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The Academic World in the Era of the Great War

Trinity Long Room Hub, 14-16 August, 2014.

A conference organised by Dr. Tomás Irish (TCD) and Dr. Marie-Eve Chagnon (Université de Montréal) with the support of the Centre for War Studies, the Trinity Long Room Hub, the TCD Department of History, and the Cultures, Academic Values and Education Research Centre (CAVE), and the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Reseach Council (SSHRC).

The Great War could neither have been fought nor won without scientific knowledge. Academic expertise in various fields, from history and law to chemistry and medicine, proved crucial to its prosecution. New links were forged with government that would alter forever the ways in which universities functioned and their relationship with the state. As communities, universities were at the heart of the societal and cultural mobilization for the war (through the activities of their staff, the roles played by students and alumni and the use of university facilities for hospitals, public meetings and war-time education). In some cases they sheltered opposition to the war. Academics and universities also played an important role in defining the meaning of the war and refashioned the very notion of international communities of scholarship in order to take account of the polarization produced by the conflict. In this, they foreshadowed the political engagement of learning that would become a marked feature of the ‘short twentieth century.’ For all these reasons, the war cast a long shadow over attempts to return to some kind of ‘normality’ once the conflict was over.

The Academic World in the Era of the Great War is a major international conference that will address these issues in a comparative, inter-disciplinary, and transnational manner.

 

 

ALL SESSIONS WILL TAKE PLACE IN THE NEILL/HOEY LECTURE THEATRE, TRINITY LONG ROOM HUB

Thursday, 14 August 2014

15.00-16.00: Registration
16.00-16.15 Welcome and Introductory Remarks (Marie-Eve Chagnon and Tomás Irish).

16.15-18.00

I Mobilizing Intellect from East to West

Chair/Respondent: Alan Kramer (TCD)

Andrew Barros, (UQAM) Echoes, Reverberations and Dissonances: The Mobilisation, Remobilisation, and Demobilisation of History from East to West (Germany, France, Britain, and the United States), 1914-1919

Gabriela A. Frei, (Oxford) International Law and the Great War. A Discipline in the Crossfire of Critique.

Sakiko Kaiga, (KCL) A Forlorn Hope of Peace: Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson, an Intellectual Father of the League of Nations, 1914-1918.

18.00-20.00: Reception and opening address by Dr. Patrick J. Prendergast, Provost, TCD.

Friday 15 August 2014

9.00 – 10.45

II Institutional Experiences in a World at War

Chair/Respondent: Robert Gerwarth (UCD).

Andreas Golob, (Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz): Propagandistic Popularization and Pure Scholarship. Graz University professors as lecturers of the university-extension movement and academic teachers.

Alexander Dmitriev, (Moscow Higher School of Economics): National School, Junior Faculty and Academic Self-Assertion: Russian Scholars on Educational Reforms during Great War

Tomás Irish, (Trinity College Dublin): Trinity College Dublin and the Academic World during the First World War.


11.00-12.45

III. Making a better World? The Social Sciences face a global conflict  

Chair/Respondent: John Horne (TCD)

Andrew M. Johnston (Carleton University) American Sociologists and international Sociology during the First World War.

Brian M. Foster (Mount Saint Vincent University) The Birth of Non-State International Expert: American Social Science and Preparations for Peace after the Great War.

Christina Theodosiou, (Université Paris-1) The influence of the Great War on Waldemar Deonna’s work

12.45-14.00: Lunch

14.00-15.45

IV. Between the Nation-State and the Universe: Natural Science at War

Chair/Respondent: Roy MacLeod (University of Sydney)

Heather Ellis, (Liverpool Hope) British Science in War: Measuring and Reshaping British Manhood, 1914-1919.

Kenneth Bertrams (Université Libre de Bruxelles): Politics of Nature: World War I and the Solvay Conferences on Physics and Chemistry, 1911-1926.

Marie-Eve Chagnon (Université de Montréal), The End of Scientific Internationalism. The Process of Demobilisation of the International Scientific Community (1917-1919).

16.00-17.45

V. Keynote speaker: Martha Hanna (University of Colorado, Boulder): Practical Reason:  The Mobilization of McGill University's Medical Faculty, 1914 - 1918.

20.00 Conference Dinner

Saturday 16 August

9.30-10.45

VI. Identity and Gender Politics of a World at War :  

Chair/Respondent: Martha Hanna (University of Colorado)

Norman Ingram (Concordia University): Women's History, Feminist History, Gendered History? Feminist Pacifism and the Paradoxes of the Great War in France

Philippa Read (University of Leeds): "Without Scruple": The Enfant de l’ennemi Debate in First World War France.

