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Julie Renwick
Assistant Professor, Clinical Microbiology

Biography

Dr Renwick graduated from Maynooth University (MU) with an Honours Degree in Biology in 2003. From there she was accepted into a PhD program in the National Institute of Cellular Biotechnology in MU where she completed her PhD in medical microbiology investigating the interactions between Aspergillus fumigatus and human and insect immune cells. In 2006 she was appointed as a microbiology and genetics lecturer in the Institute of Technology, Dublin. During her three years in this position she completed a Post-Graduate Higher Diploma in third level education in MU. In 2009 she accepted a research fellowship in the Clinical Microbiology department at the Trinity centre for Health Science in Tallaght hospital. Dr Renwick has established and developed a number of national and international clinical studies and research projects including co-founding the AIrway Microbiome in Cystic Fibrosis (AIM-CF) project. As a principle investigator of the National Children's Research Centre, her research focused on identifying and characterising the microbial communities present in the airways of children with CF and understanding how these microbial communities interact with the host and impact on disease progression. Dr Renwick was recently appointed Assistant Professor within the clinical microbiology department in Trinity College.

Publications and Further Research Outputs

Peer-Reviewed Publications

E Reece, J Renwick, R Segurado, SM Clean, P Greally, Co-colonisation of the cystic fibrosis airways with A. fumigatus and P. aeruginosa is associated with poorer health: an Irish registry analysis, Journal of Cystic Fibrosis, European Cystic Fibrosis Society , 30/06/17, 16, Elsevier, 2017, ppS101 - S101 Conference Paper, 2017

E. Reece, S. McClean, P. Greally and J. Renwick, A Short-Term Longitudinal Study of the Paediatric Cystic Fibrosis Airway Microbiome , Journal of Cystic Fibrosis, European Cystic Fibrosis Society , Seville, Spain, 08/06/17, 2017 Conference Paper, 2017

Reece E., McClean S., Segurado R., Renwick J. and Greally P., Co-colonisation of the airways with A. fumigatus and P. aeruginosa is associated with poorer health in patients with CF: An Irish registry analysis. , BMC Pulmonary Medicine, 2017 Journal Article, 2017

Emma Reece, Julie Renwick, Siobhán McClean, Peter Greally, Determining the true incidence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aspergillus fumigatus in a paediatric cystic fibrosis cohort, European Cystic Fibrosis Society , Basel, Switzerland, 2016, 15, elsevier, 2016, ppS65 - S65 Conference Paper, 2016

MirkoviÄ B, Lavelle G.M, Azim A.A, Helma K, Gargoum F.S, Molloy K, Gernez Y, Dunne K, Renwick J, Murphy P, Moss R.B, Greene C.M, Gunaratnam C, Chotirmall S.H, McElvaney N.G, The basophil surface marker CD203c identifies Aspergillus species sensitization in patients with cystic fibrosis, Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 137, (2), 2016, p436 - 443 Journal Article, 2016 DOI URL

Gillian M Lavelle, Bojana Mirkovic, Ahmed A Azim, Kristine Helma, Fatma Gargoum, Kevin Molloy, Yael Gernez, Katie Dunne, Julie Renwick, Philip Murphy, Catherine M Greene, Richard B Moss, Cedric Gunaratnam, Sanjay H Chotirmall, Noel Gerry McElvaney, Use Of The Basophil Surface Marker CD203c In The Identification Of Aspergillus fumigatus Sensitisation In Cystic Fibrosis, American Thoracic Society, San Francisco, CA, May 2016, A37, 2016, ppA1416 - A1416 Conference Paper, 2016

E Reece, J Renwick, R Segurado, S McClean, P Greally, Co-Colonisation of The Cystic Fibrosis Airways with A. fumigatus and P. aeruginosa is Associated with Health Outcomes Similar to that of Patients Persistently Colonised with P. aeruginosa: an Irish Registry Analysis, Irish Journal of Medical Science, Irish Journal of Medical Science, 2016, 185, SPRINGER LONDON LTD, 2016, ppS474 - S474 Conference Paper, 2016

E. Reece, J. Renwick, S. McClean and P. Greally, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aspergillus fumigatus co-infection reduced the pro-inflammatory response in CF epithelial cells., Journal of Cystic Fibrosis, European Cystic Fibrosis Society conference, 14, (1), 2015 Conference Paper, 2015

K Molloy, N Fettes, J Renwick, E Reece, P Murphy, A Niland, M Keogan, M Greene, SJ O'Neill, The Burden of Aspergillus fumigatus Related Respiratory Disease in Non-CF Bronchiectasis, Irish Journal of Medical Science, Irish Journal of Medical Science, 01/11/15, 184, 2015, ppS522 - S522 Conference Paper, 2015

