Production Credits/Cast (Exact Matches) (Displaying 177 Results)

    TitleTOP OF THE MORNING
    Production companyS.O.S.
    Irish Travel Club
    SponsorIrish Travel Club
    Country of originGreat Britain
    PhotographyEVANS, Joseph
    SongsVALENTINE, Hubert
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration18
    Production date1935
    CopyIFA
    SummaryPromotional film for the Irish Sweepstakes disguised as a travelogue because regulations prevented film advertising of the lottery at that time. Footage of the Sweepstake parade is integrated with various other vistas of Ireland, especially events sponsored by the Sweep and with advertising hoardings visible in the background.
    KeywordsIrish Sweepstakes
    Lotteries
    Gambling
    Travelogues
    Parades
    Advertisements
    Production creditsd: S.O.S. for the Irish Travel Club, c: Joseph Evans, pres: The Irish Travel Club, songs: Hubert Valentine, b&w, 18 mins, 1935.
    Genre/CategoryPromotional-Advertisement

    TitleIRISH JOURNEY, AN
    Country of originUSA
    Music composerCROSBY, Bing
    FEENEY, John
    FOLEY, Connie (Songs)
    Music performanceMAGUIRE, Sean
    ROWSOME, Leo
    CRONIN, Paddy
    WARD FINUCANE, Mary (Pipe Selection)
    Tyrone Pipers Band
    Drumcrow Pipers Band
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Format16mm
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryAn American travelogue detailing a Trans-Atlantic flight to Shannon and a tour of the towns and countryside of Ireland.
    KeywordsShannon
    Film can lenghts1260ft
    900ft
    Film can total lenghts2160ft
    Pos/NegPositive
    Genre/CategoryTourism-Travel-Travelogue

    TitleIRISHMEN (AN IMPRESSION OF EXILE), THE
    Production companyBBC Television (Bristol)
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerDONNELLAN, Philip
    DirectorDONNELLAN, Philip
    PhotographyWILLIAMS, Michael
    Sound recordingBARKER, Bill
    EditingBRIND, Bill
    PARKER, Charles (Tape Editing)
    Music composerMcCOLL, Ewan
    SEEGER, Peggy
    Music performanceLenihan, Paul
    HEANEY, Joe
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsoun
    Duration50
    Format16mm
    Production date1965
    TX channelTG4
    CopyIFA/NFTVA/UUC
    SummaryDocumentary tracing the journey of a young Irish fisherman from Ardwest-Cama in Connemara, as he travels to London to work on the Victoria Line Underground excavation. The film is structured as social documentary, featuring candid footage of Ireland labourers in London and at work on the English motorways, railways and canals. They are shown at work and at leisure, and interviews with the workers and their employers are dispersed throughout.
    NoteThe film was broadcast by Telifis na Gaeilge (now TG4) in Ireland in early 2000. It has never been broadcast in the UK.
    Although the BBC commissioned this film, the content - and the frankness of the interviews - proved too critical of Britain for their taste. The film has never been screened on British television.
    ReferenceBNFC Vol 24, 1986
    NFT Programme, 02/1985
    KeywordsSeamus Ennis, Builders, Building Sites, Construction Workers, Labourers, Irish in Britain, Migration, Trains, Pubs, Fishermen, Lobsters, Ferries, Irish Traditional Music, Hurling, Motorways, Ardwest (Connemara), Dun Laoghaire, County Clare, Kilburn, London M1 Motorway, Euston Station, Wembley Stadium, Scotland.
    Notes and commentsVarious off-cuts, both positive and negative,(featuring full opening and closing credits) are also available,(See Technical).
    Production creditsp.c.: BBC Television (Bristol), p/d: Philip Donnellan, ph: Michael Williams, s: Bill Barker, ed: Bill Brind, adv.: Seamus Ennis, songs to Irish traditional melodies by Ewan MacColl, Peggy Seeger, singers: Paul Lenihan, Joe Heaney, tape ed: Charles Parker.
    AdvisorENNIS, Seamus
    RightsGil Donnellan
    9 Toureen Terrace
    Passage West
    Co Cork
    Irish
    Ph 021 863 220
    Pos/NegPositive
    Genre/CategoryTV Documentary

    TitleSPELL OF IRELAND, THE
    Production companyCeltic Films Incorporated (New York)
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorDUGAN, Harry
    Script/AdaptationDUGAN, Harry
    PhotographyDUGAN, Harry
    EditingDUGAN, Harry
    CONETTA, Beatrice
    Music composerFEENEY, John (Songs)
    Music performanceComerford Troupe (Crossroads Dancing)
    NarratorMCCARTHY, Jack
    CARROLL, Helena
    ColourAnscolor
    Soundsound
    Duration74
    Format16mm
    Release date1954
    SummaryA documentary about Ireland which shows the towns and ges, religious shrines and festivals, social and sporting events, and typical scenes which reflect the occupations and recreations of the people. It includes a recording of remarks made Taoiseach Eamon de Valera recorded at Leinster House, Dublin.
    NoteNational Union Catalog Vol 28, 1953-1957:773
    Library of Congress Catalog-Motion Pictures and Filmstrips
    PeopleEamon De Valera
    Production creditsp.c: Celtic Films Inc, New York, d/sc/c: Harry Dugan, prod. super: Danny Devlin, m. d: Jack Shaindlin, tech. adv: J Fitzpatrick, Pat D'Arcy, ed: Dugan, Beatrice Conetta, songs by John Feeney, crossroads dancing by the Comerford Troop, narr: Jack McCarthy, Helena Carroll. 16mm, col, Ansco color, 75 mins.
    AdvisorFITZPATRICK, J.
    D'ARCY, Pat
    Production superviserDEVLIN, Danny
    Musical directionSHAINDLIN, Jack
    Genre/CategoryTourism-Travel-Travelogue

    TitleNORA
    Production companyVolta Films Productions
    Natural Nylon Entertainment
    IAC Holdings
    Road Movies
    Vierte Produktionen
    Metropolitan Films
    SponsorBord Scannán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    RTE Independent Production Unit
    Eurimages
    Film Forderung, Hamburg
    Ministeri per Culturali Departmenti della Spetticoli
    Country of originIreland
    Italy
    Germany
    ProducerADAMS, Bradley
    BRYANT, Damon
    SEAWARD, Treacy
    MacBRIDE, Tiernan
    McGREGOR, Ewan
    FLYNN, James
    FELSBERG, Ulrich
    Pagliei, Gherardo
    DirectorMURPHY, Pat
    Script/AdaptationMURPHY, Pat
    STEMBRIDGE, Gerry
    PhotographyROBIN, Jean Francois
    Sound recordingLINDSAY, Peter
    EditingDE CIAULA, Pia
    Executive producerCOLLINS, Guy
    STONEMAN, Rod
    MILLER, Tony
    Music composerSYREWITZ, Stanislas
    Music performancePolish Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Songs'She Is Far from the Land' vocals: Ewan McGregor, piano: Brian Gascoigne; 'The Lass of Aughrim' vocals: Susan Lynch, Ewan McGregor, guitar: Ewan McGregor; 'Green Isle of Erin' vocals: Ewan McGregor, piano: Brian Gascoigne; 'The Star of the County Down' vocals: Karl Scully, piano: Brian Gascoigne; 'The Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo' vocals: Ewan McGregor, Ignazio Oliva, piano: Brian Gascoigne; 'The Lass of Aughrim' vocals: Susan Lynch, Ewan McGregor, guitar: Gerry Grennell
    CastEwan McGregor (James Joyce), Susan Lynch (Nora Barnacle), Peter McDonald (Stanislas Joyce), Roberto Citrin (Roberto Prezioso), Andrew Scott (Michael Bodkin), Vincent McCabe (Uncle Tommy), Veronica Duffy (Annie Barnacle), Aedin Moloney (Eva Joyce), Pauline McLynn (Miss Kennedy), Neili Conroy (maid), Darragh Kelly (Cosgrave), Alan Devine (Gogarty), Paul Hickey (Curran), Kate O'Toole (Miss Delahunty), Martin Murphy (George Russell), Karl Scully (John McCormack), Frances Burke (old woman), Monica Scattini (Amalia Globocnik), Adrian McCourt (Ayers), Ignazio Oliva (Alessandro Francini Bruni), Stafania Montorsi (Cloyhilde Francini Bruni), Síle Nugent (maid 2), Franco Trevisi (Tullio Sylvestri), Eamonn Hunt (George Roberts), Manuel Bragato (baby Georgio), Liam McCourt, Odin O'Sullivan (Georgio, age 2), Dylan Mooney (Georgio, age 4), Ben Harding (Georgio, age 6), Robin Mooney (Lucia, age 2), Lauren Mulhall (Lucia, age 4).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourDeLuxe
    SoundDolby Digital
    Duration106
    Footage9585
    Format35mm
    Production date1999
    Release date2000
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryIn June 1904 James Joyce meets Galwegian Nora Barnacle on a Dublin street. Soon after, the two become lovers. Nora, a hotel maid, is sexually confident and Joyce fears she has been with other men, including his rival Cosgrave. Joyce falls in love with her. He is a writer still struggling to get his first book published, and when he explains how he finds Ireland stifling, he asks her to accompany him to Trieste, where Joyce teaches English and writes. Their relationship is stormy, with Nora, pregnant and homesick, disapproving of Joyce's heavy drinking. They have a boy, Giorgio, and Joyce's younger brother, the supportive Stanislas, comes to stay. Joyce returns to Dublin, including when in 1909 he establishes Ireland's first full-time cinema, and continues to seek a publisher for his short-story collection Dubliners. Joyce's jealousy at Nora's possible sexual encounter with Cosgrave resurfaces, but Oliver St John Gogarty reassures him that the rumour is not true. Joyce and Nora have a second child, Lucia, and they write sexually explicit letters to each other. Joyce returns to Trieste and tries to push Nora into an affair with local newspaper editor Roberto Prezioso. Nora returns to Ireland with the children. Joyce follows her and, after following his repeated failure to publish Dubliners, announces he will never return to Ireland again. Reconciled, the family returns to Trieste.The film ends in 1914 as Ulysses, the landmark modernist novel that is set on the day in 1904 when he first 'walked out' with Nora, is begun.
    ReferenceST (Culture), 29/3/1999: 4-5, interview with actress Susan Lynch who is to play Nora Barnacle opposite Ewan McGregor's James Joyce in a new film (Michael Ross).
    The Guardian, 1/4/1999: 13, 'Arts Diary', diary piece on Ewan McGregor playing James Joyce in a new film.
    IT, 7/4/1999: 13, 'Reel News', short item on Ewan McGregor who is to play James Joyce in Nora directed by Pat Murphy. Shooting begins on/4/23, 1999 (Michael Dwyer).
    ST (Review), 16/4/1999: 6, 'Celtic Cannes', brief mention of Ewan McGregor playing James Joyce in Nora directed by Pat Murphy (Ciaran Carty).
    IT (Weekend), 22/4/1999: 5, 'Portrait of the Artist as James Joyce', actor Ewan McGregor is at the Cannes Film Festival to promote his latest film, Nora directed by Pat Murphy (Michael Dwyer).
    SBP (Agenda), 23/4/1999: 36, 'Cannes Diary', actor Ewan McGregor is at the Cannes Film Festival to promote his latest film, Nora, directed by Pat Murphy (Rod Stoneman).
    ST (Culture), 23/4/1999: 10, 'Ruling the Waves', actor Ewan McGregor is at the Cannes Film Festival to promote his latest film, Nora directed by Pat Murphy (Brian Pendreigh).
    ST (Review), 13/6/1999: 1, 'Nora in Bloom', article on Nora Barnacle, James Joyce's lifelong companion (Declan Kiberd).
    IT (Weekend), 10/7/1999: 1&4, 'Portrait of an Artist', actor Ewan McGregor talks about his portrayal of James Joyce in Pat Murphy's new film Nora (Michael Dwyer).
    The Guardian, 20/8/1999: 9, 'What's the Fuss About Ewan McGregor?', profile of actor Ewan McGregor by Rob Mackie.
    ST (People and Review), 31/11/1999: 7, short news item on the reaction to Nora at market screenings (Ciaran Carty).
    IT (Sound and Vision), 'Reel News', 4/2/2000: 13, Nora directed by Pat Murphy to have its world premiere at the opening of the 15th Dublin Film Festival (Michael Dwyer).
    ST (Culture), 13/2/2000: 8, 'A Not-So-Fine Romance', using a big box-office name in Nora has spoiled Pat Murphy's attempt to catch James Joyce's muse on celluloid (Declan Burke).
    ST (People and Review), 5/3/2000: 7, short news piece on actress Susan Lynch who's latest role is Nora Barnacle in Pat Murphy's Nora (Ciaran Carty).
    15th Dublin Film Festival Programme, 6-16 Apr, 2000, programme notes and director's notes from the 15th Dublin Film Festival Programme (Pat Murphy and Paul Taylor).
    The Guardian (Friday Review), 24/3/2000: 10-11, 'A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Lover', Brenda Maddox sees her book about James Joyce's grand passion becoming a film in Dublin.
    The Volta Magazine, vol 2, issue 2, 2000: 16, 'The Scot Report', interview with actor Ewan McGregor about his role as James Joyce in Nora. (David F. Hall).
    The Volta Magazine, vol 2, issue 2, 2000: 17, review of Nora.
    IT, 1/4/2000: 4, 'For Love of Music, Hats and Jimmy', interview with Nora director Pat Murphy from the 15th Dublin Film Festival Supplement. (Helen Meany).
    IT, 1/4/2000: 1, 'Highlights of This Year's Film Festival' - review of Nora from the 15th Dublin Film Festival Supplement.
    FI, Issue 75/4/2000: 12-15, 'A Portrait of a Lady', interview with director Pat Murphy about her latest film Nora, her third feature film after Maeve and Anne Devlin which were made in the early 1980s (Ruth Barton).
    IT, 4/4/2000: 13, 'For the Love of Joyce', three Joycean experts give their verdicts on Nora (Katie Donovan).
    FI, Apr 2000: 43, positive review of Nora (Desmond Traynor).
    IT (Sound and Vision), 7/4/2000: 13, 'Portrait of the Artist as a Young Lover', synopsis of Nora, the opening film of the 15th Dublin Film Festival (Michael Dwyer).
    IT (Weekend), 8/4/2000: 24, 'No Law? The Party Goes On', social column on the premiere of Nora at the opening night of the Dublin FIlm Festival.
    ST, 9/4/2000: 24, 'The Sheer Cheek of It', social column on the premiere of Nora at the opening night of the Dublin FIlm Festival by Lise Hand.
    SBP (Agenda), 9/4/2000: 35-36, 'My Life With Nora', interview with Ireland director Pat Murphy. She talks about career and her latest film Nora which took ten years to complete (Joanne Hayden).
    Nora production notes. Includsgn.: crew list, synopsis, introduction, history, casting, look and feel of the film, costumes, actors speaking about their roles, general production information, credits. Held at the Tiernan MacBride of the Irish Film Institute.
    ST (Culture), 16/4/2000: 4-5, 'Time Off for a Life Most Ordinary', interview with actor Ewan McGregor for whom the role of James Joyce has been a creative high point in a long and arduous year (Michael Ross).
    ST (Art Life), 16/4/2000: 3, 'A Part That Might Have Been Written For Her', interview with actress Susan Lynch on her current role as Nora Barnacle in Pat Murphy's Nora (Ciaran Carty).
    SI (Living and Leisure), 23/4/2000: 32L, 'Hard Times and Colourful Sex', review (Ronan Farren).
    ST (Culture), 24/4/2000: 27, preview of Nora.
    ST (Art Life), 23/4/2000: 7, 'A Portrait of the Wife as a Muse', review (Ciaran Carty).
    ST (Art Life), 23/4/2000: 7, Susan Lynch is to follow her role in Nora with the lead role in the thriller A Little Piece of Earth (Ciaran Carty).
    In Dublin, Vol 25 No 8: 50, review by Declan Burke.
    Dublin Event Guide, 26/4/- 9/4/2000: 6, review by Pat MacMellow.
    The Mail on Sunday, 16/4/2000: 33-34, 'A Passion for Joyce', Nora Barnacle's biographer Brenda Maddox writes on the film Nora.
    RTE Guide, 7/4/2000: 8-9, 'It Had to Be Ewan', interview with actor Ewan McGregor. He talks about his career and his latest role as James Joyce in Pat Murphy's Nora (Michael Doherty).
    The Guardian (Friday Review), 19/4/2000: 5, 'Sister Act Five', negative review of Nora (Peter Bradshaw).
    S&S, 6/2000: 49, review by Kevin Maher.
    IT (Weekend), 20/4/2000: 24, 'Telling Tales', gossip column piece on a book launch attended by Pat Murphy before she went to London for the premiere of Nora (Catherine Foley).
    FW, issue 40: p14-17, 'Pat Murphy', interview with director Pat Murphy. She talks about her script for Nora. A comparison is made between Nora and her other films Anne Devlin and Maeve. Pat Murphy talks about casting Ewan McGregor as James Joyce. She talks about the potential audience for Nora. She talks about her next two projects (Katie Moylan).
    FW, Issue 40, 2000: 58, review by Paula Shields.
    IT, 10/6/2000: 9, 'The War of Words Over Joyce's Literary Legacy', article on whether the enjoyment of the works of James Joyce is being over-guarded by the Joyce estate. Includes comment by Gerry Stembridge, co-writer of film Nora (Medbh Ruane).
    RTE Guide, 21/4/2000: 66-67, 'Nora: A Woman of Substance', interview with Susan Lynch on her role as Nora Barnacle in Pat Murphy's Nora (Michael Doherty).
    RTE Guide, 12/4/2000: 90, 'Fashion', costume designer Consolata Boyle on designing clothes for film (Gisele Scanlon).
    Box Office Figures for Irish and Irish interest films from 1999 to 2003 (to date) including Nora.
    In Production, October 2003 Vol 6 No. 5: 19, box office figures for the film Nora.
    DistributorAlliance-Atlantis (UK)
    PeopleJames Joyce
    Nora Barnacle
    Stanislaus Joyce
    Oliver St. John Gogarty
    KeywordsWriters
    Literature
    Relationships
    Sex
    Trieste
    Volta cinema
    Teaching
    Maids
    Children
    Dublin
    1904
    Dubliners
    Ulysses,
    James Joyce
    Nora Barnacle
    Stanislaus Joyce
    Oliver St. John Gogarty
    LocationDublin
    Trieste
    Production creditsp.c.: Natural Nylon Entertainment in association with IAC Holdings/Volta Films/Road Movies Vierte Produktionen/Gam Film/Metropolitan Films. Supported by Bord Scannán na héireann (Irish Film Board)/ Eurimages/ FilmFörderung Hamburg GmbH/Ministero per I Beni e le Attività Culturali - dipartimento della Spettacolo/Radio Telefís Éireann. Developed in association with Sally Ann O'Reilly, Ben Barenholtz. p: Bradley Adams, Damon Bryant, Treacy Seaward, d: Pat Murphy, sc: Murphy, Gerard Stembridge based on the biography by Brenda Maddox, cost: Consolata Boyle, p.dsgn.: Alan Macdonald, m: Stanislas Syrewitz, ed: Pia De Ciaula, dop: Jean Pierre Robin AFC, co-p.: James Flynn, Uklrich Felsberg, Gherardo Pagliei, Ewan McGregor, exec.p: Guy Collins, Bord Scannán na héireann: Rod Stoneman, Natural Nylon Entertainment: Tony Miller, p.exec: Metroplitan Films: Susan Holmes, p.sup: Italy: Andrea Borella, Germany: Albert Schwinges, p.co-ord: Lisa Parker, Road Movies Vierte Produktionen: Gabrielle Niemeyer, Daniele Pfennigs, London: Katie Judge, Irish, p.man: Des Martin, unit.man, Italy: Mark Giacalone, loc.m. Irish: Paddy McCarney, Italy: Beatrice Arweiler, Maurizio Pigna, post-p.sup: Alistair Hopkins, co-ord: Katie Judge, a.d.: Tommy Gormley, Sarah Purser, Irish: Jill Dempsey, Lisa Kelly, Italy:Bojana Sutic, Gilles Canatella, Germany: Lars Henning, sc.super.:Laerke Sigfred Pedersen, cast: Nuala Moiselle, Frank Moiselle, Shaila Rubin, sc.cons: Natural Nylon Entertainment: Nell Greenwood, c.op: (Irish 2nd unit): Ciaran Barry, Steadicam ops: Roger Tooley, Vince McGahon, special visual effs: Mill Film, London, sp.effs, Irish: Team FX, sp.effs, Italy: Corridori Giovanni, graphic artist, Irish: Laurence O'Toole, super.art d: Terry Pritchard, art d: Irish: Martin Goulding, Italy: Stefano Maria Ortolani, Germany: Ulrich Schröder, set.dec, Italy: Alessandra Querzola, portrait artist: Thomasina Smith, draughtsmen, Irish: Gary McGinty, Italy: Alessandro Alberti, cost: Consolata Boyle, ward: Rhona McGuirke, key costume makers: Maggie Scobbie; men: Keith Watson, chief make-up artist: Máire O'Sullivan, chief Annabel Dundas, digital titles/optical effects: General Screen Enterprises, score perf by The Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Tadeusz Wicherek, m.ed.:Joyce, songs: Richard Todman, recording engnr: Rafal Paczkowski, mixer: Tony Taverner, soundtrack: 'She Is Far from the Land' vocals: Ewan McGregor, piano: Brian Gascoigne; 'The Lass of Aughrim' vocals: Susan Lynch, Ewan McGregor, guitar: Ewan McGregor; 'Green Isle of Erin' vocals: Ewan McGregor, piano: Brian Gascoigne; 'The Star of the County Down' vocals: Karl Scully, piano: Brian Gascoigne; 'The Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo', 'vocals: Ewan McGregor, Ignazio Oliva, piano: Brian Gascoigne; 'The Lass of Aughrim' vocals: Susan Lynch, Ewan McGregor, guitar: Gerry Grennell, s: Peter Lindsay, re.rd.mix: Adrian Rhodes, Stuart Hilliker, super.s.ed: Nick Adams, dial.ed: Gordon Brown, a.: Jonathan Cronin, a. effects ed: Hugo Adams, Foley art.: Jason Swanscott, Diane Greaves, ed: John Griffith, stunt co-ordinator (Ireland): Philippe Zone.
    Art directionPRITCHARD, Terry
    GOULDING, Martin
    ORTOLANI, StefanO'Maria
    SCHROEDER, Ulrich
    Costume designBOYLE, Consolata
    RightsVolta Films
    Gam Film SRL
    Road Movies Vierte Produktionen
    Volta / Metropolitan Films
    Contact: James Flynn
    E-mail: james@metro.iol.ie
    Ardmore Studios
    Bray
    Co Wicklow
    Tel: +353 1 286 2971
    Fax: +353 1 276 9471
    Momentum London
    Contact: Hamish Mosely
    Tel: 00 44 207 391 6950
    Production designMcDONALD, Alan
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Biopic
    Literary Adaptation

    TitleCLAIRE DOLAN
    Production companySerene Films
    MK2 Productions
    Country of originUSA
    France
    ProducerRUARK, Anne
    DirectorKERRIGAN, Lodge
    Script/AdaptationKERRIGAN, Lodge
    SIGNORE, Chip
    PhotographyMANIACHI, Teodoro
    Sound recordingSCHNEIDER, Peter
    NEESE, Kelly
    EditingBODEN, Kristina
    Music composerMISHAN, Ahrin
    FISHER TURNER, Simon
    Songs'I'll Never Be the Same' by Gus Kahn, Matty Malneck, Frank Signorelli, performed by Coleman Hawkins (tenor sax), Ernie Royal (trumpet), Eddie Bert (trombone), Joe 'Earl' Knight (piano), Sidney Gross (guitar), Wendell Marshall (bass), Osie Johnson (drums); 'A Hundred Years from Today' by Victor Young, Joseph Young, Ned Washington, performed by Jack Teagarden (trombone), Rudy Braff (trumpet), Lucky Thompson (tenor sax), Sol Yaged (clarinet), Sidney Gross (guitar), Kenny Kersey (piano), Milt Hinton (bass), Denzil Best (drums); 'Don't Say Nothing at All' by Dinah Washington, Juanita Hill, performed by Dinah Washington; 'The Inevitable' by Ari Roland, performed by Ari Roland (bass), Sacha Perry (piano), Chris Byars (tenor sax), Jimmy Lovelace (drums).
    CastKatrin Cartlidge (Claire Dolan), Vincent D'Onofrio (Elton Garrett), Colm Meaney (Roland Cain), John Doman (Cain's friend), Maryann Plunkett (Mary Egan), Miranda Stuart Rhyne (Angela, Elton's daughter), Kate Skinner (Madeleine Garrett), David Little (man in Chicago café), Lola Pashalinski (salon client 2), Jim Frangione (man in bar), Ed Hodson (driver), Tom Gilroy ($1000 trick), John Ventimiglia (Newark cab driver), Patrick Husted (George), Muriel maida (Claire's mum), Lizabeth Mackay (administrator), Svetlana Jovanivich (Eva), Madison Arnold (priest), Brenda Thomas Denmark (woman at book stand), Sean Powers (driver's friend), Sally Stark (waitress at Newark diner), Sarah Rose Hendrickson (Siobhan, Mary's daughter), Candy Buckley (salon client 1), Babo Harrison (salon owner), Marian Quinn (woman in park), Missy Yager (Cathy), Henry Morales-Ballet, Gary Warner (tricks), Alan Davidson (man in diner), Dominic Marcus (Newark cab driver), Adrianna Sevan (woman at cab stand), Michael Laurence (Elton's fare), Blaise Corrigan (gunman), Mark Zimmerman, Jonathan Smit, Joan Buddenhagen (tricks), Bruce MacVittie (obstetrician).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourDuArt Film and Video
    SoundDolby Digital
    Duration95
    Footage8550
    Format35mm
    Release date1997
    SummaryNew York, the present. Calling herself Lucy, Claire Dolan works the hotels as a call girl but gives most of her money to Roland Cain, an old family friend to whom she owes money and who acts as her pimp. When Claire's mother dies in a nursing home, she doesn't inform Cain (although he is paying for the old woman's treatment) and flees to Newark, New Jersey, shortly after the funeral. Finding work as a beautician, she meets Elton, a divorced cab driver, and they embark on an affair. Cain shows up in Newark and forces Claire back to New York, where he supplies her to his friends for free. Elton follows her and learns the truth about her existence. He gives Claire money to help settle the debt to Cain, but knowing she is a prostitute unsettles him. Elton agrees to her having their baby, but the relationship collapses. Claire, now pregnant, pays off Cain and leaves for Chicago to have the baby and start anew. Several months later, Cain meets Elton on the street, accompanied by his new wife who is happily expecting their first child. They talk as if they were old friends but neither mentions Claire.
    NoteScreened At The 13th Galway Film Fleadh, 2001.

    Although there is little reference to the character Claire Dolan's Irish origins in this film, her name is without doubt Irish - and a shot of her passport reveals her place of origin as Dun Laoghaire.
    ReferenceS&S 2000 5:45
    DistributorICA (UK)
    KeywordsProstitutes
    Irish-Americans
    LocationNewYork
    Newark
    Production creditsp.c.: Marin Karmitz presents a MK2/Serene Productions, p: Ann Ruark, d/sc: Lodge Kerrigan, dop: Teodoro Maniaci, ed: Kristina Boden, p.dsgn.: Sharon Lomofsky, m: Ahrin Mishan, Simon Fisher Turner, p.co-ord: Libby Richman, p.man: Blair Breard, loc.co-ord: Christine Welker, a.d.: John Tyson, Chip Signore, Chris Savage, sc.super.:Jessica Lichtner, cast: Avy Kaufman, Associate: Julie Lichter, set dec: Susan Ogu, cost: Laura Jean Shannon, ward: Pamela Kezal, hair/make-up: Jorge Nelson, title dsgn.: Alison Andoos, Moving Images, title opticals: The Effects House, optical effects: Moving Images, easy listening songs: James Bauer, musicians: cello: Dave Eggar, piano: Ahrin Mishan, oboe: Matt Sullivan, m.ed: Daniel Evans Farkas, m.mix.:Tony Volante, music mix tech.: Evan Benjamin, music recording rngineer: Peter Robbins, soundtrack: 'I'll Never Be the Same' by Gus Kahn, Matty Malneck, Frank Signorelli, perf by Coleman Hawkins (tenor sax), Ernie Royal (trumpet), Eddie Bert (trombone), Joe 'Earl' Knight (piano), Sidney Gross (guitar), Wendell Marshall (bass), Osie Johnson (drums); 'A Hundred Years from Today' by Victor Young, Joseph Young, Ned Washington, perf by Jack Teagarden (trombone), Rudy Braff (trumpet), Lucky Thompson (tenor sax), Sol Yaged (clarinet), Sidney Gross (guitar), Kenny Kersey (piano), Milt Hinton (bass), Denzil Best (drums); 'Don't Say Nothing at All' by Dinah Washington, Juanita Hill, perf by Dinah Washington; 'The Inevitable' by Ari Roland, perf by Ari Roland (bass), Sacha Perry (piano), Chris Byars (tenor sax), Jimmy Lovelace (drums), production sound: Peter Schneider, Kelly Neese, re-rd.mix.: Skip Lievsay, super.s.ed: Tom Paul, Foley artist: Marko Costanzo, engr: Clete Ritta, ed: Chris Todd, stunt co-ord.s: Blaise Corrigan, Douglas Crosby, Cat wrangler: Dawn Animal Agency
    Costume designSHANNON, Laura Jean
    Production designLOMOFSKY, Sharon
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleVOICE OF IRELAND, THE
    Country of originNorthern Ireland
    ProducerHADDICK, Col. Victor
    DirectorHADDICK, Col. Victor
    Script/AdaptationHADDICK, Col. Victor
    PhotographyHEATH, Cyril
    WYER, R.H.
    Music performanceHAYWARD, Richard
    CastRichard Hayward, Victor Haddick, Barney O'Hara.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    tinted
    Soundsound
    Duration49
    Footage4400
    Format35mm
    Release date1932
    SummarySongs interspersed a narrative concerning a traveller who returns home
    and meets old friends. Views of lakes and mountains, fox-hunting,
    horse-breeding, motor-racing, and folk-dancing were shown.
    (Adapted from KW 2/4/1936).
    NoteThis was the first indigenous Irish sound film. "The film is a close and expert study of the people of Ireland, completely devoid of anything that savours of the stage Irishman... [A] non-sectarian, non-political picture which comprises the art, commerce, industry, entertainment, sport, and scenic beauty of the Green Isle'. (Belfast Newsletter 13/6/1932). 'Even one or two scenes in ancient Irish have been reconstructed, but half-heartedly and with obvious economy. When a close-up of a singer or instrumentalist is required, the performer is made-up in a way suggesting the crudest amateur theatricals. The commentary is delivered in an Irish brogue which lends authenticity, but both sound effects and background music are lacking, and pauses in the commentary leave a dead silence even when motor-racing is on the screen. Recording is generally harsh. The one studio setting is obviously artificial, or the 'two-flats' variety, and the photography in general suggests an enthusiastic amateur on his holidays.' (KW 2/4/1936). 'A rather scrappy musical scenic'. (6 Laoghaire g 1945:157). Another proposed Haddick film announced at this time, BIRDS OF PASSAGE, which was to have been made at Passage, Co Waterford, in Dublin City and Limerick, does not seem to have been produced.
    ReferenceII 13/3/1933; Gifford 09967: Mar 1936; Slide 1988:20-1.
    DistributorInternational Cine (GB)
    Production creditsp/d/sc: Colonel Victor Haddick, c: Cyril Heath, R H Wyer, associate: ggg
    Professor Bailey Ross, songs sung by Richard Hayward.
    OtherBAILEY ROSS, Prof. (Associate)
    Genre/CategoryMusical Comedy
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleLUCK OF THE IRISH, THE
    Production companyCrusade Films
    Country of originNorthern Ireland
    ProducerHAYWARD, Richard
    PEDELTY, Donovan
    DirectorPEDELTY, Donovan
    Script/AdaptationPEDELTY, Donovan (from a novel by Victor Haddick)
    PhotographyWILSON, Jack
    Music performanceHAYWARD, Richard
    CastRichard Hayward (Sam Mulhem), Kay Walsh (Eileen O'Donnell), Niall MacGinnis (Derek O'Neill), Jimmy Mageean (Sir Brian O'Neill), R H MacCanless (Gavin Grogan), Charles Pagan (Sergeant Doyle), Harold Griffin (Simon Reid), Charlotte Tedlie (Hortense O'Neill), Nan Cullen (Widow Whistler), John M Henderson (Sir Richard O'Donnell), Meta Grainger (Lady O'Donnell).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    tinted
    Soundsound
    Duration81
    Format35mm
    Release date1935
    SummaryAn Irish country gentleman. Sir Brian O'Neill, pawns his castle in the hope of victory for his horse in the Grand National Steeplechase. The horse is ridden by his son, Derek, who is in love with Eileen O'Donnell. The horse wins, but it is subsequently disqualified. Bailiffs take possession of the castle at once, and efforts by a servant to retrieve the family fortune are unsuccessful. A few hours before the O'Neills are due to be evicted, an American appears and buys the horse at a price which enables Sir Brian to pay his debts and Derek to marry Eileen. (Adapted from MFB 1935:197). Film includes the poem: 'Ban Cnuic Eireann 0!'
    NoteGB Rel ca. Dec 1935; IR Rel ca. 14/2/1936; USA Rel 15/1/1936 (47th St Cinema, New York). Some of the members of the cast were from the Belfast Repertory Theatre. This was Pedelty's directorial debut, having previously worked as a film scout for Paramount in London. Part of the film was made at Laurel Hill Convent, Limerick. 'The film marks a definite advance towards the goal of having a motion picture industry in Ireland.' (SI 16/2/1936:4). 'With a little of the proverbial Celtic good fortune and the application of a soft pedal on the fact that the cast and story are both indigenous to Northern Ireland, this all-Irish film should do well among the sons of Erin. Since most of the Irish comes from the southern Catholic three-quarters of the isle, and the animosity toward the upper-eastern corner is w.k., knowledge of the film's origin won't help.' (Var 20/1/1936).
    ReferenceGifford 09885: Dec 1935; MPG; Slide 1988:21.
    DistributorParamount-British (GB)
    KeywordsIrish Gentry
    Anglo-Irish
    Production creditsp.c: Crusade Films, p: Richard Hayward, Donovan Pedelty, d/sc: Pedelty
    from a novel by Victor Haddick, c: Jack Willson, songs sung by Richard
    Hayward, poem: 'Ban Cnuic Eireann O!'
    Genre/CategoryComedy
    Rural Drama
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleACTORS, THE
    Production companyCompany of Wolves
    Four Provinces Films
    FilmFour
    Miramax Films
    Senetor Film
    SponsorBórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerJORDAN, Neil
    MORRIS, Redmond
    WOOLLEY, Stephen
    DirectorMcPHERSON, Conor
    Script/AdaptationMcPHERSON, Conor
    PhotographyMcGARVEY, Seamus
    BYRNE, Breffni
    Sound recordingWILLIS, Simon
    EditingREYNOLDS, Emer
    Executive producerWEBSTER, Paul
    HUTH, Hanno
    STONEMAN, Rod
    Associate producerDAY, Elinor
    TURNER, Romany
    ERRAUGHT, John
    Music composerNYMAN, Michael
    Songs'Star of the Sea'
    Lyrics and Music by Conor McPherson
    Performed by Laura Cullinan, Bebhinn Ni Chiosain,
    Cliona Ni Chiosain and Niamh Reynolds
    Recording courtesy of Company of Wolves (UK) Ltd.
    Published by Conor McPherson and
    Company of Wolves (UK) Ltd.

