Childhood
    Friendship
    War of Independence
    1916 Rising
    Ballyfermott
    Chapelizod
    Production creditsp.c: A Ballyfermot Community Arts Workshop Production, p: Art 6 Briain, d: Joe Comerford, sc: Noel McFarlane from the booklet 'Down the Comer' with words by McFarlane, photos by Conor Kelly, Tom Lawlor, illustrations by Jimmy McPartland (Dublin: Ballyfermot Community Arts Workshop, 1975), c: Adam Barker-Mill, a.c: Cathal Black, p.a: Marian Richardson, adv: Roddy Day, Mary Farrell, Mary Maher, ed: Comerford, Bob Quinn, songs: from the album 'Dark Horse on the Wind' by Liam Weldon (Mulligan), a. m: Roger Doyle, s: Doyle, Cinegael, dub. mix: Pat Hayes, props: Marian Whelan, p. secretary: Rosalind Pearson.
    Dubbing mixHAYES, Pat
    AdvisorDAY, Roddy
    FARRELL, Mary
    MAHER, Mary
    Production secretaryPEARSON, Rosalind
    PropsWHELAN, Marian
    Script sourceFrom the booklet 'Down the Comer' with words by McFarlane, photos by Conor Kelly, Tom
    Lawlor, illustrations by Jimmy McPartland (Dublin: Ballyfermot Community Arts Workshop, 1975.
    Genre/CategorySocial Drama
    Urban Drama
    Feature Film Drama

    Series/Newsreel titleEYE WITNESS
    Episode/Item titleRose Tattoo, The
    Production companyRadio Telefís Eireann/RTE
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerCUSACK, Paul
    Presenter/ReporterSAVAGE, Tom
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration60
    TX channelRTE 1
    TX date25/04/1979
    SummaryA series of five programmes dealing with events of importance in or to Ireland after 1941, recalling from old film, stills, newspaper cuttings and eye-witness accnts. 'The Rose Tattoo', performed at Dublin's Pike Theatre in May, 1957, was the subject of a protracted prosecution in court. With Alan Simpson (director); Carolyn Swift; Kate Binchy; Sir Harold Hobson (reviewed production for The Sunday Times); Benedict Kiely; Pat Nolan (lead male actor); other cast members
    RTE guide vol3
    RTE guide issue16
    KeywordsThe Rose Tattoo
    Dublin
    Pike Theatre
    Prosecution
    Alan Simpson
    Director
    Carolyn Swift
    Kate Binchy
    Harold Hobson
    Benedict Kiely
    Pat Nolan
    OtherMcCARTHY, Niall (series editor)
    Genre/CategoryHistorical

    Series/Newsreel titleEYE WITNESS
    Episode/Item titleNiemba Ambush, The
    Production companyRadio Telefís Eireann/RTE
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerCUSACK, Paul
    Presenter/ReporterSAVAGE, Tom
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration60
    TX channelRTE 1
    TX date02/05/1979
    SummaryA series of five programmes dealing with events of importance in or to Ireland after 1941, recalling from old film, stills, newspaper cuttings and eye-witness accnts. The Niemba ambush took place in 1960 in the Congo. The programme traces the history of the event, and the studio discussion follows with members of the Irish Army who were based with U.N. forces in the Congo at the time, as well as with the two survivors of the ambush itself. Alan Simpson (director); Carolyn Swift; Kate Binchy; Sir Harold Hobson (reviewed production for The Sunday Times); Benedict Kiely; Pat Nolan (lead male actor); other cast members.
    RTE guide vol3
    RTE guide issue17
    KeywordsNiemba Ambush
    Congo
    History
    Army
    U.N. Forces
    Alan Simpson
    Carolyn Swift
    Kate Binchy
    Harold Hobson
    Benedict Kiely
    Pat Nolan
    OtherMcCARTHY, Niall (series editor)
    Genre/CategoryHistorical

