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Trinity EngAGE/U3A Public Forum - Health in Our Changing World

Date: Tuesday 11 April 2017
Time: 09.20 - 13.00
Venue: Stanley Quek Theatre, TBSI, 152-160 Pearse Street
This free event is open to the public, click here to book

 

Schedule

09.20   Tea & Coffee
09.50   Dean’s introduction
10.00   Daniel Kelly – Printing New Bones & Joints
10.30   Aoife Mc Lysaght -New Genes from Scratch
11am   Tea & Coffee
11.30   Ellen Roche – New ways to help the heart - from light reflecting balloons to squishy robots
12.00   Nigel Stevenson - Virus immune wars and beyond
12.30   Brian Lawlor – Keeping Your Brain Alive

10.00   Daniel Kelly – Printing New Bones & Joints

3D bioprinting is a process where biomaterials, cells, proteins and/or genes are deposited in a spatially defined manner using 3D printing technologies with the goal of engineering new tissues or organs. This talk will describe how Prof. Kelly’s lab are using 3D bioprinting to engineer biological implants to regenerate damaged or diseased bones and joints. In particular, it will describe how they are taking inspiration from bone and joint development to design new bioprinting strategies.

Dr Daniel Kelly is a Professor in the School of Engineering and Director of the Trinity Centre for Bioengineering. In 2008 he was the recipient of a Science Foundation Ireland President of Ireland Young Researcher Award. He is also the recipient of two European Research Council awards (Starter grant 2010; Consolidator grant 2015). His research focuses on developing novel tissue engineering and 3D bioprinting strategies to regenerate damaged and diseased musculoskeletal tissues.

10.30   Aoife Mc Lysaght -New Genes from Scratch

The talk will explore how new genes evolve, and present some examples of new human genes from surprising sources.

Professor Aoife Mc Lysaght is Professor in Molecular Genetics at Trinity College where her lab conducts molecular evolution research through bioinformatics methods. The current focus of this research is on the origin and evolution of new genes and gene loss.

11.30   Ellen Roche – New ways to help the heart - from light reflecting balloons to squishy robots

Future implantable cardiovascular devices should be a multi-targeted, synergistic combination of (i) structural repair (ii) active assistance and (iii) biological therapy. This seminar will focus on representative implantable cardiac devices that I have worked on in each of these three areas, each addressing an identified shortcoming of existing technologies.

Dr. Ellen Roche is currently a Research Fellow at National University of Ireland, Galway.  She completed her PhD at Harvard University School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Her research focuses on applying innovative technologies to the development of cardiac devices. Her research includes development of novel devices to repair or augment cardiac function using disruptive approaches such as soft robotics, combination of mechanical actuation with delivery of cell therapy, and use of light activated biodegradable adhesives. Dr. Roche was employed in the medical device industry for over five years as a research and development engineer, and understands the regulatory pathways to medical device commercialization. She will be the director of her own laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the coming years where she will take up a joint position between Mechanical Engineering and the Institute for Medical Engineering Science. Dr. Roche has 10 patent applications, over 40 conference/journal papers. She is the recipient of multiple awards including the Fulbright International Science and Technology Award, the Wellcome Trust  Seed Award in Science and an American Heart Association Pre-Doctoral Award.

12.00   Nigel Stevenson - Virus immune wars and beyond

Dr. Stevenson’s Intracellular Immunology Research Group at Trinity College Dublin investigate the mechanisms by which viruses (including Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Middle Eastern Respiratory Virus (MERS) Hepatitis B and C Viruses (HBV and HCV)), target and avoid immune responses. These immunological discoveries feed his translational research in the development of novel therapeutics, designed to restore effective immunity and thus eliminate these infectious agents.

By deciphering the mechanisms through which viruses target the immune response, Dr. Stevenson’s research programme aims to identify new targets for therapeutic treatment of viral infection, while also harnessing these novel immuno-regulatory mechanisms in the design of new and more effective therapies for immune disorders, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Dr. Stevenson is also the Director of the M.Sc. in Immunology at Trinity College Dublin, which is an exciting new course providing academic, laboratory and research training in cellular and molecular immunology, with emphasis on the interface between basic, clinical and therapeutic immunology.

Dr. Stevenson earned his Ph.D. at Queen’s University of Belfast. He has published his research discoveries in high impact journals including The Journal of Immunology, The Journal of Virology, Nature Communications, The Journal of Biological Chemistry, The Journal of Leukocyte Biology and PLoS One and has written several book chapters. He is a member of the Irish and British Society of Immunology. He was an organiser of the Viruses and Innate Immunity EMBO workshop at Trinity College Dublin.

12.30   Brian Lawlor – Keeping Your Brain Alive

Brian Lawlor is the Conolly Norman Professor of Old Age Psychiatry at Trinity College Dublin and Consultant Psychiatrist at St. James’s Hospital. He is also the Director of the Memory Disorders Clinic at Mercer’s Institute for Research on Ageing, St. James’s Hospital. He trained in internal medicine in Ireland and then in psychiatry in the United States at the University of Florida, the National Institute for Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland, and Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, where he was Director of Psychogeriatrics. Professor Lawlor is Co-Deputy Director of the Global Brain Health Institute, a joint initiative of Trinity College Dublin and  University California, San Francisco. A geriatric psychiatrist with more than 30 years of experience in managing Alzheimer's disease and late-life mental disorders, Professor Lawlor's research interests are in the early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of Alzheimer's disease, the neurobiology and treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia, and mental disorders in the elderly. His research programs aim to develop clinical, neuropsychological, and biological markers of Alzheimer's disease at the earliest possible stage and to test promising new interventions in aging populations.