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Tuesday, 23 April, 13.00
‘Nabokov and Tennis’
A lecture by Prof Gavriel Shapiro organised by the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultural Studies, TCD.

Sports is an important domain of human culture. One of the most celebrated athletic activities, tennis, or lawn tennis, as it was initially called, originated in the 1870s in England and quickly spread throughout the world, including Russia. Nabokov grew up in an Anglophile family in St. Petersburg at the early twentieth century. He learned to play tennis in his boyhood and eventually became an accomplished player. The lecture surveys Nabokov’s fascination with tennis throughout his life and proceeds to examine the manifestations of this sport in the writer’s works of both the Russian and the American years, from 'The University Poem' (1927) and 'Glory' (1932) to 'Transparent Things' (1972) and the posthumously published 'The Original of Laura' (2009).

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

19 – 21 April 2013
‘Borderlines XVII: Occupying Space Conference’
This is an annual Irish interdisciplinary postgraduate conference for researchers in the fields of Medieval and Early Modern studies, held on a rotational basis between Belfast, Cork and Dublin. This year (its 17th) it is based in the Trinity Long Room Hub and is generously supported by the School of English, the Department of History, and the Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies (CMRS), TCD. For more details visit http://borderlinesxvii.wordpress.com/conference-programme/.

Thursday, 18 April 2013
15.00: 'Fragmentation, Incomes and Jobs: An analysis of European competitiveness'

A lecture by Prof Marcel Timmer (Groningen) organised by the Institute for International Integration Studies, TCD.
This seminar will showcase new empirical work on the relation between the fragmentation of production across global value chains and income and employment dynamics in Europe.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

16.00 Euro-Visions Lecture Series - Economic Policy Panel Speakers, a discussion of the future of the euro area with leading experts as part of the Euro-Visions Public Lecture Series on Europe, jointly organised by the IIIS and Trinity Long Room Hub. 

Hans-Werner Sinn is Director of the CES-ifo Institute and one of Germany's chief economists. Richard Portes is Professor of London Business School and President of the Centre for Economic Policy Research.  Alan Taylor is Professor of Economics at the University of Virginia and an expert in financial economics and economic history.Chair: Kevin O'Rourke Chichele Professor of Economic History, University of Oxford

Venue: JM Synge Theatre, Room 2039, Arts Building, TCD. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme

Wednesday, 17 April 2013
'Knowing What We Know’: A one-day symposium on competencies, careers, education and society
The value of a third-level education and the pathway back to national confidence, prosperity and success are among the biggest themes in Irish public discourse today.  A current project running in Trinity College Dublin has been looking at these issues and is gathering an audience of academics and other professionals grappling with these questions, to attend a public forum on the findings, and of the state of our knowledge (and actions) in these fields. The symposium (9am to 4.30pm) will provide a range of voices and perspectives, from healthcare to high-tech to humanities.  Attendance is free, but please RSVP by 12th April to kathleen.mctiernan@tcd.ie.

Tuesday, 16 April 2013, 16:30 – 21.00
World Voice Day - Irish Voices: Glórthaí, ABAIR, Amhráin’
The Phonetics and Speech Laboratory of the School of Linguistic Speech and Communication Sciences celebrates WORLD VOICE DAYwith a series of events:

  • 16.30 Glórthaí: Voice Research at TCD Research overview: how we analyse the voice; how the voice conveys emotions and meaning; how the voice is affected by our environment; how speech technology benefits from this research.
    18.00 ABAIR: Dublin Launch of Irish Voices in Speech Synthesis The Minister of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Dinny McGinley T.D. will officiate at the Dublin launch of the ABAIR synthetic voices, available at abair.ie.
    19.30 Amhráin: Recital of Songs in Irish Songs in Irish performed by members of Na Casaidigh and friends.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome. For more information visit: http://www.abair.tcd.ie/voiceday/.

Tuesday, 16 April 2013, 12:00
‘2013 Tweedy Lecture: Bloody Footprints: the Anatomy of Violence against Women'
A talk by  Turkish activist, actress and writer Pelin Batu, organised by  the Tweedy Family and the Centre for Gender & Women's Studies as part of the Hilda and Robert Tweedy Lecture Series which consists of biennial lectures alternatively addressing peace, gender and human rights, and environmental issues. In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Monday, 15 April 2013, 13:00
'Exploring Artistic Learning through Creative Collaborations and Dialogue'
A lecture by Dr Susan O’Neill (Canada) organised by the School of Drama, Film and Music, TCD. In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

8-12 April 2013, TRINITY WEEK 2013. During Trinity Week, we celebrate the academic and scholarly achievements of our staff and students.  This year the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences has organised a range of activities around the theme 'The Irish Diaspora: Social, Cultural and Economic Perspectives'. For the full progamme of activities visit http://www.tcd.ie/trinityweek/.

The Trinity Week Events based in the Trinity Long Room Hub are as follows:

Monday, 8 April 2013, 13.00 - 14.00, ‘Sean-Nós: A Contemporary Exploration’, a joint lecture-recital by Dr. Evangelia Rigaki (TCD), and Michelle O'Rourke (Mezzo Soprano).

This lecture will include a performance of a sean-nós inspired composition by Dr Evangelia Rigaki. This event will take place in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Tuesday, 9 April 2013

13:00 - 14.00, ‘Irish Migration and American Cinema’, a lecture by Prof Kevin Rockett (TCD). This lecture, with film extracts, will explore the representations of the Irish in American cinema from its beginnings to the present. In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

18.30 - 19.15 Choral+ Concert
Choral+ is a recently created small vocal ensemble consisting of students, staff and graduate members of the University of Dublin Choral Society. Informal in nature, and with a wide repertoire, the group has performed at receptions and events both on and off campus. This evening they will present a short concert featuring works by composers such as Mozart, Bach and Sullivan. In the Ideas Space, Trinity Long Room Hub. All welcome.

19.15 - 20.00 Play: 'Les Impossibles', At Large Theatre Company
Performed as part of the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in August 2012, Les Impossibles returns to Dublin for a final run. This surreal stylised comedy endeavours to bring the inner workings of an aspiring actor’s mind to life on the stage. We follow these actors on a journey of creation, enlightenment and just plain madness. Written and directed by Grainne Curistan, Global Officer. For tickets, email trinityweek@tcd.ie.

Wednesday, 10 April 2013

9.00 - 13.00, ‘The History of the Irish Diaspora and its future'- Emigration Colloquium

This colloquium will bring together researchers and commentators from inside and outside Trinity to explore contemporary discourse on emigration from a range of perspectives, and in the light of the broader history of migration in these islands. It will explore key questions including the role of universities in emigration, and whether it is time to reconceptualise emigration from Ireland in the light of changes in the contemporary world. Speakers include Professor Rory O'Donnell (National Economic and Social Council), Piaras MacEinri (Irish Centre for Migration Studies, UCC), Dr John Walsh (School of Education, TCD), Dr Margaret O hOgartaigh (independent scholar), Dr Sean Campbell (Anglia Ruskin University), Dr Enda Delaney (University of Edinburgh). In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

14.00 - 17.00, Trinity Week Academic Symposium - 'Irish Migration Today and Yesterday'

Irish emigration is on the agenda again. In this symposium four social scientists explore continuities and differences with the recent past and place the Irish experience in its international context.

  • Prof. Mary Corcoran, Department of Sociology, NUI Maynooth
    Back to the future:  what we can learn from the 1980s' 'generation emigration'
  • Prof. John Fitzgerald, ESRI
    “Open Labour market, open economy”
  • Prof. Binod Khadria, Jawaharlal Nehru University and Visiting Professor at IIIS, TCD
    “Global migration trends, global policy crisis”
  • Prof. James Wickham, Dean of Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, TCD
    "Irish emigration today: learning from Poland?"
In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Thursday, 11 April 2013

10.00 - 13.00, 'Business Innovation: Learning from the Diaspora'.

This seminar is designed to demonstrate how members of the Trinity Business Diaspora can use the experience of their innovation and entrepreneurship to educate and inspire existing and prospective business start-ups.

14.00 - 16.00, 'Ireland and Europe: 40 years and beyond' - WE REGRET THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED. IT WILL BE RESCHEDULED IN THE COMING WEEKS.

Friday, 12 April 2013, 13:00 - 14.30, ‘Maureen O’Hara, Between Ireland and Hollywood', a lecture by Prof Ruth Barton (TCD) as part of Trinity Week 2013.

Using clips from Maureen O'Hara's films, this talk will consider how Maureen O'Hara played the feisty Irish colleen not just in The Quiet Man but across a range of Hollywood productions.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Thursday, 4 April 2013, 20.15, ‘From Energeia to Energy: Plotinus and the Formation of the Notion of Energy’, a lecture by Professor Paul Calligas (Athens), organised by the Centre for Plato Studies, TCD, in association with the Trinity Long Room Hub.

Energy belongs to these ubiquitous but, at the same time, highly elusive concepts of modern physics which, on the one hand, look indispensable for our understanding of the nature and the function of our universe and, on the other, seem to defy any attempt to come up with a precise definition of them. It took modern physicists centuries to develop a conception of energy as independent of an underlying material medium. This idea, namely that energy requires such a substrate, is a holdover from the Aristotelian conception of energeia (actuality), which with its correlative notion of dunamis (potentiality) became, for Aristotle, an important way of explaining substantial change. This talk examines the notion of energeia as developed in the writings of the Neoplatonist philosopher Plotinus. It is argued that in Plotinus we find the first conception of energeia that doesn't depend upon an underlying material substrate.

This event will take place in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Thursday, 4 April 2013, 15.00, ‘Storming Babel: Military and Civilian Linguists in War, from the 1790s to the present’, a lecture by Dr Sylvie Kleinman (TCD), organised by the Centre for War Studies, Trinity College Dublin.

Mediatised conflicts in Bosnia-Herzogovina, Iraq and Afghanistan have foregrounded the problem of language barriers and the role of local interpreters in conflict zones. While it is self-evident that linguistic and cultural differences were inherent to colonial wars, occupations and conquests, and overcoming them in the soldier-civilian interface and hearts and minds operations is essential, the question has received little scholarly attention until the establishment of the UK Languages at War project. After introducing the topic by drawing on her own research on the Franco-Irish experience of 'fighting together' in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars, Dr. Kleinman will overview some other case studies tracing the progression from the ad hoc practices of the past towards the professionalisation of military linguists we know today.

This event will take place in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome

Wednesday, 3 April 2013, 18.15, ‘The Cultural Environment: The Case of Germany and Ireland’, a lecture by Prof Mary Keating and Prof Gillian Martin, as part of the Euro-Visions Public Lecture Series on Europe jointly organised by the Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) and the Trinity Long Room Hub.

Are globalization and ever closer business relationships between European countries resulting in convergence between management cultures or is there evidence to suggest that cultural divergence continues to shape management practice and behavior? This lecture will address the management-culture connection by taking the example of Ireland and Germany. It will draw on empirical research conducted by the authors over the last 15 years and explore the impact of societal culture on a range of themes including leadership, ethical leadership and integrity, decision-making, and business communication. It will also assess the implications emerging from this research for managing business relationships between the two countries.

This event will take place in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome. Please download the full programme.

Thursday, 28 March 2013, 18.00, ‘What Next’, a lecture by Paul Griffiths, noted writer and musicologist, organised by the Music Composition Centre, TCD.

What Next (1997) was the only opera to have been composed by the late Elliott Carter, for which Paul Griffiths was the librettist. In his lecture, Griffiths will be discussing how the work was put together by himself and Carter and about Carter's compositional procedure, with both audio and video excepts from the finished work serving as examples. Paul Griffiths was born in Wales in 1947. He studied biochemistry at Oxford, and joined the editorial team of The New Grove in 1973. Around the same time he began writing on music for various London papers; he was the chief critic of The Times of London and The New Yorker, and wrote regularly for The New York Times. His first book, A Concise History of Modern Music, came out in 1978. Among his fictional writings are novels — Myself and Marco Polo, The Lay of Sir Tristram, let me tell you, — and several librettos, among them The Jewel Box, Marco Polo, What Next?, there is still time, and The General. In 2001 he was made a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Thursday, 28 March 2013, 15.00, ‘The Stomach for Fighting? The significance of food for the British soldiers of the First World’,
a lecture by Dr Rachel Duffett (Essex) organised by the Centre for War Studies, TCD.

This talk will examine the significance of food in the lives of the rank and file soldiers of the British Army on the Western Front, 1914-1918, in terms of both military provisioning and an exploration of the emotional and social role of food in the soldiers’ lives. Army ration scales reflected the limited nutritional science available and concentrated upon the calorific values of the food delivered. Lack of dietary knowledge, problems in transportation, conflicting priorities and unskilled cooks resulted in a diet that left much to be desired. Whilst the official rations met calorific targets in theory and frequently in practice, the men remained unhappy. Army food did not taste like home: for the men, it carried with it an unpalatable flavour of their new, institutionalised lives. Conversely, in their correspondence with home, food provided a vocabulary for the expression of a familial love and concern founded upon past shared meals and sustained by the flow of food parcels.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Wednesday, 27 March 2013, 19.00, ‘HANOI 1967-8: A View from the Ground’, a talk by Brian Stewart, Former British Consul General, organised by the Department of History at Trinity College Dublin, in association with the Trinity Long Room Hub.

As Britain's sole official in Hanoi in 1967-8, at the height of the Vietnam War, Brian Stewart CMG witnessed the American bombing campaign against North Vietnam from the perspective of those at the receiving end, and observed the life of a city and people at war. His informal talk will explore the Vietnam War and its legacy from his unique vantage point that combines the perspective of an eye witness with that of an Asia specialist who devoted his entire career to fostering a better understanding of this region in Europe.

Born in 1922, Brian Stewart joined the Black Watch in 1942 from Oxford. After service in Europe and the Far East, he joined the Malayan Civil Service in 1946, becoming a specialist in Chinese affairs. He joined the Foreign Office in 1957, serving in Rangoon, Beijing, Shanghai, Manila, and Kuala Lumpur before appointment to Hanoi. He was subsequently an assistant secretary in the Cabinet Office, 1968-72. His final overseas posting was as Counsellor in Hong Kong, 1972-4. After retirement from government service he worked in business in China for many years.  He is the author of ‘Operation Sharp End: Smashing Terrorism in Malaya 1948-58’ (2004).

This event will take place in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub at 19.00 on Wednesday, 27 March 2013. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Tuesday, 26 March 2013, 17.00, ‘Between Cosmopolitanism and Autochthony – Richard Wagner and the concept of the German National Theatre’, a lecture by Prof. Friedemann Kreuder, Head of the Department for Theatre Studies at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, organised by the School of Drama, Film and Music in association with the Trinity Long Room Hub.

Being one of the famous German composers of the 19th century, Richard Wagner underwent a complete transformation from the revolutionary cosmopolitanism of his early work and the ideas of his Zurich essays on the “Gesamtkunstwerk” and moved toward a nationalism based on autochthony. In his late work Wagner superimposed actual political tensions and the conflict about the German empire with the concept of a “cultural nation” as an “imagined community” in line with the anthropologist Benedict Anderson.  This way, he ultimately withdrew his earlier ideals of an art revolution, thus compensating, yet at the same time, suppressing once more: this time, the modern experience of crisis in form of the dissolution of the feudal order and the spreading capitalisation, even in the theatre, by means of an autochthonous stroke of fortune.

Friedemann Kreuder is co-founder of the working group Theaterhistoriographie (Gesellschaft für Theaterwissenschaft) and spokesman of the International Postgraduate Programme (IPP) Performance and Media Studies at the University of Mainz. He has published books and articles about the theatre of the director Klaus Michael Grüber, Richard Wagner, the bourgeois theatre of the 18th century, and medieval theatre.

This event will take place in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub at 17.00 on Tuesday, 26 March 2013. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Monday, 25 March 2013, 18.15, ‘Europe in search of Itself, in search of The Other', a lecture by Prof Joep Leerssen (Amsterdam) as part of the Euro-Visions Public Lecture Series on Europe.

Nation-states have a much more robust presence in citizens' identities and allegiances than "Europe", which, as a result, is often represented as crisis-prone, faceless and infirm.
The mental image invoked by Europe lacks two elements which shore up the robust identity of nation-states: inner cohesiveness (a collective sense of shared culture) and outward distinctiveness (an outsider or "Significant Other" against whom the nation silhouettes itself). 

In this lecture Prof Leerssen will draw on insights from cultural history to argue two points: [a] neither the "inner cohesiveness"  nor the "outer distinctiveness"  is as strong within the nation-state as we commonly assume; [b] neither the "inner cohesiveness"  nor the "outward distinctiveness"  is as weak at the common-European level as the current media rhetoric would have us believe.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Thursday, 21 March 2013, 13.00, ‘The Balkans as a region of EU Growth, Conflict and Hope' with talks by Dr Silvija Jestrovic (Warwick) and Ms Ana Mijic (Vienna) as part of the Euro-Visions Public Lecture Series on Europe:

Dr Silvija Jestrovic (Warwick) "Born in YU: Performing, Negotiating, and Re-imaging an Abject Identity"

Born in YU opened in October 2010 in Yugoslav Drama Theatre—one of the leading theatres in Belgrade with the long-standing tradition in the region. The show was directed by Bosnian director Dino Mustafic and performed and developed by Serbian dramaturges and actors. Following the opening, the local broadcasting company B92 facilitated a public dialogue involving some of the creators, as well as other artists and intellectuals from former Yugoslavia. After almost twenty years since the downfall of Yugoslavia and the war that ensued, this performance and the public dialogue were among the first attempts to ask: What did Yugoslavia mean to generations that survived it?  How has Yugoslavia, not necessarily the nation state, but rather a shared cultural space, shaped various identities in the region? Why does Yugoslavian identity no longer have a place and why is it important to find it? Dr Jestrovic will explore how Born in YU, through tensions between personal and collective, foregrounds the notion of Yugoslavian identity as an abject and how it simultaneously opens a space for re-evaluating and re-negotiating of this abject identity. I will argue that Born in YU, and the dialogue that it has been inspiring potentially enable a process of understanding of the recent past; of how the current national and cultural identities in the region have been constructed; and  how these identities could be reconciled with or subverted by the abject identity that keeps asking what has it meant to be born in YU?  

Ms Ana Mijic (Univ of Vienna): "Hurt Identities? The Postwar Bosnian narrative of Self-Victimization"

During the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina (1992-1995) the identities of the conflicting parties were characterized by intensive and powerful ethnic in-group/out-group differentiations and inseparably linked with the belief in one’s own moral superiority.
After the end of war the Bosnian people were confronted with a novel situation; due to new and externally induced normative standards that delegitimize ‘hierarchical ethnicity', and due to the fact that they have to continue living as neighbours in one nation-state, they are forced to perform new definitions of ethnic boundaries, or – to frame it with a sociological classic – a new “definition of the situation”. Ms Mijic will explore how people react to these challenges to their identity, both on an individual and on a collective level. Her research has focused on a qualitative empirical analysis of the genesis and the persistence of self-attribution and the attribution of others in the context of the accelerated social transformation processes in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The reconstructive analysis of narrative interviews conducted in different regions of the country shows that the construction of personal identity is to a large extent affected by the identification with the ethnic in-group, which is typically perceived as the greatest victim of war and the post-war constellation. Self-victimization seems to be an evident solution of the post war crisis, since it enables people to handle the dilemma between the old war-shaped identities with their in-group centred normativity and universal ethical standards.