    TitleTONIGHT IS CANCELLED
    Country of originIreland
    CastMark O’Halloran, Astrit Kabashi, Edi Agagiyshi, Bublina.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    SoundDolby Digital
    Duration96
    Release date2007
    SummaryAn Irish filmmaker travels to war-torn Kosovo to tell a love story of a young man kidnapped during the war and the girl he left behind. As he attempts to get his film off the ground, the decision to cast the unwilling lovers as themselves blurs the boundary between reality and fiction.
    KeywordsFilm production
    Production creditsp.c.: Fastnet Films, spon: Bord Scannan Na hEireann/Irish Film Board, Ministry of Culture, Kosovo, p: Macdara Kelleher, d/sc: Brendan Grant, ph: David Timmons, ed: David Gibson.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    Series/Newsreel titleHULLABALOO
    Production companyRadio Telefís Eireann/RTE
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerO'DONNELL, Joe
    Presenter/ReporterHEALY, Shay; RICHARDSon, Marian; Ingoldsby 'Professor' Pat; Tom and Paschal; Willers, Terry; TEAM Theatre Company
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration50
    TX channelRTE
    TX date01/11/1977
    SummarySongs, music and comedy - the main ingredients in this series for young people. This week, the entire cast perform in a mammoth musical entitled 'Hair for Hire'. With Hubert Lambert (magician) and the Go-Go Dancers from Drumcondra Youth Club.
    RTE guide vol1
    RTE guide issue43
    KeywordsSongs
    Music
    Comedy
    Musical
    Hubert Lambert
    Magician
    Go-Go Dancers
    Drumcondra Youth Club
    Youth
    Set designMolloy, Molly
    MusicWhelan, Bill (musical director); Washboard Junction; Gimik

    Series/Newsreel titleTROM AGUS ...ADROM
    Production companyRadio Telefís Eireann/RTE
    Country of originIreland
    DirectorO'GRADY, Denis
    Presenter/ReporterO'MURCHÚ, Liam
    LanguageIrish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration70
    TX channelRTE
    TX date24/09/1977
    SummaryNew series. Ceol, craic agus comhrá le muintir ár linne.
    The All-Ireland Finals cast their unique aura of excitement over tonight's programme of song and chat geared to tomorrow's eagerly-anticipated events. Liam Ó Murchú is the man in the gap.
    RTE guide vol1
    RTE guide issue38
    KeywordsAll-Ireland Finals
    Song
    Liam Ó Murchú
    Set designO'Reilly, Desmond

    TitleNEXT PLEASE
    Production companyHibernia Pictures
    SponsorDepartment of Local Government
    Garda Siochana
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerMOYLAN, William J.
    FLEISCHMANN, George
    SCOTT, Michael
    DirectorMOYLAN, William J.
    Script/AdaptationMAGUIRE, P.P. (Story)
    PhotographyFLEISCHMANN, George
    Executive producerEGAN, Desmond
    NarratorBASTABLE, Bart
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration10
    Format16mm
    Production date1948
    Release date1948
    TX channelRTE 2
    TX date16/02/1988
    CopyIFA
    SummaryRoad safety film sponsored by the Department of Local Government. Road safety film which highlights the dangers of the road, particularly for children. Each accident scene is preceded by a superimposition of the Grim Reaper beckoning. In the first accident a child is knocked down by a bus and is pronounced dead in the hospital. The second involves a boy who runs out from behind a parked car and is knocked down. He ends up in hospital with a cast on his leg. The next scenes have careless pedestrians being reprimanded by irate drivers and gardai. The danger of car crashes is also shown and towards the end of the film a group of gardai demonstrate road safety. The end sequence repeats accidents seen earlier.
    NoteShown on RTE 2 in 1988 as part of the RE-RUN Series.
    KeywordsNational Road Safety Association, Accidents, Injuries, Children Playing, Traffic, Streets, Cloaked Skeletons, Grim Reapers, Fruit Stalls, Street Vendors, Buses, Drivers, Bandages, Hospital Beds, Nurses, Doctors, Death, Georgian Terraces, Cars, Stretcher, Toys, Out Patients Departments, Wheelchairs, Casts, Plaster of Paris, Guards, Cafes, Ambulances, Advertisements, Cyclists, Street Signs, Garda Stations, Crashed Cars, Road Safety Booklets, Mechanics, Schools, Dolls, Wheels, Indicators.
    LocationDublin, O'Connell St.
    RightsCatherine Marsh
    Road Safety Section
    Department of the Environment and Local Government
    Findlater house
    Upper O'Connell Street
    Dublin 1
    Ph 888 2000
    Genre/CategoryGovernment Sponsored
    Road Safety

    TitleALAN PARKER'S COMMITMENTS
    Production companyLondon Weekend Television
    Country of originGreat Britain
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration24
    TX channelITV
    TX date16/11/1991
    SummaryDocumentary shot over eleven weeks looks at the making of Alan Parker's film adaptation of Roddy Doyle's novel, The Commitments. Interviews with cast and crew.
    PeopleAlan Parker
    Roddy Doyle
    KeywordsFilms
    Filmmaking
    Film Production
    THE COMMITMENTS (Film)
    Movies
    Actors
    Film Directors
    Film Adaptations
    Housing Estates
    Working Class Communities
    LocationDublin City