    'Waiting'
    Lyrics by Conor McPherson
    Fionnuala Ni Chiosain & Stephen Walshe
    Music by Conor McPherson
    Performed by Miranda Richardson
    Recording courtesy of Company of Wolves (UK) Ltd.
    Published by Conor McPherson and
    Company of Wolves (UK) Ltd.

    'Come back to me'
    Lyrics and Music by Conor McPherson &
    Fionnuala Ni Chiosain
    Recording courtesy of Company of Wolves (UK) Ltd.
    Published by Conor McPherson and
    Company of Wolves (UK) ltd.

    'Could this be Love'
    Lyrics and Music by Conor McPherson
    Performed by Lana Heady and Dylan Moran
    Recording courtesy of Company of Wolves (UK) Ltd.
    Published by Conor McPherson and
    Company of Wolves (UK) Ltd.

    'Una's Waltz'
    Music by Conor McPherson and Una Ni Chiosain
    Violin Una Ni Chiosain
    Recording courtesy of Company of Wolves (UK) Ltd.
    Published by Conor McPherson and
    Company of Wolves (UK) Ltd.

    'Seems so Long'
    Lyrics and music by Fionnuala Ni Chiosain
    Performed by Cathy Davey
    Drums-Peter O'Kennedy
    Recording courtesy of Company of Wolves (UK) Ltd.
    Published by Conor McPherson and
    Company of Wolves (Uk) Ltd.

    'Ce Beau Matin'
    Music by Michael Nyman
    Lyrics by Conor McPherson & Fionnuala Ni Chiosain
    Performed by Fabienne Borget & The Michael Nyman Band
    Recording courtesy of Michael Nyman Ltd.
    Published by Chester Music Ltd./ michael Nyman Ltd.
    Conor McPherson and Company of Wolves (UK) Ltd.

    'Lovely Morning'
    Lyrics & Music by Conor McPherson and Fionnuala Ni Chiosain
    Performed by Cathy Davey
    French horn - Niall Ni Chiosain, Violin Una Ni Chiosain
    Drums - Peter O'Kennedy
    Recording courtesy of Company of Wolves (UK) Ltd.
    Published by Conor McPherson and
    Company of Wolves (UK) Ltd.
    CastAbigail Iversen (Mary), Dylan Moran (Tom), Michael Golgan (audition director), Deirdre Walsh (camcorder girl), Bill Hickey (stage doorkeeper), Veronica O'Reilly (box office attendant), Paul Ward (Maurice the usher), Brian McGuinness (Dermot the usher), Michael Caine (O'Malley), Ian Fitzgibbon, Brian McGrath, Alison McKenna, Annie Ryan, Jude Sweeney, Joanne Crawford, Rachel Rath (actors in Richard III), Deidre O'Kane (stage manager), Guy Carleton (book seller), Sean Tracey (chief fireman), Aisling O' Sullivan (Rita), Ben Miller (Clive), Michael Gambon (Barreller), Lena Headey (Dolores), Simon Delaney (Ronnie), Alvaro Lucchesi (Lesley), Michael McElhatton (Jock), Damien O'Donnell (waiter), Eamon Clancy (Mrs. Magnani hood 1), Donagh Deeney (Mrs. Magnani hood 2), Alison Doody (herself), Marty Whelan (himself)
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    SoundDolby Digital Surround
    Duration92
    Format35mm
    Release date2003
    TX channelChannel 4
    TX date07/03/2006
    CopyIFA
    SummaryIn Dublin, Anthony O'Malley, the star of a low-budget production of William Shakespeare's Richard III, has taken young Tom, who plays an assortment of parts in the play, under his wing. (Tom gets so nervous at auditions that he even fails an audition for a sausage commercial.) While doing research in a seedy pub, O'Malley learns that a smalltime crook called Barreller owes money to a London-based gangster, Magnani, whom Barreller has never met. O'Malley suggests a scam whereby Tom pretends to be one of Magnani's men and collects the money. Tom balks at the proposition but accepts when he is left homeless after a fire. He moves in with his sister and takes advice from his nine-year-old niece, Mary. Pretending to be a thug named Clive, Tom succeeds in foiling Barreller and his two brothers into thinking he is one of Magnani's men. Barreller's daughter Dolores is less convinced but she and Tom are instantly attracted to one another. He gets the money but O'Malley learns that Magnani is sending a real minion, a Scotsman named Jock. Tom, impersonating Barreller, intercepts Jock and misdirects him to the Aran Islands. He then impersonates Jock for the Barreller family, swearing to hunt down Clive. Eventually Magnani herself turns up. O'Malley who halfheartedly sells Tom down the river in order to get the money for himself, ends up impersonating her to divert the returned real Jock. When Magnani turns up at the place where the money is hidden, only the timely arrival of the police saves O'Malley from a beating. Later, at an awards ceremony, Dolores and Jack attend as a couple, O'Malley wins a prize but everyone leaves during his speech to watch Dolores in the sausage commercial.
    ReferenceIT (The Ticket), 21 Mar 2002: 28, 'Acting up in Dublin', Short news item announcing the shooting schedule for the Irish film The Actors. It gives a short synopsis of the plot, including a list of the main actors and production companies involved (Michael Dwyer).

    SI, 7 Apr 2002: 26, 'Michael Caine is Still Able to Act, but What About Colgan?', Short interview with Michael Caine on why he chose to play one of the lead roles in the Irish film, The Actors. It also includes a brief synopsis of the plot and the Irish cast involved.

    The Guardian, 18 May 2002: 7, 'Cannes Diary', Short news item on Michael Caine, who did not make it to Cannes to promote his film, The Actors, due to a flight delay at Heathrow Airport (Stuart Jeffries).

    IT, 18 May 2002: 10-14, 'The Players', Interview with actors Michael Caine, Dylan Moran and director Conor McPherson on the set of The Actors.
    (Michael Dwyer).

    IT (The Ticket), 11 July 2002: 28, 'Reel News - FilmFour Gone...But Not Forgotten', Article announcing the shut down of Channel 4's film production company, FilmFour. One of its most recent films to co-produce was the Irish film, The Actors, directed by Conor McPherson (Michael Dwyer).

    The Guardian (Magazine), 13 July 2002: 37-42, 'Funny Peculiar', Interview with Dylan Moran and Conor McPherson during The Actors shoot (Sally Vincent).

    ST (Art Life), 28 Aug 2002: 1, 'Cockney Comeback', interview with Michael Caine, who stars in The Actors. He talks about ad-libbing in the film, his family background and career to date (Ciaran Carty).

    S&S, May 2003: 38, negative review of The Actors described as the most tragic of cinematic creatures the unfunny comedy. Article includes credits and film synopsis (Leslie Felperin).

    IT (The Ticket), 8 May 2003: 2-3, 'An Actors Life for Me', stand-up comedian Dylan Moran talks about his role in The Actors and his TV sitcom Black Books (Shane Hegarty).

    IT, 9 May 2003: 3, 'Sprightly Caine has Advice for Farrell', Michael Caine talks about his role in The Actors and advises actor Colin Farrell to stay off 'the sauce' (Roisin Ingle).

    IT, 10 May 2003: 7, 'Fighting Demons', Conor McPherson talks about The Actors and briefly touches on his theatre and film career to date (Donald Clarke).

    SI (Living and Leisure), 11 May 2003: 15, 'Clothes Firmly on But Still Very Revealing', Profile of actress Lena Headey who talks about her latest film The Actors (Ciara Dwyer).

    EH, 15 May 2003: 25, 'Caine's Able', review by Chris Lowry.

    ST (Art Life), 18 May 2003: 7, 'How to Wreak Comic Havoc', review by Ciaran Carty.

    SBP (Agenda), 18 May 2003: 7, 'Talented, Funny and Farcical Actors', review by Helen Boylan.


    SI (Living and Leisure), 18 May 2003: 15, 'Actors Strutting Their Stuff', review by Evan Fanning.

    FI, issue 92, May/June 2003: 40, review by Tony Keily.

    In Production, October 2003 Vol 6 No 5: 19, Box Office Figures for Irish and Irish Interest films from 1999 to 2003 (to date).
    DistributorMomentum Pictures (UK)
    KeywordsActors
    Richard III
    Auditions
    Theatre
    Crime
    Robbery
    Dublin
    Scots
    Gangsters
    LocationDublin City
    Production creditsp.c.: Company of Wolves, Four Provinces Films, FilmFour, Miramax Films, Senetor Film, spon: Bord Scannan na hEireann/Irish Film Board, p: Stephen Woolley, Neil Jordan, Redmond Morris, d/sc: Conor McPherson, story: Neil Jordan, Redmond Morris, dop: Seamus McGarvey B.S.C., ed: Emer Reynolds, m: Michael Nynam, cost: Consolata Boyle, cast.: Susie Figgis, make-up & hair dsgn: Veronica Brebner, p.dsgn: Mark Geraghty, assoc.p: Elinor Day, Romasy Turner, John Erraught, exec.p: Paul Webster, Hanno Huth, Rod Stoneman, p.m.: Des Martin, 1st a.d.: Peter Agnew, s: Simon Willis, p.accnt.:Wendy Ellerker, a. Irish cast: Rebecca Roper, art d.: Ciara Gormley, standby art d.: Stephen Daly, set decorator: Johnny Byrne, property buyer: Jenny Oman, draughtsman: Conor Devlin, graphic.dsgn.:Jenni Cooney, scenic artist: Laurence O'Toole, art dept trainee: Sinead Kavanagh, focus puller: Richie Donnelly, clapper loader: John Watters, c.grip: Malcolm Huse, Steadicam op.: Paul Edwards, c.trainees: Cormac O'Maille, video assist: Clare McGrath, a. ph: Ciaran Barry, Cian DeBuitlear, Peter Robinson, c.a.: Shane O'Neill, a. c.grip: John Dunne, sc.super: Renee Foley Burke, boom op.: Conor O'Toole, s.trainee:Jan Johns, p.co-ord.: Annelliese O'Callaghan, a.co-ord.: Mary Gilroy, p.trainee: Steven Davenport, assistant to Mr. McPherson & Mr. Morris: Marian Cahill, assistants to Mr. Woolley Mariangela Angellacci, Peter Ogansalu, assistant to Mr. Jordan, Cian McDonald, assistant & post.paccnt.:Clare Cunningham, cashier: Mel Gallagher, loc.m.: Paddy McCarney, a.loc.m.: Edmund Sampson, loc.a.:Evelyn O'Neill, 2nd a.d.: Catherine Dunne, 3rd a.d.: Sandra Corbally, crowd co-ord.: Lisa Kelly, trainee a.d.s: Sinead Murphy, Andrew O'Malley, Bairbre Quinn, a.: Aoife Cassidy, post.p.: super: Tricia Perrott, 1st a.ed: Gavin Buckley, 2nd a.ed: Janice Toomey, conform ed: Declan McGrath, assistant conform eds: Mary Casy, Sinead McGoldrick, Anna-Maria O'Flanagan, conform trainees: Irina Muldea, James Turpin, Rushes trainee: Aidan O'Brien, super.s.ed.:Douglas Murray, dial.ed.: Richard Quinn, effs./ m.ed.:Jon Stevenson, Foley/a.s.ed.:Hugo Monks, a.s.ed..:Michael Lemass, ward.super: Rhona McGuirke, Mr. Cain's Costumier: Jim Smith, ward.a. : Ciara McArdle, Lyndie McIntyre, a.cost.:Keelin O'Siochain, key cutter: Maggie Scobbie, cost. trainee: Gaby Rooney, make-up artist: Nuala Conway, hair: Conor McAllister, trainee make-up artist: Grainne Daly, prosthetic make-up: Neil Gorton, Millenium FX, super. gaffer: Lee Walters, gaffer: Garret Baldwin, elec: Stephen Carthy, Addo Gallagher, Dave Keogh, generator op.: Peter O'Toole. stunt.co-ord. Donal O'Farrell, stunt perf.: Phil Lonergan, Geidrius Nagys, Gary Robinson, Laura Fox, Alan Walsh, Dominick Hewitt, sp.effs. co-ord.s: Pat Redmond, Brendan Byrne, sp.effs. Crew: Aidan Byrne, Kevin Byrne, Paul Byrne, Gerry Farrell, P.J. Heraty, Kevin Kearns, Michael Kearns, Jimmy Lunsden, prop master: Eamonn O'Higgins, dressing props: Alan Dunne, dressing props: Daragh Lewis, stand-by props: Nuala McKernan, Dave Wallace, props storeman: Aran Byrne, dressing props trainee: Jerome McDonnell, cnstr.man.: Russ Bailey, super.carpenter: Manus Daly, chargehand carpenter: Paul Keogh, carpenters: Stephen Byrne, Thomas Barry Cunningham, Paschal Farrell, John Green, Owen McKenna, Tommy McRennick, master plasterer: Alan Cheeves, master painters: Edward Richardson, Eoin Murname, painters: Daniel Lyons, Tony Murname, William Richardson, chargehand rigger: Robert Reilly, riggers:James Merrigan, Eoin Reilly, chargehand stagehand: Anthony Kelly, stagehands: Timothy Cummins, Shane Donnelly, stand-by carpenter: David Oldman, stand-by painter: Garry O'Donnell, stand-by stagehand: Jimmy Gillan, stand-by rigger: Drew Meldon, dialogue coach: Gerry Grennell, unit nurse: Aine Doherty, unit publicity: Anna Ragnsford, Freud Communications, unit publicist: Catriona Ward, stills ph: Tom Collins, transport captain: John Kavanagh, action vehicles: co-ord.: Stephen Carroll, assistant action vehicles: Dave Deekhurst, Mr. Caine's driver: Terry O'Toole, Mr. McPherson's driver: Pat Larkin, unit drivers; Matt Kelly, Frank Toibin, facilities drivers: John Douglas, Gerry Farrell, Michael Farrell, John Gallagher, Les Glasgow, David Jones, Padraig Kelly, Tony Lapton, George O'Dowd, Brian Thompson, Gerry Tully, Breffni Winston, facilities: Express Facilities, Winnebagos, Irish Film Location Facilities, Carleton Motor Homes, Location Facilities Ltd. caterer: Gerry Fitzpatrick, Catering Ireland, re-rd.mix.s: John Fitzgerald, Michelle Cannifee, s.cnslt.: Patrick Drummond, Foley art.: Caoimhe Doyle, Andrea King, recs: Jean McGrath, Neil Conlon, Gerry Roche, re-recorded at: Ardmore Sound, Ireland, a. ADR recorded at Delane Lea, London, Goldcrest, London, Limestreet Sound, Dublin, digital visual effs.: Framestore - CFC exec. Compositing Artist p: Gavin Toomey, Drew Jones, producers visual effects op.s.: Jo Nodwell, Luke Drummond, Anna Melly, Harriet MacMillan, digital lab p: digital lab op.: Alasdair MacCuish Andy Burrow, edial:Tom Partridge, Company of Wolves business affairs: Kate Wilson, FilmFour executive in charge of production: Tracey Josephs, business affairs: Andrew Hildebrand, Helen Tulley, production finance: Kim Ballard, m.cond.: Michael Nyman, violins/viola: Gabrielle Lester, Catherine Musker, Catherine Thompson, Phillipa Ibbotson, soprano/alto sax: David Roach, cello: Simon Haram, Anthony Hannigan, Christian Forshaw, baritone sax, alto flute, flute, piano, Fender Rhodes, synth: Andrew Findon, David Hartley, double bass/bass guitar, piano: Paul Morgan, Michael Nyman, Drums, percussion: Bob Knight, Martin Allen, voice: Fabienne Borget, Children's 'Choir': Mass Hall Junior School Choir, Children's Choir, co-ord.: Joan Lane. Wild Thyme Productions, orchestrator: Andrew Keenan, orchestral contractor: Isobel Griffiths, engnr: Austin Ince, a.engineers: Alec Scannell, Ryu Kawashima, Paul Richardson, music recorded at Abbey Road Studios, London & Sony Music Studios, London, mixed at: Snake Ranch, London, Published by Chester Music Limited/ Michael Nyman, Limited 2002 www.michaelnyman.com. Songs by Conor McPherson & Fionnuala Ni Chiosain. Songs recorded at Area 51 Ireland, Produced, Programmed & engineeredby: Ken McHugh, French translation: Eamon O'Chiosain & Gwenaelle L'azou, cameras supplied by: Panavision Ireland, stills processing: blow-up stills lab: lab contact: John Ensby, Colour grader: Martin Walsh, telecine services: Technicolour Imaging, ed. equip: London Editing Machines, post.p. services: Windmill Lane Pictures, neg cut: Professional negative cutting Ltd., Titles & opticals: Cineimage, post.p. sc:Sapex Scripts, travel agent: Flair Travel, copyright clearance: Bellwood Communications, completion bond: Film Finances UK Ltd., insurance services: AON/ Albert G. Ruben, legal services: Matheson Ormbsy Prentice, James Hickey, Ruth Hunter, Olswings - Susan Waddell, Lisbeth Savill, S.J. Berwin, Nora Malluly, auditors: Enrst and Young, U.K. auditors: Malde & Co, banking services: Anglo-Irish Bank, Bank of Ireland, HSBC, UK. EXTRACTS FROM 'You and Me Tide' (dir: Conor Morrissey), courtesy of Bord Scannain na hEireann/Irish Film Board, 'Je Taime John Wayne' (dir: Toby McDonald), courtesy of Luke Morris & Toby McDonald. special thanks to: Paddy Breathnach, Tom Debensham, Arlen Figgis, Drew Jones, Nick Marston, Mark Nelms, William Sargent, Jeffrey Katzenburg, Walter Parkes, Laurie McDonald, Paul Lister, Laura Fox, Ronni Coulter, Department of Defence, Dublin City Council. Kodak. colour by: Camera & Lenses, Motion Picture Logo: Technicolor Logo, Panavision Ireland, Logo, Dolby: Ardmore Digital Sound In Selected Theatres. Produced with the support of investment incentives for the Irish Film Industry provided by the Government of Ireland. Filmed in location in Dublin, Ireland. A Company of Wolves Production in association with Four Provinces Films for FilmFour in association with Bord Scannan na hEireann/ Irish Film Board. Copyright c 2002. FilmFour and Company of Wolves. All Rights Reserved. A united Kingdom/ Irish/ Germany Co-Production. CERTIFICATE NO. 39295 Logo: Motion Picture Association of America. The characters and incidents portrayed and the names herein are ficticious and any similarity to the name, character of history of any person, living or dead, is purely coincidental and unintentional. This motion picture is protected under the laws of the United States and other countries. Unauthorised duplication, distribution or exhibition may result in civil liability and Criminal prosecution.
    Art directionGORMLEY, Ciara
    Costume designBOYLE, Consolata
    Production designGERAGHTY, Mark
    Genre/CategoryComedy
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleBOXER, THE
    Production companyHell's Kitchen
    Universal Pictures
    SponsorBórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    Country of originIreland
    Great Britain
    USA
    ProducerLAPPIN, Arthur
    SHERIDAN, Jim
    DirectorSHERIDAN, Jim
    Script/AdaptationSHERIDAN, Jim
    GEORGE, Terry
    PhotographyMENGES, Chris
    Sound recordingHORGAN, Kieran
    CROSS, Ray
    EditingHAMBLING, Gerry
    BARRETT, Clive
    Associate producerHERON, Nye
    Music composerFRIDAY, Gavin
    SEEZER, Maurice
    Music performanceIrish Film Orchestra
    FRIDAY, Gavin
    SEEZER, Maurice
    PHILLPOT, Andrew
    GOULDING, Barnes
    MURPHY, Pinko
    O'TOOLE, Peter
    Choir of Christchurch Cathedral
    Songs'Let Me Down Easy' by/perf by Josie Doherty, arr by Conor Brady; '(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction' by Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, 'Everything's Gonna Be Alright', 'In the Shadow of the Gun', by Gavin Friday, Maurice Seezer, perf by Gavin Friday; 'The Shake' by Anthony Srock, Greg Lucas, perf by Final Cut; 'If You're Irish Come Into the Parlour' by Shaun Glenville, Frank Miller, perf by the Phoenix Youth Band; 'Danny Boy (Derry Air)' by Samuel Weatherly.
    CastDaniel Day-Lewis (Danny Flynn), Emily Watson (Maggie), Brian Cox (Joe Hamill), Ken Stott (Ike Weir), Gerard McSorley (Harry), Eleanor Methven (Patsy), Ciaran Fitzgerald (Liam), David McBlain (Sean), Damien Denny (Eddie Carroll), Clayon Stewart (Akim), Kenneth Cranham (Matt Maguire), Sean Kearns, Daragh Donnelly, Frank Coughlan (prison officers), Lorraine Pilkington (bride), Niall Shanahan (groom), father John Wall (priest), Maria McDermottroe (Betty), Carol Scanlan, Kate Perry, Andrea Irvine, Joan McGarry, Theresa McComb, Catherine Dunne, Kerrie Duggan, Sharon Dunne, Derbhla McClelland (wedding guests), Oliver Maguire (prison officer), Sandra Corbally (cake decorator), Tess Sheridan (pianist), David Hayman (Joe Hamill's aide), Paul Sheridan, John Sheridan, Pat Mulryan, Peter O'Donoghue, Martin Dunne, Tommy O'Neill (IRA men), Maurice Henry (Liam's friend), Josie Doherty (singer), Joseph Rea (Agnes' son), Joan Sheehy (Agnes), Peter Sheridan (Peter Mallon), Larry Byrne (old man in shelter), Joe Gallagher (car bomb driver), Sean Brunett (boy on bicycle), James Hayes (bomb victim), Richie Pigott (Sean's helper), Jack Waters (soldier on roof), Padraig O'Neill (doorman at gym), Masrk Mulholland, John Cowley, Dan Foley (old men in gym), Tim McDonnell (carertaker of gym), Peter Sutcliffe (boxer on pads), Britta Smith (Mrs Boots), Gavin Kennedy (Bootsy), Eamon Brown (referee 1st fight), Martin Lynch (journalist), Gavin Brown (Liam's opponent), Noel O'Donovan (timekeeper 1st fight), Joe Colgan (Danny's cornerman), Nye Heron (Eddie's trainer), Paul Ronan (Eddie's cornerman), Liam Carney (Mr Walsh), Veronica Duffy (Mrs Walsh), Des Braiden (Mr Orr), Joan Brosnan Walsh (Mrs Orr), Sean Donaghy (Mickey), Brian Milligan (Ned), Vinny Murphy, Mick Nolan, Berts Folan (Danny's supporters), Juliet Cronin (cardgirl 1st fight), Kirsten Sheridan (girl with drinks), Brian Russell (Liam's friend in gym), Mickey Tohill (Billy Patterson), Ian McElhinney (Reggie Bell), Conor Bradford (TV announcer), Anna Meegan (woman at 2nd fight), Al Morris (referee 2nd fight), Ian Thompson (child at 2nd fight), Paul Wesley (Danny's sparring partner), Michael James Ford (head waiter), John Cooke (toastmaster), Cornelius Carr, Norman Kelly (London fighters), Gerry storey (cornerman), Fred Tiedt (referee London fight), Jer O'Leary (timekeeper London fight), Jules Kingelesi, Dennis Mika (Akim's corners), David Heap (maitre d'), John Hewitt (Ike's drinking buddy), Janine McGuinness (cardgirl London fight), Tod Maguire (policeman at checkpoint).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    SoundDolby Digital
    DTS
    SDDS
    Duration114
    Footage10218
    Format35mm
    Release date1998
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryReleased from prison after serving fourteen years, former IRA member Danny returns to Belfast to revive his career as a boxer just when a ceasefire is about to be declared. He meets old republican comrades, Joe, who believes concessions can be wrung from the British, and the hardline Harry for whom there is no compromise. He also resumes his friendship with childhood sweetheart Maggie, Joe's daughter, a relationship fraught with danger as she is married to an IRA man still in prison, and with whom she has a son. In the most (symbolically) dramatic of the film's three fights, Danny fights an African challenger in a private London club, a legacy of Empire. In addition to resuming his boxing career, Danny also seeks to revive the fortunes of his old gymnasium, run by his trainer Ike. During the ceasefire, the gym is heralded as an example of nonsectarian politics, a situation which annoys Harry, who blames Danny for such publicity. In the meantime, the struggle continues between Joe and Harry, representing the two sides of the IRA and their approach to the 'peace process'.
    ReferenceSunday Tribune, 8/2/98:4, 'The Boxer Fails to Deliver US Knock-out', report on box office response in America by Diamuid Doyle.

    S&S 1998 3:41, review.

    Tribune Magazine, 8/2/98: 27, 'Sheridan in Fighting Form', short review of film plot by Ciaran Carty.

    Sunday Independent. 1998:15, 'Yes, it's a Knockout from Jim Sheridan' (Ronan Farren).

    Tribune Magazine, 1/3/98:14, 'Films on Release: The Best Bets...', short review of film.

    The Guardian, 20/2/98:8, 'My Right Hook', review of film, its production and plot synopsis (Richard Williams).

    Irish Times, 25 Feb 1998, 'Developers Call Time on Dockers' Pub', Pub used on location to be demolished (Marie O'Halloran).

    Sunday Business Post, 10/5/98:29-30, 'Bright Shining Light' , interview with Terry George about his films (Marion McKeone).

    Sunday Times, 8/3/98:17, 'Fact Strange as Fiction for Boxer Star', short item on actor with UDA connections.

    Film West, Jan 1998:16-7, feature review of film, crew and cast lists, plot synopsis, production (Paul Power).

    The Guardian, 1/8/98:16-17, 'Acts of Violence', short review of characters by Dominic Wills.

    Sunday Business Post, 8/2/98:1, The Ring of Truth', focus on sport represented in film (Eoghan Corry).

    The Guardian, 20/2/98:10-11, 'Boxing Clever', review of boxing films (Ray Winstone).

    Irish Times, 6/2/98:1, 'Sheridan Pulls No Punches', review of film, plot synopsis (Michael Dwyer).

    Sunday Times, 1/2/98:2, 'Why the Truth Has Been Put on the Ropes', film compared to others set in the North (Eoghan Harris).

    Tribune Magazine, 1/2/98:8-9,11, 'Boxing Clever - Hollywood in the Ring',
    development of screenplay, plot synopsis (Ciaran Carty).

    Irish Times, 27/3/98:1, 'Red, White and Very Blue', compares film to Resurrection Man, plot synopsis (Gary Mitchell).

    Sunday Independent, 1/2/98:1, 'The Bloody Ring Where Terror Never Triumphs', critical review of film (Brighid McLaughlin).

    Irish Times, 30/1/98, 'Boxer Premiere a Knock-out for Day Lewis Fans', report on Dublin premiere of film (Louise East).

    Irish Times (Sound and Vision), 5/2/98:13, Reel News, mention of film winning Spanish film award (Michael Dwyer).

    Sunday Tribune (Review), 14/2/99:3, 'Little Miss, Sitting Pretty', interview with actress Emily Watson who starred in the film about her life and work (Ciaran Carty).

    Sunday Tribune (Review), 14/3/99:6, 'Video Releases: The Boxer', brief favourable review of film on video release.

    Premiere, Jan 1998:86-89,101, 'Fighting Irish', interview with director Jim Sheridan an screenwriter Terry George on set of The Boxer. They speak about their previous collaborations and about their work on The Boxer. (Andy Webster).

    Villiage Voice, 6/1/98:1, 'The Fighting Irish', review by Dennis Lim.

    Irish Times, 16/6/00:13, 'Madness? There's Methodism in It', article on musicians Gavin Friday and Maurice who were responsible for the music in The Boxer (Arminta Wallace).

    RTE Guide, 9/3/01:17, 'Film of the Week', preview of The Boxer from the TV listings.

