Sarah Smyth
Associate Professor, Russian

Publications and Further Research Outputs

Peer-Reviewed Publications

Speakers of Russian in Ireland: Where Borderless and Bordered Language Meet in, editor(s)Tomasz Kamusella, Motoki Nomachi, Catherine Gibson , The Palgrave Handbook of Slavic Languages, Identities and Borders, UK, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, pp451 - 476, [Sarah Smyth] Book Chapter, 2016

Conny Opitz, Sarah Smyth, Ab initio Language Learning and the Summer Break, 3rd ICLA, Colchester, 5-7 July 2016, 2016 Conference Paper, 2016

Multivoiced Identities in, editor(s)Vera Regan Chloe Diskin Jennifer Martyn , Language, Identity and Migration, Bern, Peter Lang, 2016, pp17 - 51, [Sarah Smyth] Book Chapter, 2016

"Dear diary" - L2 proficiency development through diary writing in, editor(s)Gitsaki, Christina Gobert, Melanie Demirci, Helene , Current Trends in Reading, Writing and Visual Literacy: Research Perspectives, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015, [Opitz, Conny; Smyth, Sarah] Book Chapter, 2015

Opitz, Conny; Smyth, Sarah, "Dear diary" - L2 proficiency development through diary writing, AILA, Brisbane, 10-15 August 2014, 2014 Conference Paper, 2014

Smyth, Sarah & Conny Opitz, Negotiating Linguistic, Cultural and Social Identities in the Russian World., Bern, Peter Lang, 2013, 1 - 339pp Book, 2013 DOI

Sarah Smyth and John Murray, Basic Russian, A Grammar and Workbook, second edition, Routledge, 2013, 1 - 356pp Book, 2013

John Murray and Sarah Smyth, Intermediate Russian, A Grammar and Workbook, second edition, Routledge, 2013, 276pp Book, 2013

Exchanging words in, editor(s)Arto Mustajoki, Ekaterina Protassova, Nikolai Vakhtin , Instrumentarium of Linguistics: Sociolinguistic Approaches to Non-Standard Russian, Helsinki, 2010, pp329 - 344, [Sarah Smyth] Book Chapter, 2010

Opitz, Conny; Smyth, Sarah, Developing Students' Language Proficiency through Self-Directed Collaborative Learning, AATSEEL Newsletter, 53, (2), 2010, p14 - 15 Journal Article, 2010

'Razom nas bagato, nas ne podolati': remixes of the Orange Revolution anthem in, editor(s)Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, Cormac O Cuilleanáin & David Parris , Translation and Censorship. Patterns of Communication and Interference, Dublin, Four Courts Press, 2009, pp205 - 220, [Sarah Smyth] Book Chapter, 2009

'Second Language Acquisition and Native Language Maintenance in the Polish Diaspora in Ireland and France' and 'Our Languages: Who in Ireland Speaks and Understands Russian?' [The rationale, structure and aims of two Dublin-based research projects] in, editor(s)Maciej Duszczyk, Magdalena Lesinska (red.) , Wspolczesne migracje: dylematy Europy i Polski; Contemporary Migrations: Dilemmas of Europe and of Poland, Warsaw, Centre of Migration Research, 2009, pp196 - 220, [Singleton, D., Smyth, S. & Debaene, E.] Book Chapter, 2009

Sarah Smyth, Lankasterskaya sistema v XXI veke, Proceedings of the conference, MAPRYAL, St Petersburg, 2003, 2003 Conference Paper, 2003

Sarah Smyth and T.V. Larina, Obrashchenie v angliyskoy kommunikativnoy kulture v sopostavlenie s russkoy, Vestnik Rossiyskogo Universiteta Druzhby Narodov, 1, 2003, p79 - 91 Journal Article, 2003

Sarah Smyth and Elena Crosbie, RUS' A Comprehensive Course in Russian, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2002, v - 697pp Book, 2002

John Murray and Sarah Smyth, Intermediate Russian: A Grammar and Workbook, London and New York, Routledge, 2001, v - 244pp Book, 2001

The Teaching of Aspect to Ab Initio Learners of Russian in, editor(s)James Davie, Neil Landsman, Lindsay Silvester , Russian Language Teaching Methodologyand Course Design, Astra Press, 1999, pp55 - 66, [Sarah Smyth] Book Chapter, 1999