This event will take place in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Thursday, 21 March 2013, 15.00, ''Abrahamic Religions?",a lecture by Prof Rémi Brague, Universities of Munich and Paris Sorbonne, organised in conjunction with the School of Religions, Theology and Ecumenics.

Rémi Brague is a Trinity Long Room Hub Visiting Research Fellow and Emeritus Professor of Medieval and Arabic Philosophy at the University of Paris I. He teaches also at the Ludwig-Maximilian-Universität of Munich where he holds the chair Romano Guardini. He is member of the Institut de France (Academy of moral and political sciences). His book publications include: Eccentric Culture. A Theory of Western Civilization (2002), ET of Europe, la voie romaine (1992); The Wisdom of the World: The Human Experience of the Universe in Western Thought (2004); The Law of God: The Philosophical History of an Idea (2008); The Legend of the Middle Ages: Philosophical Explorations of Medieval Christianity, Judaism, and Islam (2011).

VENUE: Please note this lecture will take place in the Museum Building, Trinity College, Room M4. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Tuesday, 19 March 2013, 18.00, ‘What Happens to a Translated Text', a lecture by Guilherme da Silva Braga, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil and 2013 Visiting Literary Translator in Residence at Trinity College Dublin.

During his lecture Guilherme da Silva Braga will discuss what happens beneath the surface of a translated literary text by taking a close look at translated excerpts and their corresponding originals. What role do translators play in the final result? To what extent do they interfere with the original text? What is the difference between reading the same literary work translated by different translators? How is the content vs. form dilemma solved in translation? Is there such a dilemma in the first place?

Guilherme da Silva Braga is Trinity's fourth Visiting Literary Translator in Residence, appointed by the Centre for Literary Translation in partnership with Ireland Literature Exchange. He is a full-time literary translator and has worked for many Brazilian publishing houses on more than thirty novels and short story collections in a wide range of styles, including works by Emily Brontë, beat writer Jack Kerouac, weird fiction writer H. P. Lovecraft and Irishman extraordinaire James Joyce. He has a Master's degree in Comparative Literature and is currently pursuing a PhD in English-language Literatures at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul in his hometown – the city of Porto Alegre in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

In the Neill/Hoey Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome. 

Monday, 4 March - Friday, 15 March 2013, ‘Monsters of Creation: Snapshots of Women in Higher Education’, an exhibition celebrating International Women’s Week organised by the Little Women's Museum of Ireland. In the Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Wednesday, 13 March 2013, 18.15, ‘The ESM and its Constitutionality', a lecture by Dr Peter M Huber (German Federal Constitutional Court) as part of the Euro-Visions Public Lecture Series on Europe.

There has been no fundamental change in the Federal Constitutional Court’s view on the division of competence between the EEC (later EU) and the Member States since it first started dealing with the European integration at the beginning of the 1970s. There may have been a change in tone over the past 40 years. The cornerstones of the FCC’s approach, however, remain unchanged. Accordingly, the European Union possesses only such competences conferred upon it by the Member States (principle of conferral). The activities of the EU are democratically legitimate only insofar as they keep within the scope of this programme of integration. The programme of integration, however, grants EU law precedence over national law, which in principle applies to national constitutions as well.The conceptual basis of precedence is in all Member States - although they differ in its concrete design - an act of national ratification. Taking this into account, it seems inevitable that limits to pecedence should arise from national law. Over the past 20 years, the national constitutional identity and the programme of integration have proven to be relevant limits.

The Basic Law sets substantial requirements for the division of competence between the EU and the Member States and, as a necessary consequence, for the democratic legitimation and control of EU decisions as well, which happens primarily through the German Bundestag. These requirements are also valid for other supranational organizations such as the ESM.

In a more specific way the democratic principle as it is laid down in art. 20 par 1 and 2 of the Basic law entails the requirement that the Bundestag remains the place where decisions on the amount of loans and guaranties which Germany may give for other countries, their duration and their conditions have to be decided on in order to make a public debate and accountability possible.

During the ongoing crisis, this may slow down responses to the financial markets actual or perceived demands. This means, as the president of the IMF, Christine Lagarde, stated in an interview, that democracy is indeed proving to be an impediment to overcoming the crisis. Yet, this is a price we must be willing to pay for the sake of our and our children’s freedom and self determination.

This event will take place in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome but please RSVP to Colette Keleher (keleherc@tcd.ie) as seats are limited.

Tuesday, 12 March 2013, 17.00, 'Philosophies of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in the Medieval Cultural Space', a lecture by Prof Rémi Brague, Universities of Munich and Paris Sorbonne, organised in conjunction with the School of Religions, Theology and Ecumenics.

This lecture will compare the different understandings of philosophy which the three monotheistic religions developed in the Middle Ages. The variety in the practices, interpretations and institutionalisation of philosophy has shaped the whole of European higher culture. This took place especially through the independent role it attained through its institutional basis in the universities, as opposed to remaining a private undertaking. How did the faith-reason distinction affect philosophy? By striking a bargain with religion in Christendom, philosophy had to lose a part of its freedom, but contributed to make the former sacra doctrina become theology. In Islam and Judaism, it kept its original purity, but had to remain outside of mainstream religion.

Rémi Brague is a Trinity Long Room Hub Visiting Research Fellow and Emeritus Professor of Medieval and Arabic Philosophy at the University of Paris I. He teaches also at the Ludwig-Maximilian-Universität of Munich where he holds the chair Romano Guardini. He is member of the Institut de France (Academy of moral and political sciences). His book publications include: Eccentric Culture. A Theory of Western Civilization (2002), ET of Europe, la voie romaine (1992); The Wisdom of the World: The Human Experience of the Universe in Western Thought (2004); The Law of God: The Philosophical History of an Idea (2008); The Legend of the Middle Ages: Philosophical Explorations of Medieval Christianity, Judaism, and Islam (2011).

This event will take place in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome

Wednesday, 6 March 2013, 18.15, ‘Between the 'Blue Card' and Circular Migration: The Crisis of the EU's Immigration Policy for Third-country Nationals’, a lecture by Prof Binod Khadria (Jawaharial Nehru University), as part of the Euro-Visions Public Lecture Series on Europe.

Barring the United Kingdom and Ireland, the rest of Europe has traditionally been known as ‘fortress Europe’ so far as its links of migration with the outside world is concerned. Europe has however moved away from this position of being closed to immigrants, apparently borrowing from the experience of the UK and Ireland in being open to migration to and from the third-countries. The post-9/11 transition in the US immigration policy, which became restrictive, provided an immediate impetus to the switch in the European stance. With the consolidation of the EU, there have been two diametrically opposite trends in the homogenization of the EU immigration policy towards third-country nationals, mainly for those coming from the developing countries of Asia, Africa and Latin America.

Whereas, the so-called Blue-card was floated to compete with the American Green-card by way of promising settlement rights to the highly skilled immigrants and their families from countries of these continents, the circular migration policy was to give precedence to temporary immigration over permanent. Whereas the Blue card was perceived to be an instrument for unification and reunification of families, circular migration, which silently discouraged families from accompanying the migrants, led to the splitting and nomadization of the family. This contradiction is reflected in the range or the spread of diversity in the visa issuance policies of the countries of the EU. In fact, the contradictions are subtle and hidden in the practices of visa issuances as compared to the explicitly laid down policies.

The contradiction provides the EU countries a convenient handle of selectiveness for choosing the highly skilled scarce workers for their most productive part of life cycle and to rotate the unskilled and the low-skilled at shorter intervals. The transitory nature of the immigration policy, arising from frequent and unanticipated changes therein, has become the hallmark of sovereignty over border control of EU’s unified boundaries. This raises some pertinent questions regarding the age-old issues of brain drain and brain gain in the context of EU’s current fixation with circular migration.

This event will take place in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Tuesday, 5 March 2013, 19.00, a lecture by Dr Ahmed Shaheed, UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of Human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran, jointly organised by the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Studies (the School of Languages, Literature and Cultural Studies TCD) and Frontline Defenders, in association with the Trinity Long Room Hub.

Admission is free and all are welcome.

Thursday, 28 February 2013, 18.15, ‘Islam and Democracy', a lecture by Mustafa Kasim Erol, Director of the Dialogue Society, Oxford, organised by the Ireland Dialogue Society and Near and Middle Eastern Studies Department, TCD, in association with the Trinity Long Room Hub.

Mustafa Kasim Erol graduated from the Department of Theology, Selcuk University, Turkey. He obtained an MA in Islamic Studies; Christian Muslim Relations, University of Birmingham in 1999. He taught Religious Education and Citizenship in various schools 7 years. He was a head-teacher at Coral College. He was a founding member of several educational and dialogue organisations and has acted as chairman in UK. He worked for an interfaith NGO, The Journalists and Writers Foundation, in Turkey between 2008 and 2010 and has also worked part time as an Examiner and Team Leader at Cambridge University (2002-present). In January 2011 Mustafa became the Director of the Dialogue Society in Oxford. He is also a part-time PhD Candidate at Kings College, University of London, at the Department of Education. His areas of interest include Islamic theology, intercultural and interfaith dialogue, education, and human rights. He speaks at conferences and public events on the above topics in the UK and overseas. He is the co-author of the book titled Dialogue in Islam?.

All are welcome and admission is free. Please RSVP to Ms Arzu at arzu.gorbil@irldialogue.ie

Wednesday, 27 February 2013, 18.15, ‘Performing European Memories: Trauma, Ethics, Politics', a talk by Prof Milija Gluhovic (Warwick) as part of the Euro-Visions lecture series organised by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub.

The end of the forty-year Cold War that split the postwar European continent provided the impetus for rethinking the past all over Europe as well as for the study of “European memory.” A commitment on the part of European countries to “work through the past” as individual nations and often contentious negotiations about what to remember and what to forget ran parallel with the search for a transnational memory of the conflicts, contentions, complexity and ambiguity of Europe’s past. This lecture explores the intersections between contemporary European theatre and performance, the interdisciplinary field of memory studies, and current preoccupations with the politics of memory in Europe.  It discusses different ways in which European artists engage with the traumatic experiences of the Holocaust, the Stalinist Gulags, colonialism, and imperialism, challenging their audiences’ historical imagination, and renewing their affective engagement with Europe’s past.

Milija Gluhovic is Associate Professor of Theatre and Performance at the University of Warwick. His research interests include: contemporary European theatre and performance, memory studies, and discourses of European identity, migrations and human rights. His monograph Performing European Memories: Trauma, Ethics, Politics and an edited collection Performing the ‘New’ Europe: Identities, Feelings, and Politics in the Eurovision Song Contest (with Karen Fricker) are forthcoming with Palgrave in 2013. Milija is also the director of an Erasmus Mundus MA in International Performance Research, an EU sponsored program taught collaboratively at the University of Warwick, the University of Amsterdam, the University of Helsinki and the University of Arts in Belgrade.

Friday, 22 February 2013, 17.00, ‘Classicising Modernity: The Ideology of Choral Performance in Nazi Germany', a talk by Dr Eleftheria Ioannidou ( Birmingham University), organised by the Departments of Drama and Classics at Trinity College Dublin.

Dr Ionnaidou studied theatre in Athens and London and received her D.Phil from the University of Oxford on the rewriting of Greek tragic texts from the 1970s to the present. From 2010-2012 she held a Humboldt Research Fellowship at the Freie Universität, Berlin. Her current research focuses on fascist appropriations of Greek tragedy in the inter-war period. Please contact Prof. Steve Wilmer (swilmer@tcd.ie) for further information.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub at 17.00 on Friday, 22 February 2013. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Monday, 18 February 2013, 18.15, ‘European Identity and the Crisis', a talk by Prof Ettore Recchi (UNICH) as part of the Euro-Visions lecture series organised by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub.

Is EU identity affected by the Euro-crisis? To answer this question on the basis of available evidence, Prof Recchi will draw on a conceptual distinction between the "identity of the EU", understood as its public image formed by many images of many different social groups, and "identification with the EU" or the sense of attachment perceived by individuals who formally (via citizenship) belong to the EU. These two concepts tap different dimensions of identity that Prof Recchi expects to be more and less volatile, reflecting their differing "identity salience". To test this hypothesis Prof Recchi uses Eurobarometer data for the last decade. Data analysis reveals a deterioration of the EU image and a relative stability of identifications with the EU in the context of the Euro-crisis.

Thursday, 14 February 2013, 18.15, ‘How to think of Ethno-Linguistic Nationalism in Central Europe’, a talk by Prof Tomasz Kamusella, St Andrews, as part of the Euro-Visions lecture series organised by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub.

Most classical works on the phenomenon of nationalism draw examples from Central Europe and generalize on their basis for the entire globe. But the region's nationalisms are strongly steeped in language as their ideological cornerstone, which makes Central Europe quite unique in this respect. Elsewhere in the world, nation-states are not built on languages. Prof Kamusella proposes to flesh out and analyze the difference by focusing on the practises of Central Europe's ethnolinguistic nationalisms, as observed during the last two centuries. Arguably, pinpointing the salient features of this kind of nationalism makes it possible to define what and where Central Europe is, and why generalizing on the region's nationalisms is not viable on a global scale

This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU and will run until June 2013.

Tuesday, 12 February 2013, 18.00 ‘Kubrick and the Holocaust', a talk by Dr Nathan Abrams of Bangor University organised by the Herzog Centre and Dept of Film Studies, TCD.

US Film Director Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999) intended to make a film about the Holocaust but never completed it. It was said that he stopped work on his screenplay Aryan Papers (an adaptation of Louis Begley's book Wartime Times) because he was too depressed by his research to continue and also that Steven Spielberg beat him to it with Schindler's List (1993). However, drawing upon new archival material from his own collection, in this illustrated seminar Dr Abrams will argue that this story belies the fact that Kubrick was concerned with the Holocaust throughout his film-making career and that it manifested itself in various ways.

Dr. Nathan Abrams is a senior lecturer in Film Studies at Bangor University in Wales. He is the author of the New Jew in Film: Exploring Jewishness and Judaism in Contemporary Cinema (Rutgers UP, 2012) and is the founding co-editor of Jewish Film and New Media: An International Journal.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub at 18.00 on Tuesday, 12 February 2013. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Monday, 11 February 2013, 19.00, 'The Pollard Collection of Children's Books: Constructing a History of Irish Children's Literature' , a lecture by Dr Pádraic Whyte, Trinity College Dublin, as part of the Trinity Long Room Hub Library Lecture Series to mark the tercentenary of the Old Library.

The Pollard Collection of Children’s Books, a generous bequest to the Trinity Library from  Mary ('Paul') Pollard (1922-2005), is a collection of over 10,000 books covering the period from late 17thC to early 20thC. Extensive holdings of works by Maria Edgeworth, Barbara Hofland and Mary Sherwood feature in the collection. It contains many books of Irish interest, and includes moral tales and tracts, learner readers, chapbooks, nineteenth-century annuals and magazines. One of the most significant of its kind, the Pollard Collection offers enormous opportunities for research and scholarship.

During the lecture, Dr Whyte will provide an overview of the collection, research underway, its significance nationally and internationally, and also conduct a close analysis of certain texts within the collection. More specifically, he will discuss his current research and his use of the collection in constructing a history of Irish Children's Literature.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute, at 19.00 on Monday, 11 February 2013. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Wednesday, 6 February, 12.30, ''Between Commentary and Eternity’: Annotating Dante and Joyce', a lecture by Prof Sam Slote as part of the School of English’s Year of Ulysses Lecture Series.  

The act of annotations implies some deficiency in the text that the annotations then purport to correct. Either the reader is insufficiently learned to cope with the text's allusions, or the text is insufficiently accessible and cannot be trusted on its own without the mediation of the annotator's skills and knowledge. Drawing on his experiences annotating Ulysses, Prof Slote will discuss the commentary traditions around both Dante and Joyce to examine what annotation invariably omits and distorts in the service of explaining a literary text.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute, at 12.30 on Wednesay, 6 February 2013. Admission is free and all are welcome. For further information, visit dh.tcd.ie/dh, or email digital.humanities@tcd.ie.

Tuesday, 5 February 2013, 18.15, ‘Does Europe Need an Asia Strategy?', a talk by Prof Philomena Murray, Melbourne University, as part of the Euro-Visions lecture series organised by the IIIS and the Trinity Long Room Hub.

In the context of tectonic shifts in Asia in terms of power, democracy, trade and security, does the EU now need an Asia Strategy? The US has a determined pivot towards the Asia Pacific. Does the EU now need its own pivot to Asia? The EU is not recognized as a key actor in Asia. It has come under criticism for its lack of coherence and consistency in its foreign policy and external relations with Asia. This negative perception has been compounded by rivalries and disagreements among member states and EU institutions. The twin challenges of coherence and consistency of approach remain crucial, as the EU seeks to have a greater presence and impact in Asia. This Lecture will explore the EU's experiences to date and its options in Asia, with particular reference to East Asia.

This lecture series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU and will run until June 2013.

30 January 2013, 'Multiculturalism and Muslims in Europe', a lecture by Dr Erkan Toguslu, KU Leuven University Belgium, organised by the Ireland Dialogue Society as part of the Euro-Visions Public Lecture Series on Europe jointly organised by the Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) and the Trinity Long Room Hub at TCD.

The presence of Islam is felt deep within Western society, along with Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism and a host of other religions and beliefs. The integration of Islamic beliefs into European life has been increasingly visible to the naked eye, whether it be scarf clad women on the streets, Muslim pupils at schools, the halal food industry, housing, employment or social life itself. The ever increasing presence of Muslim communities have prompted the recognition of the issue of compatibility between Islamic values and the values of the host country. Previously it was a common tendency to believe that public life is plural and that secular laws are put in place to manage cultural-religious diversity in publicly occupied domain. At the same time, there has been a rising wave of doubt towards multiculturalism, and more recently its death has been hailed in several political speeches concentrating on the supposed non-compatibility of Muslim communities. The debates on multiculturalism embody the concern of Islamic identity issues and their often tarnished reflection within the public sphere.

Using the debates on multiculturalism in Europe, Dr Toguslu will explore the ways how religion and culture rise above transnational and transcultural boundaries and how transnational and transcultural Muslims can be formulated in public life.

This series is an associated event of the Irish Presidency of the Council of the EU. At 18.00 in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. All welcome and admission is free. Please RSVP to Arzu Gorbil at arzu.gorbil@irldialogue.ie.