    Sunday Times (Culture), 11/3/01:63, preview from the TV listings (Liam Stebbing).
    DistributorUniversal
    UIP Dublin (ph . 679 2668/fax 679880)
    KeywordsTroubles
    Belfast
    IRA
    Ceasefire
    Prisoners
    Boxing
    LocationNorthern Ireland
    Production creditsp.c.: Hell's Kitchen, Universal Pictures, spon: Bórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board, p: Jim Sheridan, Arthur Lappin, d: Jim Sheridan, sc: Sheridan, Terry George, dop: Chris Menges, ed: Gerry Hamblin, p.dsgn.: Brian Morris, m: Gavin Friday, Maurice Seezer, assoc.p: Nye Heron, p.co-ord: Niamh Nolan, loc.m: Geraldine Daly, Dara MacClatchie, post.p: Tommy Gormley, Suzanne Nicell, Mary Gough, Sarah Purser, Ben Gibney, Daisy Cummins, sc.super: Pat Rambout, Peggy Brazil, cast: Nuala Moiselle, c.op: Mike Proudfoot, Vic Purcell, 2nd unit c: Cían de Buitlear, Sean Corcoran, 2nd c./Steadicam: Peter Robertson, sp.effs: Yves De Bono, Andrew Wilson, John Herzberger, lightworks.ed: Dermot Diskin, art d: Fiona Daly, Richard Earl, draughtsmen: Brendan Rankin, Padraig O'Neill, storyboard: Autun Bosanac, coat: Joan Bergin, ward: Ger Scully, make-up: Maire O'Sullivan, hair: Anne Dunne, titles/opticals: Balsmeyer & Everett, The Effects House (NY), Peter Govey Film Opticals (London), m.perf: The Irish Film Orchestra, Gavin Friday, Maurice Seezer, wind instrument soloist: Bernaud Pion, a.m: Barnes Goulding, Pinko Murphy, Peter O'Toole, Choir of Christchurch Cathedral, soprano soloist: Helen Roycroft, d: Mark Duley, orch: Fiachra French, m.super: Alex Steyermark, m.co-ord: Anne-Louise Kelly, m.ed: Maisie Weissman, synth.dsgn/programming: Andrew Phillpot, m.engr: James P. Nichols, Paul Corkett, Conal Markey, songs: 'Let Me Down Easy' by/perf by Josie Doherty, arr by Conor Brady; '(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction' by Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, 'Everything's Gonna Be Alright', 'In the Shadow of the Gun', by Gavin Friday, Maurice Seezer, perf by Gavin Friday; 'The Shake' by Anthony Srock, Greg Lucas, perf by Final Cut; 'If You're Irish Come Into the Parlour' by Shaun Glenville, Frank Miller, perf by the Phoenix Youth Band; 'Danny Boy (Derry Air)' by Samuel Weatherly, choreo: Cathy O'kennedy, s.mix:b Kieran Horgan, Ray Cross, re.rd.mix: Lee Dichter, Tom Fleischmann, Sound One, re.rd.op: Harry Higgins, Ted Clark, super.s.ed: Robert Hein, dial.ed: Sylvia Menno, Jac Rubenstien, Rick Freeman, Karen McMullen, effs: Ben Cheah, s.effs.ed: Glenfield Payne, Paul P. Soucek, ADR: David Boulton, Lockie Butler, Pat Hayes, David Novak, Clodagh O'Donovan, Ted Swanscott, Gina R, Alfano, Bob Gavin.
    Art directionDALY, Fiona
    EARL, Richard
    Costume designBERGIN, Joan
    RightsHell's Kitchen
    Contact: Niamh Nolan
    hellskit@iol.ie
    Tel: +353 1 667 5599
    Fax: +353 1 667 5592

    Universal Pictures Telephone: 1-818-7771000
    Production designMORRIS, Brian
    Genre/CategoryDrama
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleEARLY BIRD, THE
    Production companyCrusade Films
    Country of originNorthern Ireland
    ProducerPEDELTY, Donovan
    DirectorPEDELTY, Donovan
    Script/AdaptationPEDELTY, Donovan (from a play by J. McGregor Douglas)
    PhotographyWILSON, Jack
    Associate producerGREENE, Victor. M
    Music performanceHAYWARD, Richard
    CastRichard Hayward (Daniel Duff), Jimmy Mageean (Charlie Simpson), Charlotte Tedlie (Euphemia Gordon), Myrtle Adams (Lizzie), Nan Cullen (Rose Madill), Elma Hayward (Susan Duff), Terence Grainger (Archie McReady), Charles Fagan (Harold Gordon), William Houston (Roderick Gordon), Charlie Owens (Jamie), Jack Clifford (farmer), Ailis Irvine (pedestrian). Pat Noonan.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    tinted
    Soundsound
    Duration71
    Footage6287
    Format35mm
    Release date1936
    CopyNFTVA/IFA
    SummaryIn the Northern Ireland village of Ballytober, a puritanical woman, Mrs Euphemia Gordon, establishes the Ballytober Uplift League to try to reform what she perceives as the lax morality of the gers. Frowning on singing and dancing, as well as sexual contact, she unsuccessfully attempts to re-introduce such childhood games as 'blind man's buff during a meeting in the village hall. During the meeting, the middle-aged Daniel Duff and Charlie Simpson vie for the attentions of Rose Madill, a widow, while a young couple, Lizzie and Mrs Gordon's son, Roderick, worry about Mrs Gordon's attitude to their relationship. After the night's frolics at the hall, Daniel wakes up to discover that his clothes have been thrown out by Susan, his niece, in reaction against his behaviour on the previous night. Daniel then hoodwinks Charlie into giving him his clothes after plying him with drink. En route to Rose's, Daniel falls from a bicycle on to a woman, and is observed by Mrs Gordon, who treats it as another example of lax morality. In the meantime, Charlie has borrowed clothes from Archie McReady, a suitor of Susan's. A threatening note from Charlie to Rose is discovered in the trousers being worn by Daniel, and when Charlie appears he is on the receiving end of Rose's ire. Meanwhile, Mrs Gordon publishes an article in the 'Ballytober Truthteller', which is owned by the Gordons, and edited by her husband. In it she attacks Daniel's public behaviour. She then goes to the Duffs' where she meets Susan. She announces that they are to be evicted from the house, which is owned by the Gordons, after she discovers Archie without his trousers under the kitchen table. Daniel then appears with Mr Gordon and Rose. While Daniel declares that he is going to sue for the libel in the article, Mr Gordon confronts his wife and silences her by taking her teeth. Mrs Gordon is forced to accept Daniel's conditions for not proceeding with the libel case: that she make Mr Gordon sole owner of the newspaper, and that she provide her tenants with twenty-year leases without any clause concerning good behaviour. It only remains for the two couples: Daniel and Rose, and Archie and Susan, to be united. The film ends as Daniel is seen at a washing board in the garden, while Rose and Mrs Gordon smile approvingly. As the baby is heard to cry, Daniel rushes to comfort it. (V).
    NoteGB Duration: 71 mins; USA: 69 mins. GB Rel 1936. Copy: IFA (16mm, 65 mins).
    Note: Slide 1988:21 reports that the play from which this film was
    adapted was by Tom Camduff and had been presented at the Belfast
    Repertory Theatre.
    ReferenceMFB 1936:138. Gifford 10052: Aug 1936; MPG.
    DistributorParamount-British (GB)
    Production creditsp.c: Crusade Films, p/d/sc: Donovan Pedelty from a play by J McGregor
    Douglas, assoc. p: Victor M Greene, songs sung by Richard Hayward.
    RightsJudith Wilson, 55a Shore Road, Greenisland, Carrickfergus, BT38 8TZ.
    Genre/CategoryMusical Comedy
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleIRISH AND PROUD OF IT
    Production companyCrusade Films
    Country of originNorthern Ireland
    ProducerPEDELTY, Donovan
    DirectorPEDELTY, Donovan
    Script/AdaptationPEDELTY, Donovan
    EVANS, David (from a story by Dorothea
    Donn Byme)
    PhotographyBURGER, Jim
    FAITHFULL, Geoffrey
    Sound recordingWRIGHT, D.A.
    EditingNIETER, Hans
    COX, John
    Associate producerGREENE, Victor. M
    Production managerPHELPS, Billy
    Music performanceHAYWARD, Richard
    Songs'Sweet Enniskillen'
    'Johnny, I Hardly Knew You'
    'The Harp That Once'
    CastRichard Hayward (Donagh O'Connor), Dinah Sheridan (Moira Flaherty), Gwen Gill (Mary Johnson), George Pembroke (Mike Finnegan), Liam Gaffney (Sean Deasy), Herbert Thorpe (Benny/Benito Colombo), Jimmy Mageean (Flaherty), Jack Clifford (O'Hara), Shaun Desmond (Maloney), J Miles Marwyn (McCartney), Wolf Curran (George), Charles Fagan (police sergeant).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    tinted
    Soundsound
    Duration73
    Footage6585
    Format35mm
    Release date1936
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    LFA
    SummaryDonagh 0'Connor, an irresponsible London-Irish businessman who makes meal concentrates, is late for an appointment with McCartney, an Irish-American business magnate, with whom he is negotiating the sale of his products. Though arriving late for the appointment, O'Connor's delay is effectively covered up by his secretary, Mary Johnson. O'Connor invites McCartney to a dinner at the Irish Hying Club, where O'Connor is the guest of honour. O'Connor sings a song about the Irish Free State ge of Ballyvoraine, his birthplace, and adds a romantic accnt. of the place. He declares that he'd give half his fortune to be there that night. He ends by saying that none of the London-Irish had 'the guts to go home'. McCartney is impressed by the song and the speech and tells him that he would be a hit on radio in America. A group of young Irish aviators at the dinner decide to take O'Connor up on his declaration about giving away half his fortune if he were to get to Ballyvoraine that night. They kidnap him and take him to an airfield, where they bundle him aboard an airplane. Meanwhile in Ballyvoraine. ex-Chicago gangsters, and now local poteen-makers, Irish-American Mike Finnegan and his Italian-American bodyguard, Benny, are told by Sean Deasy of a complaint from publican Maloney about the quality of their poteen. Finnegan threatens Maloney and demands that he take thirty gallons of poteen to mix with the whiskey, but Maloney declares that his customers will not drink his concoction. Maloney also shows Finnegan a newspaper which announces a government crackdown on poteen distilling. Before leaving, Finnegan hits Maloney, though Deasy tries to convince him to take the poteen. After he leaves, Sean meets his fiancee, Moira Flaherty, daughter of a small farmer, to whom he promises wealth, but she is worried that he will end up in jail. The aviators land in a field near Ballyvoraine and dump O'Connor from the airplane, leaving immediately afterwards. Moira observes the landing and approaches the bundle which is O'Connor and laughs at his predicament. She brings him to her home, where her father has a poteen still at the fireside. Mr Flaherty, drunk on poteen, thinks that O'Connor, dressed in formal evening clothes, is the devil. Reassured, Flaherty and Moira invite O'Connor to tea. O'Connor's appearance causes excitement and speculation amongst the gers, and Finnegan arrives at the house to investigate the stranger. He suspects him of being a government agent sent from Dublin to investigate his illegal activities. Deasy, who accompanies Finnegan, and Moira quarrel. At Maloney's pub where the customers sing and dance, Moira comes in and O'Connor sings for her. O'Connor is saved from an attack by Finnegan when Maloney and Moira intervene. She tells Finnegan she'll see him hanged if O'Connor is harmed. Moira tells Finnegan that she believes O'Connor has fled London and is on the run. Finnegan and Benny go to the Hahertys' and offer O'Connor a job as an entertainer at the pub, but he refuses. Deasy comes in and tells them that the police are coming their way. Meanwhile in London, Mary Johnson is trying to locate O'Connor, while McCartney wants to sign him to a seven-year radio contract on the basis that fifty million Americans will cry every time he sings about Ireland on the McCartney network. In Ballyvoraine, the poteen-makers try to clear the pub of poteen by pouring it down the sink. The police arrive at Maloney's pub and test the drink for traces of poteen. In his wanderings in the countryside, O'Connor discovers Finnegan's secret still in the cellar of a ruined coastguard station. He finds lodgings at the Flahertys', but a jealous Sean sees him with his arm around Moira. In London, Mary and McCartney find out from one of the aviators what happened to O'Connor, and all three head for Ireland. O'Connor reveals to Sean that he has seen the still. When told, Finnegan tells Benny to dispose of him. Benny arrives at Flahertys' to take O'Connor away. At the still, Finnegan tells him that he intends returning to Chicago, and leaves him in the cellar in Benny's care while he makes arrangements for O'Connor's 'disposal'. O'Connor and Benny sing and drink the poteen. After Benny passes out, O'Connor escapes from the cellar and goes to the harvest dance. Finnegan arrives at the cellar to find Benny awash in poteen and O'Connor gone. Finnegan and his gang go to the dance, but Sean arrives ahead of them and O'Connor gets Moira and Sean to make up their quarrel. Mary, McCartney and the aviator arrive in the ge. Finnegan turns up at the dance and orders his gang to take O'Connor out. Sean intervenes and O'Connor and Finnegan fight, with Finnegan being knocked out by O'Connor. A general fight ensues, which spreads to the bystanders. Arriving in the thick of it, McCartney and the aviator also become involved in the melee. After they have sorted themselves out, O'Connor refuses McCartney's radio contract and tells him that he won't go to America. Mary, however, stuns him with a bottle and once more he is bundled into the plane to be taken to Southampton for the Queen Mary voyage to the USA and to fulfil the radio contract. (V).
    NoteUSA: 78 mins. IR Rel ca. 30/4/1936; USA Rel Nov 1938. IR re-issue May 1952 (Dublin). Produced at the Fox British Studios, Wembley, England. This was Dinah Sheridan's first film role. Members of the Belfast Repertory Company appear in the film. The exteriors were shot in County Antrim, while the interiors were shot at the Wembley Studios, London. "The real Irish wit and the genuineness of the characters and the scenery make up for the unprofessional touches of the production.' (FD 7/11/1938). Limerick Film Archive holds a 16mm print of this film. This film was screened at the 8th Annual Chicago Irish Film Festival (2007).
    ReferenceBelfast Newsletter 16/12/1937; British Paramount News:2; MFB 1936-203-
    812/5/1937:10. Giffbrd 10101: Nov 1936.
    DistributorParamount-British (GB)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Production creditsp.c: Crusade Films, pres: Ambassador, p/d: Donovan Pedelty, assoc. p: Victor M Greene, a.d: Jack Gilling, sc: Pedelty from a story by Dorothea Donn Byrne, adapt: David Evans, c: Jim Burger, Geoffrey Faithfull, art d: W Hemsley, ed: Hans Nieter, m.d: Colin Wark, s: D A Wright, John Cox, p.m: Billy Phelps, songs sung by Richard Hayward: 'Sweet Enniskillen', 'Johnny, I Hardly Knew You', 'The Harp That Once'.
    Art directionHEMSLEY, W.
    Musical directionWARK, Coiln
    Genre/CategoryMusical Comedy
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleDEVIL'S ROCK
    CARRAIG AN DEAMHAIN
    Production companyRichard Hayward Productions
    Country of originNorthern Ireland
    ProducerBURGER, Germain Gerard
    DirectorBURGER, Germain Gerard
    HAYWARD, Richard
    Script/AdaptationHADDICK, Victor
    PhotographyORIONS, S.D.
    Sound recordingDAINES, Norman
    EditingRICK, Kenneth
    Music performanceHAYWARD, Richard
    Songs'Rose of Tralee'
    CastRichard Hayward (Sam Mulhem), Charles Fagan (the sergeant), Geraldine Mitchell (Geraldine Lamour), Terence Grainger (John Browne), Nancy Cullen (Mrs Huggins), Gloria Grainger (Veronica Lamour), Michael Gleeson (the schoolmaster), Tom Casement, Neil Christie (the crooks). the Mendoza Brothers, the Three Graces, Maurice and Beresford, Billy Reilley, Lambeg Folk Dance Society (Irish dancers), Pat O'Mealy (piper), St Gall's School Choir (choral numbers), J Humbert Craig (introductory landscape).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    tinted
    Soundsound
    Duration55
    Footage4915
    Format35mm
    Release date1938
    CopyNFTVA
    SummaryIn the seaside village of Craigadown, Sam Mulhern, a sheep-drover, asks Mrs Huggins, a widow, to manage a tea-shop he intends to establish. He organises a concert as a way of getting money to open the shop. A strict schoolmaster imposes discipline on his pupils, but Sam arrives and gets the schoolmaster's support for the concert. The sergeant initially refuses to sell tickets for the concert, as he feels it will attract thieves. The sergeant relents and agrees to sell the tickets. Geraldine Lamour and her ten-year-old sister, Veronica, are on holiday in thevillage, and John Browne falls in love with Geraldine. Geraldine tells him that he must not think of marriage to her as he has important work to do. While the fishing fleet is at sea, they picnic in a motor boat, so that when Veronica is carried out by the current and stranded on the Devil's Rock surrounded by the incoming tide, there is no boat to rescue her. Sam swims out and eventually the attention of the distant lovers is attracted by fireworks and community shouting. The pair are rescued. The box-office takings are robbed, but the thieves are caught. Mrs Huggins is given a job at a new swimming baths by John Browne and Sam returns to sheep-droving (V;MFB 31/3/1938:69).
    NoteAka CARRAIG AN DEAMHAIN. Filmed and recorded entirely in
    Irish. 'The production is halting and uncertain - there is incompleteness
    in all the incidents and a tiresome dragging in of "local colour". The
    acting is mostly conventional and neither the photography nor the sound
    reproduction are good enough. The effect is amateurish.' (MFB 1938:69).
    ReferenceGifford 10419: Mar 1938; SI 14/1/1951 (still); S&S Autumn 1939:107 (still).
    DistributorIrish International Film Agency (IE)
    Columbia Pictures (GB)
    Production creditsA Richard Hayward Production, p: Germain Gerard Burger, d: Burger,
    Richard Hayward, sc: Victor Haddick, c: S D Orions, s: Norman Daines,
    ed: Kenneth Rick, stills: Louis Morrison, cont: Meta Grainger, m. arrg:
    Hayward at the Opera Stendal Todd, songs: 'Rose ofTralee', IR distr: Irish
    International Film Agency, GB distr: Columbia Pictures Corp.
    ContinuityGRAINGER, Meta
    StillsMORRISON, Louis
    Music arrangementHAYWARD, Richard
    Opera Stendal Todd
    Genre/CategoryMusical Comedy
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleISLANDMAN, THE
    EILEEN AROON
    MEN OF IRELAND
    WEST OF KERRY
    Production companyScannán Chumann Naisiunta na hÉireann
    Irish National Film Corporation
    Frank Duffy Productions
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerTAYLOR, Victor
    DirectorHEALE, Patrick Keenan
    Script/AdaptationHEALE, Patrick Keenan (from a story by Donal O'Cahill)
    PhotographyEATON, Sidney
    Sound recordingWILKINS, Leo
    EditingNEILL-BROWNE, J.
    Music composerGALLAGHER, Eamonn (Musical Consultant)
    Music performanceCURRAN, Eileen (Singer 'The Spinning Song')
    Songs'Eileen Aroon'
    'Spinning Song, the'
    CastCecil Ford (Neal O'Moore), Eileen Curran (Eileen Guheen), Brian
    O'Sullivan (Liam O'Kane), Gabriel Fallen (Fr O'Sullivan), Delia Murphy
    (Peg), Gerard Duffy (the boy), Sheila Maguire, Josephine Fitzgerald, Brian
    Carey (student), Paddy Carey (student), Malcolm Graham, Eugene Leahy,
    Seamus Moynihan (step-dancer).
    LanguageIrish
    English
    Colourb&w
    tinted
    Soundsound
    Duration64
    Footage4300
    Format35mm
    Release date1938
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryOn the Blasket Islands, Co Kerry in the 1930s, an islander tells a day-visiting outsider the story of the young lovers, Liam, Neal and Eileen, who are at the centre of the tale. In flashback, the islander tells about a young Trinity College medical student, Neal. Living a dissolute life, he is seen in his rooms surrounded by bottles of beer, but he finds a copy of Tomas 6 Crohan's The Islandman, which he avidly reads in his rooms and while walking to the Phoenix Park. He decides to travel to the Blasket Islands, where he is greeted in Ireland on the shore at Dunquin, the Dingle Peninsula, by Fr O'Sullivan. Realising that Neal does not understand Irish, Fr O'Sullivan greets the 'stranger' in English, and invites him to use his medical expertise to help an injured fisherman, Liam. At a ceili (dance) Neal talks with Eileen, the schoolteacher, who is engaged to Liam, and who is grateful to him for having saved Liam's injured hand. Neal continues to court Eileen, but, at her spinning wheel one day where she is teaching him Irish, she asks him to compare himself to Liam. Neal acknowledges that Liam is a better man, and he reluctantly returns to his university studies. The following year, while in his college rooms, Neal, once again drinking, hears Eileen sing on the radio, and his interest in the Blaskets is again aroused. Meanwhile, on the island, Liam, who had befriended Neal, is hoping that he will return, while Eileen is wary, realising that she has fallen in love with Neal. The islanders greet Neal on his return and he declares to Eileen and Liam that he'll become an islandman and learn to be a fisherman. Fr O'Sullivan challenges Neal's love for Eileen, describing Liam and Eileen as 'children', and suggests that he return to the mainland. Neal declares that while he loves Eileen, he's satisfied just to be near her. Neal is one of the crew in Liam's boat during a fishing trip. Liam falls overboard and Neal rescues him from drowning. However, Liam is badly hurt and the islanders gather around his bed as Neal silently indicates that there is no hope for him. Liam observes this sign and then takes Eileen's and Neal's hands and joins them together, indicating his blessing of their future relationship. He is anointed by Fr O'Sullivan before he dies, while Eileen and Neal are later seen alone on a cliff-top. (V).
    NoteAlso 48 minute version. Released 28th Feb 1938 (Trade Show) and 31 March 1939 (general release). This was the only film made by Irish National Film Corporation, a breakaway group, led by Donal O'Cahill, from Hibemia Films, which made THE DAWN (Irl 1936) and UNCLE NICK (Irl 1938). Unlike Hibemia, which seems to have only employed local technical expertise, many of the crew for THE ISLANDMAN seem to have come from Britain. The actors were from amateur and professional groups, including the Gate Theatre, Dublin and the Cork Shakespeare Company. Eileen Curran was a teacher of elocution and singing at St Aloysius College, Cork and was a founder-member and player with the Shakespeare Company. Kruger Kavanagh may also be in this film. Exteriors were filmed on An Blascod Mor (The Great Blasket) from 14 to ca. 28 May 1937, while interiors were filmed at the Palace Cinema (now the Academy), Pearse St, Dublin during June 1937. The Palace was used when the nightly film screenings were finished, though one press report (28/6/1937) refers to the Dublin studio of Scannan Chumain Naisiunta na hEireann/Irish National Film Corporation being used for filming. The cast went to London in July 1937 to dub the soundtrack, as no such facilities existed in Ireland at the time. The dancing scene was shot in the house of Seanin Sullivan. The curragh race (naomhog) was shot from the strand on the Great Blasket. The film's credits list Daisy Murphy in the part of 'Peg', whereas Delia Murphy played this part. Her husband, T J Kieman, was Director of Drama at Radio Eireann. Donal O'Cahill is listed as Donald O'Cahill in the film's credits. Patrick Heale was originally the producer/director as well as scriptwriter, but when extra funds were required for the produc tion, Belfast impresario Frank Duffy became involved (his son plays the part of the boy). Though surviving prints under their different titles and different lengths are not consistent in their credits, it appears that Frank Duffy was involved from the beginning of the film, as he was on the Blaskets during filming there. According to one report (Woman's Life 1/4/1939), a Mr Milaarden, a Breton, was also one of the film's backers, and it is stated that the film cost £3,000 to make. This report also says that some scenes were shot at Greystones, Co Wicklow. MFB (30/4/1938:99) lists the director as Dick Bird. MPG lists John Duffy as co-writer of the original story. It has not been determined whether the 48-minute- or 64-minute-version of the film is the original version of the film. MFB gives the film's length as 4,300 ft, and the running time as 48 mins, in its April 1938 review of the film with the title WEST OF KERRY. This version may be the 16mm-version which is available under the title EILEEN AROON. It is also possible that this was the original version of the film and that the 64-minute-version, with the title THE ISLANDMAN, was produced for the March 1939 Irish release of the film. However, a surviving 64-minute-version of the film has the title WEST OF KERRY, which suggests that this title was used for both the 48-minute and 64-minute-versions of the film. The 64-minute-version of the film was released in the USA under the title MEN OF IRELAND. No version of the film with the title THE ISLANDMAN has been discovered, though this was the Irish release title of the film. In EILEEN AROON there is an introductory voice-over narration delivered by Micheal 6 hEithir (the sports commentator) about the Blasket Islands. It draws attention to the island's Irish-language literary heritage, especially that of 6 Crohan's An tOilednach (The Islandman, Dublin, 1929; trans. by Robert Fowler, London, 1929). Anticipating the future depopulation of the islands, which were abandoned in the 1950s, the narrator quotes 6 Crohan's observation that 'our counterparts the future cannot hold'. The narrator refers to three books associated with the Blaskets. Besides 6 Crohan's An tOilednach which is featured in the film and from which the film takes its title, the other two best known books are Peig Sayers' autobiography Peig (Dublin, 1936), and Maurice O'Sullivan's autobiography Fiche Blian ag Fds (Twenty Years A-Growing, Dublin, 1933; Maynooth, 1982; trans. by M Llewelyn Davis, George Thompson, London, 1933; Oxford, 1951). For an accnt. of life on the islands see George Thompson The Blasket That Was: The Story of a Deserted Village (Maigh Nuad, An Sagart, 1982), which also contains an extended bibliography of books by islanders and by others about the islands; and Robin Flower, The Western Island, or The Great Blasket (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1944 and 1978). "The plot develops into a triangular drama after the Hollywood pattern, and the director takes Hollywood's usual way out'. (EH 1/4/1939:9). 'Why, in Heaven's name, did they have to bring a red triangle to An Blascaod Mor?' (IP 4/4/1939:5).
    ReferenceCE 2/4/1938; DEM 1/4/1939:4; II 1/4/1939; IT 3/4/1939:4; SI 2/4/1939:10. Gifford 10448: Apr 1938; CE 22/5/1956; CE 25/1/1957; CE 22/9/1960; EH 24/1/1957; Kerryman 12/1/1958; Kerryman 24/1/1957; 6 Laoghaire 1945:158; Rose Mar 1957.

    All of the reference materials listed below are held at the Tiernan McBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    Article on making of the film and actress Eileen Curran, 28/6/37.

    Photograph of cast and crew of the film, 8/7/37.

    The Father Matthew, 1937-38:187-90, extra's account of filming on location in Kerry (Mrs T.J. Kiernan).

    ‘Island Story On Screen’ (1/3/38). review.

    ‘Film From The Blaskets’, preview.

    ‘Radio director's wife in new film’, paragraph mentioning extra, Delia Kiernan.

    ‘New Irish film’, photo and paragraph mentioning actors from film.

    ‘A New Irish Film :...We Made Island Man’, account of filming on location by actor.

    Irish Press, 1/4/39, ‘The Islandman - At the Carlton’, review.

    Woman's Life, 1/4/39, ‘...D Views’, report of of "overdue" release, and account of the production of the film.

    Monthly Film Bulletin, April 1938:99, ‘Ireland: West of Kerry’, review.

    Notice of the films release in Ireland.

    ‘Makers of "Island Man" Found A New World Off The Kerry Coast’, account of journey to the Blaskets to shoot film (Delia Kiernan).

    Typewritten synopsis and letter from the scriptwriter of The Island man, 19/11/53 (Donal O'Cahill).

    Cork Examiner, 25/1/57, ‘Loud praise for film on Blaskets: Private viewing in Killarney’, review of film and critics' quotes.

    Scannan, 21/3/1997:21, Special booklet describing films made in Kerry, production details (in English and Irish), and the film's premiere (Kevin Rockett).

    ‘Islandman (aka West of Kerry, Eileen Aroon)’, synopsis of film.
    DistributorButcher's Film Service (GB)
    J.H. Hoffberg (USA)
    LocationBlasket Islands
    Kerry
    Production creditsp.c: Scannan Chumann Naisiunta na hEireann/Irish National Film Corporation. A Frank Duffy Production, p: Victor Taylor, d: Patrick Keenan Heale, sc: Heale from a story by Donal O'Cahill, c: Sidney Baton, s: Leo Wilkins, a.d: Harold Webb, ed: J Neill-Brown, m.d: Horace Sheldon, m.c: Eamonn Gallagher, songs: 'Eileen Aroon', 'The Spinning Song' sung by Eileen Curran, GB distr: Butcher's Film Service; USA distr: J H Hoffberg.
    Assistan directorWEBB, Harold
    Music arrangementSHELDON, Horace
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleJACK OF ALL MAIDS
    Production companyDSF Productions
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerFLYNN, Desmond
    DirectorMcANNA, Tomás
    Script/AdaptationMcANNA, Tomás
    PhotographySTAFFORD, Brendan
    Sound recordingHUNT, Peter
    EditingMARTIN, Sean
    Music composerO'GALLAGHER, Eamonn
    Music performanceCeol Cumann Quintet
    Presenter/ReporterFLYNN, Desmond
    CastJack MacGowran, Marie Ní Dhomhnaill, Doreen Madden, Rita Foran, Ita Mahony, Angela Newman, Joan O'Hara, Ronnie Masterson, Patsy Madden, Molly Flynn, Maureen Flanagan, Aileen Myles, Aileen Harte, Sean Ó Magnaigh, Philip Flynn, Seathrun Ó Gothrun, Micheal Ó Briain.
    LanguageIrish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration20
    Format35mm
    Release date1952
    CopyRTE/IFA
    SummaryWhile Dublin City has its hustle and bustle, courting remains constant
    in city and country, in Ireland and elsewhere. Professor MacGowran, a
    restless man, investigates different courting habits from a male
    perspective, including Irish, Parisian and Proletarian, and women's
    occupations of weightlifter, dancer and modem artist. (V).
    NotePhotographed at the Abbey Theatre, Dublin during April-May 1951.
    LocationDublin City
    Production creditsp.c: DSF Productions, p/pres: Desmond Flynn, d/sc: Tomas MacAnna,
    dop: Brendan Stafford, s: Peter Hunt, a.d Liam 6 Laoghaire,
    sets: Geoffrey Golden, make-up: Bill Lodge, ed: Sean Martin,
    tech.: Joseph Ellis, Stephen Ennis, Charles Scott, m/original
    songs: Eamonn O'Gallagher, m.p: Ceol Cumann Quintet,
    post-synchronised at Peter Hunt Studios.
    Set designGOLDEN, Geoffrey
    Assistan directorÓ LAOGHAIRE, Liam
    Make-upLODGE, Bill
    Post production soundPeter Hunt Studios, Dublin
    OtherELLIS, Joseph (Technician)
    ENNIS, Stephen (Technician)
    SCOTT, Charles (Technician)
    Genre/CategorySatire

    Comedy

    TitlePADDY
    GOODBYE TO THE HILL
    Production companyAllied Artists Films
    Dun Laoghaire Productions
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerASSEYEV, Tamara
    DirectorHALLER, Daniel
    Script/AdaptationDUNNE, Lee
    PhotographyLACAMBRE, Daniel
    Sound recordingProducers Sound Service
    WILLIAMS, Wade (Music Recording)
    EditingHOLMES, Christopher
    Executive producerWOLF, Emanuel L. (Presented by:
    Music composerRUBINSTEIN, John
    Songs'Paddy' by Rubinstein, David Colloff, sung by Emmy Lou Harris, arrg. by Ray Ellis, super: Carl Prager
    'Maureen' by Rubinstein, Stephen Michaels, sung by The Happenings, ''
    arrg. by Charlie Calello, super: Prager
    'Oop Oomp Ee Doo' by
    Rubinstein, Colloff, orch. c: Roy Rogosin
    CastDes Cave (Paddy Maguire), Milo O'Shea (Harry Redmond), Dearbhla Molloy (Maureen), Maureen Toal (Claire Keamey), Peggy Cass (Irene Taylor), Judy Comwell (Breeda), Marie O'Donnell (Ma, Mrs Maguire), Ita Darcy (Josie Maguire), Desmond Perry (Cahill), Clive Geraghty (Tony Deugan), John Malloy (Watchbox), Pat Layde (Mr Hayes), Mark lre Mulholland (Jack Sloan), Vincent Smith (Billy Maguire), Donal Le Blanc (Larry Maguire), Lillian Rappel (Mrs Doyle), John Kavanagh (Willie ' " Egan), Desmond Walter Ellis (butcher's apprentice), Dominic Roche nan (Duncan Stuart), Alee Doran (graveyard priest), Mary Larkin (Liz O'Boyle), William Foley (priest), Brendan Dunne (Barney), , Mary Jo Kennedy (Mary), Danny Cummins (taxi driver).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourEastmancolor (Berkey Pathe)
    Soundsound
    Duration87
    Footage7815
    Release date1969
    SummaryPaddy Maguire, a butcher's delivery boy in Dublin, one of whose many unfulfilled ambitions is to be a landscape architect, directs his energies at seducing women. One of his customers is widowed Claire Kearney who provides him with remuneration for his love-making. Paddy's work-shy friend. Harry Redmond, encourages him to join an insurance company. When asked for his birth certificate at the interview he declares that his parents were not married when he was born, but he gets the job as a post clerk nonetheless. At the insurance office, Paddy turns his attention to Maureen, while continuing his affair with Claire. He studies at a technical school at night and in interludes drinks with Harry. He also meets Breeda, an artist friend of one of his office colleagues. Tony Deugan, who tells the nervous Paddy that she is a sexual masochist. After Paddy and Breeda make love Breeda invites Tony to join them in bed, which he does. Paddy's late nights and socialising lead to conflict with his sister, Josie, especially over his relationship with Mrs Kearney, and the office manager, Cahill, complains of lateness. Meanwhile, Paddy and Maureen fall in love, while Claire tells him that she has sold the house and is going back to live in Wicklow. She encourages him to go there with her, but he declines her invitation. An angry Maureen complains about Paddy being late, and he then goes to the pub where he meets Harry. Drunk, Paddy wanders home, only to see Maureen with Willie Egan, with whom he fights. Declaring their mutual love, Paddy and Maureen embrace, and then make love in a park. Paddy informs Harry that Breeda has switched from canes to whips, while he also spends a week with Claire in Wicklow. Returning home with a new suit and extra money, courtesy of Claire, he tells his mother and Josie that he earned it as a singer. At the pub. Harry and Paddy meet an American tourist, Irenee Taylor, who is led to believe that Harry is a poet. Outside Paddy comes to the rescue of Watchbox's dog, which some kids threw into the canal. At home, Paddy's younger brother Larry becomes ill and dies. On his way from the funeral, he is beaten up by three youths. He goes to see Maureen, with whom he spends the night, as her parents are away. The following day, he tries to console his upset mother. At work, Paddy is forced to apologise by the company boss, Hayes, to Cahill, while Maureen is concerned that he may leave his job. When Maureen asks whether he has another girlfriend, he treats her query lightly, especially when she hints at marriage. Paddy recoils from Maureen, and after a dream in which he is being married to Maureen, with Cahill as the priest, he meets Harry in the pub. He is told that Irenee wants to marry Harry, but Harry is concerned that Irenee wants to see his poetry. At work, Hayes overhears Paddy attack Cahill's authoritarianism. At home, his mother uncovers his deception about leaving the job and is concerned that he will follow in his father's footsteps. When he leaves, she tells him that she will not speak to him again. He meets Maureen, who tells him that she is pregnant and that she intends to marry Willie Egan since he is unwilling to support her. She let Willie make love to her the previous night, so that he will not know that Paddy is the father of the child. Paddy tells her that he still loves her, but that it wouldn't work out and that it would only last a few months. Though upset at the break-up, Paddy seems happy to return to his carefree ways. (V).
    NoteDuration USA: 97 mins. GB Rel Dec 1969; USA Rel 29/4/1970 (Los Angeles). This film was passed for the first time by the Irish Censor, John Kelleher, in July 2006. It was granted a 12A Certification. It was screened at The Irish Film Institute on 13 September, 2006. Aka GOODBYE TO THE HILL. Filmed on location in Dublin. This film was banned in Ireland. According to AFI Catalog 1961-1970 this film was released in Ireland in 1970. The novel upon which this film was based was later adapted as a play. Goodbye to the Hill. 'Think of all the well-worn cliches about happy-go-lucky Dublin life, and 'Paddy' has every one of them and then some. The hero is the expatriate Dubliner's archetypal citizen - randy, carefree, winsomely self-pitying, and a born poet. Add a troubled home life, an unfailing capacity for charming each and every Molly Malone, a touch of fantasy (grotesque) about life, death and ubiquitous priests. Milo O'Shea on hand to deliver reams of whimsical blarney over the stout, and it all makes for the kind of folk tale which might appeal to misty-eyed Irish cab drivers in the Bronx but which Irishmen nearer home will recognise as pure wish-fulfilment. A sort of cross between 'Alfie' and 'The Ginger Man'.' (MFB Feb 1970:57).
    ReferenceGifford: 14036 Dec 1969; MPG.
    DistributorTwentieth Century-Fox (GB)
    Allied Artists (US)
    KeywordsSeduction
    Dublin City
    Love Relationships
    Sex
    1960s
    Production creditsp.c: An Allied Artists Film. Dun Laoghaire Productions, pres: Emanuel L Wolf, p: Tamara Asseyev, d: Daniel Haller, sc: Lee Dunne er from his own novel Goodbye to the Hill (London: Hutchinson & Co, 1965), dop: Daniel Lacambre, ed: Christopher Holmes, m. super: John Caper Jr, m: John Rubinstein, songs: 'Paddy' by Rubinstein, David Colloff, sung by Emmy Lou Harris, arrg. by Ray Ellis, super: Carl Prager; 'Maureen' by Rubinstein, Stephen Michaels, sung by The Happenings, arrg. by Charlie Calello, super: Prager; 'Oop Oomp Ee DoO'by Rubinstein, Colloff, orch. c: Roy Rogosin, m. rd: Wade Williams, s. mix: Liam Saurin, s: Producers Sound Service, s. effs. ed: Fred Brown, Jack Cheap, a.d: Seamus Byrne, ward: Brid Ní Shuilleabhain, Jaffa Gill, make-up: Edwin Hazelton, hair: Judy Gatehouse, grip: Paddy O'Toole, c. op: Philippe Theaudiere, Gilbert Loreaux, script: Francis Doel, grip: John Murray, boom: Noel Quinn, props: Kevin Hudson, set.dec: Tim Booth.
    Set designBOOTH, Tim
    HUDSON, Kevin
    Dubbing mixSAURIN, Liam
    Assistan directorBYRNE, Seamus
    Music supervisorCAPER Jr., John
    Camera gripO TOOLE, Paddy
    Make-upHazelton, Edwin
    WardrobeNÍ Shuilleabhain, Brid
    GILL, Jaffa
    Camera operatorTheaudiere, Philippe
    Loreaux, Gilbert
    OtherMURRAY, John (Boom Operator)
    Script sourceFrom the novel Goodbye to the Hill by Lee Dunne (London: Hutchinson & Co, 1965)
    HairGATEHOUSE, Judy
    Genre/CategoryUrban Drama
    Feature Film Drama
    Student Film

