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Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin

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Course Outline (by Year)

The course is delivered as a set of five modules.

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Internship

This challenging and rewarding year provides graduates with a supervised and supported learning environment. The Intern Year is an essential step in transitioning from a graduate with a medical degree, to becoming a member of the Register of Medical Practitioners maintained by the Medical Council of Ireland. Interns have the opportunity to experience patient care through education, training and clinical responsibility, enabling the development of personal and professional competencies.

Electives

From the beginning of the third medical year, students must attend hospital continuously. In addition to clinical rotations, students must also obtain credits by completing eight weeks of clinical elective posts in order to rise to the fifth medical year. These eight weeks of elective posts are carried out during the summers of 3rd and 4th Med, with students typically completing four weeks of electives after 3rd Med and another four weeks after 4th Med. Students may opt to break down the eight weeks differently, but a minimum of 2 weeks of electives must be completed each summer. It is the responsibility of each student to secure their summer electives and to submit the required elective evaluation forms at the end of each summer.

During the first semester of 5th Med, students are required to carry out a further four weeks of clinical elective experience. This enables students to consolidate their clinical knowledge in a setting which will allow for escalation of responsibility in comparison to electives undertaken in 3rd and 4th Med.

Intercalated MSc in Biomedical Science

Students will take a core module in Clinical Research based in the Clinical Research Facility, St James's Hospital and concurrently follow one of six specialist tracks, which will be provided by the actual modules as offered by the currently running three Masters courses (i) the masters course in molecular medicine, (ii) the masters course in neuroscience, (iii) the masters course in bioengineering (iv) the masters course in immunology (v) the masters course in translational oncology or (vi) the masters course in healthcare infection management. Students will then conduct a three month research project and will submit a dissertation based on this project.

Admission to this course is restricted to undergraduate students on year 3 (and occasionally year 4) in the School of Medicine in Trinity College Dublin. At this point, students will have qualified for a B.A. which is normally awarded when the students are conferred with their final M.B. The intercalated Masters will also be conferred at this point. The course is coordinated through the Department of Clinical Medicine, TCD, St James's Hospital Dublin.