30 January 2013, 'Remembering the Troubles: Commemorating, Constructing and Contesting the recent past in Northern Ireland', a lecture by Jim Smyth of Notre Dame University.

Since the signing of the Good Friday accords in 1998, and the winding down of the conflict in Northern Ireland, ‘The Troubles’ have been conducted through other means. The politics of remembrance prevail: victims groups, the police service Historical Enquiry Teams, judicial inquiries – and demands for more – including the longest, most expensive inquiry in history, which produced the Saville Report on Bloody Sunday; memoirs, memorials, murals, marches, plaques, anniversaries and television documentaries, all focused intensely on the recent, turbulent and traumatic past, have proliferated, proliferate and seem set to continue.  The many different versions of the recent past Loyalist,Republican, ‘Official’, are competing and contested.

At one level Irish scholarly engagement with historical memory is no more exceptional than that of, say, Australian or American historians. At other levels, however, social memory, remembrance, commemoration and forgetting are here charged with an urgency and topicality rarely found elsewhere. First, how ‘The Troubles’, a recent, protracted, conflict, are interpreted and presented, and by who, is a politically raw issue in a still deeply-divided society. And second, we are just now at the outset of the so-called decade of centenaries, beginning with the signing of the Ulster Covenant, 1912/2012 and concluding with the end of the civil war 1923/2023.

Jim Smyth, Professor of History, holds a B.A. from Trinity College, Dublin, and Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge. He has written extensively on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Ireland and is the author of The Men of No Property: Irish Radicals and Popular Politics in the Late Eighteenth Century (1992, 1998). He is editor of a collection of essays, Revolution, Counter-Revolution and Union, Ireland in the 1790s (2000), and author of The Making of the United Kingdom, 1660-1800: Religion, Identity and State in Britain and Ireland (2001). He was Mellon Visiting Fellow, Folger Institute, Washington, DC in 2002-2003.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, at 12.30 on Wednesday, 30 January 2013. Admission is free and all are welcome.

29 January 2013, 'Ethics and Cultural Engagement in Post-Secular Public Theology', a lecture by Prof Elaine Graham, University of Chester.

Western society is entering an unprecedented political and cultural era in which many of the assumptions of classic sociological theory and of main­stream public theology are being overturned. Whilst many of the features of the trajectory of religious decline, typical of Western modernity, are still apparent, there are compelling and vibrant signs of religious revival, not least in public life and politics – local, national and global.

A number of scholars have adopted the terminology of the ‘post-secular’ to denote this supposedly problematic co-existence of revitalized religious activism as a decisive force in public life, both globally and locally, along­side the continuing trajectory of   organisational religious decline, accompanied by robust defence of  secularism in Western societies. This new dispensation of ‘post-secularity’ presents novel challenges for the way in which religious voices are mediated into public spaces. They must learn to negotiate a path between the ‘rock’ of religious revival and the ‘hard place’ of secularism.

Using examples from her own field of public theology, Prof Graham will consider how religious discourse and activism is having to renegotiate this new contested public space.

This lecure is part of the Trinity Long Room Hub's Lecture Series on Religion(s), Ethics and Cultural Engagement for 2012-13 organised in conjunction with the School of Religions, Theology and Ecumenics. In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub at 17.00 on Tuesday, 29 January 2013. Admission is free and all are welcome.

28 January 2013, 'African and African Diaspora Manuscripts in the Trinity College Library: Authors, Scribes and Collectors', a lecture by Prof Nikolay Dobronravin, St Petersburg State University, following his term as a Visiting Research Fellow at the Trinity Long Room Hub in 2012.

West African manuscripts represent a small, but beautiful part of the collection of the Trinity College Library. These manuscripts belong to various sub-branches of the Islamic written tradition, both in Arabic and Ajami (Arabic script adapted to African languages). Some of them were brought to Ireland in their original bags, used in pre-colonial West Africa instead of European-type bindings. Such manuscripts are in fact collections of various texts and fragments (prayers, law, poetry, medicine, private and official correspondence, a myth of creation, etc.); one collection belonged to the kings of Kano in the 19th century. The names of authors and scribes include several historical figures of today’s Mali and Nigeria, such as Uthman dan Fodiyo (1754–1817).

In the 19th and early 20th century the manuscripts were acquired by the Irish, sometimes under rather dramatic circumstances (on the battle field in West Africa). The trajectory of the manuscripts after acquisition was linked with the history of Ireland. One of them was apparently kept as part of family treasure (the Wilsons of Cahirconlish), while the provenance of other manuscripts remains obscure.

During his lecture, Prof Dobronravin will explore the West African manuscripts of the Trinity College Library, with a focus on authors, scribes and collectors. He will demonstrate how this collection opens new horizons for manuscript studies owing to abundance of named and dated colophons that testify intensive and widespread manuscript production across West Africa in the 18th and 19th centuries.

This is the third the Trinity Long Room Hub Library Lecture Series organized in conjunction with Trinity College Library to mark the tercentary of the Old Library. It will be held at 19:00 in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

24 January 2013, 'Do We Need Growth to Emancipate Vulnerable People?', a lecture by Prof Jean Philippe Plateau, Namur University, as part of the Euro-Visions Public Lecture Series on Europe jointly organised by the Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) and the Trinity Long Room Hub at TCD.

The persistence of oppressive or inequitable social norms in many developing countries is an obstacle to the emancipation of significant sections of their population. To end these norms represents a big challenge because they are typically supported by deep-rooted customs and values. It is often assumed that statutory laws are ineffective in the presence of such customs. In this lecture, however, Prof Plateau suggests that the interaction between the modern law and the custom may give rise to several outcomes, and in one of these outcomes the custom evolves in the direction of the law. Moreover, the controversy between radical and moderate reformers can be usefully revisited when an interactive approach between law and custom is followed. In those cases where the law is ineffective, it needs to be complemented by other actions that add internal to external empowerment of the disadvantaged groups of the population. If this cannot be done, economic growth is the only way to help emancipate vulnerable groups by improving their outside opportunities and, thereby, enhancing their bargaining strength.

This series is an associated event of the Irish presidency of the Council of the EU http://www.eu2013.ie/. In the Trinity Long Room Hub at 19.30. Admission is free and all are welcome.

23 January 2013, 'Novelists, Poets and a City: Istanbul in the Eyes of Hisar, Beyatli and Tanpinar', an exciting evening of readings and traditional music performance on Turkish literature by Pelin Batu, Aslı Perker, Tahir Aydoğdu. See the attached programme. In the Trinity Long Room Hub at 18.00. Admission is free and all are welcome.

23 January 2013, 'How to Fix the Euro Area', a talk by Prof Charles Wyplosz, Geneva University, as part of the as part of the Euro-Visions Public Lecture Series on Europe jointly organised by the Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) and the Trinity Long Room Hub at TCD. This series is an associated event of the Irish presidency of the Council of the EU http://www.eu2013.ie/.

Since its creation, the Euro Area has sought to enforce fiscal discipline in member states by imposing constraints on sovereign governments and their parliaments. This approach, inspired by the German model of fiscal federalism, has failed spectacularly. And yet, the reforms adopted in 2011 and 2012 rest on the same approach. During his lecture Prof Wyplosz will argue that these reforms are equally doomed. A better approach would start by recognizing that Euro Area member states are sovereign in budget matters and adopt the US model of decentralized discipline, which is both more successful than the German model and better adapted to the European situation

In the Trinity Long Room Hub at 12.00. Admission is free and all are welcome.

22 January 2013, 'Personal Debt in Georgian Dublin: Marshalseas, Spunging-Houses and the Body Politic', a talk by Dr Martyn Powell, University of Aberystwyth, following his term as a Trinity Long Room Hub Visiting Research Fellow in 2012.

Debtors in eighteenth-century Dublin occupied an ambiguous position in the city’s social and political life. They were the recipients of a good deal of philanthropy from Dublin’s civic elite – including clubs and societies, theatres and the largesse of private individuals - but they were also regarded as a drain on the body politic, and a particular danger to the livelihood of tradesmen. This talk seeks to explore the experiences and treatment of debtors in Dublin through an examination of two particular locations associated with these individuals: the marshalsea and the spunging house. Both of these locations offered solutions, and occasionally extensions, to problems of indebtedness. Each was concerned with the body of the debtor – the first offered the hell of imprisonment, the second a debtor’s version of purgatory. Both were also intimately linked with Dublin’s burgeoning public sphere in this period; marshalseas in particular were the targets of Dublin society’s progressive, improving, sociable and associational impulses. However they were also at the crux of a fracturing of older notions of credit and ‘gift-giving’, with an all-embracing patriotic politics finding itself raging against a new market economy that offered a multitude of opportunities for exploiting these unfortunates. 

Martyn Powell is a specialist in Irish political and social history, and his publications include Britain and Ireland in the Eighteenth-Century Crisis of Empire (Palgrave, 2003), The Politics of Consumption in Eighteenth-Century Ireland (Palgrave, 2005), Piss-Pots, Printers and Public Opinion in Eighteenth-Century Dublin (Four Courts, 2009), Clubs and Societies in Eighteenth-Century Ireland (Four Courts, 2010) (edited with James Kelly), and many articles and essays. He is the general editor of the bilingual, interdisciplinary journal Eighteenth-Century Ireland/Cumann Éire san Ochtú Céad Déag, and is currently working on a study of the maiming of British soldiers by Ireland’s urban ‘houghers’. During his term as a Visiting Research Fellow at the Trinity Long Room Hub in 2012, he researched the early history of Irish debt.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute, at 18.00 on Tuesday, 22 January 2013. Admission is free and all are welcome.

21 January 2013, 'Mapping Ireland, c.1550-1625: the Collections of Sir George Carew’, a talk by Annaleigh Margey, Dundalk Institute of Technology, as part of the Trinity Long Room Hub Library Lecture Series organized in conjunction with Trinity College Library to mark the tercentary of the Old Library.

The map collection of Sir George Carew, who served as an English soldier and administrator in Ireland, is one of the largest collections of early modern maps of Ireland.  Carew’s manuscript maps reflect the diversity of his career and interests in Ireland incorporating provincial maps, plantation maps, military maps and urban maps. On his death in 1629, he bequeathed his papers to his son Sir Thomas Strafford. At his death, the collection ran to 72 volumes. Carew left two catalogues of his maps within this collection. From these papers, Thomas Strafford published Pacata Hibernica in 1633. After Thomas’ death, his wife sold his papers to a London bookseller, Cornelius Bee in 1655. By 1677, the bulk of the papers had been deposited at Lambeth Palace Library. On arrival at Lambeth, however, the map material had almost completely disappeared from the collection. It was not until 1780 that a reference was made to the maps again in Richard Gough’s British topography. In this volume, Gough noted maps of the reign of Elizabeth I at Trinity College Dublin. James Hardiman, however, only noted their definite existence within the TCD Manuscripts Department in a brief catalogue of the materials in the Transactions of the Royal Irish Academy in 1824. In 1964, William O’Sullivan, the Keeper of Manuscripts at TCD, argued that the Trinity maps were indeed the missing Carew maps, exploring how the collection at Trinity was identical to Carew’s own lists of maps.

How these materials arrived at Trinity is unknown. During her lecture, Annaleigh Margey will explore this collection of Carew maps, focusing on their role within early modern governance and plantation planning and administration.

This lecture will be held at 19:00 in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free and all are welcome.

15 January 2013, Expulsions – The Fifth Circle of Hell’, a lecture by Prof Saskia Sassen (Columbia & LSE) as part of a new joint lecture series between the Departments of Sociology at TCD and UCD and the Policy Institute at TCD in which internationally acclaimed speakers will discuss contemporary sociological issues. This lecture will also mark the launch of the new Euro-Visions Public Lecture Series on Europe to mark Ireland's Presidency of the European Union.

From January to June 2013 Ireland will hold the presidency of the European Union, and 2013 also marks the 40th anniversary of Ireland's accession to the then EEC. Trinity College Dublin will be marking this momentous period with a public lecture series jointly organised by the Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute and the Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS), the two research institutes of the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. This lecture series will bring together Irish and international scholars from across a wide range of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences disciplines.

The lecture series will interrogate the current crisis of the EU from the vantage points of both the Social Sciences and the Humanities and will instigate an interdisciplinary dialogue about possible responses to this crisis. It will combine political, sociological, historical and cultural perspectives to reflect on a range of issues such as questions of identity and cultural memory within Europe, links between the past and the present, and social, political and financial models for the EU. Overall, the series will present fresh perspectives from experts across a broad spectrum of disciplines and positions towards the crucial debate about the future of Europe and Ireland's position and role within the EU.

The lecture series will run from January to June and will (normally) take place on Wednesdays at 18.15 in the Neill/Hoey Theatre in the Trinity Long Room Hub. See the attached for the full Euro-Visions Public Lecture Programme.

Please note: Prof Sassen's lecture on January 15th is at 19.00 in the Edmund Burke Theatre. To attend please complete the online booking form as places are limited.

11 December 2012 ‘Paddies Evermore: Stereotypes and Irish National Identity in the late eighteenth-century’, a talk by Professor Padhraig Higgins of Mercer County College during his term as a Trinity Long Room Hub Visiting Research Fellow.

This talk will focuses on the figure of ‘Paddy’, who came to serve as the male personification of the Irish nation from the late 1770s onwards.  While much work has focused on British representations of ‘Paddy’ in the nineteenth century, there has been little attempt to examine earlier ways in which the Irish themselves mobilized this figure in this formative period for understandings of the nation and national identity.  It explores how late eighteenth century thinking about Irishness and national identity were articulated through representations of ‘Paddy’.  Initially a figure in the tradition of the stage Irishman, during the course of the free trade dispute in 1779 ‘Paddy’ was mobilized in a range of media such as engravings, ballads, and on the stage to represent a unified, assertive nation in opposition to British policies restricting Irish trade.  By the 1790s, the figure of ‘Paddy’ was central to the symbolism of the radical United Irishmen, featuring in the title of a popular collection of ballads, Paddy’s Resource.  Prof Higgins will examine the changing nature of ‘Paddy’ in the late eighteenth century, from the feckless stage Irishman to industrious peasant and his shifting place in understandings of national identity and notions of Irishness.

Padhraig Higgins is an Associate Professor of History at Mercer County College.  He has published articles on the volunteers, national identity, and the politics of gender in eighteenth century Ireland.  His first book, A Nation of Politicians:  Gender, Patriotism and Political Culture in Late Eighteenth-Century Ireland (University of Wisconsin Press, 2010), was awarded the Donald Murphy Prize from the American Conference for Irish Studies.  He is currently an American Council of Learned Societies fellow and is working on the politics of poverty in eighteenth century Dublin.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute, at 13.00 on Tuesday, 11 December 2012. Admission is free and all are welcome

10th December 2012 ‘From Scratched Inscriptions to Social Tagging: the Historical and Cultural Dimension of Annotating Texts’,a public lecture by Professor Claudine Moulin as part of the Digital Arts and Humanities (DAH) PhD programme.

Claudine Moulin studied German and English Philology in Brussels and Bamberg. Since 2003 she holds the chair of Historical Linguistics at the German Department of the University of Trier (Germany) and is the Director of the Trier Center for Digital Humanities. She is a. o. a member of the Standing Committee for the Humanities of the European Science Foundation (ESF) and chair of the Expert Group on Research Infrastructures. She is furthermore a founding member of DHd, the Association for Digital Humanities in german speaking countries. In 2010 she was recipient of the Academy-Prize (Akademie der Wissenschaften und Literatur, Mainz). Her research covers the fields of medieval languages, manuscript studies and manuscript cultures, historical linguistics, grammaticography and digital humanities.   More information about the DAH PhD Programme can be found at www.tcd.ie/longroomhub/DAH/.

This talk will take place in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute, from 14.00 – 15.00 on Monday, 10th December 2012.  Admission is free and all are welcome.

10th December 2012 ‘Gift of the desert. Greek writing on paper from ancient Egypt’, a talk by Prof. Brian McGing, Regius Professor of Greek and Head of the School of Histories and Humanities at Trinity College Dublin.

Towards the end of the 19th century, pieces of ancient writing paper began to turn up in large quantities from rubbish dumps in the Egyptian countryside. They were mostly written in Greek, but also in Arabic, Aramaic and the various forms of the Egyptian language.The great German historian of Rome, Theodor Mommsen, is said to have declared that, in terms of Classical scholarship, the 20th century would be the century of papyrology. So how did it turn out? What do papyrologists do, and what has this huge new data-bank of evidence told us about the ancient world and our relation to it?

This is the first of the new Trinity Long Room Hub Library Lecture Series organized in conjunction with Trinity College Library to mark the tercentary of the Old Library. It will be held at 19:00 in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub.

7th December 2012 ‘Socialists grappling with the Shoah: Early Post-War Responses?’, a lecture by Dr Lars Fischer as part of the TCD Hertzog Centre Jewish Studies Lecture Series.

Dr Fisher is the Academic Director of the Centre for the Study of Jewish-Christian Relations in Cambridge and an Honorary Research Associate in the UCL Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies. He was educated at Queen Mary, University of London, and UCL and previously held lectureships in modern European History at King’s College London and German History at UCL. His publications include a monograph on The Socialist Response to Antisemitism in Imperial Germany, published by Cambridge University Press in 2007 (paperback 2010). He serves on the council of the Royal Historical Society.

This talk will take place at 13:30 in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre in the Trinity Long Room Hub.

6th December 2012, ‘An Imaginary Triumph? Remarks on the Composition of Harrison Birtwistle's 'An Imaginary Landscape', an evening with Michael Taylor, Department of Music, TCD.

The Birtwistle collection in the Paul Sacher Stiftung documents the first, abandoned, attempt at 'Triumph of Time', but is particularly rich in sources (though far from complete) for 'An Imaginary Landscape'. Two sketchbooks from this period (unique in the collection) are evidence of the composer's travails, but, contrary to promises on their covers, contain no sketches relating to the work that would eventually bear the title 'Triumph of Time'. From the extant materials, it is possible to construct a tentative chronology, which, in combination with the internal evidence of the sketches, allows an insight into the composition of 'An Imaginary Landscape', its relationship to the faltering first version of 'Triumph of Time', and its role in the evolution of what Michael Hall has called the 'processional form' of the definitive 'Triumph of Time' and subsequent works.

This talk will take place at 18:00 in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub.

4 December 2012 'When Christians were Jews: The New Jewish Annotated New Testament and its Goals', a lecture by Prof Paula Fredriksen, Aurelio Professor of Scripture emerita at Boston University and Distinguished Visiting Professor of Comparative Religion at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.

Arguments over how to observe the Sabbath; boasting of accomplishments in Jewish education; concern over the proper size of tefillin (phylacteries) and tzitziot (prayer fringes); observance of holy days, both minor (Hanukkah) and major (Pesach, Sukkot, Shavuot); collecting funds in the diaspora to send back to Jerusalem; and endless debate about the correct way to be Jewish. It’s all in the New Testament. Though the future of the Christian movement was gentile, its origins both in Jerusalem and in the Diaspora were incontrovertibly Jewish. Christian scripture in fact provides historians of religion with some of the best evidence we have from and for the rough-and-tumble days of Judaism in the Late Second Temple period.