    TitleBLACK CHAMPAGNE
    Production companyCo-operative Workshop
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerDICK, Brian
    DirectorSTANFORD, Alan
    Script/AdaptationDICK, Brian
    PhotographyBYRNE, Breffni
    Sound recordingHAYES, Pat
    Music composerWEILL, Kurt
    DRESS, Michael
    Music performanceBERNELLE, Agnes
    CastAgnes Bernelle
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration26
    Release date1977
    SummaryShort documentary looking at Berlin-style cabaret traditions.
    NoteIR Rel ca. 8/6/1977 (Cork Film Festival).
    KeywordsCabaret
    Music
    Berlin
    Torch Songs
    Production creditsp.c: Co-operative Workshop, p: Brian Dick, d: Alan Stanford, sc: Brian Dick, c: Breffni Byrne, m: Kurt Weill, Michael Dress, songs: Bertoldt Brecht, Wedekind, Klabund, Dress, act: Agnes Bernelle, col, 27 mins, 1980.
    Genre/CategoryMusical

    TitleANGEL
    Production companyMotion Picture Company of Ireland Productions
    SponsorBórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    Channel Four
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerBLACKMORE, Barry
    DirectorJORDAN, Neil
    Script/AdaptationJORDAN, Neil
    PhotographyMENGES, Chris
    Sound recordingHORGAN, Kieran
    EditingDUFFNER, Pat
    Executive producerBOORMAN, John
    Sound assistantCORCORAN, Jim (Boom Op)
    Assistant editorKELLIHER, Michael
    Production assistantMCFERRAN, Marie
    Production managerBYRNE, Seamas
    Music performanceDONALD, Keigh (Saxophone Solos)
    Songs'Requiem' by Giuseppe Verdi.
    'Thicker Than Water', 'Every Part of Me', 'Every Day of My Life', 'Tramp' by/arrg. by Paddy
    Meegan.
    'Strange Fruit' by Lewis Alien.
    'Danny Boy' (trad.), arrg. by Paddy Meegan.
    CastVeronica Quilligan (Annie), Stephen Rea (Danny), Alan Devlin (Bill), Peter Caffrey (Ray), Honor Heffernan (Deirdre), Lise-Ann McLaughlin (bride), lan McElhinney (bridegroom), Derek Lord (best man), Ray McAnally (Bloom), Donal McCann (Bonner), Marie Kean (Aunt Mae), Don Foley (bouncer), Gerald McSorley (assistant), Liz Bono (girl assistant), Tom Collins (photographer). Tony Rohr (George), Anita Reeves (Beth), Sorcha Cusack (Mary), Michael Lally (uncle), Macrea Clarke (Francie).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    Soundsound
    Duration92
    Footage8273
    Release date1982
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryPlaying at a country dancehall, Irish showband saxophonist Danny encounters Annie, a young mute girl, and is with her later when he witnesses the band's manager (who had earlier argued over protection payments) being shot dead by three gunmen. Annie, too, is shot as she wanders towards the scene, and Danny is concussed in the subsequent explosion of the dancehall. Quizzed by detectives Bloom and Bonner as he recovers in hospital, he provides no clues, but after recuperating with his Aunt Mae, rejoining the band at rehearsals, and picking up his tentative relationship with the singer, Deirdre, he hunts down a man wearing an orthopaedic shoe and kills him with his own sub-machine gun. Returning later to the scene to recover the weapon, Danny hides as two of the dead man's associates discover the corpse. Further questioned by Bloom, Danny doesn't comment on a filed photograph he recognises, but subsequently visits the suspect and shoots him. Danny traces the third killer through his estranged wife, who had briefly danced with Danny on the night of the murders. Surprised by Danny as he drives away from a meeting with his mistress, the killer first offers to name 'the big man', but then goads Danny into shooting him. Returning to find the band's drummer paying protection money, Danny shoots the collector, and goes on the run as Deirdre expresses her disgust. At an isolated farmhouse, Danny demands clothes and a haircut from the widowed Mary, who attacks him, bandages him and, inveighing against her late husband's violence, uses Danny's gun to commit suicide. Back at the site of the burnt-out dancehall, Danny comes across a young commercial faith-healer, but is dragged from the caravan by Bonner, who admits to heading the protection racket and is about to shoot Danny when he is himself killed by Bloom. (MFB Nov 1982:257). (V).
    NoteIR Rel 31 March1982 (world premiere, Celtic Film Festival, Wexford), ca. 14 May 1982 (general release); GB Rel ca. 5 Nov 1982. Screened at the 45th Cork Film Festival, 2000. Filmed on location in the Republic of Ireland. Keith Donald's surname is misspelled in the on-screen credits as Donalds. This was Neil Jordan's first feature film. This was the first feature film in which Bord Scannan na hEireann/Irish Film Board invested.
    ReferenceCity Limits No. 57, 5-11/11/1982; Daily Mail 5/11/1982; Daily Express
    5/11/1982; Daily Mirror 5/11/1982; Daily Telegraph 5/11/1982; Democrat
    28/10/1982; Face/12/1982; FT 5/11/1982; Guardian 28/10/1982; ID No 153, 13/4/1982; IT 11/4/1982:8; IT 17/4/1982:10; IT 28/4/1982:10; IT 28/11/1984: 1: LAM No. 222 9/11/1982; Mail on Sunday 7/11/1982; Melody Maker 6/11/1982; Ms London 8/11/1982; New Musical Express 13/11/1982; New Statesman; 5/11/1982; Observer 31/10/1982; SI 29/11/1981:14; S&S Autumn 1982; Standard (London) 4/11/1982; Standard (London) 8/11/1982; Sunday Telegraph 7/11/1982; ST 7/11/1982; ST 16/4/1982:7-11; Tablet 13/11/1982:1145; Time Out No. 636, 29 Oct- 4/11/1982; Time Out No. 637, 5-11/11/1982; Times 27/10/1982; Times 5/11/1982. Hill in Rockett et al, 1987:178-181.
    Variety, 26/4/1982: 1.
    ST (Magazine), 1982, 'Angel Shines In Cannes', Angel Sold for Distribution At Cannes by Michael Dwyer.
    IT, 1998, 'Angel Sold to US Buyers at Cannes', review of film sales,
    (Ray Comiskey).
    IT, 1998, 'SA deal on Irish Film', Angel sold to South Africa (Ray Comiskey).
    IT, 1998, 'Irish Grabs Attention of British Film-makers', Irish as subject for film-makers (David McKitterick).
    Films, 12/1982: 29, review of film, cast list (Eric Braun).
    IT, 28/3/1982: 1, 'Irish Angel Takes Wing for Cannes', (Cian O hEigeartaigh).
    Monthly Film Bulletin, 11/1982: 257-8, crew and cast lists, plot synopsis, review by Paul Taylor.
    In Dublin, 13/4/1982: 44, 'The Exterminating Angel', review and plot synopsis by Aidan Dunne.
    Films and Filming, 10/1982: 31-2, reveiw by Nick Roddick.
    Film Directions, 1985: 27, 'Neil Jordan's Angel', review, cast and crew list by Derek Malcolm.
    'Row over UK Staff on Irish Film', Irish objection to British crew. Held at the Tiernan MacBride of the Irish Film Institution.
    'I Have Not Resigned - Boorman', John Boorman denies resignation from National Film Studios. Held at the Tiernan MacBride of the Irish Film Institution.
    'Boorman Denies Resignation', John Boorman denies resignation from National Film Studios. Held at the Tiernan MacBride of the Irish Film Institution.
    'Boorman Defends Filming of Angel', Boorman defending use of British crew in making the film Angel.
    IT, 3/1996: 101, 'Irish Films of the Century', review of the film Angel, as one of a readers' choice selection for Dublin Film Festival.
    'Angel - A Channel Four Release', publicity for the film Angel, including cast and crew biographies and a brief plot synopsis. Held at the Tiernan MacBride of the Irish Film Institution.
    DistributorBritish Film Institute (GB)
    KeywordsTroubles
    Showbands
    Saxophonists
    Musicians
    Love Relationships
    Northern Ireland
    Paramilitaries
    Violence
    Production creditsp.c: A Motion Picture Company of Ireland Production. In Association with Bord Scannan na Eireann/Irish Film Board. For Channel Four, p: Barry Blackmore, exec p: John Boorman, d/sc: Neil Jordan, c: Chris Menges, ed: Pat Duffner, a. ed: Michael Kelliher, cont: Jean Skinner, p.m: Seamus Byrne, p.dsgn.: John Lucas, saxophone solos by and perf. by: Keith Donald, m. extract: 'Requiem' by Giuseppe Verdi, songs: 'Thicker Than Water', 'Every Part of Me', 'Every Day of My Life', 'Tramp' by/arrg. by Paddy Meegan; 'Strange Fruit' by Lewis Alien; 'Danny Boy' (trad.), arrg. by Paddy Meegan, s. ed: Ron Davis, dub. mix: Doug Turner, s: Kieran Horgan, a.d: Blackmore, Martin O'Malley, John Lawlor, focus puller: Dave Fitzgerald, clapper loader: Des Whelan, grip: Luke Quigley, boom op: Jim Corcoran, prop.buyer: Philip Henderson, props: Cos Egan, Nuala McKeman, Peter Gallagher, sp. effs: Gerry Johnston, ward: Janet O'Leary, a. ward: Helen Curran, make-up: Rosie Blackmore, hair: Joanna Lennox, p. accnt: Con Cremins, p.a: Marie McFerran, stand-bys: Bobby Richardson, Martin Forrestal, Larry O'Toole, James O'Meara, cnstr. dept: Tommy Bassett, Bobby Scott, gaffer: Louis Conroy, elec: Jim Farrell, Maurice Swan, Philip Fitzsimons, titles: GSE Ltd, s. re-rd: National Film Studios of Ireland, m. rd: Windmill Lane Studios.
    Dubbing mixTURNER, Doug
    ContinuitySKINNER, Jean
    Assistan directorBLACKMORE, Barry
    O MALLEY, Martin
    LAWLOR, John
    GafferCONROY, Louis
    Sound studiosNational Studios Of Irish
    Windmill Lane Studios
    GraphicsGSE Ltd
    Camera gripQUIGLEY, Luke
    Clapper loaderWHELAN, Des
    Electrical supervisorFARRELL, JIm
    SWAN, Maurice
    FITZSIMONS, Philip
    Make-upBLACKMORE, Rosie
    Production designLUCAS, John
    WardrobeO LEARY, Janet
    CURRAN, Helan (Assistant Wardrobe)
    Focus pullersFitzgerald, David
    Sound editorsDAVIS, Ron
    Production accountantCREMINS, Con
    OtherRICHARDSON, Bobby (Stand-by)
    FORRESTAL, Martin (Stand-by)
    O TOOLE, Larry (Stand-by)
    O MEARA, James (Stand-by)
    BASSETT, Tommy (Construction)
    SCOTT, Bobby (Construction)
    PropsEGAN, Cos
    MCKERNAN, Nuala
    GALLAGHER, Peter
    HENDERSON, Philip (Props Buyer)
    Special effectsJOHNSTON, Gerry
    HairLENNOX, Joanna
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleBEST MAN, THE
    Production companyNorthlands Productions
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerBRADLEY, Denis
    DirectorMAHON, Joe
    Script/AdaptationMAHON, Joe
    PhotographyMcDONALD, Terry
    EditingMcDONALD, Terry
    Music composerFRIEL, Eamon
    Music performanceFRIEL, Eamon
    HENRY, Ed
    Songs'Watching Days Go By', 'Its Saturday Night', 'Two Hearts' by Eamonn Friel, perf. by Friel,
    Ed Henry.
    CastSeamus Ball (Bill Maguire), Mairead Mullan (Maureen), Denis McGowan (Jamesie), Jean Flagherty (Mrs Maguire), Michael McGowan (Joe) Hugh Mclntyre (the professor), Aidan Heaney (Pat), Michael Lynch (the barman), Sharon O'Donnell (bride), Margaret O'Hagan (bridesmaid), Tommy McCay (wino).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration80
    Release date1983
    SummaryIn Derry, carefree bachelor Billy Maguire wakes up at home with a hangover after a night out with friends, one of whom, Joe, is getting married. Joe's mother encourages him to go to confession as he'll have to receive communion as the 'best man' at the wedding. Jamesie, an ex-alcoholic, is discouraged by his wife, Maureen, from going to Joe's stag party that evening, as she is worried he will resume drinking. Billy goes to the bookie's office with Joe and from there to the pub where they are joined by Jamesie who only takes non-alcoholic drinks. That night, Jamesie resists the friendly pressure from his peers to have an alcoholic drink and returns home when the others continue on to a club. On his way home. Billy calls to see Maureen. Jamesie wakes up and is annoyed at them and jealous of their friendship. At the reception following Joe's and Frances' wedding, Joe mentions to Jamesie that Billy had gone to see Maureen. Annoyed, Jamesie begins drinking, and when challenged by Maureen, he complains of the pressures he feels he is under. As she leaves in distress. Maureen verbally attacks Billy who joins Jamesie, Joe and other revellers, but, half-heartedly Billy, too, orders a drink. (V).
    DistributorNorthlands Centre, Derry
    Production creditsp.c: A Northlands Production, p: Denis Bradley, d/sc: Joe Mahon,
    c/ed: Terry McDonald, light: Billy Gallagher, songs: 'Watching Days Go
    By', 'Its Saturday Night', 'Two Hearts' by Eamonn Friel, perf. by Friel,
    Ed Henry, distr: Northlands Centre, Derry.
    LightingGALLAHER, Billy

    TitleFANTASIST, THE
    Production companyITC Entertainment Ltd
    New IrelandFilm Productions
    Mark Forstater Productions
    Country of originIreland
    DirectorHARDY, Robin
    Script/AdaptationHARDY, Robin
    LUND, Nicky (Script Ed)
    PhotographyGELL, Frank
    Sound recordingHAYES, Pat
    EditingSCHWALM, John
    Executive producerMURPHY, Mike
    Associate producerPOTTERSMAN, Vivian
    Music composerSYREWICZ, Stanislas
    CastMoira Harris (Patricia Teeling), Christopher Cazenove (Inspector McMyler), Timothy Bottoms (Danny Sullivan), John Kavanagh (Robert Foxley), Mick Lally (Uncle Lar), Bairbre Ní Chaoimh (Monica Quigley), James Bartley (Hugh Teeling), Deirdre Donnelly (Fionnuala Sullivan), Liam O'Callaghan (Detective Sergeant Farrelly), Ronan Wilmot (Patricia's father). May Giles (Patricia's mother), Se Ledwidge (Patsy Teeling), Gabrielle Reidy (Kathy O'Malley), Agnes Bernelle (Mrs O'Malley), Seamus Forde (Mr MulLally), Derek Halligan (translator), Virginia Cole (woman in ladies), Sean Rafferty (clergyman). Pat Daly (priest), Maeliosa Stafford (wine waiter), Ronan Smith (manager), Frank Melia (reporter), Derry Power, Charlie Roberts (racegoers), Des Nealon (lawyer), Dearbhla Kirwan (Fiona), Brendan Cauldwell, Michael Duffy (hotel bar drinkers), Denise Ryan, Simon Crane (stunt artists), Gerry Alexander (the voice), Tony O'Hehir (racing commentator).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration98
    Footage8846
    Format35mm
    Release date1986
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryIn Dublin, a young woman, Kathy O'Malley, is murdered after receiving an obscene phone call. Patricia Teeling, who lives on a County Wicklow farm, has her education paid for by her uncle, Lar, who hopes she will come to live on his farm and take it over when he dies. Having graduated as an agricultural scientist, Patricia decides to teach in Dublin for a year despite her mother's complaints and her uncle's disappointment at her not staying on his farm. In Dublin, she shares a flat with Monica Quigley, while she has two male admirers, Robert Foxley, a fellow teacher, and Danny Sullivan, an aspiring writer who is married and who lives in the same building. Monica also goes out with the sexually repressed Robert and finds him strange, as does Patricia. Patricia discovers Danny's wife, Fionnuala, murdered when she calls at the Sullivans' flat. Patricia withholds information about obscene phone calls Danny made to his wife which might lead the police to him. As a result of the murder, Monica moves out of the flat, while Patricia begins to receive strange phone calls. She is reassured by Danny and she receives the support of Inspector McMyler, who is leading the murder enquiry, and to whom Patricia is attracted. Following a letter from her mother, Patricia returns to the country and finds her uncle drunk, after having been a teetotaller for twenty years, and in the company of local Hugh Teeling. At Punchestown Races with Danny, Patricia meets McMyler who warns her again about Danny who is a suspect in his wife's murder enquiry. While visiting home, Patricia's uncle dies and to her mother's annoyance the farm is left in Lar's will to Teeling. Back in the city, Patricia continues to receive strange phone calls and when she thinks that someone is trying to break into her flat, she rushes to McMyler's house. He invites her to view his 'hobby' which turns out to be a room of photographs of her which he has taken secretly. He also admits that he is in love with her and that he made the obscene calls. He asks her to pose naked for him in the manner of the eighteenth-century portrait of Mary Louise O'Murphy, a mistress of Louis XV s. He also asks her whether knives interest her as Patricia sees photographs of the two murdered women on the walls amidst photographs of herself. Holding up the knife, he asks her to undress, which she does, and to take up the pose in the painting. When he begins beating her, she becomes aroused but, becoming assertive, she makes love to him. That night she leaves, promising to see him the following evening, but once outside the house she runs away. She sends a letter to Detective Sergeant Farrell, who has also been working on the murder enquiry, identifying McMyler as the murderer, and she leaves on the ferry for England. McMyler appears on the boat and attacks her with a knife, but after a struggle she pushes him overboard. She goes to the bar and declares 'man overboard' as Danny appears beside her. (V).
    NoteFilmed on location in Dublin and Wicklow.
    ReferenceMFB Feb 1987:44-5.
    DistributorBlue Dolphin
    LocationDublin
    Wicklow
    Production creditsp.c: ITC Entertainment Ltd. In association with New IrelandFilm Productions. A Mark Forstater Production, p: Mark Forstater, exec. p: Mike Murphy, assoc. p: Vivien Pottersman, a.p: Bamaby Thompson, d: Robin Hardy, sc: Hardy from the novel Goosefoot by Patrick McGinley (New York: E P Dutton, Inc, 1982), sc. ed: Nicky Lund, dop: Frank Gell, a. c: Vincent Corcoran, Lou Lavelly, Nick O'Neill, c. op: Mike Proudfoot, focus puller: Des Whelan, clapper loader: Alan Butler, c. grip: John Murphy, loc. a: Susan Carbery, cast: Nuala Moiselle, 1st a.d: Seamus Byrne, 2nd a.d: Gay Brabazon, 3rd a.d: Nick McCarthy, art d: John Lucas, a. art d: Arden Gantly, ed: John Schwalm, a. ed: Angelica Landry, sp. effs. super: Gerry Johnston, m: Stanislas Syrewicz, m. extracts: 'Easter Anthem' by John Dexter, perf. by the Boys of Saint Patrick's Cathedral Choir, (conductor) Dexter, m.p: Irish Band - Donal Lunny, Mick Hand, Mairead Mooney, Sean Potts, Hughie Flint, Racetrack musians - Des Hopkins, Barry Cluskey, Billy Hopkins, m. super: Ray Williams, m. co-ord: Tom McGuinness, songs: 'Love Games' by M King, P Gould, perf. by Level 42; 'I'll Do It All Again' by Tom McGuinness, Mike D'Abo, perf. by Honor Heffernan, played by Jim Doherty; 'Another Day Comes (Another Day Goes)' by David A Stewart, arrg. by Stewart, Patrick Seymour, perf. by Kiki Dee; 'Living in a World (Turned Upside Down)' by Michael Adams, perf. by Private Lives; 'Up on the Roof by Carole King, Gerry Goffm, perf. by Paul Quinn, choreo: Mavis Ascot, cost. super: Maeve Patterson, ward. a: Jacqueline Young, make-up: Rosie Blackmore, make-up effs: Nick Dudman, hair: Anne Dunne, titles dsgn: Richard Morrison, s. ed: Nicolas Gaster, s: Pat Hayes, boom op.: Pat Doyle, s. re-rd: Cine Lingual Sound Studio, dub. mix: Aad Wirtz, a. dub. ed: Laurie McDowell, p. cnslt: Eileen Mount Charles, stunt arrg: George Leech, stunts: Denise Ryan, Simon Crane, p. secretary: Jennie Chartier, stills: Tom Collins, p. accnt: Kevin Moriarty, accnts a: Paul Myler, p. buyer: Joe Nevin, prop mas- ter: Cos Egan, dressing propman: Eamon O'Higgins, propmen: P J Smith, Owen Monahan, cnstr. m: Tommy Bassett, chargehand painter: Bobby Scott, stand-by carpenter: Barry Cunningham, stand-by painter: Bobby Richardson, stand-by stagehand: Jimmy O'Meara, stand- by rigger: Pascal Jones, gaffer elec: Louis Conroy, chargehand elec: Derek Hale, elec: Terry Eiffe, Philip Fitzsimons, Bill Levins, trainees: Helene Falton, Pat Hayes Jr, Peter Vollebregt, Cassie Ogier, publicity cnslt: Zakiya Powell, unit publicist: Blaise O'Hara.
    Art directionLUCAS, John
    Costume designPATTERSON, Maeve
    Genre/CategoryPsychological Drama
    Thriller
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleREEFER AND THE MODEL
    Production companyBerber Films Productions
    SponsorBórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    Channel Four/Film Four International
    Radio Telefís Éireann/RTE
    Hemdale Film Corporation
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerDOOLAN, Lelia
    HAYES, Tom (Co-Prod)
    DirectorCOMERFORD, Joe
    Script/AdaptationCOMERFORD, Joe
    DOOLAN, Lelia (Associate)
    HARRIS, Eoghan (Story Ed)
    PhotographyBYRNE, Breffni
    Sound recordingHORGAN, Kieran
    EditingMERRY DOYLE, Sé
    Music composerDUHAN, Johnny
    Songs'After The Dream' by Duhan, perf. by Keane; 'You Come Back Into My Life' by and perf. by Duhan; 'Shanagolden' by Sean McCarthy, perf. by John Dooley & Creganna.
    Castlan McElhinney (Reefer), Eve Watkinson (mother), Carol Scanlan (the Model), Birdy Sweeney (Instant Photo), Sean Lawlor (Spider), Ray McBride (Badger), Fionn Comerford (messenger boy), John Lillis (porter), Henry Comerford (waiter), Sabina Higgins (restaurant woman). Henry Waters (pub musician), Paraic Breathnach (quayside fisherman), Maire Chinsealach (island woman), Dave Duffy (sergeant), Rosena Brown (the blonde). Little John Nee (boy soldier), Sean Ó Coisdealbha ('Rossaveal' skipper), Noel Spain (boatman), Peter Fitzgerald (bank guard), Dick Sffi Donaghue, Maire Ní Mhaille (bank tellers), Mick Rowland (older bank guard), Patrick Blackaby (1st tinker guard), Uinseann MacThomais (2nd tinker guard), Deirdre Lawless (policewoman), Gary McMahon (young guard), Lelia Ní Chathmhoil, Iseult Ní Chathimiloil, Lera Ní Chathimiloil, Stephen Wall, Donal Mahon, Gabriel Fahy, Terry Waters, Padhraic Campbell, Maire Stafford, Nancy Coughlan, Deirdre Grandi, Tony Christofides, Noel Browne, Phyllis Browne, Mike Anderson, Mavis Buckley, Maggie Fagan, Kethrein Curtin, Carmel Campbell, Trish Bush, Eoin Bourke, Peadar Ó Cualain, Michael Flanagan, Enda O'Byrne, Liam Stenson, Brendan Dempsey, Steve Donohue, Deirdre Ní Thuairisg, James O'Meara, Patsy Dodd, Tessie Dodd, Bill Conway, Mary D'Arcy, MiriamAllen, Marcus Quinn, Liam Greene, Richard Byrne.
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    Soundsound
    Duration93
    Footage8399
    Format35mm
    Release date1988
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryOn a quiet road in Connemara in 1981, Reefer, an ex-IRA man, stops his car in which his mother is a passenger and gives a lift to the Model. The Model has just returned to Ireland from London where she decided to give up heroin when she became pregnant. On the trawler on which Reefer lives with his partners Spider and Badger, they discuss the hunger strike in Northern Ireland. Reefer and the Model go for dinner to an exclusive members-only restaurant and force their way in. In a phone call. Reefer learns from the Dublin police that the Model is suspected of IRA membership, has been a prostitute in London and is a known heroin user. After being challenged for non-membership. Reefer disturbs the quiet equilibrium of the restaurant before they leave. Reefer introduces the Model to Badger and Spider and she is accepted as one of the 'family' on the trawler. They go to an off-shore island with passengers and goods. During, a dance at a pub, Badger picks up a soldier who is on holiday from border duty. They are discovered in the toilets by the soldier's sergeant. Later, they dance in the pub, but when they are observed being intimate by the sergeant he attacks Badger. Spider intervenes on behalf of Badger an a vicious fight ensues, until Reefer separates the pair. Later, the sergeant goes to the trawler and tries to knife Reefer, but Reefer knocks him out and throws him overboard. On their way back to the mainland, the trawler breaks down, and Reefer suggests they rob a bank to pay for the parts. Before going on the raid, the Model invites Reefer to make love. In disguise, the three men rob a mobile bank. They make their getaway in a police car and hide the money. They come upon a crashed police car in which one of the policemen is dead. The second policeman wakes up and realises who they are. Spider plans to shoot him, but then changes his mind and tries to drown him. The police Task Force raid the trawler as Reefer observes them. The Model is arrested and then released. At the trawler, the Model starts up the engine as Reefer rows to meet her. Meanwhile, the police surround the hideout as Spider and Badger collect the money. Spider fires a loaded shotgun at them and is killed by the return fire. Badger is jailed. At the trawler. Reefer's mother holds up the policeman guarding the boat and forces him to take off his clothes. Meanwhile, the Model takes the trawler into the bay as she begins to give birth to the baby. In a rowing boat. Reefer tries to catch up with the trawler as it heads out to sea but the boat is destroyed by the trawler. As the trawler continues out to sea and the Model screams in pain from the birth. Reefer tries to catch up with the boat by swimming after her. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 4/8/1988 (world premiere). The script for this film won an Arts Council Script Award in 1982. Filmed on location in Galway Bay, Connemara and the Aran Islands. This film won the Europa Prize at the Barcelona Film Festival, July 1988. The actress who play the Model, Carol Scanlan, wrote and directed GORT NA gCHAMH aka FIELD OF BONES (1998) under the name Carol Moore. Working Title: STORMY AND THE MODEL. The IFA holds a VHS tape of actor Dave Duffy auditioning for the role of Reefer (Stormy).
    ReferenceCE 4/8/1988:2; FBN No. 5:3; FBN No. 8:6-7; FBN No. 9:12-13; ID 4-17 August 1988:16-19; IT 27/8/1987:10; IT 5/8/1988:12; MFB Dec 1989:373; SP 7/8/1988, part 2:6; ST 7/8/1988:18.

    Reefer And The Model Programme, 4 Apr 1988, Programme for the film premiere in the Savoy, Dublin, listing cast and credits, filmmakers and cast details, and film score details for film.

    Reefer And The Model - Advertisements for the film, 1988. Held at the Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    'Glib Irish Tale', Critical review of the film.

    'Irishman Wins Film Prize Worth £147,000', 30 Nov 1989, Brief report of director Joe Comerford winning Best Film prize at Barcelona. Clipping held at the Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    IT, 8 July, 1988, Reefer and The Model review.

    IT, 29 July 1988, 'Script to Screen, How Reefer Got Made', Interview with Joe Comerford and Lelia Doolan about the production of the film (Michael Finlan).

    'A Tale of Two Telexes as Filmmakers Answer Haughey', 9 Aug 1988, Report of filmmakers' response to congratulatory telex from the Taoiseach (Paddy Woodworth). Clipping held at the Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    Cork Examiner, 3 Aug 1988, 'Reefer And The Model - Cast-iron Case for Film Board Revival'.

    Cork Examiner, 15 Aug 1988: 8, 'Chasing Connemara Sheep as Cameras Roll on Reefer', On-location report on production of film, Paddy Woodworth.

    'Out of the Wild West of Ireland', Michael Finlan, review, Clipping held at the Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    'True Grit', Olive Keogh, Interview with producer Lelia Doolan about the film. Clipping held at the Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    EH, 2 Aug 1988, 'The Making of an Irish Movie', Interview with director Joe Comerford and producer Lelia Doolan about the making of the film. Journalist Mary Carr.

    FilmBase News, Aug-Sept 1988: 6-8, 'Land ahoy! - Being the Model', Feature on film including interview with director Joe Comerford and producer Lelia Doolan, and actress Carol Scanlon (Mike Collins, Johnny Gogan).

    FilmBase News, Oct-Nov 1988: 12, 'Reefer Talk' , Part of discussion about film by Luke Gibbons, Pat Murphy, Johnny Gogan and Frank Connolly (Stephanie McBride).

    City Paper, Apr 1989, 'Rites and Wrongs', review of film showing at Baltimore Film Festival (Kevin Whitehead).