John Murray and Sarah Smyth, Basic Russian, A Grammar and Workbook, Routledge , 1999 Book, 1999

The Sequencing of Syntactic Categories in Russian Ab Initio Language Courses in, editor(s)James Davie, Neil Landsman, Lindsay Silvester , Russian Language Teaching Methodologyand Course Design, Astra Press, 1999, pp13 - 30, [Sarah Smyth] Book Chapter, 1999

Non-Peer-Reviewed Publications

Marie-Therese Batardiere (UL), Anne Brindley (GMIT), Kristin Brogan (IT Tralee), Frances Carr (The Old Schoolhouse Montessori School), Ann Devitt (TCD), Tanya Flanagan (St Farnan's, Co. Kildare), Aine Furlong (WIT), Barbara Geraghty (UL), Mary Ann Kenny (IT Blanchardstown), Deirdre Kirwan (Scoil Bhride, Dublin), Agnieszka Matys (Polska Szkola SEN, Dublin), Niamh Nestor (UCD), Susanna Nocchi (DIT), Conny Opitz (TCD), Frederique Rantz (PPLI), Mary Ruane (IRAAL), Christiane Schönfeld (UL), Sarah Smyth (TCD), Margot Spencer (UCC), Riana Walsh (IT Tallaght), OVFL Submission to DES Consultation on a Foreign Languages in Education Strategy, 2014 Report, 2014 URL

Marie-Therese Batardiere (UL), Anne Brindley (GMIT), Kristin Brogan (IT Tralee), Frances Carr (The Old Schoolhouse Montessori School), Ann Devitt (TCD), Tanya Flanagan (St Farnan's, Co. Kildare), Aine Furlong (WIT), Barbara Geraghty (UL), Mary Ann Kenny (IT Blanchardstown), Deirdre Kirwan (Scoil Bhride, Dublin), Agnieszka Matys (Polska Szkola SEN, Dublin), Niamh Nestor (UCD), Susanna Nocchi (DIT), Conny Opitz (TCD), Frederique Rantz (PPLI), Mary Ruane (IRAAL), Christiane Schönfeld (UL), Sarah Smyth (TCD), Margot Spencer (UCC), Riana Walsh (IT Tallaght), OVFL Response to DES Consultation on Foreign Languages in Irish Education, 2014 Report, 2014 URL

Peer-Learning in the Language Departments at Trinity College Dublin in, editor(s)Sarah Moore, Peter Carr, Martina Crehan, Jane Crowley, Deirdre Flynn, Pat Morgan and Pat Shannon , Keeping Students at University: The Retention Debate at Third Level, Dublin, Interesource Group Publishing, 2006, pp89 - 101 , [Sarah Smyth, Conny Opitz] Book Chapter, 2006

Sarah Smyth, Conny Opitz, Peer-Learning in the Language Departments at Trinity College Dublin, Keeping Students at University: The Retention Debate at Third Level, Athlone, January 2004, 2004 Conference Paper, 2004

Research Expertise

Description

Russian 19th-century prose narrative; Syllabus and textbook design; Russian in the diaspora