Dunne K, Prior AR, Murphy K, Wall N, Leen G, Rogers TR, Elnazir B, Greally P, Renwick J, Murphy P, Emergence of persistent Aspergillus terreus colonisation in a child with cystic fibrosis., Medical mycology case reports, 9, 2015, p26-30 Journal Article, 2015 TARA - Full Text

GM Lavelle, B Mirkovic, AA Azim, K Helma, FS Gargoum, K Molloy, Y Gernez, K Dunne, J Renwick, P Murphy, RB Moss, CM Greene, C Gunaratnam, SH Chotirmall, NG Mcelvaney, The Basophil Surface Marker Cd203c Identifies Aspergillus fumigatus sensitisation In Cystic Fibrosis, Pediatric Pulmonology , 50, 2015, p227 - 228 Journal Article, 2015

Renwick J, McNally P, John B, DeSantis T, Linnane B, Murphy P, The microbial community of the cystic fibrosis airway is disrupted in early life., PloS one, 9, (12), 2014, pe109798 Journal Article, 2014 TARA - Full Text DOI

Coughlan CA, Chotirmall SH, Renwick J, Hassan T, Low TB, Bergsson G, Eshwika A, Bennett K, Dunne K, Greene CM, Gunaratnam C, Kavanagh K, Logan PM, Murphy P, Reeves EP, McElvaney NG, The effect of Aspergillus fumigatus infection on vitamin D receptor expression in cystic fibrosis., American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine, 186, (10), 2012, p999 - 1007 Journal Article, 2012

Chotirmall SH, Renwick J, Hassan TM, Low TB, Bergsson G, Bennett K, Eshwika A, Dunne K, Coughlan CCA. , Itraconazole Up-Regulates The Vitamin D Receptor And Reduces T-Helper 2 Responses In Aspergillus Fumigatus Colonised Individuals With Cystic Fibrosis., Journal of Cystic Fibrosis, European Cystic Fibrosis Society conference, San Francisco, California, 2012, 11, 2012 Conference Paper, 2012

Renwick, J.*, McNally P., Linnane B., Greally P., Elnazir B., Lynch S., Murphy P. , The Airway Microbiome in Children with Cystic Fibrosis. , Journal of Cystic Fibrosis, European Cystic Fibrosis Society conference, Dublin, 2012, WS20.5, (S46), 2012 Conference Paper, 2012

Katie Dunne, Julie Renwick, Gerard McElvaney, Sanjay Chotirmall, Jacques F, Meis, Corné Klaassen, Philip Murphy and Thomas Rogers. , Epidemiology and Antifungal Susceptibility of Aspergillus fumigatus in an Irish Cystic Fibrosis Patient Cohort. , Ulster Medical Journal, Irish Fungal Society, 2012, 81, (3), 2012, pp158 - 162 Published Abstract, 2012

Mowlds P, Coates C, Renwick J, Kavanagh K, Dose-dependent cellular and humoral responses in Galleria mellonella larvae following β-glucan inoculation, Microbes and Infection, 12, (2), 2010, p146 - 153 Journal Article, 2010 URL DOI

Renwick J, Reeves E.P, Wientjes F.B, Kavanagh K, Translocation of proteins homologous to human neutrophil p47phox and p67phox to the cell membrane in activated hemocytes of Galleria mellonella, Developmental and Comparative Immunology, 31, (4), 2007, p347 - 359 Journal Article, 2007 URL DOI

Renwick J, Daly P, Reeves E.P, Kavanagh K, Susceptibility of larvae of Galleria mellonella to infection by Aspergillus fumigatus is dependent upon stage of conidial germination, Mycopathologia, 161, (6), 2006, p377 - 384 Journal Article, 2006 URL DOI

Bergin D, Reeves E.P, Renwick J, Wientjes F.B, Kavanagh K, Superoxide production in Galleria mellonella hemocytes: Identification of proteins homologous to the NADPH oxidase complex of human neutrophils, Infection and Immunity, 73, (7), 2005, p4161 - 4170 Journal Article, 2005 URL DOI

Non-Peer-Reviewed Publications

Insects as Models for Studying the Virulence of Fungal Pathogens of Humans in, editor(s)Kevin Kavanagh , New Insights in Medical Mycology, Springer, Springer, 2007, pp45 - 67, [Julie Renwick] Book Chapter, 2007

Research Expertise

Description

My research focuses on chronic respiratory infections, with a particular interest in Cystic Fibrosis (CF). In recent years the airways of people with CF have been found to harbour a diverse community of microorganisms. These finding are forcing a paradigm shift in how we view airway infections. To date the clinical significance of the presence of these microbial communities in the CF airways is still poorly understood. I currently have numerous basic science and clinical studies underway exploring the microbial communities present in the airway and how they contribute to chronic airway disease progression. I co-founded the Airway Microbiome in CF (AIM CF) project which is an arm of the larger Study of Host Immunity and Early Lung Disease in CF (SHIELD CF) longitudinal project. I also have an interest in advancing diagnostic techniques and improving detection of common airway pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aspergillus fumigatus. My research is multidisciplinary and relies on a high level of communication between clinicians and scientists to apply the most advanced, cutting-edge sequencing and molecular techniques to the clinical setting.