    IT, 10 June 1989, 'Raves for Reefer in Paris'. Favourable response to film in France (Paddy Woodworth).

    Monthly Film Bulletin, Dec 1989: 373, review by Farrah Anwar.
    Film on Four, 1992: 114-5, Viewing Figures 1990/1991, Viewing figures for film shown on British television channel, and production details (John Pym).

    The Observer, 26 Nov 1989: 1, review by Philip French.

    ST, 7 Aug 1988, 'Floundering on the Reefer', review by Ciaran Carty.

    The Guardian, 23 Nov 1989, review by Derek Malcolm.

    Publicity for gala benefit premiere of Reefer And The Model, 4 Aug 1988, held at the Tiernan MacBride of The Irish Film Institute.

    IT, 23 Mar 1988, 'Irish Film Wins', Reefer and the Model wins first prize in the feature film category at the Celtic Film Festival.
    DistributorMetro Pictures
    KeywordsTroubles
    Republicans
    Smugglers
    Fishing Trawlers
    Misfits
    Outlaws
    Marijuana
    Homosexuality
    Sexual Relationships
    IRA Men
    Abortion
    Production creditsp.c: A Berber Films Production. With financial assistance from Bord Scannan na hEireann/Irish Film Board. In association with Radio Teleffs Eireann, Channel Four/Film Four International, Hemdale Film Corp. p/sc. assoc: Lelia Doolan, d/sc: Joe Comerford, story ed: Eoghan Harris, co-p. in development: Tom Hayes, p.m: Darryl Collins, dop: Breffni Byrne, loc: Yvonne McDonald, Dublin co-ord: Jane Gogan, 1st a.d: Dave Murphy, 2nd a.d: Mick Rowland, 3rd a.d: Seamus Collins, trainee: Martha O'Neill, cont: Deirdre O'Brien, p. secretary: Niamh Nolan, a. to p: Siobhan Gibbons, focus puller: Declan Emerson, clapper/loader: Conor Hammond, c. trainee: Donal Gilligan, grip: Eddie Burt, ed: Se Merry Doyle, a. ed: Adrienne Ross, Rebecca Curthoys, p.dsgn.: John Lucas, sp. effs: Maurice Foley, Owen MacCarthaigh, m: Johnny Duhan, m.p: Aiveen Anderson, Frankie Colohan, Brendan O'Regan, Duhan, Tony Maher, Eamon Murphy, Gerald O'Donoghue, Davy Spillane, Noel O'Brien, (vocals) Dolores Keane, m. co-ord: Peter Harkin, songs: 'After The Dream' by Duhan, perf. by Keane; 'You Come Back Into My Life' by and perf. by Duhan; 'Shanagolden' by Sean McCarthy, perf. by John Dooley & Creganna, s. ed: Martin Evans, s: Kieran Horgan, (m.) Gerald O'Donoghue, boom op.: Jack Armstrong, a.s. ed: Antonia Bruce, s. re-rd: David Old, s. transfers: Roger Cherrill Ltd, Transfer Bay, props master: Cos Egan, prop.buyer: Ronnie Skinner, a. props: Darragh Lewis, ward: Jacqueline Young, make-up: Ailbhe Lemass, hair: Eileen Doyle, gaffer: Philip Fitzsimons, elec: Terry Eiffe, cnstr. m: Tommy Bassett, stand-by painter. Paul Fleming, stand-by rigger: Jimmy O'Meara, stand-by carpenter: John Lamon, painter: Bobby Scott, titles/opticals: Optical Film Effects, stunt co-ord: Mick Rowland, stunts: Bronco McLoughlin, Patrick Condren, Susan Foreman, stand-in: Caitlin Connolly, best boy: Paddy O'Neill, publicist: Patsy O'Shannon, stills: Peter Harkin, Jonathan Hession, a. personnel: Pauline Geatons, Sean Creagh, Derek Hale, Galway), Dr Bemie Mclnemey, Tom Conroy, p. accnt: Kevin Moriarty, a. p. accnt: Jackie O'Dwyer, legal adv: Eddie McGarr (Taylor & Buchalter).
    Production designLUCAS, John
    Genre/CategoryThriller
    Crime Film
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleCLASH OF THE ASH
    Production companyCircus Films
    SponsorBórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    Radio Telefís Éireann/RTE
    Mirror Films
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerGOGAN, Jane
    DirectorTIGHE, Fergus
    Script/AdaptationTIGHE, Fergus
    PhotographyQUINN, Declan
    Sound recordingDUFFIELD, Mick
    EditingDUGGAN, JImmy
    Executive producerDOOLIN, Lelia
    Music composerCOONEY, Stephen
    Songs'Dirty Old Town' by Ewan McColl, perf. by The Pogues; 'Amhran na bhFiann' by Peadar Keamey, arrg: Brian Boydell, perf. by RTE Concert Orchestra; 'Street Comer Casanova' by and perf. by Ron Kavana; 'Fermoy' by Juice on the Loose; 'Ain't Misbehavin'
    CastWilliam Heffernan (Phil Kelly), Vincent Murphy (Martin Hogan), Gina Moxley (Mary Haitneit), Myles Breen (Willy), Marian Dowley (Rosie), Alan Devlin (Mick Barry), Michael McAuliffe (Mr Kelly), Kay Rae Malone (Mrs Kelly), Donnacha Crowley (priest), Jim Queally (garda), Frank Duggan, Michael Twomey (barmen), Maura Young (Mrs O'Brien), Charles Ruxton (Paddy Murphy), Jimmy Dennigan (referee), Mary McCarthy (woman in cafe), Colette Egan (Murphy's girlfriend), Phil Noonan, Tom McLellan, James O'Donoghue, Patrick Waters (Murphy's mates), Elizabeth Dolan, Deirdre Foley, William John Murphy Lillis, Andrew Scannell (people at party). Big Guns (the dance band), Kevin Liddy (teenage Elvis), Keith Hanley (Mick Barry' s son), Frank O' Sullivan (barman), Johnny Mahon (bouncer).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration50
    Release date1987
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryA young man, Phil Kelly, who is about to leave school in a small town, questions the plans and expectations his parents have mapped out for him against a background of Leaving Certificate pressures and his involvement with the local hurling team. Deciding not to sit the exams, Phil leaves home to migrate to London and stay at his friend Mary Hartnett's house there. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 31/10/1987 (Dublin Film Festival).

    Filmed in Fergus Tighe's home town, Fermoy, Co Cork. This
    film received a grant from the Arts Council of Ireland. This film won the
    Starting Out Award at the 8th Festival of Film and Television in the Celtic
    Countries, April 1987; and Best Irish Film Award at the 1987 Cork Film
    Festival.
    ReferenceFBN No. 3:9; IT 13/4/1987:12; IT 22/7/1987; IT 6/8/1987:10; International Film Guide 1988; SP 8/2/1987.

    Irish Times, 22/7/87:1, ‘Visions of a vibrant film industry’, Film maker, Fergus Tighe, interviewed on future plans after success of Clash Of The Ash (Michael Cunningham).

    Irish Independent, 6/2/87:1, ‘Budding director's Clash Of The Ash is a hit’,
    Report on world premiere of Clash Of The Ash in Dublin (Miriam Lord).

    International Film Guide, 1988:236, Brief plot synopsis and review (Liam O'Leary).

    Sunday Press, 8/2/87:1, ‘Sporting Rebels’, Preview of film, Clash Of The Ash, with a focus on the hurling backdrop (Paddy Woodworth).

    Irish Times, 6/8/87:10, ‘Arts and Studies: Training for a career’, Post-Film Board look at careers in the film industry (David Kavanagh).

    Irish Times, 6/8/87:1, ‘Vital films and tales of financial woe’, Report on Eighth Celtic Film Festival in Inverness, and success of Fergus Tighe's Clash Of The Ash (Kenny Mathieson).

    Sunday Tribune, 24/09/00:4, ‘More Shocks in 'Glenroe' as Blackie Throws in the Towel’, Irish actor Liam Heffernan announces his decision to leave the TV series Glenroe. He previously starred in the film Clash of the Ash (Olivia Doyle and Valerie Roe).

    Publicity material for Clash Of The Ash. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.
    KeywordsHurling
    Rural Life
    Migration
    Love Relationships
    Leaving Certificate
    LocationFermoy
    Cork
    Production creditsp.c: Circus Films. With the assistance of Bord Scannan na hEireann/Irish Film Board. In association with Radio Telefís Eireann/Mirror Films, p: Jane Gogan, exec. p: (Bord Scannan na hEireann) Lelia Doolan, p. in development: Hilary McLoughlin, d/sc: Fergus Tighe, story ed: Eoghan Harris, creative adv: Cathal Black, light, c: Declan Quinn, focus puller: Caren Moy, clapper loader: Donal Gilligan, a. c: Thaddeus O'Sullivan, ed: Jim Duggan, a. ed: Kevin Liddy, songs: 'Dirty Old Town' by Ewan McColl, perf. by The Pogues; 'Amhran na bhFiann' by Peadar Keamey, arrg: Brian Boydell, perf. by RTE Concert Orchestra; 'Street Comer Casanova' by and perf. by Ron Kavana; 'Fermoy' by Juice on the Loose; 'Ain't Misbehavin', m: Stephen Cooney, s: Mick Duffield, art d: Robert Armstrong, cost/make-up: Edda Augustsson, Caroline Gogan, a.d: Darryl Collins, cont: Miriam Allen, a. to p: Yvonne McDonald, sponsorship organiser Dublin office: Martha O'Neill, loc. m: Bernard Fleming, stills: Christine Bond, Trish McAdam, gaffer: Tony Byrne, elec: Frank McDonald, Philip Fitzsimons, a. lights: Billy McCannon, Kevin Liddy, a.s. ed: Amanda Sutton, a. s: Liam Saurin, Brian O'Mahony, Jackie Crawford, dub. mix: Tony McHugh, titles: Robert Armstrong.
    Art directionARMSTRONG, Robert
    Costume designAUGUSTSSON, Edda
    GOGAN, Caroline
    Genre/CategoryShort Film Drama
    Drama
    Sport Drama

    TitleALISON
    Production companyBrian O'Flaherty
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerO'FLAHERTY, Brian
    DirectorO'FLAHERTY, Brian
    Script/AdaptationO'FLAHERTY, Brian
    PhotographyBERNSTEIN, Steve
    CUNNINGHAM, Nieve
    EditingCALDER, Juniper
    Associate producerO TOOLE, Michael
    Songs'Why Should I Cry Over You' written by Ned Miller and Chester Cohn, sung by Frank Sinatra. 'Don't Smoke in Bed' written by W. Robinson, sung by Julie London.
    CastAl McKenna (Jerry Staunton), Liz Kane (Alison Staunton), Jane
    Adams (Alison Staunton's voice).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration5
    Format16mm
    Release date1988
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryAtmospheric film noir thriller set in a large Georgian house where a
    recently-divorced young businessman. Jerry, dreams that his wife, Alison,
    has shot him. When he wakes up from the dream he is actually shot by his
    wife. (Production synopsis).
    NoteIR Rel 7/10/1988 (Cork Film Festival).
    KeywordsDreams
    LocationMerrion Square
    Arts Council Building
    Production creditsp.c: Brian O'Flaherty, p/d/sc: Brian O'Flaherty, light, c: Steve Bernstein, a.c: Nieve Cunningham, a. c: Aidan McGuinness, a.d: Michael Tully, assoc. p: Michael O'Toole, art d: Paidí Ó Domhnaill, ed: Juniper Calder, a. ed: Philip Cullen, hair: Kieron O'Flaherty, make-up: Liz Nagle, gaffer: Thomas B Tyrwhitt, prop.buyer: William (Jock) Keers, songs: 'Why Should I Cry Over You' by Ned Miller, Chester Cohn, sung by Frank Sinatra; 'Don't Smoke in Bed' by W Robinson, sung by Julie London.
    Art directionO'DOMHNAILL, Paidí
    Production designCALDER, Juniper
    Genre/CategoryShort Film Drama
    Psychological Drama
    Student Film

    TitleHUSH-A-BYE BABY
    Production companyDerry Film and Video Workshop
    Channel Four
    SponsorBritish Screen
    Radio Telefís Éireann/RTE
    Arts Council of Ireland
    Country of originIreland
    Great Britain
    ProducerCOLLINS, Tom
    DirectorHARKIN, Margo
    Script/AdaptationHARKIN, Margo
    ENGLISH, Stephanie
    PhotographyBYRNE, Breffni
    Sound recordingSAURIN, Liam
    EditingDUFFY, Martin
    Music composerO'CONNOR, Sinead
    Music performanceO'CONNOR, Sinead
    Songs'Girls Just Wanna Have Fun' by Cyndi Lauper (CBS); 'You're The Best Thing' by Style Council (Polydor); 'It's A Miracle' by Culture Club (Virgin); 'Unfinished Revolution' by Christy Moore (WEA)
    CastEmer McCourt (Goretti), Michael Liebmann (Ciaran), Cathy Casey (Dinky), Julie Marie Rogers (Majella), Sinead O'Connor (Sinead), Rosina Brown (Mrs Friel), Seamus Ball (Mr Friel), Julie McDonald (Fidelma), Marie Jones (Mrs McGuigan), Alan Howley (Lenny), David Coyle (Father Devine), Brenda Winter (schoolteacher), Sean Doherty (Irish-speaking soldier), Brian McGabhann (Irish teacher), Irene Bates (bean ti), Maureen Dow (Sister Consilio), Declan McLaughlin (Patrick McGuigan), Thomas McMenamin (Ruari McGuigan), Sean Carlin (Gareth McGuigan), John Coyle (Davey McGuigan), John McMenamin (Michael McGuigan), Paul Deane (Seamus McGuigan), John McDaid (Paul McGuigan), Nuala Hayes, Bemie Downes, Enna May (radio voice-overs), Aine Ní Ghalchoir (bean ti voice-over), Leanbh Taylor Feeney, Charli Doherty (Fidelma's children), Liam Donnelly (Clitoris Allsorts), Sean Green (Macker), Lawrence Elliott, Billy McFeeley (1st British army patrol), John Harris (2nd British army patrol), Tom Collins, Eddy Doherty (prison wardens), Brian Hegarty (RUC man), Paddy O'Carroll (student at Irish class), Paula Doherty (barperson), Orla Kavanagh (child at baptism), George Kelly, George Kilkie, Paddy McCafferty, Brendan Gunn (ceili band), Nina Wade, Helen Powell, Linnesse Williamson, Roslyn Ward, Carla Martin, Leontia Lavery, Debbie McGinley, Debbie Tierney, Jane Harris, Julie McElhinney, Frances Williamson, Jean Deeham, Elaine Collins, Martina Doherty. Jean Martin, Karen Rudd, Sally O'Rourke.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration72
    Release date1989
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryIn Derry in 1984 Goretti, Majella, Sinead, and Dinky are four fifteen-year-old school friends who are living in the Catholic ghetto areas of the Bogside and Creggan estates. Goretti Friel lives with her mother and father, while her married sister Fidelma is always looking for a baby-sitter. At disco practice in the local sports complex with Majella and Sinead, Goretti notices Ciaran for the first time. Ciaran is given a run-down on the girls by his friend Lenny, who is himself an object of fun for the girls. In the girls' showers, Goretti also tries to find out more about Ciaran. Majella teases her in her usual brash way and the two girls carry on to the point where they upset Sinead who is much more inhibited and shy. At their all-girls convent school the girls continue with their favourite past-time of teasing their young religious education teacher, Fr Devine. They are joined in this by their friend Dinky who is part of their gang when it comes to discussing boys. At home, Ciaran is the most responsible of a large family of boys presided over by his widowed mother. It is clear that she has a special relationship with Ciaran. Saturday night arrives but at the local bar/disco, the boy whom Sinead fancies asks Majella out to dance instead of her. Dinky comes on the scene and reveals that he is the famous 'Chtons Allsorts' who only goes out with girls who will have sex with him. He has already left more than one girl pregnant. Ciaran turns up and he and Goretti exchange looks of mutual attraction. She waits all night for him to ask her to dance but he gets drunk instead. Lenny fancies Sinead, but she ends up dancing with Dinky. The night ends disastrously when none of the girls manage to 'get off and they end up slagging one another in the taxi home. Eventually, Ciaran and Goretti meet at an evening Irish class in the local community centre. They start to date and soon fall in love. Goretti drifts from her friends and her mother warns her that she is too young to be going steady. Goretti's sister Fidelma has no difficulty in getting the young couple to baby-sit at the new flat and it is here mainly that they begin to explore their sexuality. The local political environment in 1984 is dominated by the last of the supergrass trials. As the end of the school term approaches, this reality comes suddenly to Goretti's door when she is informed that Ciaran has been 'lifted' in a British-army swoop. She discovers that her shock is overshadowed by his mother's devastation and she realises that she has to cope alone while Ciaran's family has first claim on him in prison. Goretti's isolation increases when it dawns on her that she is pregnant. She determines to hide the pregnancy from everyone but Ciaran, and to maintain her secret she writes to him in Ireland. Since prisoners are not allowed to receive letters in Ireland, Ciaran never gets the letter. Goretti becomes more depressed and everything in her world is perceived now from the point of view of her secret pregnancy. In August she goes to the Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking region) in Donegal with Dinky. While she is there she accidentally hears a radio debate on the subject of abortion (in the year following the abortion referendum in the Republic of Irish). She is deeply affected by this and also by the recurring imagery of the Virgin Mary which has been a constantly-represented and attractive role model in her Catholic upbringing. The dichotomy between her upbringing and the situation in which she now finds herself, her increasing isolation, and her apparent abandonment by Ciaran are all more than she can bear. The pressures are only brought to a head when she attracts her parents attention at night with her screams when giving birth. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 23/11/1989 (world premiere, Derry); 24/2/1990 (Dublin Film Festival); 9/3/1990 (general release); TX RTE 20/9/1990. Filmed on location in Derry and in County Donegal. This film won the Best Actress Award for Emer McCourt at the 1990 Locarno Film Festival; it won the Best Drama Award at the llth International Celtic Film Festival, 1990; it was awarded the Director's Prize at the 1990 Orleans Film Festival; and was the Irish Nomination for Young European Film of the Year, European Film Awards, 1990. This was the first feature film by Deny Film and Video Workshop which had been set up in 1984. After making community videos, its first production was a documentary, MOTHER IRELAND (1988), which was banned from broadcast in Britain.
    ReferenceFBN No 3-10-11; FBN No. 16:8-10; FBN No. 17:2; FW No. 4:4; Irish Reporter No. 6, 1992:18-21; IT 9/3/1990:14; IT 10/3/1990:WK5; IT 9/4/1990:18; Living Marxism, June 1990:44-5. Butler Cullingford, 1994.

    Publicity: synopsis, cast and crew lists, Derry Film & Video Workshop details and cast biographies for the film Hush-a-bye Baby.

    Cineaste, 1989:43, ‘Derry F`ilm and Video: An interview with Margo Harkin’,
    Margo Harkin, director of the film Hush-a-bye Baby, interviewed about the production company Derry Film and Video (Marsha Emerman).

    Irish Times, 9/3/90, ‘Teenage pregnancy in Derry, loveless sex in Poland’, review of the film Hush-a-bye Baby on its cinema release (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Times, 1989, ‘Telling it their own way’, interview with director Margo Harkin about the film Hush-a-bye Baby and the production company Derry Film and Video (Arminta Wallace).

    Film Base News, Feb/Mar. 1990:8-10, ‘Hush-a-bye Baby’, interview with director Margo Harkin and scriptwriter Stephanie English about making their film Hush-a-bye Baby (Patsy Murphy).

    Publicity: synopsis, cast and credits for film.

    Pacific Tribune, 1/10/90, ‘Message on teen sexuality’, review (Marie Lorenzo).

    Screen International, 28/7-3/8/90, review (Patricia Dobson).

    The Observer, 29/7/90, review.

    Time Out, 27/6-4/7/90, short review (Wally Hammond).

    The Guardian, 26/7/90, ‘Margo Harkin's Hush-a-bye Baby’, review.

    Gender, Nation, Excess: Reading Hush-a Bye Baby.

    Chapter 9 from Ireland in Proximity: History, Gender, Space edited by Scott Bewster, Virginia Crossman, Fiona Becket and David Alderson; Routledge 1999:109-121 (Richard Kirkland).
    KeywordsTroubles
    Young People
    Women
    Pregnancy
    Contraception
    Abortion
    Catholicism
    LocationDerry
    Donegal
    Production creditsp.c: Derry Film and Video Workshop. Made under the A.C.T.T Workshop Declaration. For Channel Four. In association with British Screen and Radio Telefís Éireann. With assistance from the Arts Council of Ireland, p: Tom Collins. d: Margo Harkin, sc: Harkin, Stephanie English, c: Breffni Byrne, focus puller: Mike Duffield, 1st a.c: Conor Kelly, 2nd a.c: English, grip: Glyn Fielding, gaffer: Tim Church, elec: Rob Brock, boom op.: Pat Doyle, a. art d: Moira Mclver, ed: Martin Duffy, cont: Deirdre O'Brien, p.m: Antonella Ibba, p.dsgn.: Diane Menaul, p. co-ord: Geraldine McGuinness, 1st a.d: Darryl Collins, 2nd a.d: Brendan McMenamin, 3rd a.d: Aidan Feeney, theme m/m.p: Sinead O'Connor, songs: 'Girls Just Wanna Have Fun' by Cyndi Lauper (CBS); 'You're The Best Thing' by Style Council (Polydor); 'It's A Miracle' by Culture Club (Virgin); 'UNíinished Revolution' by Christy Moore (WEA), poem: 'LimbO'from Wintering Out by Seamus Heaney (Faber & Faber), s: Liam Saurin, a.s. mix: Jim Curran, dub. mix: Peter Hodges, ward: Lynn Aitken, ward a: Kate Gillen, cnstr: Paul Harkin, make-up: Rosie Blackmore, 1st a. ed: Emer Reynolds, trainee a. ed: Anne Marie McCallion, p.a: Therese Friel, p. accnt: Mike Ash, p secretary: Pauline ward, stills: Willie Doherty, dial. coach: Brendan Gunn, titles: Les Latimer Opticals.
    Art directionMcIVER, Moira
    Production designMENAUL, Diane
    Genre/CategoryComedy
    Social Drama
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleBIG SWINGER
    Production companyDun Laoghaire College of Art and Design
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerRECKS, Declan
    DirectorRECKS, Declan
    Script/AdaptationRECKS, Declan
    PhotographyO'NEILL, Liam
    Sound recordingNEWPORT, Jim
    EditingO'LEARY, Anne
    CastTom Hickey (Jimmy Sullivan), Kevin Reynolds (Sid), Maurice
    O'Donoghue (Frank), Graham Wilkinson (Paddy), Charlie Roberts (Peter),
    Tom Lawlor (Jack), Helen Roche (Madge), Donnacha Crowley (Father
    Byrne), David Nolan (postman), Peter Vollebregt (airline pilot), Deirdre
    Champ (woman at kiosk).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration15
    Format16mm
    Release date1989
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryJimmy Sullivan is an ex-showband drummer who runs a pirate-radio station in a small midlands town. He is assisted by Sid, who is an aspiring musician. When Jimmy's radio programme interferes with passing aeroplanes, the authorities send two heavies, Frank and Paddy, to close the station, but they turn out to be old musician friends of his. Though the radio station is closed. Jimmy discovers satellite television. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 23/7/1989 (Galway Film Fleadh).
    This film won the 1989 Fuji Award for Best Overall Production
    and was runner-up in the Best Editing category. It won the Best Short Film
    Award at the 1989 Galway Film Fleadh.
    KeywordsMusicians
    Pirate Radio
    Satellite TV
    Media
    Production creditsp.c: Dun Laoghaire College of Art and Design, p/d/sc: Declan Recks, co-p: Cathy Davis, light, c: Liam O'Neill, c. op: lain Keeney, a.c: Stephen Kane, s: Jim Newport, boom op.: Joe Tanhem, cont: Jon White, p.dsgn.: Sean O'Mara, super, ed: Anne O'Leary, cont: John White, a.d: Eamon Manning, stills: Finn Van Gelderen, cost. cnslt: John O'Clery, storyboard artist: Emma Fitzpatrick, 1st a.d: Eamon Manning, elec: Richie Recks, elec. a: Derek Recks, songs: '21 Acres of Land', 'Brown Eyes' perf. by T.R. Dallas; 'The Hucklebuck' (EMI, Irish).
    Production designO'MARA, Sean
    LightingO NEILL, Liam
    Genre/CategoryShort Film Drama
    Comedy
    Student Film

    TitleAFTER MIDNIGHT
    Production companyLazer Entertainments (Irl)
    SponsorChannel Four
    Dublin Cinema Group
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerJULIUS, Maxine
    DirectorGREWAL, Shani S.
    Script/AdaptationGREWAL, Shani S.
    PhotographyCONROY, Jack
    Sound recordingDEASY, Brendan
    EditingTHOMSON, Carl
    Executive producerANDERSON, Paul C.
    Music composerGALLAGHER, Mickey
    Songs'We Used To Do The Birdland', 'Bye Bye Dublin' by lan Drury, Gallagher; 'The Quick Quick Slow' by Drury, Gallagher. Merlin Rhys-Jones; 'Jas'
    Theme', 'Sally's Theme', 'El Ayi's Theme' by Gallagher, vocals:
    Drury, lan Home, Delphi Newman, keyboards: Gallagher, guitar/bass:
    Rhys-Jones, drums/percussion: Will Parnell, Drury, saxophone: Davey
    Payne, keyboards/guitar: Chaz Jankel, lan Drury lyrics publ. by Warner
    Chappell Music Ltt.
    CastSaeed Jaffrey (Jas), Hayley Mills (Sally), lan Drury (Harry), Dhirendra (Ranji), Vladek Sheybal (El Ayi), Maurice O'Donoghue (Basil), Patrick Condren (Pat), Gerard Byrne (Charles Winner), Sean Simon (Brendan), Pat Laffan (head chef), Joan Sheehy (Colleen), Cliona Maher (Emily), Mikel Murfi (Michaeleen), Brendan O'Reilly (drunken guest), Brian Munn (handsome man), Majella Nolan (pretty girl), Cunie Lecomte (call girl), Jer O'Leary (Liam), Owen Conroy (Owen), Patrick Blackaby (garda), Martin Murphy (ambulance man), Emer Kenny (harpist), Mary McGuckian (pianist), Christy O'Reilly (bag piper), Frank Vincent Smith Smith (drunken men), Siobhan Shortt, Elaine O'Reilly (blonde girls).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration90
    Format35mm
    Release date1990
    SummaryIn a respectable Dublin hotel the morning after a wedding, the guests are drunk, fighting and making love in public. Jas, one of the security employees, arrives for work in a horsedrawn carriage with his girlfriend, hotel employee Sally. A new and innocent young employee, Ranji, is bemused at the eccentric behaviour of staff and guests, one of whom is Harry, a paraplegic, who is on the run. A prostitute arrives to visit a guest, but Jas will not allow her stay at the hotel until she goes with him first, but Ranji interrupts the encounter with a bogus emer- gency phone call. After a fire at the hotel, Jas is accused by the man- ager of neglect of duty and of being drunk. The general manager, Basil, acknowledges the pressures Jas has been under since his family was killed. Refusing to offer any mitigation for his actions, Basil reluctant- ly sacks him. Another manager. El Ayi, with whom Jas has been in con- tinual conflict, is triumphant. As Jas is leaving, Ranji rings to say that one of the guests, Charles Winner, is holding El Ayi over the balcony. After El Ayi confesses that he tried to extract extra payments from Winner for allowing two women to stay with him, he is freed into a fire net. El Ayi is fired and Jas is reinstated with promotion, but he tells Sally that he has decided to return to writing. He then asks Sally to marry him. (V).
    NoteFilmed on location in Dublin and Fitzpatrick's Castle Hotel,
    Killiney, Co Dublin.
    DistributorLazer Entertainments (Irl)
    Dublin Cinema Group
    LocationKilliney
    Dublin
    Production creditsp.c: Lazer Entertainments (Irl). In association with Channel Four, Dublin Cinema Group, p: Maxine Julius, exec. p: Paul C Anderson, d/sc: Shani S Grewal, dop: Jack Conroy, c. op: Vie Purcell, focus puller: Matt Skinner, clapper loader: Jo Gibney, grip: Joe Quigley, p.dsgn.: Brien Vahey, p.m: Kevin C Nelson, art d: Owen MacCarthaigh, ed: Carl Thomson, 1st a.d: Ben Gibney, 2nd a.d: Konrad Jay, 3rd a.d: Catriona Ryan, cont: Jean Skinner, m: Mickey Gallagher, songs: 'We Used To Do The Birdland', 'Bye Bye Dublin' by lan Drury, Gallagher; 'The Quick Quick Slow' by Drury, Gallagher. Merlin Rhys-Jones; 'Jas' Theme', 'Sally's Theme', 'El Ayi's Theme' by Gallagher, vocals: Drury, lan Home, Delphi Newman, keyboards: Gallagher, guitar/bass: Rhys-Jones, drums/percussion: Will Parnell, Drury, saxophone: Davey Payne, keyboards/guitar: Chaz Jankel, lan Drury lyrics publ. by Warner Chappell music Ltd, s: Brendan Deasy, boom op.: James Corcoran, Jack Armstrong, prop.buyer/set d: Cos Egan. stand-by props: Patrick Murray, trainee art d: Bairbre Murray, painter: Peter McCullough, cost/ward: Grainne Keeley, a. ward: Lian Callaghan, make-up: Morna Ferguson, a. make-up: Jennifer Hegarty, trainee make-up: Celine O'Connell, hair: Bemadette Dooley, a. hair: Martina McCarthy, trainee hair: Linda Byrne, gaffer: Albert Cassells, elec: Patrick Murphy, gener- ator op: Peter O'Toole, sp. effs: Jim Brady, stunts/flight co-ord: Patrick Condren, stunts: Rod Woodruff, Joe Condren, a. to p: Andrew Croonez, stills: Andres Ordonez, producer's secretary: Jacqueline O'Neill, p.a: Niall Grant, runners: Ruan Magan, Mary Corcoran, Luke Johnson, 1st a. ed: Andrew Jackson, 2nd a. ed: Chris Dickens, dub. mix: Henry Dobson, distr: Lazer Entertainments (Irl), Dublin Cinema Group.
    Costume designMacCARTHAIGH, Owen
    Production designVAHEY, Brien
    Genre/CategoryRomantic Comedy

    TitleHARD SHOULDER
    Production companyMirror Films
    SponsorChannel Four Television
    Radio Telefís Éireann/RTE
    Arts Council Of Ireland
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerGOGAN, Jane
    DirectorKILROY, Mark
    Script/AdaptationKILROY, Mark
    BLACK, Cathal (Scipt Ed)
    PhotographyO'NEILL, Shane
    Sound recordingHAYES, Pat
    EditingMERRY DOYLE, Sé
    Music composerKELLY, Paul
    Songs'Texas Boxcar Incident' by P Cummins, 'Jailhouse Blues' by F Lane, perf. by The Fleadh Cowboys (Side Kick Records); 'Smoke Along the Track' by Rose & Helms, perf. by Big Tom and the Mainliners (Denver Records); 'Coventry Carol' by M Shaw, perf. by A Jones and the BBC Orchestra (Virgin Records)
    CastOlwen Fouere (Ella Burke), Johnny Murphy (Charlie Henshaw), Donal O'Kelly (Tony), Geoff Golden (Burke), Eamonn Hunt (Michael), Gina Moxley (secretary), Kira Carroll (Jackie), Tom O'Brien (taxi driver). Pat Leavy (landlady), Jackie Mulvey, David Gorry (young couple selling), Carmel Rooney (housewife), Sheila Flitton (mother), Michael Ó Briain (father), Mick Nolan (Spanner), Jer O'Leary (1st heavy), Maurice Kehoe (2nd heavy), Joan Sheehy (cafe waitress), John Cowley (bikeshop owner), Karen O'Brien (hotel waitress), Caroline Winterson (woman in hotel bar), Agnes Bernelle (bar proprietor). Jack Lynch (man in bar), Lisa Tiemey-Keogh, Demian McAdam, Rosie Gogan-Keogh, Naoise McNamara (ice cream eaters), Molly Magahy (young girl), Bemie Downes (nurse), Fiona Nolan (2nd nurse), Molly Fogarty (souvenir shop owner), Brendan Gleeson (lorry driver).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration72
    Format16mm
    Release date1990
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryAll five people who turn up for an interview are employed by Charlie Henshaw to sell fire extinguishers, but unknown to them the extinguish- ers have been stolen. By the end of the first day's selling, three of the recruits, including Michael, who is beaten up for an unknown reason, abandon Henshaw and his merchandise. This leaves Henshaw with just two salespeople - the mysterious Ella and the apparently innocent Tony. They agree to go west in Henshaw's car, but before their departure Henshaw receives a threatening message on his answering machine about the merchandise. He sets fire to his office, taking the fire extinguishers with him, and heads west with Ella and Tony. While on the road, Charlie calls Burke, the owner of his office premises and the supplier of the merchandise, who tries to find out where he is. Charlie asks him whether he has one of his henchmen. Spanner, out looking for him. The three of them leave and travel further west. Charlie is hospitalised with nervous exhaustion. Ella tells him that Burke is her father and that he wants her to go back to him. Charlie tells them to continue on to T. J.'s garage in Westport and he'll join them there. Ella discovers a gun in the car as another car begins to chase them. As they try to escape from their pur- suers, Ella gets out of the car and heads across country, while Tony tries to evade them. Tony crashes the car on the outskirts of Knock. As he wanders around the religious artefacts on display in thevillage, Ella finds him. She tells him that Charlie is dead. Ella won't reveal why their pursuers knew her name, but she tells Tony that she is still going to Westport. Leaving only two crosses on the bedroom mirror, Ella walks to the outskirts of town where Spanner tells her that Burke will be at the crossroads. When she gets there, she asks her father what he wants. He takes out her passport, noting that she's been travelling around. As she walks away from him, he pursues her and Ella gets into his car. He gives back her passport and begins stoking her hair. She tells him that she has something for him and takes out the gun and shoots him. She walks away from the car. Tony travels with a truck driver along the same road and continues west like Ella. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 9/2/1990; TX RTE 5/1/1991.
    ReferenceCE 3/4/1990; EH 8/2/1990; FBN No. 15:10-14; FBN No. 17:20-21; FBN No. 21:13 (still); IP 9/2/1990:22; IT 9/2/1990; SI 11/2/1990:19.