In commissioning its most recent edition of THE JEWISH ANNOTATED NEW TESTAMENT, Oxford University Press (2011) has restored this originary historical context for the non-academic reader. Join Prof Paula Fredriksen as she explores how this project affects, and refreshes, our under-standing of these traditions and texts.

This lecure is part of the Trinity Long Room Hub's Lecture Series on Religion(s), Ethics and Cultural Engagement for 2012-13 organised in conjunction with the School of Religions, Theology and Ecumenics. In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub at 5.00pm on Tuesday, 4 December 2012. Admission is free and all are welcome.

3 December 2012 'Tabloid Values: On the Trail of the World's First News Hound', the inaugural annual lecture of the Centre for Early Modern History delivered by Professor Andrew Pettegree of the University of St Andrews. In the Thomas Davis Lecture Theatre, Arts Building,Trinity College Dublin. Admission is free, all are welcome.

29th November 2012 “The BBC's Irish Troubles” a talk by Professor Robert Savage of Boston College during his term as a Trinity Long Room Hub Visiting Research Fellow.

Throughout ‘the Troubles’ government-imposed censorship, accompanying self-censorship practised by anxious broadcasters, raised critical questions about the freedom of the press and threats to basic civil rights. Throughout the conflict both British and Irish governments resolved to influence if not control how the media presented years of political turmoil and unrest. However, the omnipresence of television compromised their efforts to present an uncomplicated picture — i.e. of the forces of law and order struggling to defeat savage terrorists bent on a campaign of murder and mayhem. During his talk Prof Savage will address the efforts of British governments to shape reporting of the conflict at the start of the 1970s.

Robert Savage is faculty member of the Boston College History Department and teaches in the University’s Irish Studies Program. His research on contemporary Irish history has been funded through fellowships and grants by the Boston College School of Arts and Sciences, the Long Room Hub at Trinity College Dublin; The Moore Institute at the National University of Ireland, Galway; the Leverhulme Trust of Great Britain, the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, the Department of Education and Science (Ireland), the Irish-American Cultural Institute, and the Centre for Irish Studies at the National University of Ireland Galway. His most recent book: A Loss of Innocence? Television and Irish Society 1960-1972 was awarded the 2010 James S. Donnelly, Sr. Prize for Best Book in History and Social Sciences by the American Conference for Irish Studies.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute, at 13.00 on Thursday, 29 November 2012. Admission is free and all are welcome.

27 November 2012 New Methods/New Perspectives on Humanities Scholarship: A NeDimah/DARIAH Workshop
Digital technologies have opened up a wealth of methodologies that can augment and enhance more traditional research practice, allowing new ways to engage with the ever-growing web of digital data. This one-day workshop hosted by NeDIMAH with support from DARIAH will provide an introduction to these methods.

NeDiMAH (Network for Digital Methods in the Arts and Humanities) is an ESF-funded network investigating the use and impact of digital methods on arts and humanities research in Europe. As part of the network's ongoing work, the Trinity Long Room Hub will be the venue for a free one-day symposium to analyse and evaluate the methods thus far developed within the network, and identify ways in which it can further assist scholarly research being carried out in the Digital Arts and Humanities. This workshop will focus on the core areas which NeDIMAH has been investigating: space and time; information visualisation; linked data and ontological methods; building and developing collections for digital data for research; using large-scale text collections for research; digital scholarly editions; and  the impact of digital methods on scholarly publishing. We invite digital humanists at all different career levels, from MPhil students to advanced researchers, to join us for this event.  Your experience and feedback is vital to the ongoing work of NeDIMAH and DARIAH. The event is free but registration is required at  http://nedimahdublin2012.eventbrite.com/

For further information about NeDimah see http://nedimah.eu; about DARIAH see http://dariah.eu; and on DH@TCD see http://dh.tcd.ie/dh

21 November 2012 "Thinking about our Knowledge of Numbers. What is Arithmetic about?", a talk by Professor Rafal Urbaniak during his term as a Trinity Long Room Hub Visiting Research Fellow.

Arithmetic seems to be about objects called numbers.  Prima facie, they don't seem to belong to the realm of the physical: you can't literally kick a number. But if numbers really are aspacial and atemporal, how can we, humble mundane beings, know anything about them? On the other hand, if there are no aspatial and atemporal numbers, what is our arithmetical knowledge really about? In his talk Prof Urbaniak will describe a way of handling such issues which he finds particularly promising.

Rafal Urbaniak obtained his PhD specializing in logic and philosophy of mathematics at the University of Calgary in Canada. He spent some time at Bristol University as a British Academy Visiting Fellow and as a Visiting Researcher at Banaras Hindu University in Varanasi in India. Now, he is both an assistant professor at Gdansk University in Poland and a postdoctoral fellow of the Research Foundation Flanders at the Centre for Logic and Philosophy of Science, Ghent University, Belgium. Apart from non-classical logics and philosophy of mathematics, he is interested in logical aspects of philosophical arguments, especially in the philosophy of religion.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute at 6.00pm on Wednesday, 21 November 2012. Admission is free and all are welcome.

20th November 2012 'Pastoral, Anti-Pastoral, Post-Pastoral (and Georgic): UK, US and Irish Dimensions', a talk by Terry Gifford organised by the School of English.

Terry Gifford has published widely in the fields of ecocriticism, pastoral and modern poetry. He is the author of Green Voices: Understanding Contemporary Nature Poetry (1995), a volume on Pastoral (1999) in the Routledge New Critical Idiom series and two studies of the work of Ted Hughes. He has also edited the complete works of John Muir, The Cambridge Companion to Ted Hughes (2001) and, together with Fiona Becket, Culture, Creativity and Environment: New Environmentalist Criticism (2007).

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin on Tuesday 20th November at 5.00pm. Admission is free, all are welcome.

19th November 2012 “The Future of the EU: Break-up or Superstate?” a talk by Daithi O Ceallaigh, Director General of the Institute of International and European Affairs, organised by the DU Europa Society and DU Politics Society.

The question of the future of the European Union has never been more pertinent. Could the current eurozone crisis be the first visible cracks in an eventual collapse of over 60 years of political and economic co-operation in Europe? Or will there be, in response to this financial threat, greater political will for, and further steps toward EU-wide integration between member states? Is the EU an unsalvageable sinking ship, or can the Union still be saved? Break-up or superstate? These seem to be the two most likely outcomes of the current economic turmoil. Dáithí O'Ceallaigh, former Irish Ambassador to Finland and Estonia, the United Kingdom, as well as former Irish Ambassador to the United Nations in Geneva (2007-2009), speaks about this issue in this upcoming public lecture. Mr. O'Ceallaigh is currently Director General of the Institute of International and European Affairs, Ireland’s leading think tank on European and international affairs.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin on Monday 19th November at 7.00pm. Admission is free, all are welcome.

13 November 2012 'Researching Islam in Ireland: Issues and Challenges', an exploration by Prof Tuula Sakaranaho of the University of Helsinki and Dr Oliver Scharbrodt of University College Cork.

In recent decades, Islam in Western Europe has received considerable attention by the media and public in general. Research has keenly followed the rapid development of Islam in Europe and produced numerous studies which map this phenomenon from different perspectives. These studies, however, rarely touch upon the Republic of Ireland.

Prof Tuula Sakaranaho and Dr. Oliver Scharbrodt have led research projects on the new Islamic presence in Ireland and co-edited a special edition of the Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs on this topic. At this event, both will present and discuss issues and challenges when researching Islam in Ireland

This lecure is part of the Trinity Long Room Hub's Lecture Series on Religion(s), Ethics and Cultural Engagement for 2012-13 organised in conjunction with the School of Religions, Theology and Ecumenics. In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub at 5pm on Tuesday, 13 November 2012. Admission is free and all are welcome.

12 November 2012 The School of English in Association with Lively Conversation Debate Topics Present...'This House Would See Unseen University Run by Witches', A public debate by Staff & Students of Trinity College Dublin, 6:30pm Monday 12th November 2012, Quek Hall, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Pearse Street. Ably Adjudicated by Professor Sir Terry Pratchett, OBE, Blackboard Monitor.

31 October - 2 November 2012 'Biopolitics, Society and Performance', a conference sponsored by the Trinity Long Room Hub and organised by the School of Drama, Film and Music at Trinity which will reconsider the notion of biopolitics and its recent transformations in theory and the contemporary world.

The term biopolitics was first defined by Michel Foucault in his book The Will to Knowledge. For Foucault, biopolitics means the technologies of political power that allow for the control of the human population as a biological species. Biopolitics has become a highly controversial philosophical concept today. Giorgio Agamben, Visiting Professor of Philosophy at University of Paris 8 and a keynote speaker at the conference, relates the term to the legislative aspects of power and the emergence of the totalitarian states of the twentieth century. For Agamben the inclusion of “bare life” in the political realm constitutes the original nucleus of sovereign power. Thus, the political system has the power to decide not only who deserves to have “human rights”, but also which life counts as “human” and worth living.

Many contemporary artists are concerned with the implications of biopolitics. Their work attempts to expose the control mechanisms that affect human behaviour and limit human rights, while exploring bioethical questions in relation to human tissue and genetic modification. Artists including Oron Catts and Ionat Zurr at Symbiotica, Eduardo Kac and Kira O’Reilly will explore bio-art practices and the new frontiers of body art.

This conference will be co-hosted by the Trinity Long Room Hub and the Arts Technology Research Laboratory. Programme and other information is available at http://biopoliticstcd.wordpress.com/programme/

31 October 2012 'The Archaeology of the Work of Art', a Public Lecture by Giorgio Agamben as part of the Biopolitics, Society and Performance conference at Trinity College Dublin. Giorgio Agamben, a major philosopher and cultural theorist from Italy, is widely known for his criticism of the "War on Terror" in the US, as well as for his many books, and for developing such concepts as “Homo Sacer” ( someone who can be killed with impunity because he is regarded as worthless by the state) and “State of Exception”. At 6.00pm in the Tercentenary Lecture Theatre of the Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, 152-160 Pearse St. Admission is free. All welcome.

30 October 2012 'Clever Enough to do Variations: Maurice Sendak as Visual Musician, a talk by Perry Nodelman (Professor Emeritus, University of Winnipeg). Prof Nodelman is author of 'Words About Pictures: The Narrative Art of Children's Picture Books', 'The Pleasures of Children's Literature', and 'The Hidden Adult: Defining Children's Literature'. He was editor of the Children's Literature Association Quarterly (1983-87), and CCL/LCJ, the Canadian children's literature journal (2004-2008). He is a former President of the Children's Literature Association, and currently serves on the Editorial Boards of Jeunesse, IRCL, and the Journal of Children's Literature Studies. Organised by the School of English. In the Trinity Long Room Hub at 10am. All welcome.

30 October 2012 'Democracy and Money in America: A Historical Perspective on the Election of 2012' a lecture by Gary Gerstle, the James G. Stahlman Professor of American History and Professor of Political Science at Vanderbilt University. This lecture by a leading scholar in American political history will offer a historical account of money in American politics from the American Revolution to the present day. Gerstle will explain why elections in America are so long, labor intensive, expensive, and provide frequent opportunities for people with money to influence politics. At 7pm on Tuesday 30 October in the Synge Theater in the Arts Building at Trinity College. All are welcome to attend the lecture.

28 October 2012 'What is it with Vampires'. The Vampire motif seems to be everywhere these days, in teen fiction (Twilight), television (The Vampire Diaries, True Blood) and movies (where do you start?). Teenagers, from Goths to geeks, emos to metalheads, can't get enough, but is it all innocent fantasy? How ambiguous are the underlying messages about love and sexuality, dominance and submission? To what extent is Bram Stoker's Dracula the template for all of this? An expert panel ponders what's really at stake. With moderator Edel Coffey and panelists Anna Carey, Will Hill, Celine Kiernan. In the Trinity Long Room Hub at 2pm. Admission is free, but pre-booking essential. Parents and teens welcome together.

28 October 2012 'What Lies Beneath: Dracula and its Legacy'. A panel discussion of what is hidden beneath the surface of this Gothic tale as part of the Bram Stoker Festival. Modern scholars and Stokerites discuss the effect of Stoker's legacy on literature, and how society's fears manifest in the darkest of tales. Apart from being a masterpiece of the Gothic horror novel, Dracula has been described as a 'coded Victorian diary' and while there is ample textual evidence to support such a claim, analytical theories have ranged from the astute to the deranged. The panel will attempt to separate the two, examining the conflicting elements in the nature and sexuality of an extremely complex man- Bram Stoker, creator of Dracula. Featuring Dr. Jarlath Killeen, Stoker biographer Paul Murray, author Ruth Dudley Edwards, and Senator David Norris. At 4pm in the Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission is free but pre-booking is essential.

27-28 October 2012 'Blood Red Ink' a 3 hour focused writing workshop with double Children's Books award-winner Celine McKiernan as part of the Bram Stoker Festival. Find out how important character is to every story, how to plot and plan, and how fantasy and horror stories, like Dracula, play on societies fears for maximum effect. Join Celine at the Bram Stoker weekend to hear about publishing opportunities and what it is to be a writer. Find out if Dracula really is rising.... 10am to 1pm in the Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission 5 euro. Pre-booking and registration required. BOOK TICKETS24 October 2012 Year of Ulysses talk with Hans Walter Gabler. On the occasion of the 90th Anniversary of the publication of James Joyce's "Ulysses", the School of English, in association with the Modernist Versions Project (MVP), present the second of two free public talks by leading Joyceans. This talk entitled Asyndetic segmenting is a Significant Structuring Device in High Modernist Narrative
is by the esteemed Joycean and textual scholar, Professor Hans Walter Gabler. Gabler is editor-in-chief of the 1986 Synoptic Edition of Ulysses, as well author of many other texts, including A Portrait of the Author as A Young Man. He is Emeritus Professor at the University of Munich and is currently a member of the International Advisory Committee for the Digital Repository of Ireland. In the Trinity Long Room Hub at 12.00pm. Admission free, all welcome. For further information, visit dh.tcd.ie, or email digital.humanities@tcd.ie.

26-27 October 2012 'Laughter and other Non-Verbal Vocalisations in Speech', a two day interdisciplinary workshop. Previous research has shown that laughter and other nonverbal vocalisations (e.g., breath sounds, yawning, sighing) have important functions in social interaction. However, much of the phonetic characteristics of non-verbal vocalisations, and the relationship between social functions and non-verbal vocalisations is still unknown. The goal of this workshop is to bring together scientists from diverse research areas and to provide an exchange forum for interdisciplinary discussions in order to gain a better understanding of laughter and other non-verbal vocalisations. Supported by SSPnet, the Speech Communication Lab and SFI FastNet Project at Trinity College Dublin, as well as by Saarland University (Computational Linguistics and Phonetics) and University of Twente (Human Media Interaction). In the Trinity Long Room Hub.

26 October 2012 'The Anatomy of Fear - From Stoker to Scarpetta', with Patricia Cornwell, Best Selling US Crime Novellist, as part of the inaugural Dublin Bram Stoker Festival. Fear is the currency of the contemporary crime writer just as it was for the writers of Victorian gothic fiction. Bram Stoker's Dracula exploited the Victorian's dread of the supernatural just as the crime thriller excites our fear of sudden murderous violence. In this event, Patricia Cornwell, whose bestselling novels have elevated her to the highest rank of international crime writing, will discuss ways in which the serial killer has become, in some sense, a modern-day equivalent of the vampire. By comparing characters, plots and stories to her own Scarpetta books, the author will illuminate those dark corners of the human psyche which, regardless of time and place, harbour and nourish our deepest human fears. Patricia Cornwell's latest novel in the Scarpetta series, Bone Bed, is published in October and she will be signing copies of the book after the event.Venue: Edmund Burke Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin Tickets: 12euro / 10 euro concession.

10 October 2012 'Year of Ulysses' talk with Terence Killeen. On the occasion of the 90th Anniversary of the publication of James Joyce's "Ulysses", the School of English, in association with the Modernist Versions Project (MVP), present two free and public talks by leading Joyceans.

This first talk, by Terence Killeen, Research Scholar at the James Joyce Centre, is entitled ‘Ulysses in the Mirror of Modernism’. Mr Killeen has published many books on Joyce, including Ulysses Unbound: A Reader’s Companion to Ulysses, and regularly lectures on James Joyce across Europe. Mr Killeen is a former journalist with the Irish Times, and a former trustee of the International James Joyce Foundation. His talk on 10th October will look at the varieties of Modernism during the time Joyce was writing Ulysses as well as the influence these may have had on the book’s reception. In the Trinity Long Room Hub at 3.00pm. Admission free, all welcome. For further information, visit dh.tcd.ie, or email digital.humanities@tcd.ie

9 October 2012 'The Bible and the Buddha: Christian interpretations of Scripture in relation to the Buddhist Tradition', a talk by Prof Leo Lefebure, the Matteo Ricci SJ Professor of Theology at Georgetown University, Washington DC.

In each age Christians interpret their scriptures in light of their relationships to other religious communities; and they interpret their relationships with other religious communities in light of their under-standing of their scriptures. Christian interpretations of the Bible in relation to the Buddhist tradition have ranged widely from bitter hostility to positive appreciation and even to the incorporation of Buddhist perspectives into Christian hermeneutics. Hostile interpretations of the Bible can power-fully shape and reinforce adversarial relationships in an unending cycle of conflict; more generous inter-pretations of the Bible can support and encourage cordial relationships of cooperation.

This lecture will examine various Christian perspectives on the Bible in relation to Buddhists and Buddhism.

This talk is part of the Trinity Long Room Hub's Lecture Series on Religion(s), Ethics and Cultural Engagement for 2012-13 organised in conjunction with the School of Religions, Theology and Ecumenics and the Irish Network for Studies in Buddhism. In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub at 5pm on Tuesday, 9 October 2012. Admission is free and all are welcome.

7 October 2012 Open House Dublin - Tours of the Trinity Long Room Hub building.With the theme ‘Architecture Alive’, this year’s Open House Festival is an exploration of the vitality of Dublin through its architecture and the people who experience it. Throughout the course of the weekend staff and students from Trinity’s Department of History of Art and Architecture will host tours of the College’s most famous and historic buildings as well as its newest building projects including the Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute and the Dublin Dental Hospital. The Trinity Long Room Hub was winner of the 2011 Irish Architecture Award and was shortlisted for the 2010 World Building of the Year. Tours are on Sunday, 7 October from 2pm to 4.30pm. Entry is FREE and on a first-come basis.

5 October 2012 'Art without Borders: Cultural Exchange and Influence in Irish Art History', a Department of Art History student-led symposium with keynote address by Sean Rainbird, Director of the National Gallery of Ireland. In the Trinity Long Room Hub from 9.30am to 5.00pm, advance registration required.