Projects

  • Title
    • Russian speakers in the Republic of Ireland: Who are they? a sociolinguistic study of hybrid identities
  • Summary
    • Since the early 1990s Europe has experienced a wave of migration westwards of people of various ethnic origins and nationalities from the territories of the former Soviet Union. A significant number settled in Ireland: some were targeted at recruitment fairs (on the whole, but not exclusively, before EU expansion satisfied Ireland's labour needs); some have obtained refugee status; some married Irish or EU citizens; some came as students and remained on in the work force; some have come since EU expansion from the accession states; some were simply the best at whatever it is they do and were recruited to employment through open competition. There has been no attempt to paint a comprehensive picture of who or where these migrants are or what capital they have brought to Ireland. This research project will address this deficit. This group was selected as particularly interesting for a number of reasons: . their geo-political space of origin was traditionally multicultural and multilingual (with Russian as the supra-ethnic lingua franca); . they do not share an ethnic or homeland identity, but an identity based on a shared language; all to some degree associate or disassociate themselves from homo sovieticus, an identity constructed on a shared historic past and common cultural and educational background; . they are verging on being invisible in contemporary Ireland: all Central or Eastern European countries are erroneously and misleadingly referred to as 'accession states' in public discourse; all migrants are conceived of as a rather homogenized set of 'new Irish' or 'non-nationals'; . they exemplify not only the possibility, but more importantly the potential benefits, of living in and with multiple languages and cultures - or living with diversity and difference. Ireland can learn considerably from the past and present experience of these communities whose life stories exemplify the flux, fragmentation and rupture that characterize modern life without necessarily compromising continuity and tradition. Aims: The central aim of this study is to ask who are the Russian speakers currently resident in Ireland. This study will be structured in two inter-connected lines of enquiry. The first is best summarized as who are you? This investigation will provide empirical sociolinguistic data. This data is product-oriented; it captures a snap-shot of the participants' social realities and language practices. The second is concerned to present and make present the voices and points of view of the participants. It invites participants to articulate responses in various genres to the self-reflexive questions who am I? who are we? This data is process-oriented: the analysis will be concerned with the processes by which participants become what they are as they speak and through their speech. This second will address the following questions: a) The narrative of migration: What has migration meant in terms of continuity, change, opportunity and loss? b) Russian-speaking communities: what groups within the Russian-speaking community(-ies) do participants identify/not identify with? What identity options are available to them within variously configured Russian-speaking communities? c) The Irish experience: what identity options are available to Russian-speaking migrants in Ireland at present? How do they conceive that Ireland's 'language policy' and policy of integration impact on identity construction? To what extent do they feel empowered/ disempowered by the customs and practices of the host community? d) Aspirations: what hopes and identity options do they have for the future for themselves and for the next generation? e) Degree of transmission of Russian language/ Russian cultural values from one generation to the next: what linguistic and cultural values do they want/not want to transmit to the younger generation?
  • Funding Agency
    • IRCHSS
  • Date From
    • 1st April 2008
  • Date To
    • 31st March 2011
  • Title
    • Developing L2 proficiency and learner autonomy in ab initio students of Russian
  • Summary
    • Purpose of research: The study has two main interests: a) the development of ab initio language proficiency, and b) of language-learner autonomy in the Department of Russian and Slavonic Studies at Trinity College Dublin. In relation to the first interest, the research focuses on a diary task routinely completed by all, not just participating, first-year students on a weekly basis. In relation to the second interest, it investigates students' engagement with technology, again mainly through assignments set for all students which entail opportunities for self-guided learning and thus the development of language-learner autonomy. Justification for the research: The weekly diary task presents a unique opportunity to trace students' linguistic development from ab initio over an extended period of time (one academic year = five months/17 teaching weeks in Phase I; some learners will be followed for the duration of their 4-year degree). It allows us to build a dense longitudinal corpus of written student productions, which will be very valuable in identifying individual and cross-individual developmental patterns. This part of the project addresses the dearth of longitudinal written corpora in studies of second language acquisition (SLA), particularly at the early stages of SLA. It takes its impetus from recent theoretical advances which conceptualise language as a complex dynamic system to be studied holistically and with an emphasis on development and emergent properties, such as will be discernable from the data collected during this project. Identifying individual and more general developmental patterns is also relevant for potential pedagogical intervention in future years. The second part of the project is devoted to the development of learner autonomy, and is also of theoretical and pedagogical interest. By investigating how ab initio learners use technology to support their learning, the project contributes to the body of research on computer-mediated/assisted language learning, on learner autonomy and lifelong learning.
  • Date From
    • 2012
  • Date To
    • 2018

Keywords

18th and 19th century political, social and intellectual histroy of Russia; 19th century Russian literature; Methodology of teaching Russian as a foreign language; Migration, multilingualism, multiculturalism; Religious tolerance and intolerance; Russian cultural history; Russian Language/Literature; Russian-speaking communities; Teaching Russian as a foriegn language; Translation studies

Recognition

Awards and Honours

Honorary Doctorate of Literature awarded by the Gorky Literary Institute, Moscow 2002

Laureate of the Pushkin Medal November 2010

Memberships

Committee member of the Irish Association of Russian and East European Studies