    Evening Herald, 8/2/90, ‘An extinguished cast’, interview with Mark Kilroy, director of the film Hard Shoulder (Paddy Kehoe).

    Irish Times, 9/2/90, ‘Awkward but engaging journey’, favourable review of the film Hard Shoulder (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Times, 9/2/90, ‘Jane Gogan: from gardener to film producer’, profile of the career of Jane Gogan, producer of the film HARD SHOULDER (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Press, 9/2/90:22-3, ‘Making It Onto the Big Screen’, interview with director Mark Kilroy, and review of his film HARD SHOULDER (Patricia Murray).

    Cork Examiner, 31/3/90, ‘Camera rolls for a new Irish director’, interview with director Mark Kilroy about his career, and the making of the film HARD SHOULDER (Barry Roche).

    Irish Times, Feb. 1989 (?), ‘Meanwhile, a new Irish feature film...’, short review of film.

    Film Base News, Nov/Dec 1989:10-4, interview with director Mark Kilroy and producer Jane Gogan about making the film (Patsey Murphy).
    Production creditsp.c: Mirror Films. For Channel Four Television and Radio Telifis Eire- ann. With assistance from the Arts Council of Ireland, p: Jane Gogan, d/sc: Mark Kilroy, sc. ed: Cathal Black, dop: Shane O'Neill, ed: Se Merry Doyle, art d: Arden Gantly, Gabby Dowling, a. to d: Trish McAdam, cont: Jean Skinner, p.m: Martin O'Malley, p. co-ord: Anneliese O'Callaghan, loc. super: Yvonne McDonald, p. secretary: Siobhan Gibbons, 1st a.d: Seamus Collins, 2nd a.d: Nick McCarthy, trainee a.d: Edel O'Brien, Brendan Geraghty, Catriona Ryan, m: Paul Kelly, s: Pat Hayes, boom op.: Jack Armstrong, focus puller: Ivan Meagher, clapper loader: Donal Gilligan, trainee clapper loader: Stephen Burke, gaffer: Tony Byrne, elec: Kevin Scott, Kieran Dempsey, grip: Luke Quigley, Joe Quigley, a. grip: Gerry Quigley, dub. ed: Geraldine Creed, s. mix: Richard King, a. ed: Bemadette Moloney, a. dub. ed: Brendan McCarthy, trainee a. ed: Paul Melrose, a. s: Jackie Crawford, songs: 'Texas Boxcar Incident' by P Cummins, 'Jailhouse Blues' by F Lane, perf. by The Fleadh Cowboys (Side Kick Records); 'Smoke Along the Track' by Rose & Helms, perf. by Big Tom and the Mainliners (Denver Records); 'Coventry Carol' by M Shaw, perf. by A Jones and the BBC Orchestra (Virgin Records), ward: Marie Tiemey, a. ward: Caroline Winterson, make-up: Ken Jennings, hair: Bemie Dooley, carpenter: John Lamon, stand-by props: Kevin Hudson, painters: Paul Fleming, Martin Duff, studio cnstr: Tommy Bassett, mechanic: Fintan Connolly, accnt: Laura Magahy, stills: Jonathan Hession, Denis Mortell, titles: The Graphiconies, sp. effs: Film Engineering Irish.
    Art directionGANTLY, Arden
    DOWLING, Gabby
    Genre/CategoryRoad Movie
    Thriller
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleUNDERCURRENTS
    Production companyTile Films Ltd
    SponsorRadio Telefís Éireann/RTE
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerROOKE, Stephen
    DirectorROOKE, Stephen
    Script/AdaptationROOKE, Stephen
    RENWICK, Reg
    PhotographyGILES, Robert
    Sound recordingSEELY, Martin
    EditingFALLEN-BAILEY, Oliver
    Music composerWHELAN, Bill
    Songs'Recovery' by and perf. by Jan Nagle; 'The Woman In Me' by Roberto
    Danova, 'Spanish Eddie' by David Palmer, Chuck Cochran, 'Colour My
    Rainbow' by May, perf. by Joanna and Tequila Sunrise.
    CastMary McGuckian (Helen), Sighle Toibin (Lisa), David O'Meara (John), Vincent Murphy (Peter), Niall Toibin (Mr Nolan), Martin Dunne (Helen's father), Gail Curtis (Helen as a child), Patrick Laffan (Mr Hill), Helena Breen (Mrs Hill), Seamus Moran (barman), Marion Dowley (insurance clerk), Lynda Gallagher(Lisa's daughter), Peter Sweeney (conductor). Mark Fitzgerald, Anthony O'Shea, Niall O'Connor (trumpet players), Christchurch Cathedral Choir, Dublin (choir), Joanna and Tequila Sunrise (nightclub band).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration32
    Format16mm
    Release date1990
    TX channelTG4
    TX date26/07/1998
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryHelen, a London-based Irish organist, arrives at Dublin Airport where she is met by Mr Nolan. A church performance attended by a school friend, Lisa, brings back memories of their teen years together. At that time an intimate relationship developed between the two. They continue their relationship until one evening at a nightclub two men join them. While Lisa becomes attached to one of them, John, Helen is repulsed by the other. Returning home after organ practice to their apartment, Helen and Lisa argue and fight over Lisa's relationship with John. When Lisa doesn't return the following day, Helen is disconsolate and recalls a childhood sexual assault by her father. She goes to John's apartment where she meets Lisa, who tells her that she loves John and wants to live with him. When John returns. Lisa tells Helen that she intends to stay. Ten months later, Lisa rings Helen to arrange a meeting, but she fails to turn up. Helen finds a note from Lisa and rushes to a maternity hospital where Lisa has given birth to a daughter. After Helen turns away, John follows her out and tells her that running away will not do any good, but she leaves nonetheless. Now, a few years later, as Helen is leaving Dublin Airport following her successful performance, Lisa is there with her daughter. Helen has told her about her father's childhood assaults and they restate their love for each other. (V).
    NoteFilmed in County Wicklow and on location in Dublin, including Trinity College.
    KeywordsOrganists
    Emigration
    Love Lelationships
    Birth
    Pregnancy
    Child Abuse
    Family
    LocationDublin
    Wicklow
    Trinity College
    Production creditsp.c: Tile Films Ltd. In association with Radio Telefís Éireann, p/d: Stephen Rooke, co-p: Philippa Langdale, sc: Rooke, Reg Renwick, dop: Robert Giles, art d: Fiona Daly, ed: Oliver Fallen-Bailey, cont: Alan Irish, p.m: Langdale, John Butterworth, m/m. arrg: Bill Whelan, songs: 'Recovery' by and perf. by Jan Nagle; 'The Woman In Me' by Roberto Danova, 'Spanish Eddie' by David Palmer, Chuck Cochran, 'Colour My Rainbow' by May, perf. by Joanna and Tequila Sunrise, 1st a.d/a. ed: John O'Donnell, 2nd a.d: Vincent Murphy, a.c: Justine Evans, light: Alexander __ Howe, 1st light: Martin Parry, a. light: Giancario Gemin, s. mix: Aidan Sheeran, s: Martin Seeley, boom op.: Nicola Meerabux, grip: Mel Griffin, Kevin O'Leary, elec: Terry Ross, Ken Ross, cont: Alan Irish, ward: Orlaith Browne, Derby Browne, make-up: Elizabeth Bukkehaue, set dec: Celine Ryan, Anne Geraghty, Angela Mitchell, Wendela Rosonberg-Polack, Cally Archer, titles: Dorcass O'Toole.
    Art directionDALY, Fiona
    LightingHOWE, Alexander
    Genre/CategoryShort Film Drama

    TitleBARGAIN SHOP, THE
    Production companyBandit Films
    SponsorZDF/Das Kleine Femsehspiel
    Arte
    Radio Telefís Éireann/RTE
    Arts Council of Ireland
    European Script Fund
    Country of originIreland
    Germany
    ProducerGOGAN, Jane
    DirectorGOGAN, Johnny
    Script/AdaptationGOGAN, Johnny
    MORRISON, Pearl (Supervisor)
    O'BYRNE, Joe (Script Editor)
    PhotographyQUINN, Declan
    EditingCREED, Geraldine
    McCARTHY, Brendan
    Music composerCOUGHLAN, Cathal
    Songs'Fairytale of New York' by Shane MacGowan, Jem Finer (Stiff Records); 'The Suitman' by and perf. by Cathal Coughlan.
    NarratorMcCANN, Donal
    CastEmer McCourt (Maria), Garrett Keogh (Billy), Stuart Graham (Packy), Ruth McCabe (Oracle), Brendan Gleeson (Jim Kennedy), Donal O'Kelly (Detective O'Brien), Frank O'Sullivan (Detective Murphy), Sean McCarthy (Dick), Pat Laffan (Charlie), Wesley Murphy (Duncan), Vinnie McCabe (O'Donnell), Doreen Hepbum (Mrs Martin), Brendan Conroy (antique man), Fionnuala Murphy (Josephine), Mal Whyte (Cecil), Michelle Forbes (receptionist), Brid MacFhearai (trader), Eamonn Hunt (foreman), Jack Lynch (customer), Anthony Brophy, Lana Citron, Rachel Hyland, Philip Bolger, Paul Mangan, Damien Doyle, Steven Gately (locusts), Paul Tylak (DJ), Rose Henderson (newsreader), Donal McCann (narrator).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration57
    Format16mm
    Release date1992
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryBilly gives Maria a job as the accnts clerk in his antiques shop where Packy also works. With a decline in the antiques business, Packy is smuggling electrical goods from Northern Ireland, an arrangement begun with Billy's father, Eoin, who had been a communist. Oracle draws Billy's attention to the attempt to rezone the nearby convent lands. At a golf course, Billy meets his business partner, property developer Jim Kennedy, while Maria's father, an architect, is one of Kennedy's golf companions. Kennedy offers to arrange for a franchise from retail supermarket chain Four Seasons to replace the antiques shop. Packy expresses his bitterness at the change, while Billy claims that Packy's associates frightened off customers. Billy sells the contents of his antiques shop and converts the premises to a food supermarket where Maria becomes manageress and Packy works in the stores and continues to restore antiques. During a break, Packy tells Maria that he spent time in jail, while friends of his are still there. To his surprise. Billy receives a letter addressed to his father acknowledging his objection to the rezoning of the convent lands, but it transpires that he died the month before the letter was written and that it was forged by Packy. Maria and Packy becomes lovers. Billy suggests to Kennedy that they become closer partners, while a London pension fund buys the local pub, the Shamrock. Billy goes to see Kennedy's proposed redevelopment of the area. When he objects to the development, Kennedy shows Billy that he hasn't been paying the mortgage he owns, while offering him a retail outlet in the new shopping centre. Under pressure, Billy reveals to Maria and Packy that a planning official is receiving bribes. Maria goes to Kennedy's office where she discovers that Kennedy has access to the shop's accnts via a modem. Meanwhile, Packy, who is under pressure from the police, tells Maria that he intends going back to the north. Maria returns to Kennedy's office and taps into the computer. As the bargain shop is being demolished, Maria arrives with the incriminating ledger. Packy appears in the door of the old bargain shop and the local community drift past him into the interior with Billy the last one to enter. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 14/11/1992 (Foyle Film Festival).
    Shot on location in Dublin and at Ardmore Studios.
    ReferenceFBN No. 30:14-15; FI No. 33:24-5.
    Production notes for 'The Bargain Shop' including synopsis, cast, crew details. Held at the Tiernan MacBride of the Film Institute of Ireland.
    Irish Times, 25/1/1993, brief review of The Bargain Shop. (Brendan Glacken).
    Sunday Independent, 3/1/1993: 15, brief review of The Bargain Shop (Colm Toibin).
    Film Ireland, Feb/Mar 1993: 24-25, review of The Bargain Shop including discussion of themes and plot (Gerry McCarthy).
    'Making Films Your Business', a look at the factors involved in developing low budget independent drama using The Bargain Shop as an example (Patrick Barrett). Held at the Tiernan MacBride of the Film Institute of Ireland.
    Evening Herald, 5/1/1993: 21, 'Bargain Buy and Made in Ireland', Johnny Gogan briefly talks about The Bargain Shop which has its TV premiere tonight (Sharon Black).
    Sunday Independent, 3/1/1993: 1, 'Hurricane Johnny's Bargain', director Johnny Gogan talks about The Bargain Shop (Brighis McLaughlin).
    KeywordsAntique Shops
    Smuggling
    Retail Business
    Urban Development
    Troubles
    Real Estate
    LocationDublin
    Production creditsp.c: Bandit Films. For ZDF/Das Kleine Femsehspiel and Arte (commissioning ed: Claudia Trannier). In association with Radio Telefís Eireann. Developed with the assistance of the Arts Council of Irish and the European Script Fund, p: Jane Gogan, d/sc: Johnny Gogan, sc. super: Pearl Morrison, sc. ed: Joe O'Byrne, light, c: Declan Quinn, a. c/focus puller: Donal Gilligan, p.dsgn.: Mark Geraghty, ed: Geraldine Creed, original m: Cathal Coughlan, songs: 'Fairytale of New York' by Shane MacGowan, Jem Finer (Stiff Records); 'The Suitman' by and perf. by Cathal Coughlan, s. mix: Jack Armstrong, boom op.: Simon Willis, s. dub: Richard King, Worldwide Pictures, p.m: Des Martin, loc. m: Robert Walpole, loc. a: Jody Cosgrove, 1st a.d: Martha O'Neill, cast: Trish McAdam, Maureen White, cost: Marie Tiemey, ward: Sheila Fahey, make-up: Ailbhe Lemass, hair: Anne Dunne, titles: INíormation Design, Bargain Shop d: Robert Ballagh, clapper loader: P J Dillon, grip: Joe Quigley, gaffer: Con Dempsey, elec: Bill Levins, Brian Sheridan, p. secretary: Breda Walsh, 2nd a.d: Paul Bames, 3rd a.d: Constance Harris, a. ed: Brendan MacCarthy, storyboard artist: Emma Fitzpatrick, props master: Darragh Lewis, prop.buyer: Tina Brophy, Jane Perrott, stand-in props: Noel Walsh, cnstr. m: Tommy Bassett, stand-in carpenter: Colm Bassett, master painter: Bobby Scott, stand-in painter: Alan Scott, p. accnt: Donal Geraghty, a. accnt: Yvonne McDonald, solicitors: Amory's.
    Costume designTIERNEY, Marie
    Production designGERAGHTY, Mark
    Genre/CategoryUrban Drama
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleIN THE NAME OF THE FATHER
    Production companyHell's Kitchen
    Gabriel Byme
    Universal Pictures
    Country of originIreland
    Great Britain
    USA
    ProducerSHERIDAN, JIm
    LAPPIN, Arthur
    DirectorSHERIDAN, JIm
    Script/AdaptationGEORGE, Terry
    SHERIDAN, JIm
    PhotographyBIZIOU, Peter
    Sound recordingHORGAN, Kieran
    EditingHAMBLING, Gerry
    BARRETT, Clive
    Executive producerBYRNE, Gabriel
    Associate producerHERON, Nye
    Music composerJONES, Trevor
    Music performanceLondon Philharmonic Synthesizers
    Songs'In the Name of the Father', 'Billy Boola' by Bono, Friday, Maurice Seezer, perf. by Bono, Friday; 'Voodoo Child (Slight Return)' by Jimi Hendrix, pert. by The Jimi Hendrix Experience; 'Dedicated Follower of Fashion' by Ray Davies, perf. by The Kinks; 'Is This Love' by Bob Marley, perf. by Bob Marley and the Wailers; 'Whiskey in the Jar' by Phil Lynott, Eric Bell, Brian Downey, perf. by Thin Lizzy; 'You Made Me the Thief of Your Heart' by Bono, Friday, Seezer, perf. by Sinead O'Connor.
    CastDaniel Day-Lewis (Gerry Conlon), Emma Thompson (Gareth Peirce), Pete Postlethwaite (Giuseppe Conlon), John Lynch (Paul Hill), Mark Sheppard (Paddy Amstrong), Beatie Edney (Carole Richardson), Marie Jones (Sarah Conlon), Britta Smith (Annie Maguire), Corin Redgrave (Robert Dixon), Don Baker (Joe McAndrew), Paterson Joseph (Benbay), John BeNíield (Chief PO Barker), Frank Harper (Ronnie Smalls), Alison Crosbie (girl in pub), Philip King (Guildford soldier), Nye Heron, Seamus Moran, Billy Byrne (IRA men), Anthony Brophy (Danny), Frankie McCafferty (Tommo), Paul Warriner, Julian Walsh, Stuart Wolvenden (soldiers), Jo Connor (bin lady), Karen Carlisle (female rioter), Maureen McBride (mother), Jane Nolan (girl with baby), Laurence Griffin, Jason Murtagh (boys in riot), Kelly McKeavney (young girl), Joanna Irvine (Ann Conlon), Fiona Daly (IRA woman), Catherine Dunne (woman on balcony), Anna Meegan (Granny Conlon), Lean McCullagh (Bridie Conlon), Saffron Burrows (girl in commune), Jamie Harris (Deptford Jim), Barbara Mulcahy (Marian), Mick Tohill (man in bookies), Peter Sheridan Sr (manager of bookies), Joe McPartland (Charlie Burke), Stanley Townsend (hooker's driver), Gerald McSorley (Detective Pavis), Tim Perrin, Tony Denham, Rob Spendlove, Philip Davis, Martin Murphy, Richard Graham, Oliver Maguire, Maurice Kehoe (detectives), Rachael Dowling, Tina Kellegher (policewomen), Ronan Wilmot (Paddy Maguire), Maclean Burke (young Vincent Maguire), Joe Jeffers (young Patrick Maguire), Alistair Findlay (forensic scientist), Peter Howitt, Sean Lawlor, Brian De Salvo, Luke Hayden (remand prison officers), Aiden Grennell (trial judge), Daniel Massey (prosecutor), Bosco Hogan (defence counsel), Kenneth Edge (jury foreman), Aine O'Connor (Dixon's wife). Guy Carleton (prison-admissions officer), Dave Duffy, Martin Dunne (prison officers), Larry Murphy (old prison officer), Richard Michaelis, Mal Whyte, John Gallagher, Marcus Lynch (cockney prisoners), Jer O'Leary (prisoner John O'Brien), Joey Cashman, Alan Amsby, Paul Savage, Owen Conroy, Dee man Kole, Bernard Pellegrinetti, Emeka Okeki, Alan O'Connor, Mario McGovem, John Joe Fontana, Terry O'Neill, Joey Legaspi, Jimmie Bergin, John Higgins (prisoners), Malcolm Tiemey (Home Office official), lain Montague (leader of delegation), Paul Raynor (new chief prison officer), Clodagh Conroy (Dixon's secretary), Peter Sheridan (priest), Darren McHugh (Dixon's son), Peter Campbell (government official), Alan Barry (archivist Jenkins), Jonathan Ryan (Scottish governor), John Pickles (procedural court judge), Liam O'Callaghan (2nd archivist), Denys Hawthorne (appeal judge), Tom Wilkinson (appeal prosecutor).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration133
    Footage11999
    Format35mm
    Release date1993
    CopyIFA
    SummaryOn 5th October 1974 as customers arrive at a pub in Guildford, near London, a bomb placed there by the IRA explodes. Ten years later a woman solicitor, Gareth Peirce, listens to an audio tape of the testimony of Gerry Conlon, one of the four people, now known as the 'Guildford Four', who were convicted of the bombing. In flashback, Conlon is seen as a young man in Belfast where he is stealing lead from a roof. A British army patrol mistakes Conlon's playing on an imitation guitar as a rifle and they fire at him. Conlon runs through the streets with the army in pursuit. Since he has exposed a real IRA gang waiting to ambush the army, the IRA threaten to knee-cap him until his father, Giuseppe, rushes from his job as a bookie office clerk to plead with the IRA. Deciding to leave Belfast, Gerry takes the boat to England, and meets an old friend, Paul Hill, en route. In London, Hill introduces him to Patrick Armstrong, who is also from Belfast, and who is living with his girlfriend, Carole Richardson, in a squat. Hill and Conlon move into the squat, but following an argument about the British presence in Northern Ireland they are forced to leave. They spend the night of the Guildford bombing in a park with an Irish down-and-out, Charlie Burke, who talks to them about the dangers of living in London. They break into the flat of a prostitute and steal money. Gerry decides to return to Belfast, while the squat is raided by the police. Shortly afterwards, the police look for him in Belfast. In custody, Paul Hill confesses to the Guildford bombing and tells Gerry to do likewise. Gerry resists the pressure from the police until he is told that his father will be shot unless he confesses. During their trial, the prosecution case is almost exclusively based on Hill and Conlon's confessions and those of Patrick Armstrong and Carole Richardson. All four are found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment. In prison, Gerry shares a cell with his father, who has also been framed on terrorist charges, but who initiates a campaign to prove their innocence. Gerry takes little interest in the campaign, preferring to get high on LSD with other inmates, including a group of Rastafarians. The atmosphere in prison changes when an IRA member, Joe McAndrew, one of those who actually placed the Guildford bomb, arrives. Initially challenged by some of the other prisoners, McAndrew asserts his authority during a fight in which Gerry sides with him. Gerry is impressed by McAndrew's courage and discipline and he leads the other prisoners in a protest against prison conditions. When the chief prison officer. Barker, orders in the riot squad to quell a disturbance, McAndrew attacks him with a home-made flame thrower. Repelled by McAndrew's violence against Barker, Gerry distances himself from him and becomes actively involved in Giuseppe's campaign to prove their innocence. When Giuseppe dies in prison, Gerry becomes even more determined with the campaign. Gareth Peirce doggedly pursues the case and achieves a breakthrough when she discovers a file marked 'Not to be shown to the defence' in the police archives. This file contains a statement from Charlie Burke stating that he was with Hill and Conlon on the night of the bombing. In 1989, Peirce presents this suppressed evidence at an appeal court hearing. As a result, the sentences of the Guildford Four are quashed and the prisoners are freed. Outside the court, Gerry tells enthusiastic supporters that he intends to continue the fight to clear his father's name. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 16/12/1993. An extract from THE GODFATHER (USA 1972) is included in this film. This film was shot on location in Dublin, including Kilmainham Jail and the north inner city, Liverpool and at Shepperton Studios. This film was awarded a Golden Bear at the 1992 Berlin Film Festival and was nominated for seven Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director (Jim Sheridan), Best Adapted Screenplay (Sheridan, Terry George), Best Actor (Daniel Day-Lewis), Best Supporting Actor (Pete Postlethwaite), Best Supporting Actress (Emma Thompson), Best Film Editing (Gerry Hambling).
    ReferenceFI No. 38:12-14; FI No. 39:24-5; IT 11/12/1993:W1; IT 17/12/1993:7, 15;
    IT 18/12/1993:2; IT 24/12/1993:4; IT 31/12/1993:7; IT 15/1/1994:W1, W2; IT 25/1/1994:13; IT 10/2/1994:1, 10, 12, 13; IT 22/2/1994:2; IT 23/2/1994:12; IT 10/3/1994:11; IT 19/3/1994:W1; IT 15/6/1994:1; S&S Mar 1994:41-42; SI 11/7/1993:L1, L6; SI 12/12/1993:13; SI 19/12/1993:7, L9; SI 16/1/1994:L7; SI 23/1/1994:L10; ST /12/1993:A6, B6.

    Daily Post, ‘Film bomb blast rocks disused pub’, report of filming on location in England (Jane Woodhead).

    Evening Press, 11/3/93:5, ‘Belfast comes to Dublin’, report of filming on location (John Kilraine).

    The Star, 12/3/93:17, ‘...battle zone for a new blockbuster movie’, feature of filming on location.

    The Star, 3/4/93:12, ‘Byrne is too busy to make top film’, report of actor Gabriel Byrne being too busy to act in film.

    Sunday Independent, 4/4/93, ‘Jail tail of Mr Pussy’, report of female impersonators acting in the film.

    Sunday Life, 4/4/93, ‘Four film sex sensation’, report of female impersonators acting in film (John Moore).

    The Star, 5/4/93:10, ‘Emma in row over Guildford Four film’, controversy over actress Emma Thompson appearing in film.

    Evening Standard, 6/4/93:12, ‘From darling to rebel?’, report of anticipated controversy over actress Emma Thompson acting in film (Neil Norman).

    The Star, 9/4/93:14, ‘Don heads cue’, report of musician Don Baker getting hurt on set of film (Terry McGeehan).

    Sunday Independent, 11/4/93, ‘Quotes of the Week’, quotes from actress Emma Thompson defending her choice to act in film.

    Sunday World, 11/4/93:4, ‘Mr Pussy - the transvestite jailbird in Guildford 4 movie’, report of female impersonators acting in film.

    Sunday Press, 11/4/93:7, ‘Prison debut for Don Baker’, report of musician Don Baker appearing in film (Richie Taylor).

    RTE Guide, 7/5/93:4-5, ‘Out to Shock?’, report of media reaction to actress Emma Thompson appearing in film (Michael Doherty).

    Irish Times, 8/5/93, ‘The Shooting of Gerry Conlon’, incomplete interview with Jim Sheridan about making the film (Michael Dwyer).

    The Times, 20/5/93, ‘Books and films keep the Guildford Four case alive’, report of media attention to case ongoing (Richard Duce).

    Sunday Independent (Living and Leisure), 11/7/93:1,6, ‘Scenes from the cutting room floor’, account of experiences on location during making of film (Lise Hand).

    New York Times, 29/7/93:3, ‘In The Name Of The Father puts justice under the lens’, explanation of the background to the film and how the cast reacted initially to their roles (Mark Burnam).

    Premiere, Sept. 1993, ‘Leader of the A’, interview with film's co-producer Gabriel Byrne (John Clarke).

    Liverpool Echo, 1/10/93, ‘Driven Up The Wall’, incomplete report of apology to location resident for mural painted on a wall (Alex Hunt).

    Hollywood Reporter, 6/10/1993, ‘Father Uni's amen to the holiday season’,
    preview article on premiere screening of the film (Martin A. Grove).

    Premiere, Nov. 1993, short preview article.

    Evening Standard, 3/12/93:3, ‘Rebel film without an IRA cause’, preview (Alexander Walker).

    The Ten Best Movies of 1993, Sixty Second Preview mentioning the film (Jeff Craig).

    Daily Telegraph, 10/12/93:18, ‘Daniel in a political lion's den’, preview of film (Hugh Davies).

    Publicity for Irish premiere of the film (Eilish MacPhillips).

    Production notes: includes: about the story, about the cast, and about the filmmakers.

    Belfast Telegraph, 16/12/93:18, ‘Film's cry for an end to violence’, review (Brian Hunter).

    Ulster News Letter, 17/12/93:21, ‘Fear Not’, review (Robin Young).

    Screen International, 17/12-6/1/94, review (Ana Maria Bahiana).

    Variety, 20/12/93, ‘Miscarried justice...’, review (Todd McCarthy).

    Rolling Stone, 20/12/93, review (Peter Travers).

    Hollywood Reporter, 20/12/936,16, (David Hunter).

    Variety, 23/12/93:7-9, ‘Schindler, Piano Globe Foes’, list of Golden globe nominations including those for In The Name Of The Father (Brian Lowry).

    USA Today, 23/12/93:1D-2D, ‘In the name of acting: Daniel Day-Lewis lives his roles’, profile of actor Daniel Day-Lewis (Stephen Schaefer).

    New York Times, 26/12/93:2, ‘The Good Guys, The Bad Guys and the Irish Guys’, review of film (Francis X. Clines).

    Time, 27/12/93:70-2, ‘Tidings of Job’, review of film's for the season, including In The Name Of The Father (Richard Corliss).

    New York Times, 29/12/93:11,19, ‘The Sins of a Son Are Visited on His Father’, favourable review of film, cast and credits (Janet Maslin).

    New York Daily News, 29/12/93:Cover, 43, ‘Life in the Belfast Lane”, review of In the Name of the Father with emphasis on Daniel Day-Lewis's performance (Jami Bernard).

    New York Newsday, 29/12/93:241, ‘Irish Martyrs, British Villains’, review (John Anderson).

    Daily News, 29/12/93, ‘Father gripping, overwrought’, review (Bob Strauss).

    New York Post, 29/12/93:32, ‘A Case of Holy Terror’, review (Michael Medved).

    USA Today, 29/12/93, ‘Day-Lewis' spirited In The Name Of The Father’, review (Mike Clark).

    Star Ledger, 29/12/93:2, ‘Shocking true story turns more astounding on screen’, review (Bob Campbell).

    Los Angeles Times, 29/12/93:Cover, F8, ‘The Right Actor for the Wrong Man’, favourable review of film (Kenneth Turan).

    Wall Street Journal, 30/12/93, Leisure & Arts, review.

    Film Ireland, 12/93-1/94:12-4, ‘Getting out of jail’, interview with director Jim Sheridan about film, directing and Irish film industry (Hugh Linehan).

    Sunday Times, Jan. 1994, ‘Rocking the boat in a feeble film world’, filmmaker writes about Irish film industry (Eoghan Harris).

    Big Issue, Jan. 1995:2, ‘In The Name Of Sheridan’, interview with director Jim Sheridan about Irish film industry (Dearbhla Regan).

    Tatler, Jan. 1994, ‘Bulging Biceps’, mention of film in short piece about difference between American and British made films.

    People, 10/1/94:1, review (R.N.).

    Sunday Business Post, 2/1/94, ‘In the name of the facts’, critical review of film questioning why it should deviate from facts (Tom McGurk).

    Time, 3/1/94:70, ‘The Best Movies of 1993’, Top ten chart of 1993 movies in U.S., including In The Name Of The Father.

    Daily Mail, 10/1/94, ‘Family's anger at lies in the Guildford Four movie’, report of criticism levelled at film by family.

    Evening Press, 13/1/94:6, ‘In The Name Of The Truth’, report of family's criticism of film (Maggie O'Kane, John Mullin, David Pallister).

    Irish Times (Weekend), 15/1/94, ‘Film: facts and fictions’, commentary on films portraying real life events such as the Guildford Four story (Michael Dwyer).

    Sunday Independent, 16/1/94, ‘In the name of a damn good yarn’, opinion on why the truth of the Guildford Four story did not make for a good film (Gene Kerrigan).

    Irish Times, 22/1/94, ‘Lounge bar discussions...’, discussion of the effects of the controversy surrounding the "truth" of the film plot (Kathy Sheridan).

    Sunday Tribune, 23/1/94:B1-2, ‘In The Name Of The Mother’, report on how unhappy the Maguire family were with the portrayal of events in the film (Susan McKay).

    Belfast Telegraph, 25/1/94, ‘Tory slams Commons screening of Conlon film’,
    report of planned screening of film at Westminster (Desmond McCartan).

    RTE Guide, 29/1-5/2/94:2, ‘All About Emma’, profile of actress Emma Thompson who acted in the film (Michael Doherty).

    The Face, Feb. 1994, ‘The failure of...’, review.

    Sight and Sound, Feb. 1994, The Business, reaction to columnist's criticisms of the film.

    Irish Independent, Feb.1994, ‘Bitter row over movie accuracy’, controversy over film's accuracy continues (Annemaria McEneaney).

    I.D., Feb. 1994, ‘Daniel Day-Lewis's second appearance...’, review of film.

    TV Hits, Feb.1994, ‘Daniel Day-Lewis is starring...’, inaccurate paragraph mentioning film.

    Premiere, Feb.1994, short review and still from film.

    Cosmopolitan, Feb. 1994, paragraph review and trivia paragraph about the film.