28-29 September 2012 ‘Catholic Loyalty in Britain and Ireland 1660-1900’, a two day symposium organised by the School of Histories and Humanities.

26 September 2012  ‘Voicing 2012: Quality, Inclusion & Participation in Music Education’ , a conference organised by the School of Education in conjunction with Music Generation, St. Patrick’s College Drumcondra and Mary Immaculate College Limerick. 9.30am-4.30pm Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub.

21 September 2012 Culture Night Join us in the Trinity Long Room Hub for a Multilingual Soiree. Staff, students, and friends of the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultural Studies will read their favourite poems and prose extracts in French, German, Italian, Polish, Irish, Russian and Spanish as well as in translation. Some may even sing! Families can collect a self guided tour of the Trinity campus for school-age culture vultures. From 7pm to 8pm. For further information on Culture Night please check http://www.culturenight.ie/

21-22 September 2012 ‘Tolkien: The Forest and the City’, a two day conference organised by the School of English.  

20 September 2012 "Reading Joyce:  Broch's Concept of Classical Modernism", a talk by Professor Wolfgang Mueller-Funk during his term as a Trinity Long Room Hub Visiting Research Fellow.

Prof Mueller-Funk is probably the most prominent cultural theorist of Austria and a very renowned commentator in the national press. He is Professor of Cultural Studies and Theory at the Dept of European and Comarative Literature at the University of Vienna and Director of Research at its Centre for Cultural Studies and Philologies. He has authored numerous books on cultural studies and Austrian literature(s), e.g. "Die Kultur und ihre Narrative", "Einfuehrung in die Kulturtheorie" und "Komplex Oesterreich". Launching his new book on the "Architecture of Modern Culture", Prof Mueller-Funk will give a critical reading of Broch's programmatic essay on James Joyce, which is not only an interpretation of Ulysses, but, at the same time, gives us a deep insight in Broch's own literary project. In the centre of his reflection there is the "loss of values"("Werteverlust") which is seen as the empty centre of modern culture.  The lecture will also contain a short view on other concepts of modernism such as Benjamin and Bachtin.

In the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub at 5pm on Thursday, 20 September 2012. Admission is free and all are welcome.

13 September 2012 ‘Du Bon Usage De Rousseau’, a one-day conference on Jean-Jacques Rousseau organised by the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultural Studies and the French Embassy in Ireland. Keynote speech by Jean-Luc Guichet (Universite de Picardie - Jules Verne, France) 'Anthropological uses of Rousseau: animals, environment, sexuality' at 4pm. In the Neill Hoey Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub from 9am to 5pm. Admission free. All welcome.

12 September 2012 "Man Amidst InHumanity' conference organized on the occasion of the centenary of the birth of Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish diplomat who rescued thousands of Jews during the Holocaust in Hungary. The event is organized jointly by the Hungarian, Israeli and Swedish Embassies, the Centre for European Studies, and Trinity Long Room Hub. The keynote speaker of the conference is Dr. Robert Rozett, Director of Yad Vashem Libraries and editor of Encyclopedia of the Holocaust. From 9.00am - 5.00pm, the Neill Hoey Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Admission free. All welcome.

22 June 2011. 'Desire, Loathing, and Fear in European Fiction, preceding the Exhaustion of Romanticism', a lecture by Gerald Gillespie
(Professor Emeritus, Stanford University). 3.00 p.m. - 4.30 p.m. Wednesday, 22 June. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Trinity College Dublin. Admission free. All welcome.

16-18 June 2011. 'Empires & Bureacracy', a colloquium exploring the comparative history of European empires from late antiquity to the modern world. Venue: The Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin. For further information, please contact the organiser, Dr Peter Crooks, at <empires.bureaucracy@gmail.com> You will find a copy of the programme for the event here.

14 June 2011. 'Inventing the Myth of Hollywood', by Professor Charlie Keil (University of Toronto). 2.00 p.m. - 3.30 p.m. The Seminar Room, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome. For further information, please contact Dr Ruth Barton of the School of Drama, Film and Music: ruth.barton@tcd.ie

9-10 June 2011. 'Reconstructions of the Gothic Past'. A Colloquium Exploring the Perceptions, Reception and Uses of Gothic Architecture from the Thirteenth Century to the Present Day. There is no fee for attending but places must be reserved by returning the registration form available for download on the URl highlighted above. A full programme will be available shortly. Venue: The Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin. For furtehr infomration, contact Caroline McGee.

7 June 2011. 'Building Democracy in India after British Rule', by Professor Aditya Mukherjee and Professor Mridula Mukherjee. 4.00 p.m. - 5.30 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building. Admission free. All welcome.

Friday 27 - Saturday 28 May 2011. 'Space and Settlement in the Middle Ages'.
Following on from the success of 2010's Space and Settlement in the Middle Ages: the final frontier (supported by the Trinity Long Room Hub and the Arts and Social Science Benefaction Fund), we are pleased to announce that Space and Settlement is back for a second year.  This year, the two-day international conference will be held in the Trinity Long Room Hub Building on the 27th and 28th May 2011.  The conference will once again host a range of speakers from universities, the commercial sector and government organisations.  Four inter-disciplinary, thematic sessions will address key issues, including: Landscape and Environment; Domestic Architecture; and Church, Culture and Society.  Dr Tómas Ó Carragáin of University College Cork will deliver the keynote address on Friday evening, followed by an informal reception.  Registration for Space and Settlement in the Middle Ages is free, but places are limited, so it is essential to register in advance at http://spaceandsettlement.eventbrite.com/

Thursday 19 May 2011. 'Glucksman Symposium on Medical Humanities', 3.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome. There will be presentations by Professor Maurice Biriotti (SHM Productions Ltd, and University College London) on 'Medicine, contradiction and experience: Insights from an experiment in the practical application of the humanities', and Professor Roger Smith on 'Why history in an age of neuroscience?'. There will be a response by Professor Ian Robertson of Trinity College Dublin.

4 May 2011. 'The Future of the Past: Recent Developments in the National Library of Ireland', a lunchtime lecture by Fiona Ross, Director of the National Library of Ireland. 1.00 p.m. - 2.00 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, TCD. This is the last session in this year's Dublin Seminar organised by Dr Sandra O'Connell. Admission Free. All Welcome.

Saturday 30 April. Two panel discussions to discuss the work and influence of Thomas Kilroy (further details to follow). 2.00 p.m. – 6.00 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, TCD. Admission Free. To reserve a place, please email Lillian Foley of the Oscar Wilde Centre

Saturday 30 April. A staged reading of Thomas Kilroy’s play ‘Blake’ in The Samuel Beckett Theatre, TCD. Start time 8.00 p.m. Directed by Patrick Mason; Kindly supported by The Abbey Theatre. Tickets for the Saturday performance of ‘Blake’ may be purchased from The Abbey Theatre.

Friday 29 April. ‘The Modernism of Thomas Kilroy’, a public lecture by Professor Nicholas Grene (TCD). 6.00 p.m. – 7.30 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, TCD. All Welcome. Admission free, but it is essential to book tickets in advance. To book a ticket, please email Lillian Foley of the Oscar Wilde Centre.

29-30 April 2011. 'Across The Boundaries: Talking about Thomas Kilroy', a series of events to celebrate the work of the playwright Thomas Kilroy.

20 April 2011. 'Linking the architecture of the City of Dublin and Trinity College', a lunchtime talk by Niall McCullough and Valerie Mulvin, architects. 1.00 p.m. - 2.00 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre. Trinity Long Room Hub Building, TCD. Admission Free. All Welcome. This event is part of the Dublin Seminar organised by Dr Sandra O'Connell.

19 April 2011. 'The "end of censorship" and the politics of toleration and republicanism', by Dr Geoff Kemp (University of Auckland, New Zealand). Neill - Hoey Lecture Theatre, 1.00 p.m. - 2.15 p.m. Admission Free. All Welcome.

Description: Dr Kemp is an expert on contemporary censorship and media, as well as the history of these phenomena. In this talk, he will examine the lapse of pre-publication licensing in 1695 - a date which was long seen as marking the emergence of a free press in these islands - in the context of late-seventeenth and early-eighteenth century arguments about toleration and republicanism. This lecture will be of interest to historians, literary scholars, political theorists and lawyers, among others.

18 April 2011. 'Normalizing India', a lecture by Professor Dipankar Gupta (Jawaharlal Nehru University, India). 1.00 p.m. – 2.00 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, TCD. Admission Free. All Welcome.

15 April 2011. 'Visual Translation: Artistic Challenges in Imaging God as Trinity', a lecture by Dr Gesa E. Thiessen (Trinity Long Room Hub Visiting Research Fellow). Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, TCD. 4.00 p.m. - 5.30 p.m. Admission Free. All Welcome. Coffee will be served before the talk at 3.30 p.m.

15 April 2011. ‘A digital reconstruction of the old Abbey Theatre’, by Dr Hugh Denard (Visiting Research Fellow at the Trinity Long Room Hub). Reception at 7pm. This will be followed by S H I FT, a performance in which contemporary Irish video and sound artists, actors, and musicians will create a live, improvisatory response to the Playboy of the Western World riots in the old Abbey Theatre in 1907.Venue: The Samuel Beckett Theatre, TCD. RSVP to fthackab@tcd.ie before 11 April. (As seating for this event is strictly limited, early booking is advised).

15 April 2011. 'The collapse of the Soviet Union: Twenty years on', Professor Viktor Kuvaldin (Moscow State University) in conversation with Professor Ron Hill (Trinity College Dublin). 7.00 p.m. in  European House, Dawson St, Dublin 2. Admission Free. All Welcome. This keynote lecture opens a two-day conference entitled The Collapse of the Soviet Union: Twenty Years On. Click here for a copy of the conference poster and programme.

14 April 2011. 'Multilinguality, Multimodality and Multicompetence: Code- and mode-switching by minority ethnic children in complementary schools', a lecture by Professor Li Wei, Birkbeck, University of London. 7.30 p.m. Location: Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome.

This lecture is part of the two-day conference in the Hub Building entitled Relocating Cultures. Click here to see a copy of the conference poster and programme.

14 April 2011. 'Wolves in Ireland: A Natural and Cultural History', a lecture by Dr. Kieran Hickey (Department of Geography, NUIG). This is The Fourteenth Meeting of the Irish Environmental History Network. The meeting will take place from 5pm in Room 3051, Floor 3, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin.
Abstract: 'This talk will assess the evidence for wolves in Ireland using a variety of sources including archaeological, placenames, folklore and documentary information. It will be shown that wolves were a deep part of Ireland’s cultural history mostly forgotten and that they were a major component of the Irish landscape long before humans arrived and right up to 1786 when the last wild one was most likely killed. An assessment of wolf numbers will be presented based on a variety of evidence and the cause of their demise will also be outlined. The case for re-introduction will also be discussed'.

13 April 2011.'The micropolicing of language: emergent norms in free spaces', a lecture by Professor Jan Blommaert of Tilberg University. 7.30 p.m. Location: Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Trinity College Dublin. Admission to this lecture is free. All Welcome.

This keynote lecture opens a two-day conference in the Hub Building entitled Relocating Cultures, 13-15 April 2011. Click here to see a copy of the conference poster and programme.

12 April 2011. The Plato Centre presents the 2011 Stephen MacKenna Lecture, '"The Fox knoweth many things, the Hedgehog one great thing": The relation of philosophical concepts and historical contexts in Plato's dialogues'. By Professor Michael Erler (University of Würzburg). 7.30 p.m. - 9.00 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Fellows' Square, TCD. Admission Free. All Welcome.

12 April 2011. Readings by Nordic Poets. 1.00 p.m. - 2.00 p.m. This event is co-ordinated by Poetry Ireland. It will consist of readings by four eminent Nordic poets in English translation. They will do 10 minutes apiece with a short Q&A. The poets are Tua Forsström, Jan Erik Rekdal , Morten Sondergaard & Eva Runefelt. Venue: The Ideas Space, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome.

Sponsors: Poetry Ireland; the Irish Writers' Centre; The Royal Danish Embassy in Ireland; The Royal Norwegian Embassy in Ireland; NORLA; Norwegian Literature Abroad; The Finnish Embassy in Ireland; The Embassy of Sweden in Ireland, and The Swedish Arts Council.

12 April 2011. Poetry Ireland in association with the Irish Writers' Centre, The Royal Danish Embassy in Ireland, The Royal Norwegian Embassy in Ireland, The Finnish Embassy in Ireland & the Embassy of Sweden in Ireland presents a Nordic Night of Poets and Poetry featuring, Tua Forsström, Jan Erik Rekdal , Morten Sondergaard & Eva Runefelt. Venue: 6.30 p.m. Irish Writers' Centre, 19 Parnell Square North, Dublin 1. Contact, 01 872 1302, info@writerscentre.ie
Admission Free. All Welcome.

7 April 2011. 'Indic Religions, Poverty and Social Justice – Facing Unfinished Projects', the eighth of a series of seminars hosted by Professor Felix Wilfred of Madras. 7.30pm Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre.

6 April 2011. 'Interval Studies'. The New York-based artist Tristan Perich is inspired by the aesthetics of maths and physics. His practice includes an intersection of acoustic and electronic music, and physical and digital art. In this post-graduate seminar, Tristan Perich will discuss his work, which can be seen in an exhibition opening at Monster Truck Gallery on 6th April. Venue: Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, TCD. Time: 4.00 - 5.30 pm. Admission Free. All Welcome.

This event is the result of a collaboration between the History of Art Department, TCD; TRIARC, TCD; Department of Music, TCD; Monster Truck Gallery; and the Trinity Long Room Hub.

6 April 2011. 'A History of the Crime Novel, in Ten-and-a-Bit Novels', by the Irish crime writer John Connolly. Reception at 6.00 p.m., followed by talk at 7.00 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. TCD. Admission Free. All Welcome.

5 April 2011. 'Globalization of Consumption: Lessons from the Past', by Professor Dominique Bouchet (University of Southern Denmark), Location: GLT in the Museum Building, Trinity College Dublin. 2.00 p.m. - 3.00 p.m. This lecture is co-organised by the Trinity Long Room Hub and the Business School, TCD.

Description: What is happening today as consumption becomes more globalized and individualized is reminiscent of the processes that led to the emergence of political economy 400 years ago. It is not only the flows and uses of goods and services that change. The very definitions and the various interactions between production, consumption, wealth and power evolve further.

5 April 2011. 'Avoiding Cross Cultural Misunderstandings Thanks to Humanities', by Professor Dominique Bouchet (University of Southern Denmark), Location: Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. 6.00 p.m. - 7.30 p.m. The lecture is co-organised by the Trinity Long Room Hub, the Business School, and the Department of German.

Description: This lecture is about the necessity of taking cultural differences seriously in management and the serious possibilities to learn from a plurality of research fields.

1 April 2011. ‘Remembrance and Amnesia’, one of the spring seminars organised by the Centre for War Studies, TCD. With presentations by: Tobias Temming (University of Münster), ‘Remembrance and Amnesia or Identity and Trauma? Visual History of anti-fascist resistance in German and Dutch post-war cinema, 1945 - 1965’; and Benjamin Möckel (University of Göttingen), ‘The Social Construction of Silence in Post- World War Two Germany.’ 2.00 p.m. - 4.00 p.m. Small Seminar Room, Trinity Long Room Hub Building.

31 March 2011. 'Religious Conversion – Cultural Horizons and Political Frontiers', the seventh of a series of seminars hosted by Professor Felix Wilfred of Madras. 7.30pm Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre.

30 March 2011. 'Capturing and Experiencing Cultural Heritage in Digital Form', by P. Anandan, Distinguished Scientist and Managing Director, Microsoft Research India. 12 noon. Venue: Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome.

30 March 2011. 'Between Plagiarism and Original Thoughts: The Challenge of the Testimonies of Iamblichus', by Professor Wolfgang Polleichtner (Trinity Long Room Hub Visiting Research Fellow). 5.30 pm. Venue: Dept. of Classics Seminar Room, 6th Floor, Arts Building
Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome.

30 March 2011. A reading by the poet Professor Harry Clifton, current holder of the Ireland Chair of Poetry. 7.30 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome. To reserve a place, please email Aoife Moynihan at info@irelandchairofpoetry.org or phone +353 (01) 6197817

28 March 2011. 'Barack Obama and the American Democratic Tradition', a lecture by Professor James Kloppenberg (Charles Warren Professor of History at Harvard University). 7.00 p.m. in the Synge Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin. There will be a reception after the event in the Ideas Space on the 3rd floor of the Trinity Long Room Hub Building. This lecture is the first in a new Annual Lecture Series in U.S. History funded by Trinity alumni. Admission free. All Welcome.

25 March 2011. 'Sanitation, Contagion and the Cattle Plague in Dublin, 1865-9', a lecture by Dr. Juliana Adelman. This is the 13th meeting of the Irish Environmental History Network. 4.00 p.m. to 5.30 p.m. Venue: Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building.

24 March 2011. 'The Old Library: Politics, Architecture, Books - and more books', a lunchtime lecture by Mr Peter Fox (Selwyn College, Cambridge and current Visiting Research fellow at the Trinity Long Room Hub). 1.05 p.m. - 2.00 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building. Admission Free. All Welcome.

24 March 2011. 'Religions Before the Tragic – Encountering Evil and Suffering', the sixth of a series of seminars hosted by Professor Felix Wilfred of Madras. 7.30pm Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building.

23 March 2011. 'The Engagement/Function/Role of the Intellectual in Contemporary Italian Society', a dialogue between the writer Professor Marcello Fois and the academic Dr Gigliola Sulis of Leeds University. Start time: 5.00 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin. All Welcome.

22 March 2011. 'The Bohuns and their Books: Illuminated Manuscripts for Aristocrats in Fourteenth-Century England', a lecture by
Professor Lucy Sandler (Helen Gould Sheppard Professor of Art History, emerita, New York University), 5.15 p.m., Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome. This event has been sponsored by the International Center of Medieval Art, New York.

18 March 2011. 'DublinSwell: Words and Voices from the City of Literature'. Venue: CCD, Spencer Dock, North Wall Quay, Dublin 1. Time: event begins at 7.30 p.m.

15 March 2011. 'COLLATERAL DAMAGE: Literature, Science, and Economy', a reading (in English) by Olga Flor, followed by a discussion and reception hosted by Professor Moray McGowan (TCD) & the Austrian Embassy. This event is organised under the auspices of The Identity Workshop, a lecture and seminar series organised by The School of Languages, Literatures and Cultural Studies. Venue: Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin. Start time: 5.30 p.m. Admission Free. All Welcome.

15 March 2011. 'Indic Religions and Sexuality – Interreligious Frontiers and Gender Constructs', the fifth of a series of seminars hosted by Professor Felix Wilfred of Madras. 7.30pm Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre.