11.00-12.45

VII. Scholarly Networks in War and Peace:

Chair/Respondent: Gearoid Barry (NUIG)

Charlotte A. Lerg, (Ludwig-Maximilliams-Universität München) Fractions of Academic Identity: The German "Propaganda Professors" on the American Campus and Beyond.

Aoife O' Gorman (Oxford) Boche Barbarism: The depiction of Germany in the Oxford Pamphlets (1914-15).

Tara Windsor (Wuppertal) Studying (with) the Former Enemy: Anglo-German Academic Exchange after the Great War.

12.45-13.45: Lunch

14.00-15.45

VIII. Cultural Demobilization and the Aftermath of the Great War:

Chair/Respondent: Norman Ingram (Concordia)

Elisabeth Piller (Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)“Can Science and the World allow this?” –German Academic Distress, Foreign Aid and International Relations, 1919-24.

Julia Roos (Indiana University) International Debates over Atrocity Propaganda in the Aftermath of the Great War: A Contribution to Cultural Demobilization?

Mona Siegel (California State University) Negotiated Truth: The Franco-German Historians Agreement of 1951 and the Long History of Cultural Demobilization after the First World War.

16.00-17.45

IX. Roundtable Discussion

17.45-18.00

Concluding Remarks.

 

From Sarajevo to Troy: Civilians under Siege

A workshop organised by Alex Dowdall, Dr. Ciska Neyts and Prof. John Horne for the Centre for War Studies and the Long Room Hub

Neil-Hoey Theatre, Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin
28 Feb. – 1 Mar. 2014

Sieges have been a continual feature of warfare since the 'founding epic' of western literature, the Iliad, and continuing up to Sarajevo in the 1990s. This type of engagement has regularly placed non-combatants at the heart of military action. Rather than focusing on sieges in merely tactical terms, this workshop aims to examine the various physical, social, and cultural effects of sieges on urban civilian populations. Beginning with the Siege of Sarajevo and working backwards, the workshop’s structure aims to counteract teleological interpretations. Major themes to be explored include the 'blurring' of the lines between combatants and non-combatants, 'everyday life' under siege, sieges as sites of particularly acute inter-religious or inter-ethnic violence, the codification of laws and 'customs' of siege warfare, as well as the long term social, cultural and economic repercussions of sieges on urban populations.

Registration is free and all are welcome. To register, email neytsc@tcd.ie

Workshop Programme

Friday, 28 February 2014
13.00  Registration
13.30-15.00: Panel Session 1: Civilians under Siege in 20th Century Europe (chair: Dr. Balázs Apor)
Dr. Stef Jansen, University of Manchester: Struggles for 'normal lives' in besieged Sarajevo
Alexandra Wachter, Queen Mary, University of London: Between myth and trauma – survivors of the Siege of Leningrad (1941-1944) and the “truth about the blockade”

15.00-15.15:  Tea/coffee

15.15-15.30: Selma Harrington, Griffith College Dublin, ‘The Sarajevo Siege Exhibition: Piecing the Puzzle, Re-Living the Experience’
This presentation will showcase the work of the GCD Group MA Interior Architecture student’s project in cooperation with the History Museum of Bosnia-Herzegovina on the exhibition ‘The Siege of Sarajevo’

15.30-17.00: Panel Session 2: Civilians in ‘Non-Traditional’ Siege Warfare (chair: Prof. Alan Kramer)
Alex Dowdall, Trinity College Dublin: Civilians under siege during the First World War
Emilie Dosquet, Université de Paris I: From siege warfare to ‘guerre de partis’: the desolation of the Palatinate between military violence and laws of war

17.00-17.30: Tea/coffee

17.30-19.00: Keynote Session
Prof. Hans Van Wees, University College London:
The fate of Troy: siege and genocide in ancient Greek warfare
Respondent: Dr. Philip De Souza, University College Dublin

Saturday, 1 March 2014

9.15-10.45: Panel Session 3: Mayhem and Murder in Early Modern and Medieval Sieges (chair: Prof. Terry Barry)
Dr. Ciska Neyts, Hertford College, University of Oxford:Reciprocity and retaliation in early modern Irish and European sieges
Kimberly Cowan, Hertford College, University of Oxford: Pillage, burn and massacre: necessary evils of twelfth-century castle-warfare

10.45-11.15: Tea/coffee

11.15-12.45: Panel Session 4: Civilians under Siege in the Mediterranean and Near East (chair: Dr. Joseph Clarke)
Dr. Alan Murray, University of Leeds: A race against time - a fight to the death: combatants and civilians in the crusader capture of Jerusalem (1099)
Joshua Hall, University of Cardiff: Gods Under Siege: sanctuaries and civilians in Greek sieges