    Smash Hits, 2/2/94, review (Anita Naik).

    Sunday Times, 6/2/94:Cover, 2&4, ‘The Camera that lies’, critical piece on film's accuracy (Robert Kee).

    Girl About Town, 7/1/94 (Julie Stevens).

    Big Issue, 8/2/94, ‘Film: In The Name Of The Father’, review.

    Time Out, 9/2/94, ‘Film: Preview - Doing justice’, preview (Trevor Johnston).

    Irish Independent, 9/2/94:12, ‘Not always in the name of the truth’, account of the inaccuracies portrayed in the film (Robert Kee).

    Irish Times, 10/2/94, ‘Oscar Nominations’, report of film nominated for seven Oscars.

    Irish Independent, 10/2/94, ‘Oscars: it's the field of dreams’, article on 66th Academy Awards nominations (Philip Molloy).

    Irish Times, 10/2/94, Cover, Irish film receives seven Oscar nominations; Nominations; Jubilations!; A Small country projects itself on the big screen of quality world cinema’, details of nominations for awards and a piece on the knock-on effects for the Irish film industry (Michael Dwyer, Hugh Linehan).

    Irish Independent, 10/2/94, ‘Screen kudos’, editorial on nominations for Irish films and actor.

    Irish Independent, 10/2/94, ‘Oscar nomination for Da’, account of Jim Sheridan's post-nomination party (Miriam Lord).

    Moving Pictures, 10/2/94, ‘Marketing Focus: In the Name Of The Father (UIP)’, feature on the hype surrounding the film (SH.).

    Daily Telegraph, 11/2/94:18, ‘History blurred in soft focus’, review (Hugo Davenport).

    Today, 11/2/94:32, ‘Daniel's odyssey...’, review (Angie Errigo).

    Daily Express, 12/2/94:21, ‘In the name of the truth?’, review (Rachel Simpson).

    The Observer, 13/2/94:6-7, ‘Tricks of history and memory’, review (Philip French).

    Sunday Tribune, 13/2/94:A6, ‘Jim Sheridan: "We won't be disappointed"’; Daniel Day-Lewis: contrasts on celluloid; No chance of leaks of possible winners’, three articles: Jim Sheridan on cost of producing movies and his three years deal with Universal, review of actor Daniel Day-Lewis's career, and the build-up to the Oscars' ceremony (Maeve Sheehan, Ann Marie Hourihane, Brenda Power).

    London Independent, 13/2/94, ‘Jim Sheridan's rage of innocence’, review (Quentin Curtis).

    Sunday Press, 13/2/94:31, ‘Sheridan's triple whammy’, profile of director Jim Sheridan (William Rocke).

    Sunday Express, 13/2/94:47, ‘Capturing true injustice’, review (Sheridan Morley).

    Sunday Telegraph, 1994, ‘Guildford Four saviour says blockbuster film does not do the saga justice’, solicitor connected with Guildford Four case criticises portrayal of procedures and court room scenes in film (Valerie Elliott).

    Irish Times, 16/2/94:12, ‘The facts of history are shaped by the needs of the present’, columnist's opinion on revisionist films, including In the Name Of The Father (Fintan O'Toole).

    Film Ireland, Feb/Mar. 1994:24-5, ‘In The Name Of The Father’, review (Mike Collins).

    Sky, March 1994, review.

    Options, March 1994, ‘Coming Up Soon’, review.

    GQ, March 1994, review.

    Q Magazine, March 1997, review (Sue Elliott).

    Sight and Sound, March 1994:41-2, review (Martin Bright).

    Sight and Sound, March 1994:7, ‘Jurassic Justice’, solicitor's opinion on legal issues represented in film (Michael Mansfield QC).

    Empire, March 1994 (Kim Newman).

    Film West, July 1994:14-5, ‘The Far side - American Letter’ (Joan Dean).

    Vertigo, Spring 1994:52-3 (David Pallister).

    Cineaste, Oct. 1994:44-7, long review (Martin McLoone).

    Sunday Times, 13/2/94:4-5, ‘Like father, love son’, review of film, concentrating especially on two main characters (Julie Burchill).

    Evening Herald, 2/2/94:10, ‘Guildford film got it all wrong - MP’, British MPs reaction to the film after Westminster screening (Bernard Purcell).

    Irish Independent, Feb.1994, ‘In the name of the drama’, article looking at different aspects of film, including the Irish audiences' reaction to it (Michael Sheridan).

    Irish Post, 29/1/94, ‘Fact a casualty?’, discusses Maquire family's reaction to film before the screening at Westminster (Fionn Mac Cool).

    No. 34. Notice of Motions: 26th January 1994 (1591) 449 Screening of In The Name Of The Father. Motion put forward in Westminster for screening of film for Members and Peers.

    New York Daily News, 17/1/94:54-5, ‘The Troubles He's Seen’, favourable review of the film (John Powers).

    Newsweek, 3/1/94:63, ‘Injustice and cruel fates’, review (David Ansen).

    Sunday Telegraph, 9/1/94, ‘A law unto herself’, profile of Gareth Peirce, solicitor for the Guildford Four (Carol Sarler).

    Daily Mail, 10/1/94, ‘Conlon relatives attack Guildford Four film lies’, Maguire family critical of film (Peter Rose).

    Los Angeles Times, 7/1/94, ‘The Fire This Time’, interview with actor Daniel Day-Lewis, and profile of director Jim Sheridan (Rick Marin).

    New York Times, 1/2/94:5, ‘Under the spell of magic and the green; Ireland finds the green and weaves a spell’, feature on Irish films including director Jim Sheridan's (Janet Roach).

    Vanity Fair, Jan. 1994:112-5, 125-7, ‘London Burning’, feature on actors Emma Thompson and Daniel Day-Lewis, and director Jim Sheridan during making of film (Graham Boynton).

    Chicago Tribune, 13/1/94,’ And justice for some’, review of film (Michael Wilmington).

    Boston Globe, 14/1/94:73, 78-9, ‘In the Name Of The Father merits an amen’, review (Jay Carr).

    Boston Herald, 14/1/94:2, ‘IRA Drama has the ring of truth thanks to powerful performance by Daniel Day-Lewis’, review of 'In the Name of the Father' which focuses on Daniel Day-Lewis's performance (James Verniere).

    Philadelphia Daily News, 14/1/94:50, 53, ‘Father needs less driving and more drive’, review (Gary Thompson).

    Washington Post, 14/1/94, ‘In the Name of the Father: Unholy Justice’, review
    (Rita Kempley).

    Irish Times (Weekend), 7/3/98, ‘Food on film’, report on location catering, including quote about In the Name Of The Father (Louise East).

    Sunday Business Post, 10/5/98:29, ‘Bright shining light’, interview with Terry George, scriptwriter for In The Name Of The Father (Marion McKeone).

    Sunday Times (Culture), 6/12/98:57, TV listings.

    Daily Telegraph, 15/3/94:16, ‘An Oscar for Pete who?’, article on actor Pete Postlethwaite (David Gritten).

    Irish Times (Magazine), 21/04/01:47 (Tony Clayton-Lea).
    DistributorUIP (GB)
    KeywordsTroubles
    Republicanism
    Bombings
    Nationalism
    Miscarriages of Justice
    British Legal System
    Prison
    Family
    Ftaher Son Relationships
    Courtrooms
    LocationNorthern Ireland
    England
    Production creditsp.c: Hell's Kitchen/Gabriel Byrne Universal Pictures, p/d: Jim Sheridan, exec. p: Gabriel Byrne, co-p: Arthur Lappin, assoc. p: Nye Heron, sc: Terry George, Sheridan, 2nd unit d: Terry George, p. co-ord: Niamh Nolan, (UK) Cate Arbeid (UK), Patsy De Lord, p.m: Mary Alleguen, 8B| Kathy Sykes (UK), loc m: John McDonnell, 2nd unit: Christian McWilliams, Howard Gibbins (UK), Keith Hatcher, cast: Patsy Pollock, WE, Nuala Moiselle, a.d: Gerry Toomey, Mick Walsh, Robert Quinn, Luke Johnston, Nick McCarthy (2nd unit), Simon Moseley, Peter McAleese HiS (UK), Des Hughes, dop: Peter Biziou, c. op: Des Whelan, Mike Proudfoot (2nd), Sean Corcoran (2nd unit), Roddie Barren (UK 2nd), video crew: Joe O'Byrne, Brendan Campbell, video playback op: John Gleeson, ed: Gerry Hambling, a. ed: Clive Barrett, p.dsgn.: Caroline Amies, art d: Rick Butler, Tom Brown (UK), draughtsman: Conor Devlin, scenic artist: Fred Gray, sp. effs. super: Joss Williams, senior effs. tech: Clive Beard, David Knowles, Michael Dawson, Gerry Johnston, m: Trevor Jones, m.d: David Snell, m.p: London Philharmonic Synthesizers - Trevor Jones, Guy Dagul, Phil Todd (solo Ewi), orch: Jones, Jeff Atmajian, m. ed: Bill Abbott, m. cnslt: Gavin Friday, songs: Tn the Name of the Father', 'Billy Boola' by Bono, Friday, Maurice Seezer, perf. by Bono, Friday; 'Voodoo Child (Slight Return)' by Jimi Hendrix, pert. by The Jimi Hendrix Experience; 'Dedicated Follower of Fashion' by Ray Davies, perf. by The Kinks; 'Is This Love' by Bob Marley, perf. by Bob Marley and the Wailers; 'Whiskey in the Jar' by Phil Lynott, Eric Bell, Brian Downey, perf. by Thin Lizzy; 'You Made Me the Thief of Your Heart' by Bono, Friday, Seezer, perf. by Sinead O'Connor, cost: Joan Bergin, ward: Sue Wain, Janet O'Leary, make-up: Toni Delany, hair: Anne Dunne, title d: Alan Hall, titles/opticals: Peerless Camera Company, s. ed: Ron Davis, a. s. ed: Hollywood Way, Louis L Edemann, Chuck Neely, dial. ed: Pat Brennan, ADR ed: Teddy Mason, (Foley) Rocky Phelan, s: Kieran Horgan, ADR rd: Peter Lacey, Foley rd: Kevin Tayler, Andrea Lakin, Sam Kaufman, 2nd unit s: Brendan Campbell, Peter Sutton, (m.) Roger King, s. re-rd: Andy Nelson, Anna Behlmer, Roger King (m.), Foley art.: Jenny Lee-Wright, Jean Sheffield, courtroom adv: Marion McKeone, Bernard Phelan, stunt co-ord: Bill Weston, stunts: Patrick Condren, Alan Walsh, Tim Condren, David Cronnelly, Gabe Cronnelly, Clive Curtis, Jim Dowdall, Steve Street Griffin, Paul Heasman, Dominic Hewitt, Sy Hollands, Paul Kelly, Mark Lisbon, Donal O'Farrell, Greg Powell, Gary Powell, Lee Sheward, armourer: John McKenna.
    Art directionBUTLER, Rick
    BROWN, Tom
    Costume designBERGIN, Joan
    Production designAMIES, Caroline
    Genre/CategoryPolitical Thriller
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleAFTER '68
    Production companyMammoth Films
    Dublin Institute of Technology
    Cornerstone Pictures
    SponsorRadio Telefís Éireann/RTE
    Arts Council of Ireland
    FilmBase/RTE Short Films Award
    Cultural Traditions Group
    Community Relations Council (Northern Ireland)
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerBURKE, Stephen
    McDONNELL, John
    DirectorBURKE, Stephen
    Script/AdaptationBURKE, Stephen
    PhotographyGILLIGAN, Donal
    Sound recordingO'DONNELL, Damien
    CHALMERS, Joe
    EditingBURKE, Stephen
    FITZGERALD, Paul
    Music composerMCGRATH, Maurice
    Music performanceMCGRATH, Maurice
    Songs'Bless You' by Laine Baker, 'The Fly' by Madara/White, perf. by Brendan Bowyer and The Royal Showband; 'Georgie Porgie' by Stuart, perf. by Dickie Rock and the Miami Showband; 'We Could' by Bryant, 'No One Will Ever Know' by Foree/Rose, perf. by Sonny Knowles and the Pacific Showband; 'She Moved through the Fair' (trad.), vocals by Eithne Flynn, arrg. by Derek Cronin; 'Walking the Streets in the Rain' by Hamgan/Conlan/Prendergast, perf. by Butch Moore and the Capitol Showband.
    CastDeirdre Molloy (Frieda), Ger Ryan (Frieda's mother), Fidelma Murphy (Mrs Craig), Dermott Martin (Tommy Halpin), Brian McGrath (Mr Craig), Aine Harris (Frieda's friend), Therese Ballantine (smoking nun), Susan Caldwell (nun in staffroom), Barbara Mulcahy (nun in classroom), 5th yr class 1992, Cross and Passion Convent, Dublin (Deny schoolgirls), Anne Brogan (biology teacher), Gertie Alien (principal), Cecil Bell (Mr Craig's assistant), Anne McGeown (mother's friend), Ritchie Donnelly (news reader). Billy Doherty (Dermott), Shaun Doherty (Martin), Stephen Burke (Eamonn), Anthony Walsh, Stephen Kingston (coughing rioters), Peter Wamock, Brendan Courtney, Ger Stafford (RUC men), Paul Somers, Jarleth Devaney, Stephen Gault, Nemara Hennigan, Eileen Foyle (rioters), David Butler (arrestee), Tess McDaid, Lena Cooney (housewives, tea), Bernard Walsh (photographer). Hazel Ryan (Deirdre Reilly), Joseph Rorke (farmer), 4th yr 1992, St Mary's Convent, Baldoyle (Donegal schoolgirls), Nora Keneghan (nun), Sandra Byrne (squatter), Gregory Byrne, Edel Byrne (children), Mr Byrne (man on street), Jim Furlong (taxi driver), John McKenna, Paul Somers (IRA men).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration25
    Format16mm
    Release date1993
    TX channelRTE 2
    TX date07/06/1995
    CopyIFA/RTE
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryIn Derry, fourteen-year-old Frieda, the product of a brief liaison between a Catholic woman and a Protestant city councillor, Mr Craig, retells their story which begins in the 1960s. Though receiving money from Frieda's father, her mother goes to see Mrs Craig, Frieda's father's wife, who, to Frieda's discomfort, then visits her. At this time the Civil Rights struggle begins, and Frieda's mother is assaulted by the RUC during marches, including on the four-day march from Belfast to Derry which was ambushed at Burntollet Bridge by loyalists. Her father joins the newly-formed Ulster Defence Regiment, while in 1971 the Provisional IRA kill a soldier at the end of their street. By Bloody Sunday 1972, when thirteen civilians are killed by British soldiers, her mother can take no more and they move to a cottage across the border in Donegal. Her father is killed while on patrol and Frieda and her mother return to Derry for the funeral. On their way back to Donegal, Frieda sees an ex-boyfriend with a rifle at an IRA checkpoint in the city. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 9/10/1993 (Cork Film Festival).
    This film won the Best European Short Award at the 1993 Cork
    Film Festival. Actuality material of events in Northern Ireland in the 1960s
    and the 1970s are included in this film.
    TX In The Debut Slot On Rte Network 2 On 7/6/1995.
    ReferenceFI No. 37:10; n No. 38:33; IT 3/6/1995:W5.
    KeywordsTroubles
    LocationNorthern Ireland
    Production creditsp.c: Mammoth Films. Made in association with Dublin Institute of Technology, Cornerstone Pictures and Radio Telefís Eireann. With assistance from the Arts Council of Ireland, FilmBase/RTE Short Films Award, Cultural Traditions Group, Community Relations Council (Northern Ireland), p: Stephen Burke, John McDonnell, d/sc: Burke, dop: Donal Gilligan, art d: Jean Kerr, ed: Burke, Paul Fitzgerald, p.dsgn.: Mark Geraghty, p.m: (Deny) Tom Collins, p. co-ord: Paul Donovan, Fran Byrne, m/m.p: Maurice McGrath, songs: 'Bless You' by Laine Baker, 'The Fly' by Madara/White, perf. by Brendan Bowyer and The Royal Showband; 'Georgie Porgie' by Stuart, perf. by Dickie Rock and the Miami Showband; 'We Could' by Bryant, 'No One Will Ever Know' by Foree/Rose, perf. by Sonny Knowles and the Pacific Showband; 'She Moved through the Fair' (trad.), vocals by Eithne Flynn, arrg. by Derek Cronin; 'Walking the Streets in the Rain' by Hamgan/Conlan/Prendergast, perf. by Butch Moore and the Capitol Showband, 1st a.d: Robert Quinn, 2nd a.d: Charlotte Somers, co-2nd a.d: David Byrne, 3rd a.d: Catherine Dunne, trainee a.d: Daisy Fortune, Tara Mullen, a. art d: Olwen Weekes, art dept. trainees: Ronan Callanan, Liz Byrnes, make-up: Jennifer Hegarty, cost: Orla O'Brien, a. cost: Eimear Ní Mhaoldomnaigh, s: Damien O'Donnell, Joe Chalmers, s. dsgn: Paul Fitzgerald, Jack 'Mix' Moore, a.s. ed: Siobhan Gardiner, Siobhan O'Shea, dub. mix: Pat Hayes, a. dub. mix: Paco Hayes, mix. engrs: Neil O'Sullivan, Butch Moore, engrs: Derek Cronin, Peter Mee, Karen Brady, loc. m: Dougal Cousins, cont: Catherine Morris, cast: Ros Hubbard, video a: John Gleeson, sp. effs: Mick Keams, Conor Coughlan, 1st a.c: P J Dillon, 2nd a.c: John Moor, trainee a.c: Ciaran Burke, dolly grip: Harry Purdue, a. grip: Mel Cannon, gaffer: Brian Sheridan, elec: Garret Baldwin, Peter O'Toole, Stephen Bruen, Anthony Comiskey, armourer: John McKenna, cnstr. m: John Lamon, carpenter: Barry Cunningham, painter: Robbie Richardson, cnstr. adv: Russ Bailey, props: Daragh Lewis, Weekes, stills: Dave O'Shea, a. ed: Ciaran Burke, sc. collaboration: Weekes, Tom Collins, title dsgn: Harrison G Purdue, D V O'Dea, uniforms: Maurice Angels, archive sources: RTE, BBC.
    Art directionKERR, Jean
    Costume designO'BRIEN, Orla
    NÍ MHAOLDOMHNAIGH, Eimer
    Production designGERAGHTY, Mark
    Genre/CategoryShort Film Drama
    Political Drama

    TitleALL THINGS BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL
    Production companyHilltown Ltd.
    Good Film Company
    SponsorBBC Northern Ireland.
    Screen Two
    Bórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    Radio Telefís Éireann/RTE
    European Script Fund
    Country of originIreland
    Northern ireland
    Great Britain
    ProducerMcGUINNESS, Katy
    GREY, Donna
    DirectorDEVLIN, Barry
    Script/AdaptationDEVLIN, Barry
    PhotographyQUINN, Declan
    Sound recordingKIRBY, Godfrey
    EditingHEALY, Maurice
    Executive producerCOOPER, Robert
    McGUINNESS, Paul
    SHIVAS, Mark
    Associate producerGARLAND, Michael
    Songs'The Ugly Duckling' by Frank Loesser, perf. by Danny Kaye; 'Bring Flowers of the Fairest', 'The Laughing Policeman' by Bill Grey, perf. by Charles Penrose; 'All Things Bright And Beautiful', 'There's a Friend for Little Children' perf. by Uncle Mac, Barbara Mullen, Dennis Wright; 'Typewriter' by/perf. by Leroy Anderson; 'Nellie The Elephant' by Peter Hart, Ralph Butler perf by Mandy Miller; 'Christopher Robin at Buckingham Palace' by A A Milne, Ralph Butler, nperf by Anne Stephens
    CastTom Wilkinson (Father McAteer), Kevin McNally (Tommy O'Neill), Gabrielle Reidy (Maeve O'Neill), Lorraine Pilkington (Eileen O'Neill), Ciaran Fitzgerald (Barry O'Neill), Gabriel Byrne (the Good Thief), Conall Toland (Francie), John-Joe Hartigan (Charlie), Kevin McGilloway (Phelim), Caoileann McEnhill (Sarah O'Neill), Barbara Adair (Miss McKeown), Marie Jones (Ellie Coyle), Christine McGonagle (Rosie), Marie Ward (Gretta), Dearbhaile O'Reilly (Bridgie), Frances Quinn (Miss Rocks), Robert Taylor ('B' special sergeant), Ruairi Conaghan ('B' Special), Jimmy Keogh (Tarry Coyle), Lalor Roddy (Pat Joe Coyle), Gabriel Brady (1st man in pub), Seamus Ball (labourer), Brendan Cauldwell (fisherman), Karl O'Neill (Big Jack), Phil Kelly (man at grotto), Paul Devlin, Jack Devlin, Kate Devlin (children at door), Jean Costello (woman with sick child), George Shane (cardinal's secretary), Garrett Keogh (religious inspector), Paddy Scully (Kenneth Graham, the barber), Sean Rafferty (Father Sheridan), John Keegan (Father Donnelly), Pat Leavy (woman at grotto), Dave Carey (1st medical attendant), Gerry Sullivan (2nd medical attendant).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourEastman Colour
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration90
    Footage8996
    Format35mm
    Release date1994
    TX channelBBC 2
    TX date10/04/1993
    CopyIFA
    BBC
    NFTVA
    SummaryIn 1954 in Eglish, Co Tyrone, ten-year-old Barry O'Neill and other altar boys are taken by Fr McAteer to visit a grotto to the Virgin Mary built in the rival lower parish. Fr McAteer attacks his own parishioners from the pulpit for not contributing enough to build their own grotto. Barry is impressed by Fr McAteer's commitment to the grotto, but his family are cynical of the project. At dinner, Barry's father. Tommy, a publican, reports that 'B' Specials had visited him the previous night looking for information about IRA activity in Dungannon. Shortly afterwards, Barry comes across a man hiding in a barn. The man tells Barry not to tell anyone about him, though Barry, a daydreamer, believes him to be Barabbas, The Good Thief, who is the subject of a painting in the church. Barry is told by his mother that he has been accepted into a boarding school, but Barry wants to stay to help Fr McAteer's campaign for the grotto. He asks the statue of the Virgin Mary in the church for guidance and help. A neighbour, Ellie Coyle, is raided by the 'B' Specials searching for an IRA man who is a relation others. It is revealed by a photograph at her house that the person Barry knows as The Good Thief is the IRA suspect. Barry tells Fr McAteer that he has spoken to The Good Thief and the Virgin Mary, though his convincing statements have emanated from a programme on the radio. Barry is soon regarded as a prophet, the parishioners become more devoted to the church, and Fr McAteer gets the grotto built. The affair has angered Barry's father, who forbids his son from visiting the grotto. When Barry goes to the grotto, his father follows him there and pushes Fr McAteer into the grotto. In the meantime, the cardinal's investigating commissioners have decided that the apparition is bogus and that Fr McAteer should be replaced. Barry tells his sister Eileen that the Virgin is imaginary, but that The Good Thief is not. Barry goes to the deserted grotto and apologises to the statue that he had hoped would be like the one at Fatima. A new curate is appointed by the cardinal to replace Fr McAteer and he reads a letter from the cardinal in which he pronounces that there was no apparition in the ge. Near his home, Barry is confronted by a mentally-disturbed Fr McAteer who pleads with him to confirm that he saw the Virgin, but Barry runs away. After Eileen has left for boarding school, Barry finds a gun in the loft where The Good Thief stayed. He hears shots, and goes outside where he comes across an overturned van guarded by 'B' Specials. Inside, The Good Thief and a companion lie dead. Barry runs to the grotto which has been destroyed and he apologises to the broken statue. Asked by an old woman whether it was he who saw the Virgin, he tells her that it was not, but that it was a little child. As the summer holidays end, Barry is being taken to the boarding school when his father takes him to Fr McAteer's house as the priest is taken away by two men. (V). "A number of films about Irish childhood made in the 1980s and 1990s focused on experiences in the 1950s or early 1960s. Until Neil Jordan's murderous and dysfunctional Francie in The Butcher Boy (1997), many of these films, including this one, recall lovingly (even nostalgically) an idyllic childhood which is disturbed only by adult skepticism. As would happen with adult films of the 1990s, historical or contemporary political events also impinge, in this case when ten-year-old Barry (Ciaran Fitzgerald, above) meets an IRA man on-the-run whom he mistakes for Barabbas (Gabriel Byrne), who is later killed by 'B' Specials, Northern Ireland's military police. Forced to reject as bogus his belief in the apparition of Our Lady, Barry witnesses the by-now deranged local priest being lead away, while his own innocence comes to an end when an old woman asks him whether it was he who saw the Virgin. No, he replies, it was a little child".
    NoteIR Rel 10/3/1994 (charity premiere); TX RTE 14/3/1994; TX BBC 16/3/1994.
    The budget for this film was £1.5 million. The main location for
    this film was Donaghmore, Co Laois. The writer/director Barry Devlin
    grew up in the village of Ardboe, Co Tyrone, where there was a reported
    apparition of the Virgin Mary in 1954 which attracted wide attention.
    ReferenceFI No. 40, Apr/May 1994:26; FI No. 40:8-9, 26; IT 13/3/1994:W5; MP Int No. 148, 12/8/1993:17; MP Int No. 149, 19/8/1993:38; S&S Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1994:61-2; Var 6/6/1994:43.
    Variety, 6 June 1994: 43, review, David Stratton.
    Screen International, 8th Oct 1993, review by Paddy Barrett.
    FI, Apr/May 1994: 8-9, 'Bright Spark', interview with Barry Devlin by
    Jocelyn Clarke.
    FI, Apr/May 1994: 26, review by Martin McCabe.
    'Sources of Inspiration' Lecture 3, 9 Mar 1994: 1-32, Lecture given by Barry Devlin to a script development workshop.
    DistributorBBC TV
    KeywordsApparitions
    Virgin Mary
    Childhood
    Rural Ireland
    1950s
    Catholicism
    Priests
    IRA
    B Specials
    LocationEglish
    Tyrone
    Production creditsp.c: Hilltown Ltd. For Good Film Company. For BBC Northern Ireland. For Screen Two. In association with Bord Scannan na hEireann/Irish Film Board and Radio TelefÍs Eireann. Developed with support from the European Script Fund, p: Katy McGuinness, exec. p: Robert Cooper, Paul McGuinness, Mark Shivas, d/sc: Barry Devlin, line p: Donna Grey, assoc. p: Michael Garland, p. co-ord: Yvonne McDonald, loc. m: Des Martin, sc. super: Rosaline Kane, dop: Declan Quinn, p.dsgn.: Grant Hicks, ed: Maurice Healy, super, art d: Eddy Andres, art d: Karen Wakefield, set dec: Josie MacAvin, focus puller: Simon Richards, clapper loader: Nicko Cummins, grip: Richard Broom, c. dept trainee: Simon Walsh, cast: John Hubbard, Ros Hubbard, cast. a: Lisa-Anne Porter, ward. a: Daniel Grace, a.d: lan Madden, 2nd. a.d: Cliff Lanning, 3rd a.d: Tracy O'Connor, m. co-ord: Jim Lockhart, songs: 'The Ugly Duckling' by Frank Loesser, perf. by Danny Kaye; 'Bring Flowers of the Fairest', 'The Laughing Policeman' by Bill Grey, perf. by Charles Penrose; 'All Things Bright And Beautiful', 'There's a Friend for Little Children' perf. by Uncle Mac, Barbara Mullen, Dennis Wright; 'Typewriter' by/perf. by Leroy Anderson; 'Nellie The Elephant' by Peter Hart, Ralph Butler perf by Mandy Miller; 'Christopher Robin at Buckingham Palace' by A A Milne, Ralph Butler, perf by Anne Stephens, s: Godfrey Kirby, digital s. ed: Chris Graver, boom op.: Paul Alan Filby, dub. mix: Keith Marriner, Foley art.: Dianne Greaves, Jack Stew, cost: Lindy Hemming, cost. a: Sharon Long, chief make-up/hair: Christine Blundell, a. make-up/hair: Hilary Martin, title dsgn: William Finney, prop.buyer: Sunny Mulligan, props master: Gordon Fitzgerald, stand-by props: Pat Harkins, Piero Jamieson, armourer: John McKenna, post.p. super: Winston McCartney, stills: Simon Mein, a. stills: Alex Bailey, p. accnt: Paul Fennelly, chargehand dresser. Stewart Cunningham, cnstr. m: Ross Balfour, painters: Bob Richardson, Robbie Richardson, lain Geddes, plasterers: Raymond McCann, Brian Doyle, chargehand carpenter: John Donnelly, carpenter: Thomas Dowling, stand-by carpenter: Danny Sumsion, rigger: Eamonn Kelly, stagehand: Hector Chronos, chargehand stag: Brian Boyne, gaffer: Noel Cullen, best boy: Anthony Swan, best girl: Esme Dunne, elec: Liam Moran, Albert Cassells, J J Kelly, unit publicist: Corbett and Keane, a. ed: Dermot Diskin, p. trainees: Paul Donovan, Alan Gregg, Kate Hyland, Daime O'Sullivan, distr: BBC TV.
    Art directionANDRES, Eddy
    WAKEFIELD, Karen
    Costume designHEMMING, Lindy
    LONG, Sharon
    Production designHICKS, Grant
    Genre/CategoryPeriod Drama
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleBROKEN HARVEST
    Production companyDestiny Films
    Maurice O'Callaghan Films
    SponsorBord Scannán na hEireann
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerO'CALLAGHAN, Jerry
    DirectorO'CALLAGHAN, Maurice
    Script/AdaptationO'CALLAGHAN, Maurice
    O'CALLAGHAN, Kate
    PhotographyCONROY, Jack
    DEASY, Seamus (b&w sequence)
    Sound recordingMASTERSON, Brian
    EditingDUFFNER, J. Patrick
    KELLIHER, Michael
    KEATING, Arthur (b&w sequence)
    Executive producerO'CALLAGHAN, Maurice
    Associate producerCONROY, Jack
    FERNS, Grainne
    Music composerCASSIDY, Patrick
    Music performanceHUGHES, John (Conductor)
    SMALE, Alan (Orch. Leader)
    O'FLYNN, Liam (uileann pipes)
    KILDUFF, Vinny (Low Flute)
    London Symphony Orchestra
    Songs'The Children of Lir' by Patrick Cassidy, perf. by the London Symphony :
    Orchestra and Tallis Choir, 'Memphis Tennessee' by Chuck Berry;
    'Don't Let Our Love Die' by L York; 'Save the Last Dance for Me' by
    Pomus/Schuman; 'Oft in the Stilly Night' by Thomas Moore, trad. arrg:
    Edwin Schneider, perf. by John McCormack; radio extract: 'The Legend
    of Wyatt Earp'.
    CastColin Lane (Arthur O'Leary), Marian Quinn (Catherine/Kate O'Leary), Niall O'Brien (Josie McCarthy), Darren McHugh (Jimmy O'Leary), Joe Jeffers (Willie Hogan), Joy Florish (Mary Finnegan), Jim Queally (Master O'Donnell), Michael Twomey (bank manager), Christy O'Sullivan (Bud Lordan), Tim Coffey (Michael Hickey), Mon Murphy (Mrs Donnelly), Ben McDowell (Father Cassidy), Joe O'Gorman (sergeant), Aine O'Sullivan (Hattie O'Brien) Pete O'Reilly (adult Jimmy O'Leary), Michael Crowley (adult Willie Hogan), Jonathan Ryan (voice over), Terry Riley (doctor), Dick Healy (cattle buyer), Tom O'Donovan, Sean Ryan, Michael Daly (tanglers), Michael Brosnan, Willie Hurley (Electricity Supply Board men), Denis O'Mahony (Denis), John Verling (postman), Francie O'Callaghan, John O'Callaghan, Tom O'Donovan, John Nolan (policemen), Tim Sheehan (sheriff), Charlie O'Donovan, Willie Bradfield (sheriff's men), Denis Duggan (truck driver), Padraig O'Malley (bugler), Patrick Kelliher, Mick O'Farrell, Con O'Neill, Dan John Murphy O'Callaghan, Louis White (veterans), Orla McGourty, Yana O'Callaghan, Bebe O'Mahony, Harry Moore, Billy O'Brien, Ann O'Callaghan (gers), Seamus Crowley (referee), Donie Keane, Tom Coughlan (team trainers), Tim Foley (Arthur's companion), Martin O'Callaghan, Joe Long (barmen), John Ford (mouth organ player), Timmy Collins (man with pipe), Ivan Shorten (man with newspaper), Tony O'Hehir (race commentator), Diarmuid Considine (singer). Street Talk (dance band), Ann Kingston (Catherine's companion), Thomas Lordan, Antoinette O'Donovan (leading jivers), Finbarr Collins, Mary Collins, Colman Milner, Clare Skally (leading waltzers), Denis O'Mahony (engine driver), Willie Horgan, Peter O'Donovan, Jim O'Brien (harvest helpers), Patrick Condren, Donagh Verling, Liam Beechinor (Bud's companions), Aidan Ring (motorcyclist), Tom Deane, Chris Murray, Billy O'Brien, Willie Hurley, Pat Curran, Bill Healy, Tim Foley, John Hurley, Brian Kelly, Dan Nyhan, Billy Dukes, Mick Murphy, Timmy Ryan, Dan Hurley (farmers at fair), Eoin Verling, Niall Coakley (buskers), Dan Murray (man with sheep), Kate O'Leary, Louise O'Leary (girls with horse), lan Doyle (army officer), Leonard Ryan, Adrian Keohane, Denis Boyle, Sydney Yates, Alan Walsh (soldiers), Michael Ryan (car driver). May Florish, Patrick Kelliher, Tim Foley (neighbours), b&w sequences - Peter Gowan (Doc), Liam Stack (young Arthur), Seamus Newham (farmer in bog), Nigel Mercier (young man in bog), Lorraine McCourt (girl on bicycle), Mark Shelley, Alan Walsh, Dominic Hewitt, Donal O'Farrell, Paul Kelly, Mark Foley, Ronan Verling (Black and Tans), actors from the Montford stage School, Cork and Rossmore Dramatic Society.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol/b&w
    Soundsound
    Duration97/110
    Format35mm
    Release date1994
    TX channelRTE 1
    TX date26/02/2006
    CopyIFA
    RTE
    SummaryJimmy O'Leary, a successful businessman in present-day New York, hears of the death of his mother, Catherine, and recalls his childhood in rural Ireland in the 1950s. In flashback. Jimmy, as a young boy, lives with his father, Arthur, and his mother on the family farm. Arthur had fought on the anti-Treaty side in the Irish Civil War (recalled in black and white flashback sequences) and subsequently he spent time in America. Arthur has an on-going rivalry with Josie McCarthy, who had fought on the Free State side in the Civil War, but the tension between the two men is intensified as Josie was also a suitor of Catherine's. The feud between the two farmers is reawakened when Jimmy keeps a shilling belonging to Josie and destined for a church collection. Instead, he spends it on English comic books, especially his favourite, 'Roy of the Rovers'. The O'Learys are ostracised by the community and are forced to try to gather in the harvest alone. A rainstorm destroys their crop and with it any further chance for them to save their farm from financial ruin. The bank manager demands £1,300 which is owed, but Arthur is only able to get £185 for his cows. In the pub afterwards, Josie muses that they were better off under the English. A customer provokes him into a fight and the guards arrive. Arthur is taken into custody and released when Catherine arrives. Later, he tells Jimmy that he should always make a stand. Catherine tells Arthur that there is a rumour that Josie will buy their farm, but he says he will burn it down before he will allow that to happen. When the sheriff comes to take his horse, Arthur shoots at him and the accompanying guards. After chasing them off, Arthur rides on horseback to Josie's farm. The two men fight. As Arthur is about to kill Josie with a pitchfork. Jimmy pleads for him to stop. Arthur relents and rides off again, throwing away his remaining bullet. The army are brought in to capture Arthur and he is challenged to drop the gun. Following a sudden movement by Arthur, a soldier shoots and kills him. After Arthur's funeral, Catherine and Jimmy leave for New York. Returning to the present, Josie tells Jimmy after Catherine's funeral that the farm is his as he bought it after they left and he has willed it to him. Jimmy takes a horse out on the land where his father used to ride. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 3/3/1994 (Dublin Film Festival); 15/9/1994 (re-cut version, premiere, Cork); 16/9/1994 (general release); USA Rel June 1994 (Walter Reade Theatre, Lincoln Center, New York); GB Rel July 1994 (Cambridge Film Festival). Filmed on location in Ireland in Castletownkenneigh and in Ballydehob, Co Cork, in Rosenallis, Co Laois, in County Wicklow, and in New York City. The original screening time was 110 minutes when shown at the Dublin Film Festival, but this version was later re-cut to 97 minutes and released in September 1994. The black and white sequences were pho- tographed in 1984, while the remainder was photographed in 1993.
    ReferenceBoston Globe 6/10/1995; FI No. 40:24; FW No 17:14-16; IT 4/3/1994:5; IT 16/9/1994:13; NYT 6/10/1995:014; SP 18/9/1994:31.

