Martha O'Hagan Luff
Assistant Professor, Business & Administrative Studies

Biography

Martha O'Hagan-Luff is an Assistant Professor of Finance in Trinity College. She holds a BA in Economics and an MSc in Finance from Trinity College and a PhD in International Finance. Her PhD research is in the area of International Diversification and Home Bias in Equity Investments. Prior to completing her PhD she worked in Investment Banking in London and Dublin, for Bank of America, Credit Suisse First Boston and Bank of Ireland Global Markets. Her area of specialisation was derivatives and financial engineering, covering a German, Austrian and Swiss client base. She worked as a structured products dealer for Bank of Ireland, structuring investment products for UK and Irish clients.

Publications and Further Research Outputs

Peer-Reviewed Publications

O'Hagan-Luff, Martha, Berrill, Jenny & Lucey, Brian, Does Firm Internationalisation Matter to Investors When Markets are Declining? , Infiniti Conference, Valencia, June 2017, edited by Brian Lucey , 2017 Conference Paper, 2017

Jenny Berrill, Martha O'Hagan-Luff, André van Stel , The Joint Role of FDI and Education in Explaining Entrepreneurial Activity, IMES, IMES, Prague, May 2017, 2017 Conference Paper, 2017

O'Hagan-Luff, Martha, Berrill, Jenny & Lucey, Brian, , Does Firm Internationalisation Matter to Investors in Market Downturns, EFM, Basel, May 2016, 2016 Conference Paper, 2016

Berrill, Jenny, Kearney, Colm & O'Hagan-Luff, Martha, The Diversification Benefits of Highly and Rapidly Internationalising Firms, Infiniti Conference, Ljubljana, June 2016, 2016 Conference Paper, 2016

Martha O'Hagan-Luff, Jenny Berrill, US firms - How global are they? A longitudinal study, International Review of Financial Analysis, 44, (1), 2016, p1 - 45 Journal Article, 2016

O'Hagan-Luff, Martha; Berrill, Jenny, Why Stay-at-Home Investing Makes Sense, International Review of Financial Analysis, 38, 2015, p1 - 14 Journal Article, 2015 URL

O'Hagan-Luff, Martha, Berrill, Jenny & Kearney, Colm, The Diversification Benefits of Highly and Rapidly Internationalising Firms, Infiniti Conference, Dublin, June 2015, 2015 Conference Paper, 2015

O'Hagan-Luff, Martha & Berrill, Jenny , Why Home-Based Investing in the US Makes Sense, Infiniti Conference, Prato, June 2014, 2014 Conference Paper, 2014

O'Hagan-Luff, Martha, Berrill, Jenny & Kearney, Colm, The Diversification Benefits of Highly and Rapidly Internationalising Firms, Academy of International Business, Birmingham, March 2013, 2013 Conference Paper, 2013

O'Hagan-Luff, Martha & Berrill, Jenny , A Comparison of the Indirect Diversification Benefits of US Equity Investments, Academy of International Business, Liverpool, March 2012, 2012 Conference Paper, 2012

O'Hagan-Luff, Martha, Berrill, Jenny & Kearney, Colm, The Indirect International Diversification Benefits of Investing in US-based Multinationals, Academy of International Business, Edinburgh , March 2011, 2011 Conference Paper, 2011

Research Expertise

Description

Martha O'Hagan-Luff's PhD research, An Investigation into the Indirect Diversification Benefits of US Equity Products, includes an in-depth longitudinal study of the internationalisation of US Multinational Corporations (MNCs), an investigation into their indirect international diversification benefits and a detailed study of the diversification benefits of 5 US-traded equity products; MNCs, Industry Indices, American Depository Receipts, Closed-End Country Funds and single country iShares Exchange Traded Funds. It finds compelling evidence that home bias is being overstated and that US investors can effectively diversify using domestically-traded products. She is currently researching market reactions to foreign shocks based on the level of internationalisation of the firm. She is also undertaking a study of the internationalisation patterns of European firms and the impact on their performance in the last 20 years. In the area of entrepreneurship, she has undertaken a study of the impact of self-employment on the financial well-being of individuals aged 50 and over across 21 European countries. A further study in the area of entrepreneurship looks at the joint impact of labour force education and foreign direct investment on levels of entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship at the country level.

Projects

  • Title
    • The relationship between personal financial health and well-being: Exploring the role of self-employment
  • Summary
    • Income is a crucial driver of well-being. However, especially for relatively older labor force participants, current income is only part of a person's financial health, as accumulated savings may vary greatly across individuals. This paper uses broader measures of personal financial health and relates them to eight indicators of well-being, classified in three categories of well-being: general health, mental health and happiness. Using data of workers aged 50 and over from 21 European countries, we find strong and consistent evidence for a negative association between poor financial health and our various indicators of well-being. Moreover, we find this relation to be moderated by self-employment in the sense that financial problems are much stronger associated with poor health for the self-employed compared to the wage-employed.
  • Date From
    • Jan 2017
  • Date To
    • Oct 2017

Keywords

Entrepreneurship; International Finance

Recognition

Representations

Journal Reviewer for International Review of Financial Analysis 2014 - Present

Academic Mentor for Chartered Financial Analyst Institute 2014 - Present

Panel Organiser for Trinity Global Business Forum March 2017

Awards and Honours

Scholarship Trinity Business School 2011

Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship - Irish Research Council 2011 - 2014

Memberships

Academic Advisor to the Trinity Student Managed Fund 2016 – Current

Academic Mentor for the Chartered Financial Analyst Challenge 2015 – Current