11 March 2011. 'Queer Treasure: Documenting LGBT History in Ireland', by Tonie Walsh (founding editor of Gay Community News and co-founder of the Irish Queer Archive). 12 noon - 1.00 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin. Synopsis: 'Societal taboos and criminal sanctions around homosexuality and other "transgressive" sexual behaviour have long militated against any real understanding and acceptance of a significant sexual minority with its own distinctive rituals, traditions and history. After centuries of marginalisation, the demonising and outright exclusion of  LGBT culture would reach its apogée in Nazi Germany, when decades of research and documentation were destroyed and thousands of gay cultural and political figures sent to the gas chambers. Only with the emergence of a vibrant civil rights movement in late 60's USA and Europe would a newly liberated community begin in earnest the task of preserving and documenting its record of existence. This lecture explores attempts at collecting, preserving and documenting materials in late 20th c. Ireland; a determination by LGBT individuals and groups to collect, document and celebrate its joyous (if at times tortuous) history, often in the face of a shabby unwillingness by the state to even recognise this community's existence. An overview of the Irish Queer Archive  (Ireland's most significant repository of LGBT documents), its foundation and historic transfer in 2008 to the National Library of Ireland also offers many suggestions for its exploitation and benefit to all of Irish society.

11 March 2011. The Centre for War Studies presents its sixth seminar, on the topic of ‘Everyday life: Continuity and Disjuncture’. The presentations will be by Justin Dolan Stover (TCD), ‘Negotiating allegiance:  Exploring loyalty and treason during the Irish Revolution, 1913-21’, and Franziska Heimburger (EHESS, Paris), ‘“Intercrossings intrinsic to the subject”: military language policy and usage as a way of approaching the Allied coalition during the First World War.’ Trinity Long Room Hub Seminar Room. 2.00 p.m. - 4.00 p.m.

4 March 2011. 'Honest to Blog. A Symposium on Web Legitimacy', 10.00 a.m. - 4.00 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin.

3 March 2011. 'Readings of Russian Literature with Vladimir Babkoff'. 11:30 a.m. - 1.00 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin

3 March 2011. 'The Multicultural Culture of Russia'. By Brigit Katharine McCone. 1.00 p.m. - 2.30 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Trinity College Dublin.

3 March 2011. 'Toward Social Transformation through Arts Education: Spiritual Awakenings', Professor Marie McCarthy (University of Michigan), 5.00 p.m. - 7.00 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub.

2 March 2011. 'The life and Times of the Irish-Russian poet, publisher and literary translator, George Reavey (1907-76)', by Dr Sandra O'Connell. 1.00 p.m. - 2.30 p.m.. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin.

1 March 2011. 'Twenty Years On. What do Russians Think About Democracy?' By Dr Derek Hutcheson (UCD). 1.00 p.m. - 2.30 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Trinity College Dublin. 

26 February 2011. 'Children’s Literature, Classics and the City', a public forum for debate. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity Coleeg Dublin. 9.30am - 6.30pm. See the programme of events here. All Welcome.

24 February 2011. 'The Curse of Isms', by Dr Cesare Cuttica (Marie Curie Fellow in Intellectual History, University of Sussex). 2.00 p.m. - 3.30 p.m., Seminar Room, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All welcome.

23-25 February 2011. The Founding Conference of the European Consortium for Humanities Institutes & Centres (ECHIC). Venue: Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin.

23 February 2011. 'Edizione Tradizionale ed Edizione Digitalizzata: Accenni a Problematiche Metodologiche' by Professor Marco Santoro
(University  La Sapienza, Rome). Venue: The Henry Jones Room, The Old Library, Trinity College Dublin. 2.30 pm- 4.30 pm. All Welcome.

23 February 2011. 'Historicizing American Conservatism: A Century of Economic Evolutions, Porous Borders, and Political Revolts in the South and West', by Dr Elizabeth Tandy Shermer (current Mellon Fellow of American History at the University of Cambridge and an Assistant Professor at Loyola University Chicago). 3.00 p.m. - 4.30 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin.

22 February 2011. 'Specificity and Place', a lunchtime talk by Alan Mee. 1.00 p.m. - 2.00 p.m. Neill / Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Fellows' Square, TCD. All welcome.

Details: Alan Mee (Urban Agenda), an architect working in urbanism, architecture and education, will give a lecture in 'The Dublin Seminar Series' in TCD's new  Trinity Long Room Hub on "Specificity and Place" on Tuesday 22 February, 1-2pm. The lecture explores specificity in the Dublin context as well as the impact of rapid unchecked change, which has led to a form of spatial chaos. In reviewing the analysis of these new and fast changing spatial conditions at various scales, it is possible to assess impacts on Irish specificity in design, across jurisdictions, their places, and their urban form. Alan Mee runs a design practice, which responds to the increasing demand for organising systems and design quality in development. Alan edits and writes Urban Agenda, an on-line forum for urbanism and a regular column in Architecture Ireland, the journal of the RIAI. He has published and spoken nationally and internationally on the particularities of the recent dramatic changes in the Irish designed environment.  He is also Director of the Urban Design Masters programme at University College Dublin.

22 February 2011. Professor Erich Gruen (Gladys Rehard Wood Professor of History and Classics Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley) on ‘Jewish Appropriation of Greek Mythology.’ 5.00 p.m. - 7.00 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. This is a seminar of the Centre for Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies.

17 February 2011. 'Indianness of Christianity & South Asian Christian Diaspora', the fourth of a series of seminars hosted by Professor Felix Wilfred of Madras. 7:30pm. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building.

17 February 2011. 'Priest, Poet and Criminal: Violence, Infanticide and Literature in early-modern Genoa', by Dr Elena Taddia (Visiting Research Fellow, Trinity Long Room Hub). This lecture is given as one of the 'DEPARTMENT OF ITALIAN RESEARCH SEMINARS'
Venue: Seminar Room, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, TCD. 7.00 p.m. - 8.30 p.m. All Welcome.

16 February 2011. 'Structures and Intuitions in Art and Science from Leonardo to Now', by Professor Martin Kemp (Emeritus Professor of Art History, Oxford University), 6pm, PACCAR Theatre, Science Gallery, Pearse Street. All Welcome. Please note: The Science Gallery charges 5 Euro entrance to this event.

15 February 2011. ‘Smallpox in Eighteenth-Century Britain’, by Dr Deborah Brunton (Open University). Venue: The Edward Worth Library, Dr Steevens’ Hospital, Dublin 8. Time: 3.00 p.m. - 5.00 p.m.

11 February 2011. 'Queer Oscar Versus Wilde the Irish Rebel', a lecture by Dr Eibhear Walshe, UCC, and scholar in residence at Trinity Long Room Hub, TCD. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, 12.00 noon - 1.30 p.m. This is one of the talks organised by Dr Fintan Walsh under the auspices of the Queer Theory Seminar.
Synopsis: 'One way or another, Oscar  Wilde always represents a challenge within Irish cultural discourse. Wildeʼs homosexuality was contested within twentieth-century Ireland, a discourse often interconnected with Irish cultural nationalism and this interconnection often downplayed the other, potentially subversive elements within his writings and his public personal. This lecture consider two key elements within Irish cultural perceptions of Oscar Wilde - the  ways in which the figure of Wilde was re-appropriated within a particular tradition of rebellious Irish nationalism after his trials in 1895 and how the nationalist re-appropriation submerged or denied the radical or ʽqueerʼ potential for Wildeʽs transgressive decadent persona,  the queer prophet of sin.'

11 February 2011. The Herzog Centre at TCD presents Professor Irene Zweip (Professor of Hebrew, Aramaic and Jewish Studies at the University of Amsterdam) on ‘Whose knowledge is it anyway? Author and authority in Jewish interpretation from antiquity to the Enlightenment’. 1.30 p.m. - 3.00 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub.

10 February 2011. 'Ecology, Climate Change and Film', a talk by Dr. Pat Brereton of the School of Communications, Dublin City University. This is the 12th meeting of the Irish Environmental History Network. 5.00 p.m. - 6.30 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. Synopsis: 'The talk will draw upon textual analysis of film undertaken for Dr. Brereton’s PhD, together with ongoing research and publications on ecology and cinema that can be used to measure and evaluate the power of mass media in framing debates on ecology and climate change. Using examples from Climate Change narratives, Green Irish cinema, and an upcoming symposium on Eco-cinema, the talk will tease out some issues that influence a range of ecological debates. The Hollywood dream factory frequently produces ecological fantasies, which feed into the public consciousness of world audiences. While "feel good" narratives focusing on fears of environmental catastrophes and humanity’s need to reassess their role as part of nature can be criticised as vacuous, endorsing grand symbolic gestures, nevertheless such narratives also remain significant in keeping the environment at the centre of human consciousness.'

10 February 2011. ‘Marina Carr’s By The Bog of Cats’. Readings in the original English, and from the new Chinese translation of, the classic By The Bog of Cats.  7.00 p.m. – 9.00 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, TCD. Admission free. All welcome. This event is organised in conjunction with Dublin City Council to mark the Chinese New Year.

10 February 2011. 'Indic Religions, Migrations, and South Asian Diasporas', the third of a series of seminars hosted by Professor Felix Wilfred of Madras, India. 7.30 p.m. Note the change of venue to IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor, Arts Building, TCD.

4 February 2011. A public lecture by Professor Paul Collier, Director of the Centre for the Study of African Economies at the University of Oxford. 11.00 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Organised by the Institute for International Integration Studies. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub. For further details, please contact mcguirke@tcd.ie

3 February 2011. 'The One and the Many – Religious Pluralism: An Asian Perspective', the second of a series of seminars hosted by Professor Felix Wilfred of Madras, India. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre. 7:30 p.m.

27 January 2011. 'The archaeological evidence for tillage agriculture and environment in Early Medieval Ireland', by Dr Mick Monk, School of the Human Environment, University College Cork. 5.00 p.m - 6.30 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building. This is the 11th Meeting of the Irish Environmental History Network.

27 January 2011. 'I Confess', a lecture by Professor Thomas Docherty (Professor of English and Comparative Literature, University of Warwick). 7.30 p.m. - 9.00. IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor, Arts Building, TCD.

27 January 2011. 'Europe and India in Dialogue: Crisis of Secularism and Hope for Peace', the first of a series of seminars hosted by Professor Felix Wilfred of Madras, India. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre. 7:30pm.

25 January 2011. Mr Haruhiko Kuroda, President of the Asian Development Bank will speak on the topic of 'Developing Asia: Economic Outlook and Post-Crisis Challenges'. 7.00p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Fellows' Square, Trinity Long Room Hub.

21 January 2011. 'Andrew Marvell's sense of humour: Wit, evil, and why we should read him', by Professor Nigel Smith (Princeton University). Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre. 1.00 p.m. – 2.00 p.m.
 
21 January 2011. 'Words vs. Music from Plato to Bono', by Professor Nigel Smith (Princeton University). 4.00-5:30pm. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre. This event is the annual H.O. White Lecture organised this year by the School of English and Trinity Long Room Hub.

19 January 2011. 'Planning FOR Dublin', by Dr Conor Skehan, School of Spatial Planning, DIT.
‘The Dublin Seminar’ is a new lecture series at the Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College, which explores the city from multiple perspectives including architecture and design, history, literature, social and economic issues as well as strategic planning.  The talks take place from 1 to 2pm in the new Trinity Long Room Hub building, designed by McCullough Mulvin Architects, with time allocated for discussion. The series will run to April 2011 inclusive. Spatial Planner, Dr Conor Skehan, Head of the Environment and Planning Department in the School of Spatial Planning at DIT, will speak on 19 January on  “Planning FOR Dublin” – debating whether in planning terms Dublin’s important role as the economic driver of Ireland is being recognized. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre. 1.00 p.m. – 2.00 p.m.

17 January 2011. 'Erasmus, Antitrinitarianism and the anatomy of a forgery', by Dr Grantley McDonald (Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven and Visiting Research Fellow at the Trinity Long Room Hub for the month of January 2011). Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, 4.00 p.m. - 5.30 p.m. Admission free. All welcome.

13 December 2010. "Israel and the Nations: Three Contesting Jewish Worldviews", a lecture by Professor Aharon Klieman, Stanley Gold Visiting Professor, Herzog Centre, TCD. 2.00 p.m. - 3.45 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin. All Welcome.

10 December 2010. 'God, Atlantis and Women’s Fashion: Plato On (Just) About Everything', by Dr Carl O'Brien, Trinity Long Room Hub Visiting Research Fellow. 1.00 p.m. - 2.00 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome.

10 December 2010. 'Queer Futures: Rehearsing the (Im)Possible'. The 3rd meeting of the Queer Theory Seminar will provide a rare opportunity to encounter groundbreaking artists, working with different media, who will discuss their queer cultural interventions. Panelists from Ireland, the UK and the USA will consider the queer currents of their work by reflecting upon themes, concepts, aesthetics and audiences. Discussion will focus on the past achievements, current urgencies and future possibilities of queer arts practices. Speakers will include Liz Burns (Curator, Ireland), Mark O’Halloran (Actor/Writer, Ireland), Stacy Makishi (Live Artist, UK), and Peggy Shaw (Artist/Performer, USA). The event will be chaired by Dr. Fintan Walsh (TCD). Queer Futures is programmed as part of Queer Theory, Culture and Society, a year-long interdisciplinary seminar series hosted by The Trinity Long Room Hub which is open to the public. The event is sponsored by The Trinity Long Room Hub and a Visual and Performing Arts Fund (TCD).

Time and venue: 3.30 p.m. - 5.30 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin. All Welcome.

9 December 2010. 'Education for Development', a lecture by Sister Cyril Mooney, PhD, Educational Reformer and Headteacher of Sealdah Loreto Day School, Kolkata, India. Introduced by Professor Michael Grenfell. The talk begins at 6.15pm in the Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome. Tea will be served from 5.30 p.m. Please RSVP to tidi@tcd.ie by Monday 6th December.

8 December 2010. 'Joseph Mary Plunkett, The Irish Review and the 1916 Proclamation', 1.00 p.m - 2.00 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome. This event is organised as part of The Dublin Seminar organised by Dr Sandra O'Connell of Architecture Ireland.

8 December 2010. 'How Medieval Nuns Invented the Postcard', by Dr Kathryn Rudy, Visiting Research Fellow, Trinity Long Room Hub. Ui Chadhain Lecture Theatre, Arts Building, TCD. This talk starts at 7.00 p.m. and has been organised by the Hub in conjunction with TRIARC.

3 December 2010. 'Mr Kemble's Curious Acquaintance: N. F. S. Grundtvig and his remarkable reception of Anglo-Saxondom', a lecture by Professor Sid Bradley, Professor Emeritus of the University of York. Friday 3rd December, 5.00 p.m. Synge Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin.

3 December 2010. Professor Jørgen Søndergaard, 'Creating Consensus and Managing Change in Difficult Times: Lessons for Ireland from the Danish experience'. There will be a talk for an invited audience of politicians, social partners and policy makers between 12 noon and 2pm, and a public lecture from 5pm to 7pm. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin.

2 December 2010. '"Redeeming Landscapes": restoring landscape in Australia (& Ireland)', by Prof. Katie Holmes (UCD). 5.00 p.m. - 6.30 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin. All Welcome. This is the Tenth Meeting of the Irish Environmental History Network.

2 December 2010. 'The Battle of Grunwald: Changing the Face of Europe', a lecture by Professor Henryk Samsonowicz. 7.00 pm - 8.30 pm. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome. There will be simultaneous translation from Polish into English.

1 December 2010. 'Folkloric Patterns in Satyajit Ray's Films for Children', by Professor Bansari Mitra, Visiting Scholar, English Department, Trinity College Dublin. 5.00 p.m. in 191/192 Pearse Street (Film Studies teaching room). Orgainsed by Dr Ruth Barton in the School of Drama, Film and Music at TCD. CANCELLED DUE TO ADVERSE WEATHER CONDITIONS.

29 November 2010. 'Identity in the making: European Literature Past, Present & Future'. By Professor Roberto Antonelli (La Sapienza University, Rome). 6.00 p.m. - 8.00 p.m. This event is part of the year-long Identity Workshop organised by Dr Clemens Ruthner of the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultural Studies. All Welcome. Please email Dr Ruthner to book a place.

27 November 2010. 'The 6th Symposium of the Eighteenth-Century Literature Research Network in Ireland'. This event will be held in the Linen Hall Library, Belfast. To register, contact Moyra Haslett. To join the Eighteenth-Century Literature Research Netowork, please contact Professor Ian Campbell Ross.

25 November 2010. 'Digital Humanities – Technology Transforming the Arts'. Professor Jane Ohlmeyer will speak to how Digital Humanities is emerging as one of the most groundbreaking innovations in the Arts and Humanities at an exclusive alumni event in the newly opened Trinity Long Room Hub Building from 6-8pm. Find out more or purchase your ticket online for €15 including a wine and canapé reception. 

24 November 2010. 'Air from another time and place: Seamus Heaney's Human Chain', by Professor Michael Parker, University of Central Lancashire'. 2.30 - 4.00 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin. All Welcome.

24 November 2010. ‘Dublin and the World Design Capital Bid for 2014’, by Ali Grehan, Dublin City Architect. 1.00 p.m. to 2.00 p.m. All Welcome. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin. All Welcome. This is part of The Dublin Seminar organised for the Trinity Long Room Hub by Dr Sandra O'Connell of Architecture Ireland.

19 November 2010. 'Beyond Normandy in World War 2: Occupation, Resistance & Remembrance', a colloquium organised by the Department of French, TCD. 9.15 am - 5.30 pm. For further details, or to register contact Dr Sarah Alyn Stacey

18, 19 & 20 November 2010. Oceans Past III, an international conference on environmental history organised by Professor Poul Holm, Academic Director of the Trinity Long Room Hub. 9.00 a.m. - 5.00 p.m. Venue: Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin. All Welcome.

17 November 2010. 'Forging Ireland’s Identity: Yeats and Croatia'. By Professor Ljiljana Gjurgjan, University of Zagreb. 12 noon – 1 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Trinity College Dublin. Organised by the School of English at TCD. All Welcome.

17 November 2010. 'Confessions of a Convert: From Fishery Biology to Environmental History', by Dr Tim D. Smith. 5.00 p.m. to 7.00 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, Trinity College Dublin.

15 November 2010. 'Hibernia Cantans': Medieval Music Manuscripts in the Library of Trinity College Dublin', a talk by Dr Ann Buckley of the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, TCD as part of Innovation Week. 12.30 pm to 2 pm. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre. Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, TCD. All Welcome.

13 November 2010. ‘1916 and After’. A symposium at the Trinity Long Room Hub. This symposium will focus on the ways in which the events of 1916 pinpoint collapse and changes in the world system of empire. For further details of this event, please visit www.nuigalway.ie/mooreinstitute or email mooreinstitute@nuigalway.ie

10 November 2010.Blasphemy. Modern Crime or Historical Anachronism?’, by Professor David Nash (Oxford Brookes University). 2.00 p.m. – 3.30 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building. All Welcome.