12.45-13.00: Closing remarks (Prof. John Horne, Trinity College Dublin)

The Academic World in the Era of the Great War (Trinity College Dublin, August 14-16, 2014)

The Great War could neither have been fought nor won without scientific knowledge. Academic expertise in various fields, from history and law to chemistry and medicine, proved crucial to its prosecution. New links were forged with government that would alter forever the ways in which universities functioned and their relationship with the state. As communities, universities were at the heart of the societal and cultural mobilization for the war (through the activities of their staff, the roles played by students and alumni and the use of university facilities for hospitals, public meetings and war-time education). In some cases they sheltered opposition to the war. Academics and universities also played an important role in defining the meaning of the war and refashioned the very notion of international communities of scholarship in order to take account of the polarization produced by the conflict. In this, they foreshadowed the political engagement of learning that would become a marked feature of the ‘short twentieth century.’ For all these reasons, the war cast a long shadow over attempts to return to some kind of ‘normality’ once the conflict was over.

The Academic World in the Era of the Great War is a major international conference that will address these issues. Co-organised by the Centre for War Studies at Trinity College Dublin and the Centre canadien des études allemandes et européennes at the Université de Montréal, it will be held at Trinity College Dublin on August 14th-16th 2014 to mark the centenary of the outbreak of the Great War. It will be the first attempt to examine this subject systematically and in a comparative and trans-national fashion. The organisers are Dr. Tomas Irish in Trinity College Dublin and Dr Marie-Eve Chagnon at the Université de Montréal.

While the conference will address a broad range of questions, particularly relevant are:

  1. How did engagement in the Great War impact the development of different disciplines?
  2. How did the mobilization of academic expertise into growing state bureaucracies shape the relationship between higher education and the state?
  3. How did the war change the relationship between scholarship and industry?
  4. How did scholarly engagement in war-related issues challenge traditional understandings of academic function and academic freedom?
  5. What impact did war have upon the international community of scholars which had flourished before 1914?  How did academics deal with the breakdown in international relations, and what mediating techniques were utilised?
  6. How was scholarship utilised to achieve a lasting peace and how were academics used as agents of demobilization?
  7. How did the war impact student life and identity?
  8. To what extent did the war change traditional gender roles in academic communities?
  9. In what ways did academic communities nurture pacifism?

The keynote speakers for the event will be Prof. Martha Hanna (University of Colorado, Boulder).

Details will be posted here as they become available. For further information, contact Dr. Tomas Irish.

 

Commemorating the Disabled Soldier: Comparative Approaches to the History of War, Disability and Remembrance, 1914-1940 (Ypres, 4-6 November 2013)

http://commemoratingthedisabledsoldier.wordpress.com/

 

International Network for the Study of War and the Religion in the Modern World

Third Annual Conference (call for papers)
17-19 July 2013

 

The Centre for the Study of Wider Europe invites you to the next lecture of its seminar series: Tomas Balkelis (UCD)
‘From Imperial Soldiers to National Guardians: German and Lithuanian Volunteers after the Great War,1918-1919’
Wednesday, 28 March, 2012

2010

28-29 May

TCD and UCD Centres for War Studies Joint Conference

'Paramilitary Violence in Europe after the Great War'

15-16 April

Conference

Unarmed on the Battlefield: non-combatants and the experience of combat in modern war (Call for Papers - Word Document)

University of Glamorgan (Cardiff/Pontypridd) Co-convened by Jane Finucane (Glamorgan) and Edward Madigan (TCD)

2009

23-24 October

Centre for War Studies Conference

'Veterans, Internationalism and the Cultures of Victory and Peace (1919-1933)' (Word Document)

Organised by Julia Eichenberg (TCD), Arts Building, 6th Floor, Room C6002'

11 - 12 May

Rape in Wartime: A History to be Written (PDF)

Conference Programme (Word Document)

Conference at the University of Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne Organized by John Horne (TCD) et al.

2008

5 - 6 December

Aftershocks. Paramilitary Violence following the Great War, 1918-1923 (Word Document)

Conference in University College, Dublin, Organized by Robert Gerwarth (UCD) & John Horne (TCD)

7-9 November

Inside the War (1914-1918): Acceptance, Endurance, Refusal (Word Document - Conference Programme)

Conference in Péronne, France Organized by the Historial de la Grande Guerre

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Last updated 11 August 2014 by tcdcws@gmail.com (Email).