Projects

  • Title
    • The Airway Microbiome in Cystic Fibrosis (AIM CF)
  • Summary
    • AIM CF is a branch of the larger Study of Host Immunity and Early Lung Disease in Cystic Fibrosis (SHIELD CF) biobanking project established by Prof Paul McNally and Dr Barry Linnane. I am co-PI on the AIM CF project where we have developed protocols for isolating DNA and RNA from CF patient BAL samples and optimised an assay for detected viable bacteria using molecular methods. We have employed a 16S rRNA microarray, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq to characterise the upper and lower CF airway microbiome and compare it to healthy controls. This is an ongoing longitudinal study.
  • Funding Agency
    • The National Children's Hospital & The National Children's Research Centre
  • Title
    • Isolation and characterisation of an anti-pseudomonal and anti-biofilm agent produced by Aspergillus fumigatus: a potential therapy
  • Summary
    • Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of infection in people with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Colonisation with P. aeruginosa occurs early in life and once established is very difficult to eradicate. Up to 95% of morbidity and mortality in CF occurs as a result of chronic airway infections. In people with CF, airway damage begins early in life and the course of infection and inflammation in childhood can influence future prognosis. P. aeruginosa is independently linked to worsened prognosis for CF patients and has the ability to rapidly develop resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics including Penicillin, Cephalosporin, Aminoglycosides, Quinolones, Polymyxins and Carbapenems which are the leading antibiotics used to treat P. aeruginosa infections currently. P. aeruginosa acquires resistance genes and specific mutations that enhance its survival in the presence of antibiotics. New therapeutic avenues for treatment of P. aeruginosa infections in CF are imminent and early eradication is vital to prevent establishment of chronic infection. We have identified a molecule produced by Aspergillus fumigatus (a fungus that commonly co-colonises the CF airways with P. aeruginosa) that can inhibit P. aeruginosa growth in planktonic and biofilm forms. We aim to explore the therapeutic potential of this molecule.
  • Funding Agency
    • The National Children's Hospital
  • Title
    • Early Detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection and the Associated Microbial Community in Children with CF
  • Summary
    • This project aims to establish a molecular technique called ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) in Tallaght hospital with the ultimate aim of monitoring the microbial community in the airways of children with CF and providing a means for early detection of important pathogens, such as P. aeruginosa. We will monitor the microbial community before the acquisition of P. aeruginosa and characterise the changes in microbial community composition upon onset of P. aeruginosa infection. This will enable us to identifying early signs of susceptiblity to P. aeruginosa infection and explore the potential of the microbiome as an early biomarker or predictor of P. aeruginosa infection. This research will improve early diagnosis of P. aeruginosa infection in CF providing clinicians with advanced notice from which to plan therapeutic approaches and ultimately delay onset of chronic infection.
  • Funding Agency
    • The National Children's Hospital
  • Title
    • Advancing Bone and Joint Infection Diagnostics
  • Summary
    • Culture-based methods of diagnosis have inherent limitations. We can only detect the bacteria we know and those we know how to grow. There are many cases where no microorganisms grow from a presumed infected site. For example, over half of bone/ joint specimens from presumed infected patients are recorded as having "no growth" following culture-based diagnostics. Whether this is true absence of microorganisms in a specimen or a false negative is unknown. We are using molecular approaches to identify the bacteria that may be causing inflammation from "presumed infected" bone and joint tissue.
  • Funding Agency
    • The Meath Foundation
  • Title
    • AIM CF: Future Development
  • Summary
    • The AIM CF project will be further developed to begin exploring the functional capabilities of the airway microbiome and how microbiome metabolites can influence airway inflammation and disease progression.
  • Funding Agency
    • Wellcome Institutional Strategic Support Fund (ISSF)

Keywords

ASPERGILLUS-FUMIGATUS; CYSTIC FIBROSIS; DIAGNOSTICS; LOWER RESPIRATORY-TRACT; MICROBIOLOGY; microbiome; PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA; RESPIRATORY INFECTION

Recognition

Memberships

European Respiratory Society 2011 – Present

Irish Thoracic Society 2011 – Present


Last updated 23 November 2016 Stephen Smith (Email).