9 November 2010. 'Civil Partnership or Civil Marriage?' Speaker: Senator Ivana Bacik. 11.00 am – 12.30 pm. Neil/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Fellows’ Square, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome.

5 November 2010. 'Bram Stoker: The Twilight of Dracula', by David Skal. 12.00 noon. – 1.30 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Fellows’ Square, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome.

22 October 2010. The 9th Lewis Glucksman Memorial Symposium entitled 'The 1641 Depositions, War and Atrocity'. Speakers: Professor Jane Ohlmeyer (Trinity College Dublin) ‘The 1641 Depositions Project’; Professor John Morrill (University of Cambridge) ‘Did the English over-react to the massacres of 1641?’; and Professor Ben Kiernan (Yale University) ‘A world away? Ethno-religious violence in early-modern Southeast Asia’. 3.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m. The Synge Theatre, The Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin. Admission Free. All Welcome.

Video of the Glucksman Symposium on the 1641 Depositions from Jason McElligott on Vimeo.

15 October 2010. ‘Horace Walpole’s Cat’, by Professor Christopher Frayling (Royal College of Art). 2.00 p.m. – 3.30 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building. All Welcome.

11 October 2010. Professor Joep Leerssen (University of Amsterdam) will present a paper at the first of a series of all-day workshops on the theme of 'Identity'. Exact title and timings to be confirmed. This seminar is organised by Dr Clemens Ruthner of the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultural Studies.

8 October 2010. 'On Mental Conflict. Ovid's Medea Revisited.', by Dr Robert Zaborowski of the Institute for History of Science, Warsaw. 3.30 p.m. – 5.30 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building. All Welcome.

7 October 2010. Public Forum: Why Does the Past Matter? This forum on Greco-Roman antiquity in the 21st century will explore some of the ways in which we use the Classical past and to what extent and why it remains relevant today and important for our future. The event will be chaired by former Provost Thomas Mitchell in the Trinity Long Room Hub building.

1 October 2010. Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies Workshop - "Convivencia" in Byzantium? Cultural Exchanges in a Multi-Ethnic and Multi-Lingual Society. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, TCD. By invitation only.

27 Sept. 2010. Lecture by Professor Louise Richardson (University of St Andrews, UK). Title and time tbc. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, TCD. By invitation only.

22 Sept. 2010. 'The Writer as Geographer. Considering Literature, Landscape and Technology', by Dr. Charles Travis (Lecturer in Geography, NUI Maynooth). This lecture will be followed by the combined launch of Dr. Travis's new book, Literary Landscapes of Ireland: Geographies of Irish Stories, 1929-1946 (Mellen Press, New York) and the launch of A Digital Literary Atlas of Ireland, 1922-1949, which will be made available on the Trinity Long Room Hub website. 5.00 p.m. - 7.00 p.m. All Welcome.

16 Sept. 2010. 'The Rationality of Folk Healing in the Enchanted Present', Professor David Hufford, Penn State University, USA. This lecture is presented by the Trinity Long Room Hub in conjunction with the Centre for the History of Medicine in Ireland at UCD. 4.00 p.m. - 5.30 p.m. Neill/Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub Building, Fellows' Square, TCD. All Welcome.

10-12 Sept. 2010. 'The Perils of Print Culture', an interdisciplinary conference at TCD organised by Dr Jason McElligott and Dr Eve Patten.

3 September 2010. Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies Conference - Forum for the Study of Early-Modern Women in Continental Europe.Switft Theatre, Arts Building 9:00am - 6:00pm.

23 June 2010. Perspectives on India and the West: Politics, Religion and Art . The 8th Lewis Glucksman Memorial Symposium. With contributions by Professor Francis Clooney (Harvard Divinity School), Professor Gauri Viswanathan (Columbia University) and Mr Charles Horton (Chester Beatty Library, Dublin). Synge Theatre, Arts Building 5.00p.m. to 7.30 p.m. All welcome. In conjunction with the Library Exhibition Nabobs, Soldiers and Imperial Service: The Irish in India

2 June 2010. The 1st Annual Mary Pollard Memorial Lecture. ‘"This Will Make Learning Pleasant": Early Modern Children & Pictures', a lecture by Ms Jill Shefrin in the Emmet Theatre, Arts Building. 6.00 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. All welcome.

27 May - 3 October 2010. Library Exhibition: Nabobs, Soldiers and Imperial Services: The Irish in India. The Long Room.

27-28 May 2010. Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies Conference - Les Conflits en Savoie 1500-1800 / Conflict and Society in Savoy in the early-modern period. Thomas Davis Theatre, Arts Building, 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

28th - 29th May 2010. Space and settlement in the Middle Ages: The Final Frontier. Jonathan Swift Theatre, Arts Building TCD

29 April 2010. 'Scientific Taboos'. Short presentations by Dr Máirín Ní Cheallaigh (IRCHSS Postdoctoral Fellow) on ‘Taboos and Scientific Objectivity: Irish Archaeological Approaches to the Display of Ancient Human Remains’, and Evangelos Kapros (PhD Candidate in Computer Science) on ‘The Institutional Nature of Moral Taboos in Science’. Room C6002, Arts Building, 12 noon - 1.00 p.m.

27 April 2010. Professor David Anderson (History and African Politics, University of Oxford) ‘Development and Environment in Ethiopia: The Gibe Dams and the Omo River Flood’. Robert Emmet Theatre, Arts Building, 5.00 p.m. – 7.00 p.m. Organised in conjunction with TIDI. All welcome.

26 April 2010. Professor Jonathan L. Hart (Edmonton, Canada) will speak on the topic 'Does Empire Ever Die? Decolonization versus Neo-Imperialism'. 6.00 p.m. - 8.00. IIIS Seminar Room, Room C.6002, 6th Floor, Arts Building. TCD.

22 April 2010. Dr Giovanna Fossati (EYE Film Institute, The Netherlands), ‘From Grain to Pixel. The Archival Life of Film in Transition from Analogue to Digital Technology’. This is the keynote address for the Irish Postgraduate Film Research Seminar. Time. 6.00 p.m. Venue: Theatre Mhairtin Ui Chadhain (Room 2041B), Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin. A reception in the IIIS Seminar room will follow Dr Fossati’s address.

22-23 April 2010. Irish Postgraduate Film Research Seminar. Location: IIIS Seminar Room, C.6002, 6th floor, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin.

20 April 2010. 'Blasphemy: historical anachronism or modern crime?' Professor David Nash (Oxford Brookes University, UK). Swift Theatre, Arts Building, TCD. 4.00 p.m. - 5.30 p.m. CANCELLED DUE TO VOLCANIC ACTIVITY.

17 April 2010. Philip Pullman will talk about his new book ‘The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ’ in conversation with Fintan O'Toole. Edmund Burke Theatre, Arts Building. 3.00 p.m. – 4.30 p.m. All welcome. CANCELLED DUE TO VOLCANIC ACTIVITY.

16 April 2010. Professor Terry Eagleton, ‘What is Evil?’ 12 noon to 2.00 p.m. J.M. Synge Theatre, Arts Building. All welcome.

15 April 2010. 'Global Visualities and The New Everyday'. A post-graduate seminar for the School of Drama, Film and Music at TCD by Professor Nicholas Mirzoeff of New York University. Start time: 10.15 am. Location: ATRL, Trinity Tech. and Enterprise Campus, Pearse St, Dublin 2 (i.e. not on the main city-centre campus). All welcome..

15 April 2010. 'Leadership Forum: Arts and Culture – the Future for Ireland?' This forum will contribute to the discussion of what lessons Irish leaders in the business and government sectors might have to learn from the arts and cultural spheres. The speakers include Professor Maurice Biriotti, CEO of SHM Ltd and Adjunct Professor of Humanities Innovation at Trinity College Dublin; Ed Guiney, producer of the Palme d’Or winning “The Wind that Shakes the Barley” and co-founder of the film production company, Element Films; Gráinne Millar, the Head of Cultural Development at the Temple Bar Cultural Trust; and John O’Hagan, Professor of Economics at Trinity College Dublin. Venue: JM Synge Theatre, Arts Building. 2.00 p.m. – 5.00 p.m.

14 April 2010. 20/20 Vision: What will the world be like in ten years time?' A symposium with presentations on ‘Globalisation’ by Stephen D King, (Global Chief Economist at HSBC Bank); ‘Climate Change Denial’ by Howard Friel, author of The Lomborg Deception; and Nicholas Mirzoeff of NYU on ‘The Change to a Visual World’. Moderator: Aine Lawlor, RTE. Venue: Edmund Burke Theatre, Arts Building. 2.00 – 4.30 pm. All welcome.

13 April 2010. 'Fantastic Futures' with the science-fiction writers Philip Reeve, Oisin McGann and Conor Kostick. 11.00 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Edmund Burke Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin. All welcome. Organised in association with Children's Books Ireland as part of Trinity Week 2010. In the evening there will be a session entitled 'Philip Reeve in conversation with Robert Dunbar'. This will take place in the JM Synge theatre in the Arts Building from 6.30 p.m. to 8.00 p.m. All welcome.

12 April 2010. 'New Ways to Remember Fontenoy: The Professionalization of Soldiering in Eighteenth-Century France'. A lecture by Professor Hervé Drévillon (Université de Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne). 4.00 p.m. Room C6002. Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin. Organised by the Trinity Long Room Hub in conjunction with the Centre for War Studies. TCD. All welcome.

10 April 2010. 'Archives in Crisis: A Symposium to Debate the Future of Archives in Irish Society'. 3.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m. Venue: Robert Emmet Lecture Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College, Dublin. Moderator: Professor Diarmaid Ferriter. Speakers: Fintan O’Toole, Catriona Crowe, Eunan O’Halpin.

8 April 2010. ‘The Meaning of Medieval Culture’. Professor Brian McGuire (Roskilde University, Denmark). Room 5030, 5th floor, Arts Building. 6.00pm to 7.30pm. All welcome.

31 March 2010. ‘The Opportunities of Multiculturalism’. TLRH Post-Graduate Seminar in Ethics, South Training Room of the Berkeley Library. 4.00 p.m. – 6.00 p.m. Convened by Amy Daughton ( daughtoa@tcd.ie). Advance booking essential.

30 March 2010. ‘Samuel Ferguson and the Fraternity of Irish Poetry’. By Dr. Matthew Campbell (School of English, University of Sheffield). 10.00 a.m. – 12 noon. IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor, Arts Building, TCD. All welcome

23 March 2010. “Scales of Prostitution: International Governmentalities and Interwar India”. By Dr Stephen Legg (Cultural and Historical Geography, University of Nottingham). 10.00 a.m. – 12 noon. IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor, Arts Building, TCD. All welcome.

22 March 2010. ‘From Grain to Pixel: The Archival Life of Film in Transition’ by Professor Giovanna Fossati (Curator, Nederlands Filmmuseum). 6.00 p.m. – 7.30 p.m. Venue to be confirmed. This lecture is a keynote address at the Irish Postgraduate Film Research Seminar 2010.

19 March 2010. ‘Touring the Dead Lands: Emily Eden and a Victorian Apocalypse'. By Dr Pablo Mukherjee (School of English, University of Warwick). IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor, Arts Building, TCD. 10.00 a.m. – 12.00 noon. All welcome.

15 March 2010. ‘The Ethics of Climate Change’. By Professor John Broome (Philosophy, Oxford University). Seminar Room 1.10, School of Nursing and Midwifery, D’Olier Street. 10.00 a.m. – 11.30 a.m. All welcome.

11 March 2010. ‘From War Talk to Rights Talk: the Wartime Origins of the Human Rights Movement, 1940-1945.’ by Professor Jay Winter (Yale University). The first annual ‘War in History’ lecture sponsored by the Centre for War Studies and the Trinity Long Room Hub. 7.30 p.m. – 9.00 p.m. Emmet Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College. All welcome.

10 March 2010. – ‘Remembered History’, TLRH Post-Graduate Seminar in Ethics, South Training Room of the Berkeley Library 4.00 p.m. – 6.00 p.m. Convened by Amy Daughton ( daughtoa@tcd.ie). Advance booking essential.

5 March 2010. Professor Ralph Wedgwood (Philosophy, University of Oxford).‘The Doctrine of Double Effect: A Defence’. 10.00 a.m. – 12 noon, IIIS Seminar Room, C.6002, 6th Floor, Arts Building. TCD. All welcome.

3 March 2010. ‘Debates over Climate Change in Tsarist Russia’. Professor David Moon (History, University of Durham). 4.00 p.m. – 6.00 p.m. Swift Theatre. Arts Building. All welcome.

2 March. ‘Force Reading: Captive Audiences in Victorian Britain’. A lecture by Professor Leah Price of Harvard University. From 6.00 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. Room 3051, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin. All Welcome.

    26 Feb. 2010. 'Popular Cult and Power: The Function of the Juktas Peak Sanctuary in Protopalatial and Neopalatial Crete', a lecture by Dr Alexandra Karetsou. 7.30 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. Synge Lecture Theatre (2039), Arts Building, TCD.

    25 Feb. 2010. ‘Scholarship and Sacrifice: Can we Bank on a Humanistic Future?’, Dr W. J. McCormack, Edward Worth Library. 7.00 p.m. - 8.30 p.m. in the Robert Emmet Lecture Theatre, Arts Building, TCD. This is the seventh, and final, Mackey Lecture.

    25 Feb. 2010. 'Taboos Relating to Sexuality and Childcare
    '. Short presentations by Mr Paul Shield (Clinical Lecturer, Department of Psychiatry) on ‘Industrial Schools and the Taboo of Cruelty and Sexual Abuse in Childcare
    and Jemimah Bailey (PhD student in Social Work) on ‘Taboos Relating to Sexuality and Fatherhood in Contemporary Ireland’. Room C6002, Arts Building. 12 noon - 1.00 p.m.

    24 Feb. 2010. ‘The Story of the Other’. TLRH Post-Graduate Seminar in Ethics, South Training Room of the Berkeley Library 4-6pm. Convened by Amy Daughton (daughtoa@tcd.ie). Advance booking essential.

    24 Feb. 2010. ‘Libraries, Readers and Bibliographers’, by Professor David McKitterick, Trinity College, Cambridge. From 5.30 p.m. in Dr Steevens’s Hospital, opposite Heuston Railway Station. This is the sixth of the Mackey Lectures.

    23 Feb. 2010. ‘Explaining the Trinity Long Room Hub Building’. A talk by the architects Valerie Mulvin and Niall McCulloch. Room 5033, Arts Building. 5.00pm to 6.30 pm. All welcome.

    11 Feb. 2010. ‘Dublin's First Antigones: From J-J Barthelemy (1795) to Helen Faucit (1845)’, by Dr Fiona Macintosh, Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford. From 5.30 p.m. in Dr Steevens’s Hospital, opposite Heuston Railway Station. This is the fifth of the Mackey Lectures.

    10 Feb. 2010. ‘Medicine and the State: The Poor Law Medical Service in Ireland, 1851-1921’, by Dr Laurence Geary, Senior Lecturer in History, University College Cork. From 5.30 p.m. in the National Library of Ireland. This is the fourth of the Mackey Lectures.

    28 Jan. 2010. 'Religious Taboos'. Short presentations by Dr Norbert Hintersteiner (School of Religions and Theology) on ‘The Taboo of Double Religious Belonging’ and Katie Sturm (PhD student in theology) on ‘The Taboo of Liberal Thought in US Evangelicalism’. Room C6002, Arts Building, 12 noon - 1.30 p.m.

    11-12 January 2010. From Mazzini to Garibaldi: The Italian Risorgimento and Irish Nationalism. An international conference to be held at Trinity College Dublin and the Italian Cultural Institute, Dublin. All welcome. Contact Professor Michele Finelli at michefinelli@alice.it

    10 Dec. 2009. 'Language, Culture and Press Freedom in Eastern Europe since 1989'. The 7th Lewis Glucksman Memorial Symposium. 7.00 p.m. - 9.00 p.m. J.M. Synge Theatre, Arts Building, TCD.

    10 Dec. 2009. 'Memory, Culture and Hope: Reinventing Western-Islamic Relations', a public lecture by Dr Ismail Serageldin, the Librarian of Alexandria. 5.15 pm - 7.00 pm. Edmund Burke Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin.

    4 Dec. 2009. 'Psychiatry and Photography in Colonial East Africa'. Dr Sloan Mahone, Deputy Director of the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, University of Oxford. 11.00 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. Room C6002, IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, TCD.

    Dec. 2009. ‘The New Environmental History: Silver Darlings, King Cod and Professor Huxley in 1883’, by Professor Poul Holm, Academic Director of the Trinity Long Room Hub, TCD. 7.00 p.m. - 8.30 p.m. in the Robert Emmet Lecture Theatre, Arts Building, TCD. This is the third of the Mackey Lectures.

    Dec. 2009. 'Academic Research: is it of any value to the taxpayer?' A debate and discussion with Professor Poul Holm (TCD), Dr Declan Jordan (UCC) and Professor Luke O'Neill (TCD). Robert Emmet Theatre, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin. 6.00 p.m - 7.30 p.m.

    6 Nov. 2009. 'Vergil's Library', by Prof Damien Nelis (Geneva). 7.00 p.m. - 8.30 p.m. Robert Emmet Theatre, Arts Building, TCD.

    6 Nov. 2009. 'Business Taboos'. Short presentations by Dr Martine Cuypers (Classics) on ‘Taboo trade-offs in ancient Greece’, and Nicholas McIlroy and Ahmad Shadid (PhD Students in the School of Business) on ‘Business Taboos in China and the Middle East'. Room C6002, Arts Building, 12 noon - 1.30 p.m.

    5 Nov. 2009. ‘Margaret Huxley (1856-1940), Dublin's Pioneer of  Scientific Nursing’, by Ms Susan McGann, Director of Archives, Royal College of Nursing. From 5.30 p.m. in Newman House, Saint Stephens Green, Dublin 2. This is the second of the Mackey Lectures.

    1 Nov. 2009. 'Early-Modern Gardens in Context'. An international conference organised by Dr Anatole Tchikine (TCD) with the support of The Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at TCD. Venue: Robert Emmet Theatre, Arts Building, from 9.00 a.m. - 6.00 p.m.

    8 Nov. 2009. 'Freedom of Information, Freedom of Inquiry', by Mr James Hamilton, Director of Public Prosecutions. 7.00 p.m. - 8.30 p.m. Robert Emmet Lecture Theatre, Arts Building, TCD. This is the first of the Mackey Lectures organised by the Trinity Long Room Hub in conjunction with the Worth Library, the National Library of Ireland, UCD and the Health Service Executive.

    3 Nov. 2009. Prof Ermengol Gassiot (Barcelona) ‘The Politics of Memory: Unearthing Mass Graves from the Spanish Civil War’. 1.00 p.m. - 2.30 p.m., Room C6002, IIIS Seminar Room, 6th floor, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin.

    Nov. 2009. Dr Tomasz Kamusella (TCD), 'Language in Modern Central Europe: A Steel Hand in a Kid Glove'. 5.00 pm - 6.30 p.m. Room 3074, Arts Building, TCD.

    Nov. 2009. Workshop organised by the Digital Humanities Observatory (DHO) entitled 'Creating Really Useful Databases for Humanities Research'. 9.30 a.m. - 4.30 p.m. IIIS Seminar Room, C.6002, 6th Floor, Arts Building, TCD.

    Nov. 2009. Prof Arne Jarrick (Swedish Research Council), ‘The Role and Mission of the Humanities’. 11:00am – 12:30pm. IIIS Conference Room, 6th Floor, Arts Building, TCD.

    9 Oct. 2009. 'Taboos' seminar organised by Dr Deana Heath. 12.00 p.m. - 1.30 p.m. IIIS Seminar Room, C.6002, 6th Floor, Arts Building, TCD. This month's topic is 'Irish Sexual Taboos (or the Lack Thereof)'.

    5 Oct. 2009. Prof. Poul Holm will speak on 'Innovation and the Arts and Humanities'. IIIS Seminar Room. Room C6002. Arts Building. 12.30 p.m. - 1.30 p.m. This talk is part of the week-long festival Innovation Dublin 2009.

    Oct. 2009. Mme Annette Lauras 'Henri Pourrat, écrivain auvergnat : du particulier au général'. 7.00 p.m. - 9.00 p.m. Room 2041B, Arts Building, TCD. This lecture will be given in French, with translation into English.

    Oct. 2009. A research seminar for PhD students and staff on the French writer Henri Pourrat. 5.00 p.m. - 6.00 p.m. Room 4096 in the Arts Building, TCD.

    Oct. 2009. Dr Aaron Quigley (UCD), 'Using Information Visualisation as an Analytical Tool'. 1.00 p.m. - 2.30 p.m. IIIS Seminar Room, C.6002, 6th Floor, Arts Building, TCD.

    9 Sept. 2009. Professor John Kerrigan (University of Cambridge), 'Louis MacNeice among the Islands'. Robert Emmet Theatre, Arts Building, TCD. 7.00 p.m. - 8.30 p.m.

    6 Sept. 2009. Dr Ruth Barton orgainsed an international symposium at TCD entitled 'Screening the Irish in Britain'. This event was funded by the Trinity Long Room Hub.

    -5 Sept. 2009. 'Popular Revenants. German Gothic in its International Contexts'. This international symposium is funded by the Trinity Long Room Hub. IIIS Seminar Room, Level 6, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin.

    -9 July 2009. Dr Claire Taylor organized a conference entitled 'Communities and Networks in the Ancient Greek World'at TCD.

    5-26 June 2009. 'Continuities: from Medieval to Early Modern in English Literature,1400-1650'. A postgraduate conference co-sponsored by the Trinity Long Room Hub and the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

    9-30 June 2009. Dr Joseph Clarke hosted the 23rd annual conference of the Society for the Study of French History in TCD.

    3 June 2009. Dr Crawford Gribben and Dr Rory Loughnane organised a conference entitled 'Shakespeare, Ireland, Scotland, Wales' at TCD.

    8 June 2009. The 6th Lewis Glucksman Memorial Symposium: 'Napoleon,Empire and Europe'. The speakers were Dr Sudhir Hazareesingh (Balliol College, Oxford),Professor Tom Bartlett (University of Aberdeen) and Professor Hugh Gough (UCD).

    4-15 May 2009. Dr Crawford Gribben (TCD) and Dr Richard Kirwan (NUI Maynooth) organised a workshop entitled 'Self-Fashioning and Community in the Early-Modern University'.

    0 April 2009. 'Taboos' an interdisciplinary seminar organised by Dr Deana Heath. The papers at this term’s seminars were Professor John Horne on ' Taboo or blind spot? Rape in Wartime' and Alison Mary Nesbitt (Psychology) on 'The Taboo of Childhood Sexuality'.

    3-24 April 2009. An interdisciplinary workshop entitled 'The Arts, the State, Identity and the Wealth of Nations: Case Studies of Ireland and Scotland'.This event was organised by Professor John O’Hagan (TCD) and Professor Professor Cairns Craig (University of Aberdeen).

    2 April 2009. Professor Robert E Goodin (Australian National University) gave a lecture entitled 'Global Democracy: In the Beginning' in the J.M. Synge Theatre. This 2009 Edmund Burke Lecture in Practical Philosophy was organised by the Department of Philosophy, TCD.

    5 April 2009. 'The Dynamics of Incompletion: Samuel Beckett’s Manuscripts', a lecture by Dr. Dirk Van Hulle, Centre for Manuscript Genetics, University of Antwerp.  This event was one of the Trinity Long Room Hub Methods Seminars.

    8 March 2009. 'The Letters and Speeches of Oliver Cromwell'. The first of three workshops, attended by a range of specialists in early-modern history from across Britain and Ireland, which will sketch the parameters for the forthcoming multi-volume edition of the Letters and Speeches of Oliver Cromwell.  This scholarly edition will be published by Oxford University Press. This event was organised by Dr Michéal Ó Siochrú of TCD and Professor John Morrill of Cambridge University.

    7 March 2009.  Dr. Bernard Gainot (Université de Paris I - Panthéon Sorbonne) delivered a keynote speech at a symposium entitled 'Linking Best Practice in France and Ireland in Academic Military History'. The event was organised by Dr Sylvie Kleinman and funded by the Trinity Long Room Hub and the French Embassy.

    6-27 March 2009. 'Synge and Edwardian Ireland: A Centenary Symposium'. A celebration and re-evaluation of the work of one of Ireland’s greatest writers on the centenary of his birth organised by Professor Nicholas Grene and Dr Brian Cliff. (Programme at http://syngecentenary.blogspot.com/)

    5 March 2009. Professor Poul Holm, Academic Director of the Trinity Long Room Hub delivered his inaugural lecture 'Arts and Humanities: A compass for a Rapidly Changing World'.

    March 2009. 'Trinity and the Cultural Institutions of Dublin'. A workshop at TCD led by Professor John O’Hagan and Dr Johanna Archbold. In attendance were senior staff from TCD, the National Museum of Ireland, the National Library of Ireland, the National Gallery of Ireland, the Chester Beatty Library, Dublin City Public Libraries, and the Digital Humanities Observatory. This workshop presented research on Trinity’s historical interaction with cultural institutions in Dublin; evidence of current interactions and cooperation; useful contexts from international models for such investigations; and discussed future areas of interaction and co-operation between Trinity and each cultural institution.

    6 Feb 2009. 'Taboos'. An interdisciplinary seminar organised by Dr Deana Heath. The speakers at this first meeting of the seminar were Michael O’Laughlin (Writer in Residence, School of English), who presented on 'Literary Taboos: The Politics of Literary Reputation' and Sarah Crider Arndt (Ph.D. student in TCC) who spoke about 'Historical Taboos: On Liking the British in Ireland'.

    6 Feb 2009. Prof. Peter Burke (University of Cambridge) gave a lecture entitled 'The Renaissance in Global Context' in the Máirtín Uí Chadhain Theatre. This event was organised by Dr Sarah Alyn-Stacey under the auspices of the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

    5 Feb 2009. Prof. Peter Burke (University of Cambridge) gave a lecture entitled 'Cultures of Translation in Renaissance Europe' in the Máirtín Uí Chadhain Theatre. This event was organised by Dr Sarah Alyn-Stacey under the auspices of the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

    4 Feb 2009. The best-selling author Alison Weir talked about her latest book Katherine Swynford: the Story of John of Gaunt and his Scandalous Duchess in the Swift Theatre. This event was organised by Dr Sarah Alyn-Stacey under the auspices of the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. 

    0 Feb 2009. Prof. Susan Niditch (Amherst College, USA)gave a keynote lecture entitled 'The Hebrew Bible and Oral Literature: Misconceptions and New Directions' to a postgraduate conference funded by the Trinity Long Room Hub.

    3 Feb 2009. 'Censuses, Newspapers and Literature: Using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in the Humanities'. A lecture delivered by Dr Ian Gregory (University of Lancaster) as part of the series of Trinity Long Room Hub Methods Seminars.

    5 Feb 2009. Professor Joseph Raz of Balliol College, Oxford delivered a lecture entitled 'Innovative Interpretation'. This inaugural lecture of the Irish Jurisprudence Society was held in the Lloyd Building of Trinity College Dublin.

    1 Jan 2009. 'Migrations, Multiculturalism and Multilingualism'. A workshop organised by Professor David Singleton to organise a trans-European migration research consortium which will submit an application for funding under the EU’s HERA scheme. Among those attending were Prof. Guus Extra (Tilburg University), Dr Ekaterina Protassova (University of Helsinki), Prof Li Wei (Birkbeck), and Dr Lidija Cvikić (Zagreb, Crotia).

    9 Jan 2009. A screening of the film 'Bose: The Forgotten Hero' under the auspices of the Trinity South Asia Initiative. This was attended by Trinity staff and students, members of the Indian community in Ireland, and representatives from the Indian Embassy in Dublin.

    3 Jan 2009. Professor Christopher Rowe (University of Durham) delivered the 2009 Stephen MacKenna Lecture entitled 'Reading Socrates in Plato's Dialogues'. This was organised by the Department of Philosophy and the Plato Centre.

    2 Jan 2009. Professor Nigel Smith (Princeton) gave a lecture entitled 'Radicalism, Royalism and the Literary Canon'. Professor Smith gave this lecture as part of the IRCHSS-AHRC 'Royalist and Radical Religion, 1642-1660' conference and seminar series.

    3-14 Dec 2008. 'Ulster Scots: Linguistic, Literary and Cultural Perspectives'. A conference organised by Dr Lorna Carson and Dr Crawford Gribben of TCD. Professor Michael Montgomery (University of South Carolina), an internationally-renowned expert in the field, delivered a keynote address via videolink.

    3 Dec 2008. Dr Barbara Crostini gave a masterclass on 'Cataloguing Greek Manuscripts' as part of the Department of Classics’s workshop ‘Greek Paleography: Reading Greek Manuscripts’. The talks were followed by an exhibition of Greek manuscripts held in Trinity College.

    2 Dec 2008. Dr Niels Gaul (Central European University, Budapest)gave a masterclass on 'Greek Palaeography, Byzantine Scholarship and Textual Criticism' as part of the Department of Classics’s workshop ‘Greek Paleography: Reading Greek Manuscripts’.

    2 Dec 2008. A workshop in TCD on the 1641 Depositions Project. This event brought together 30 academics from Ireland and the UK and software developers from IBM. The meeting discussed how the experience of transcribing and digitizing the 1641 Depositions might help to create new software which would have profitable academic and business applications.

    -6 Dec 2008. 'Paramilitary Violence after the First World War: Towards a Global Perspective, 1918-1923'. A conference co-organised by Prof John Horne of TCD and Dr Robert Gerwarth of UCD. This conference included a public lecture at the Royal Irish Academy by Professor Emilio Gentile (University of La Sapienza, Rome) on 'Paramilitary Violence: the Rationale of Fascism and the Origins of Totalitarianism'.

    27 Nov-2 Dec 2008. The Trinity Long Room Hub maintained a stall with interactive displays at the Higher Education Authority's exhibition 'Transformations: How Research is Changing Ireland'.

    15 Nov 2008. The 5th Lewis Glucksman Memorial Symposium: 'The Poetry of Plants'. An audience of almost 400 people packed the Edmund Burke theatre to hear Dr Matthew Jebb (National Botanic Gardens), Ms Anna Pavord (author), Dr Shelley Saguaro (academic), and Mr Andrew Wilson (garden designer) discuss the history, politics, literature and aesthetics of gardens, gardening, and garden design .

    14-15 Nov 2008. 'The Irish at War'. A conference organised by Professor Ian Campbell Ross and Dr Anne Markey at TCD.

    8 Nov 2008. Professor Ian Campbell Ross organised the 4th Eighteenth-Century Literature in Ireland Research Network Symposium at the Public Library in Armagh.

    7-9 Nov 2008. Professor John Horne co-organised an international conference at Péronne in France entitled 'Inside the Great War: Acceptance, Endurance, Refusal, 1914-1918'.

    28 Oct 2008. Mr Shawn Day of Digital Humanities Observatory gave a presentation entitled 'Visualisation and What You Can do with Historical Data.' This was one of the regular Trinity Long Room Hub Methods Seminars.

    23 Oct 2008. Dr Conor Kostick (TCD) organised a symposium entitled 'Warfare in the Mediterranean Region in the Age of the Crusades (1095 – 1291)'. The lecture by Professor John France (University of Cardiff) filled the Swift Theatre in Trinity College.

    11 Oct 2008. ‘Ireland, India and Education’. This international symposium launched the ‘Ireland, Education and Empire’ research project led by Professor David Dickson (TCD) and Dr Deana Heath(TCD). It was held at the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin, and featured talks by prominent Indian and Irish academics. Funding was provided by the Trinity Long Room Hub, the Department of History in TCD, the Indian Embassy of Ireland, the Indian Council for Social Relations, and the Chester Beatty Library.

    10 Oct 2008. Prof Alan Kramer organised a workshop entitled 'The International History of Concentration Camps to 1941'. Thirteen papers were presented by researchers from Ireland, Britain, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, and Australia, with five further colleagues in attendance from TCD. This was a fruitful attempt to compare and contrast disparate branches of research on the origins of concentration camps.

    18-20 Sept 2008. A conference was held on 'Metrics, Research Evaluation and Open Access in the Arts and Humanities'. This event was organised by the Trinity Long Room Hub, the Coimbra Group Task Force, and the Humanities Serving Irish Society consortium.

    16 Sept 2008. Dr Sean Duffy organised an international conference on 'Ideas of Empire, c.1100-c.1500'.

    11-13 Sept 2008. Dr Derval Conroy of UCD and Prof Jane Conroy of NUI Galway organised a conference entitled 'Power and Perspective'under the auspices of the Society for Seventeenth-Century French Studies.The conference took place in Royal Irish Academy, Trinity College Dublin, and University College, Dublin.

    4-6 Sept 2008. Dr Charles Benson (TCD) and Dr Helga Robinson-Hammerstein organised an international symposium on the collection of books amassed by Hendrik Fagel (1765-1838), and which were bought by College in the early-nineteenth century.

    4 Sept 2008. Dr Peter Fox of Cambridge University Library delivered a keynote address entitled 'The Fagel Collection: Den Haag to Dublin.'

    4 Sept–23 Dec 2008. The Library staged an exhibition entitled 'Nature's Bounty: Botanical Beauties in Trinity College Dublin'.

    July-26 Sept 2008. The Library staged an exhibition entitled 'Early Printings of Humanist Literature'.

    8 June 2008. Dr Christine Morris organised a one-day symposium at TCD on 'Archaeology and the Goddess: between past and present'.

    19 June 2008. Dr Simon Hodson (University of Hull) gave a presentation entitled 'Virtual Environments for Teaching and Research in Early Modern Studies'. This talk was part of the Trinity Long Room Hub Methods Seminars.

    12 June 2008. The 4th Lewis Glucksman Memorial Symposium took place. The topic was 'From the Horse’s Mouth, the Significance of the Artist’s Statement'. The speakers included Professor Stephen Bann (University of Bristol)and the leading contemporary Irish artists Dorothy Cross and HughieO’Donoghue.

    27 May 2008. Professor Khurshid Ahmad (TCD) organised a workshop entitled 'Sentiment Analysis: Emotion, Metaphor, Ontology and Terminology

    23 May-31 Aug 2008. The Library held an exhibition entitled 'A Window on the Middle Ages: Medieval Manuscripts at Trinity College Library'.  

    22 May 2008. Dr Rachel Moss (TCD) organised a workshop on 'Annotating Aesthetic Images using Metaphors and Terminology'.

    21 May 2008. Professor Sam Glucksberg (Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Princeton University) gave a lecture entitled 'Do all Ducks Lay Eggs? Understanding and Misunderstanding Generics'. This lecture was part of the Trinity Long Room Hub Methods Seminars.

    25-26 April 2008. The Trinity Long Room Hub sponsored an international symposium entitled 'William Trevor at 80: his Life and Work'.

    16 April 2008. Professor Willard McCarty (King's College, London) gave a lecture entitled 'Digitizing is Questioning, or else'. This was one of the series of regular Trinity Long Room Hub Methods Seminars.

    9-11 April 2008. The Department of Classics and the Centre for Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies organised a lecture series entitled 'Greece and Mesopotamia: Dialogues in Literature'. The lectures were given by Dr Johannes Haubold (University of Durham). Lecture 1, April 9: ‘Homer, Hesiod and the epics of Babylon’; Lecture 2, April 10: ‘Herodotus and Mesopotamian ideologies of empire’; Lecture 3, April 11: ‘Berossos between Babylon and Greece’.

    13 Feb 2008. The Rt Hon Alex Salmond, MSP, First Minister of Scotland, gave a lecture entitled 'Scotland's National Conversation: The Next Steps'.

    11 Feb 2008. Dr Hugh Denard (King’s College, London) gave a presentation entitled 'Parallel Universes, Shared Worlds: Visualisation in the Arts and Humanities'. This was one of the series of regular Trinity Long Room Hub Methods Seminars.

    10 Dec 2007. The 3rd Lewis Glucksman Memorial Symposium: 'Reflections on the Four Masters and their World'. The speakers were Professor Donnchadh Ó Corráin (UCC), Professor Anna Chahoud (TCD), and Dr John McCafferty (UCD).

    23 Oct 2007. Dr Rachel Moss (TCD) and Mr John McDonough (UCD) gave presentations of the topic of 'Past, Present and Future: Virtual Archives in Ireland'. This was one of the series of regular Trinity Long Room Hub Methods Seminars.

    13 June 2007. The 2nd Lewis Glucksman Memorial Symposium: 'Commemorating the Unthinkable: Europe, Ireland and the Great War'. The Symposium heard readings by the writer Sebastian Barry and the poet Michael Longley, and lectures by Professor John Horne (TCD), Mr Gerald Dawe (TCD), and Ms Jane Leonard (Ulster Museum, Belfast).

    1 March 2007. Alastair Dunning (Arts and Humanities Data Service, UK) gave a lecture entitled 'Can the Centre Hold? The Arts and Humanities Data Service' as part of the series of regular Trinity Long Room Hub Methods Seminars.

    1 Dec 2006. The 1st Lewis Glucksman Memorial Symposium. Professor Mordechai Feingold (Caltech, USA) delivered a lecture entitled 'Humanities in the Age of Science'.

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    Funding Bodies

    Ireland EU Structural Funds Programmes 2007 – 2013, European Regional Development Fund, Department of Enterprise, Trade and Innovation, HEA, Trinity College Dublin, and


Last updated 8 March 2016 by Trinity Long Room Hub (Email) .