    The Big Ticket, Nov 1994:38,'Irish in Focus', director Maurice O'Callaghan talks about life and making of debut film (Alan Gregg).

    Evening Press, 'All-Irish Film Makes a Splash', brief plot synopsis, finance, locations, release by Richard Balls.

    Irish Times, 29/5/85, 'Irish Film Deal Agreed', film deal made with Cannon in Cannes by Ray Comiskey.

    Irish Times, May 85, 'Film Festival Ends with Premiere of Broken Harvest', film ends Dublin Film Festival, brief plot synopsis (Michael Dwyer).

    Film Ireland, Apr-May, 1994:24, premiere of film, scenes to be recut, plot synopsis, critical review, by Ted Sheehy.

    Film West, May 1994:14-16, interview with filmmaker Maurice O'Callaghan.

    Sunday Times, 18/9/94, two short favourable reviews of Broken Harvest. (Harry Browne).

    RTE Guide, 24-30/9/94, 'Reap The Wild Wind', review by Michael Doherty.
    DistributorBuena Vista
    KeywordsChildhood
    Rural Ireland
    1950s
    Irish Civil War
    Irish-Americans
    Family
    Fathers
    Sons
    LocationCastletownkenneigh
    Ballydehob
    Co Cork
    Rosenallis
    Co Laois
    County Wicklow
    New York City
    Production creditsp.c: Destiny Films, A Maurice O'Callaghan Film, made with the help of Bord Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board, p: Jerry O'Callaghan, exec. p: Maurice O'Callaghan, assoc. p: Jack Conroy, Grainne Ferns, d/cast: Maurice O'Callaghan, sc: Maurice O'Callaghan, Kate O'Callaghan from the story The Shilling by Maurice O'Callaghan, sc. super: Annie Coulter, dop: Jack Conroy, focus puller: Ivan Meagher, clapper loader: P J Dillon, grips: Eddie Burt, Stuart Bunting, John Higgins, c. op: Victor Purcell, p.dsgn.: Alan Gallett, p. super: Kate O'Callaghan, p.m: Yana Verling, p. co-ord: Patrick Farrelly, ed: J Patrick Duffner, set dsgn: Laura Bowe, set arrg: Camilla McGourty, 1st a.d: Nick McCarthy, 2nd a.d: John A Phelan, 3rd a.d: Emer Conroy, m: Patrick Cassidy, m.c: John Hughes, orch. leader: Alan Smale, uileann pipes: Liam O'Flynn, low flute: Vinny Kilduff, a. m. from 'The Children of Lir' by Patrick Cassidy, perf. by the London Symphony : Orchestra and Tallis Choir, songs: 'Memphis Tennessee' by Chuck Berry; 'Don't Let Our Love Die' by L York; 'Save the Last Dance for Me' by Pomus/Schuman; 'Oft in the Stilly Night' by Thomas Moore, trad. arrg: Edwin Schneider, perf. by John McCormack; radio extract: 'The Legend of Wyatt Earp', choreo: Emer Conroy, s. engr: Brian Masterson, s. mix: Trevor O'Connor, Liam Saurin, boom op.: Pat Doyle, dub. mix: Pat Hayes, a.s. dub/re-rd: Paco Hayes, Dan Birch, m. rd: Windmill Lane Studios (Dublin), Sulan Studios (Ballyvoumey), Carringdoun Studios (Coppeen), dub/re-rd: Purple Room (Ardmore Studios, Bray), cost: Maeve Patterson, ward: Sheila Healy, ward. a: Georgina O'Sullivan, hair: Catriona Bradfield, Marie McSweeney, Geraldine O'Gorman, make-up super: Rosie Blackmore, make-up: Moira O'Sullivan, gaffer: Mike Hand, elec. Martin Bloye, elec. equip: Michael O'Mahony, a. light: Conor O'Mahony, Jake Capstick, a. ed: Michael Kelliher, lightworks a: Nicky Dunne, video and sound transfers: Paul warde, Screen Scene, negative cutter: Mike Frazer, loc. m: Seamus Crowley, lighting: Michael Samuelson, crane: John Murphy, stunt co-ord: Patrick Condren, stunt doubles: Alan Walsh, Donagh Verling, John Roche, Liam Beechinor, sp. effs: Michael Keams, Conor Coughlan, Jim Brady, Derek Shane, Stephen Sutton, armourer: John McKenna, wranglers: Antoinette O'Donovan, Ronan Verling, loc. cast: Mim O'Donovan, accom, m: Etty O'Donovan, a. to d: Mick O'Farrell, p.a: Eoin Verling, Antoinette O'Donovan, Ronan Verling, Charlotte O'Donovan, Donagh Verling, set cnstr: Tal Gallett, Reg Cox, Bruce Capstick, titles/opticals: Peter Govey Film Opticals, stills: Pat Redmond, publicity: Patrick Farrelly, machinery m: Peter O'Donovan, vintage machinery: Denis O'Mahony, legal services: Maurice O'Callaghan & Co, co. auditors: James Byrne & Associates, post-p. co-ord: Jim Colgan, 2nd unit - c: Ivan Meagher, focus pullers: Adrienne Dollard, P J Dillon, s: Brendan Deasy, make-up: Moira O'Sullivan, stunts: Alan Walsh, Dominic Hewitt, loc. facilities: David Brabazon (Bray Head), Alan Keegan (Enniskerry), b&w sequences - p.m: Cameron Clark, Mick O'Shea, c: Seamus Deasy, s: Brendan Deasy, light: Maurice Swan, ed: Arthur Keating, sc: Maurice O'Callaghan, Dermot O'Donovan, loc. facilities: Capard House (Rosenallis, County Laois), distr: Buena Vista.
    Costume designPATTERSON, Maeve
    Production designGALLETT, Alan
    BOWE, Laura
    McGOURTY, Camilla
    LightingSAMUELSON, Michael
    O MAHONY, Conor
    CAPSTICK, Jake
    SWAN, Maurice (b&w sequence)
    Genre/CategoryRural Drama
    Period Drama
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleMOONDANCE
    ROSARIL
    Production companyLittle Bird Films
    MFG Film GmbH
    Majestic Films and Television
    Lodge Productions Ltd.
    SponsorBórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    European Co-Production Fund (U.K.)
    Bayerischer Rundfunk
    Bayerische Filmfoerderung,
    Filmfberderungsanstalt
    Arte
    Mutoskop/M-P/Quantum
    European Script Fund
    Eurimages Fund of the Council of Europe
    Country of originIreland
    Germany
    ProducerCAVENDISH, Jonathan
    HIRTZ, Dagmar
    DirectorHIRTZ, Dagmar
    Script/AdaptationWEINSHANKER, Burt
    WALTERS, Mark
    RUPPERT, Christine (Supervisor)
    PhotographyBERNSTEIN, Stephen
    CORCORAN, Seamus
    GILLIGAN, Donal
    PURDUE, Harry
    Sound recordingHORGAN, Kieran
    EditingHIRTZ, Dagmar
    UNDRITZ-COPE, Nicola
    CREED, Geraldine
    Executive producerMITCHELL, James
    EAST, Guy
    SOEHNLEIN, Rainer
    Associate producerDOOLAN, Jane
    Music composerTRENCH, Fiachra
    Music performanceTRENCH, Fiachra
    RODFORD, Maggie
    Songs'Moondance' trad. version perf. by Artie McGlynn, Nollaig Casey; 'Moondance' vocal version perf. by Brian Kennedy, written by Van
    Morrison (Wamer Chappell Music Ltd); 'Have I Told You Lately' by Van
    Morrison, perf. by Brian Kennedy, Shanna Morrison (publ. Exile by
    Polygram Music Ltd); 'Queen of the Slipstream' by Van Morrison, perf.
    by Brian Kennedy (publ. Essential Polygram Music Ltd); 'Madam George'
    by Van Morrison, perf. by Marianne Faithfull (publ. WEB IV/Polygram
    Music Ltd), titles produced by Van Morrison and Phil Coulter for Exile
    Productions Ltd except 'Queen of the Slipstream', produced by James
    McMillan, 'Happy Days', 'Ed's Got a New Car', perf. by Blink.
    CastRuaidhri Conroy (Dominic), lan Shaw (Patrick), Julia Brendler (Anya), Marianne Faithfull (mother), Brendan Grace (Murphy), Jasmine Russell (Rose), Darren Monks (Chalky), David Kelly (Mr Dunwoody), Tom Hickey (Mr Dunbar), Kate Flynn (Aunt Dorothy), Alan Devlin (John Joe), Gerard McSorley (Father McGrath), P J Brady (Murty), Joan O'Hara (nun). Blink (the band).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration85
    Format35mm
    Release date1994
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryIn the West of Ireland, teenager Dominic and his elder brother Patrick live in a country house, Rosaril, with their greyhound, Uisce, while their mother is living with a tribe in Africa. Their Aunt Dorothy and German teenager Anya who is staying with her for the summer arrive at the house. Aunt Dorothy tries to pressure Dominic into going to boarding school. He resists Anya's attempts to teach him, while beginning to fall in love with her, but she begins to fall for Patrick. After a day out with Patrick and Anya, Dominic insists on riding the horse back to the house as the others travel by car. At the house, Anya defies Dorothy and insists on staying with Patrick and Dominic. They go shopping at John Joe's, undertaker and shopkeeper, where Martin is fitting himself out for a cof fin. As Patrick and Anya become lovers, Dominic becomes upset at his exclusion. On St John's Day they drink and dance outdoors. The follow- ing day their mother arrives back to find all three of them in bed togeth- er. She has returned to stay, but while Dominic is happy at her return, Patrick is upset at how she will affect his relationship with Anya. Declaring their love for each other, Patrick proposes they get married, as she is due to go to university shortly. Dominic brings Anya to a bridal chamber where he tells her that she can't treat him as a kid and that she'll be his bride too. After confiding to Patrick's mother that she can't go through with the wedding, she tells him that she can't marry him. Later, Anya and Patrick make love in the bridal room. All three go to Dublin with the greyhound, leaving their mother at the house. They get a derelict ) flat above a pub, owned by Murphy, while Patrick gets a job at a church furnishers. Feeling alienated from Patrick and Anya's relationship, ) Dominic goes wandering in a dangerous area of the city until he is picked up by Chalky, who looks after the greyhound. The following morning after a night's drinking with Chalky and when Patrick has gone to work, Dominic goes into Anya's bedroom and lies down beside her in bed. While cutting his hair and later on the beach, Dominic and Anya begin to become lovers. In her bedroom, Dominic paints Anya's leg as she becomes more aroused, while Patrick walks in on them. In the pub down- stairs Patrick gets drunk and challenges Anya's ignoring of him. Upstairs, Anya encourages Dominic to make love to her, but he is unable to go through with it and leaves. The next night during a dinner for Chalky who is due to leave as a ship's mate, Patrick and Dominic argue. Later Dominic asks Chalky if he can get a job on the ship on which he is leaving, but the skipper says that he's too young, but if he pays £500 he'll take him despite being underage. At the greyhound track, Uisce is backed by Murphy and by Dominic who gets the money to pay the skipper of Chalky's boat. Dominic tells Anya that despite loving her he has to go. Dominic goes back to the country and goes to the bridal room which he bums down. His mother appears and comforts him. After telling her the story of the triangular relationship she advises him to make it up with Patrick before leaving. During a disco at the pub, Anya tells Patrick that she intends going back to Germany and that while she and Dominic are in love, she loves him more. Dominic and Patrick become reconciled before Dominic leaves on the ship. (V).
    NoteIR Rel (premiere, 13/7/1994, Galway Film Fleadh); IR Rel Sept 1994 (general release).
    Working title ROSARIL.
    ReferenceFI No. 37:14-15; FI No. 42:26-7; FW No. 19:34; IT 9/9/1994:15;
    SI11/9/1994:9L.
    KeywordsRelationships
    Young People
    Production creditsp.c: Little Bird Films, MFG Film GmbH, Majestic Films and Television, Lodge Productions Ltd. Produced with the participation of Bord Scannan na hEireann/the Irish Film Board, the European Co-Production Fund (U.K.), Bayerischer Rundfunk, Bayerische Filmfoerderung, Filmfberderungsanstalt, Arte, Mutoskop/M-P/Quantum. Developed with the support of the European Script Fund. Supported by the EuFilmages Fund of the Council of Europe, p: Jonathan Cavendish, co-p: Dagmar Hirtz, exec. p: James Mitchell, Guy East, Rainer Soehnlein, assoc. p: Jane Doolan, d/ed: Hirtz, sc: Burt Weinshanker, Mark Walters from the novel The White Hare by Francis Stuart, sc. super: Christine Ruppert, p.dsgn.: Tom Conroy, cost: Sheena Napier, dop: Steven Bernstein, p.m: Seamus Byrne, p. accnt: Alan Gavin, 1st a.d: Konrad Jay, p. exec: Thomas Dierks, TV p. Bayerischer Rundfunk: Christina Undritz, cast: Nuala Moiselle (Ireland), Sabine Schroth (Germany), Karen Stewart (U.K.), s: Kieran Horgan, boom op.: Jim Corcoran, loc. m: Mark Huffam, cnstr. m: Russ Bailey, a. to p: Marion Craemer, p. co-ord: Fran Byrne, loc. co-ord: Constance Harris, unit runner: Liz Kenny, accnt: Helma Flachsmeier (Germany), a. accnt: Andrew Lowe, focus puller: Brendan Galvin, clapper loader: Ciaran Barry, c. trainee: John Moore, c. grip: John Murphy, 2nd unit c: Seamus Corcoran, 2nd unit c.a: Donal Gilligan, 2nd unit c. trainee: Harry Purdue, 2nd a.d: Martha O'Neill, 3rd a.d: Peter Agnew, trainee a.d: Karl Hayden, sound/Foley ed: Uschi Busse, diaVADR ed: Nani Schumann, s. ed: Jeanette Magerl, a. ed: Nicola Undritz-Cope (Germany), Geraldine Creed (Ireland), 2nd a. ed: Bemd Schlegel, trainee ed: Gay Lynch, a.s. ed: Danielb Dietenberger, a. Foley ed: Oliver Gieth, dub. mix: Michael Kranz (Bavaria Film, Munich), Foley art.: Mel Kutbay, Joo Fuerst, chief make-up: Ken Jennings, chief hair: Bemie Dooley, ward. mistress: Ger Scally, a. to cost:n Orla O'Brien, stills: Simon Mein, set.dec: Alison Stewart-Richardson, prop.buyer: Tina Brophy, art d: Denis Bosher, a. art d: Anna Packard, trainee prop.buyer: Joanne McAvin, props master: Cos Egan, trainee props: Ronan Callanan, stand-by carpenter: Vivion O'Brien, stand-by props: P J Smith, stand-by painter: Robbie Richardson, stand-by rigger: Robbie Reilly, stand-by stagehand: John Purdue, master painter: Owen Mumane, painter: Sean Scott, carpenters: Dave Whelan, George Joyce, gaffer: Louis Conroy, best boy: Terry Mulligan, elec: Paddy Murphy, gen. op: John Carr, stand-ins: Mark Joyce, Pamela Earls, dial. coach: Brendan Gunn, international publicity: Tristan Whalley, p. notes: Nicholas O'Neill, stills: Shane McCarthy, stunt co-ord: Phillipe Zone, precision driver: Gordon Fildes, dog handlers: Fircroft Kennels, sp. effs: Gerry Johnston, p.a: Mary Glynn, Monica Meleady, Carrie Comerford (Dublin), Ulla Tiihonen (Munich), Craig Murray (London), sound transfers: Paco Hayes, Annemarie Huemer, opticals/titles: Blow Up Film, Munich, songs: 'Moondance' trad. version perf. by Artie McGlynn, Nollaig Casey; 'Moondance' vocal version perf. by Brian Kennedy, written by Van Morrison (Warner Chappell music Ltd); 'Have I Told You Lately' by Van Morrison, perf. by Brian Kennedy, Shanna Morrison (publ. Exile by Polygram music Ltd); 'Queen of the Slipstream' by Van Morrison, perf. by Brian Kennedy (publ. Essential Polygram music Ltd); 'Madam George' by Van Morrison, perf. by Marianne Faithfull (publ. WEB IV/Polygram mus Ltd), titles p: Van Morrison and Phil Coulter for Exile Productions Ltd except 'Queen of the Slipstream', p: James McMillan, music score composed, orchestrated, conducted by Fiachra Trench, p: Maggie Rodford, Trench, m. engr: Brian Masterson, assisted by Alastair McMilllan, Richard Rainey, rd: Windmill Lane Studios, Dublin, musians booked by Bill Whelan, 'Happy Days', 'Ed's Got a New Car', perf. by Blink.
    Art directionBOSHER, Denis
    PACKARD, Anna
    Costume designNAPIER, Sheena
    Production designCONROY, Tom
    Genre/CategoryRomantic Comedy
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleSTEPHANIE KNOWS WHO
    Production companyDun Laoghaire College of Art and Design
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerCORCORAN, Mark
    DirectorCORCORAN, Mark
    Script/AdaptationCORCORAN, Mark
    DAVISON, Philip (Supervisor)
    PhotographyO'DONOVAN, Michael
    SPILLANE, Michelle
    Sound recordingDALY, Orla
    CONSLEMAN, John
    EditingCORCORAN, Mark
    GILES, Paul (Supervisor)
    MERRY DOYLE, Sé (Supervisor)
    Music performancePink Floyd
    Move, The
    Byrds, The
    Elastic Band
    Love
    CastMichael O'Reilly (Prescott Niles), Christine Larkin (Priscilla), Sheila McDonald (Stephanie), Dermot Lavery (the judge). Jimmy Keogh, Patrick McDonnell, Carl Dearey, John Gunshenan, Aine Hughes, Brian McManus, Paul Loughran, Eoin Whelan, J Morgan, Orla Daly, Michelle Spillane, Brendan Muldowney, James Mather, Brendan Moriarty, Elizabeth-Ann McKevitt, Brid Lennon, Sean Whelan, Robbie Kemp.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration18
    Format16mm
    Release date1994
    SummaryPrescott Niles lives with his wife, Priscilla, in the north east, and then he meets the beautiful Stephanie.
    NoteIR Rel 24/6/1994 (Irish Film Centre); 16/7/1994 (Galway
    Film Fleadh.
    Shot on location in Dundalk.
    KeywordsRelationships
    LocationDundalk
    Production creditsp.c: Dun Laoghaire College of Art and Design, p/d/sc/ed: Mark Corcoran, c: Michael O'Donovan, sc. super: Philip Davison, super, ed: Paul Giles, Se Merry Doyle, a.c: Michelle Spillane, lights: James Mather, a. lights: Dan-an Tiernan, songs: Pink Floyd, The Move, The Byrds, The Elastic Band, Love, s: Orla Daly, a.s: John Consleman, p.m: Madeleine Lennon, art d/ward: Emer O'Clery, asst: Susan Drennan, Jason Morgan, Patricia Hayes, cont: Drennan, make-up: Niamh O'Loan, sets: O'Clery, Liam Sharkey, John Gunshenan, Martin Magee, cast: Kathleen Brennan, Deirdre Corcoran, Anita Corcoran.
    Art directionO'CLERY, Emer
    DRENNAN, Susan
    MORGAN, Jason
    HAYES, Patricia
    LightingMATHER, James
    TIERNAN, Darran
    Genre/CategoryShort Film Drama
    Student Film

    TitleCIRCLE OF FRIENDS
    Production companyPrice Entertainment
    Lantana Productions
    Savoy Pictures
    SponsorBord Scannan na hEireann
    Good Girls Productions
    Country of originIreland
    USA
    ProducerELLERS, Arlene
    WINITSKY, Alex
    PRICE, Frank
    TRODD, Kennith
    DirectorO'CONNOR, Pat
    Script/AdaptationDAVIES, Andrew
    PhotographyMcMILLAN, Ken
    CORCORAN, Seamus
    Sound recordingSIMMONS, Brian
    McLAUGHLIN, Stephen P.
    EditingJYMPSON, JIm
    HARRIS, Simon
    Executive producerCLEGG, Terence
    STONEMAN, Rod
    Music composerKAMEN, Michael
    Music performanceLondon Metropolitan Orchestra
    Chieftains, The
    BROWN, Ronan
    Songs'You're the One' by Michael Kamen, Shane MacGowan, perf. by Marie Brennan, MacGowan; 'The Girl Can't Help It' by Bobby Troup, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'C'Mon Everybody' Eddie Cochran, Jerry Capehart, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'I Hear You Knocking' by Dave Bartholomew, Pearl King, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'Memories Are Made of This' by Terry Gilkyson, Richard Dehr, Frank Miller, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'Little Things Mean a Lot' by Edith Linderman, Carl Stutz, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'Love is a Many Splendored Thing' by Paul Francis Webster, Sammy Fain, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'Hawaiian War Chant' (Ta-Hu-Wa-Hu-Wai)' by Johnny Noble, Leleiohaka, English lyr: Ralph Freed, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'Bo Weevil' by Antoine Domino, Dave Bartholomew, perf. by Fats Domino; 'The Girl Can't Help It' by Bobby Troup, perf. by Little Richard; 'Little Things Mean a Lot' by Edith Linderman, Carl Stutz, perf. by Kitty Kallen.
    CastChris O'Donnell (Jack), Minnie Driver (Benny), Geraldine O'Rawe (Eve), Saffron Burrows (Nan), Alan Cumming (Sean), Colin Firth (Simon Westward), Aidan Gillen (Aidan), Mick Lally (Dan Hogan), Britta Smith (Mrs Hogan), John Kavanagh (Brian Mahon), Ruth McCabe (Emily Mahon), Ciaran Hinds (Professor Flynn), Tony Doyle (Doctor Foley), Marie Mullen (Mrs Foley), Marie Conmee (Mrs Healey), Gerry Walsh (Mr Flood), Sean McGinley (Mr Duggan), Tom Hickey (Professor Maclure), Seamus Forde (parish priest), Ingrid Craigie (Celia Westward), Major Lambert (Major Westward), Pauline Delaney (big House maid), Jason Barry (Nosey Mahon), Edward Manning (Paul Mahon), Phil Kelly (Hibernian Hotel waiter), Gwynne McElveen (Rosemary), Marguerite Drea (Sheila), Stephen Rooney (Bill Dunne), Cathy Belton (moaning girl), Elizabeth Keller (sobbing girl), Tanya Cawley (rugby girl), Niamh O'Byrne (dancing girl), Dervla O'Farrell (Benny, aged 10), Pamela Cardillo (Nan, aged 10), Louise Maher (Eve, aged 10), Karen O'Neill, Elaine Dunphy, Emma Lannon (little girls), Margaret O'Neill, Maureen Lyster, Eliza Dear (nuns), Brendan Conroy (priest).
    ColourTechnicolor
    Eastmancolor (prints)
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration102
    Footage9225
    Format35mm
    Release date1995
    CopyIFA
    SummaryIn the village of Knockglen, Ireland in 1949, three friends: Eve, Nan, and Benny the narrator, are confirmed in the Catholic Church at the age of ten. In 1957 when Benny and Eve have graduated from the local convent school. Nan has already moved to Dublin. Eve is an orphan, whose father had been the gardener to the Anglo-Irish Protestant Westwards. After finishing school she asks them for the fees to go university and they give her the money. On their first day in college, Benny and Eve meet Nan, who is more familiar with the city than they are. She introduces them to Jack Foley, a rugby star and medical student. Benny and Jack become attracted to each other, but she is not able to socialise with him as she has to return home each evening on the bus. Benny's parents want her to marry the repulsive Sean who works in her family's drapery store. Benny meets Jack unexpectedly when his father, a doctor, visits Knockglen. Jack asks Benny to go to the college ball with him, but she is disappointed to learn that the others will also be in their company. Benny anxiously watches as Nan and Jack dance together, but later she finds that her feelings for Jack are reciprocated by him. Eve takes Nan and Benny to her family's derelict cottage where her mother died giving birth to her. Aidan, another student, is now Eve's boyfriend and he helps her do up the cottage. Sean keeps pursuing Benny and she eventually tells him she in love with someone else. When the girls and their boyfriends have a party at the cottage Sean observes them from afar. Encouraged by lectures on tribal sexuality, and repelled from it by Catholic guilt, the girls' sexuality gradually awakens. Nan becomes involved with suave Simon Westward, while Aidan stays with Eve at the cottage. Nan uses the cottage to meet Simon, but their love-making is observed by Sean. Jack is disturbed by an anatomy lecture and thinks he may not want to be a doctor. At dinner with her parents, Benny shocks them when she says she wants to stay in Dublin with Jack. She also attacks Sean and the way he is wheedling his way into the business. Shortly after the row Benny's father dies suddenly and Benny expresses her guilt for her action at the funeral. Benny and Jack are separated when she is forced to work in the shop. Nan discovers that she is pregnant and goes to see Simon who wants her to have a abortion. She is shocked that he will not marry her, but he tells her that he has to marry for money to keep the family afloat. At a pub she meets Jack, who is drunk, and goes to a rugby party with him. Later, she seduces him and afterwards tells him that he is responsible for her pregnancy. Freed from her responsibility at the shop when her mother's health improves, Benny can return to college. She rings Jack and they meet. He tells her that he is the father of Nan's child. Jack and Nan go to a party at Eve's cottage where Jack and Benny talk awkwardly. Realising that Nan has been at the cottage. Eve confronts her and establishes that she and Simon have spent time there. As an argument flares between them. Nan falls against a window, cuts herself and is taken to hospital. Back in Knockglen, Benny goes to the shop one night and Sean follows her there. Sean begins taking off his clothes and attacks her. In the struggle she finds the money she has long suspected he has been stealing from the business. She threatens to call the police unless he leaves. Nan apologises to Jack for her action as he sees her off on the boat to England. Jack goes to see Benny in Knockglen. He says he loves her and wants to marry her, but she, now more confident of herself, says she may not be able to love him again. Benny moves to Dublin and shares a flat with Eve and resumes her relationship with Jack. She writes a controversial paper comparing the mating rites of an island tribe with Irish Catholicism and causes a storm. It points to her future career as a writer. Benny and Jack go to the cottage to spend time there together. (V).
    NoteAn extract from ON THE WATERFRONT (USA 1954) is included in this film. Filmed on location in Inistioge, Co Kilkenny and at Trinity College, Dublin. 'There is nothing innocent about the single-mindedness with which this film is directed at the international market. Barely a line of dialogue goes by without a shifting backdrop of bustling period street-scene, a babbling brook or a misty hillside, while Michael Kamen's score wears its shamrock on its sleeve with almost comical commitment. The screenplay has its fair share of tourist board Irishry too: the breathless giggling of trios of brash young Irish women is becoming something of a cliche post Roddy Doyle, and I'm not sure how convincing everybody saying "altogether" at the end of every sentence is as a signifier of Gaelic warmth. More worrying... is the fact that only one of the six main roles is played by an Irish actor. (Ben Thompson, Sight and Sound May 1995:42).
    ReferenceFI No. 47, June/July 1995:56; IT 7/4/1995:13; IT 11/5/1995:W3; IT 12/5/1995:7, 13; IT 13/5/1995:W2; IT 30/5/1995:10; S&S May 1995:41-2; SI 14/5/1995:9; SP 30/4/1995:27, 29; ST Magazinel4/5/1955:13.

    Irish Times, 1995, discussion of aspects of Irish life portrayed in Circle Of Friends (Nuala O Faolain). Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the irsh Film Institute.

    ‘Circle Of Friends: Sometimes dreams do come true’, publicity: brief plot synopsis, cast and crew lists. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the irsh Film Institute.

    Screen International, 30/6/95:36-7, ‘Circle Of Friends box office ratings in UK and US for June 23-25’.

    Irish Times, 7/4/95: 13, Reel News: ‘The Pakula brief’, paragraph mentioning success of Circle Of Friends in the US (Michael Dwyer).

    Sunday Times, 12/4/98:25, ‘A Novel arrangement’, author Maeve Binchy talks about her work and insistence films made from her books be made in Ireland (John Ryan).

    Tribune Magazine, 14/5/95:13, ‘Bless me father for I have sinned’, Pat O'Connor, Circle Of Friends director, talks about his life and the film.

    Sunday Independent (Living and Leisure), 31/10/99:11L, ‘The Devil's in the Deep Blue Sea’, interview with actress Saffron Burows by Gaby Wood.
    DistributorRank
    Keywords40s
    Production creditsp.c: A Price Entertainment/Lantana Production. In association with Savoy Pictures. With the assistance of Bord Scannan na hEireann/Good Girls Productions, p: Arlene Ellers, Alex Winitsky, Frank Price, exec. p: Terence Clegg, Rod Stoneman (Bord Scannan na hEireann), exec. in charge of production: Clegg, co-p: Kenith Trodd, d: Pat O'Connor, sc: Andrew Davies from the novel Circle of Friends by Maeve Binchy (London: Random Century Group, 1990), p. co-ord: Leila Kirkpatrick, p.m: Emma Fallen, unit p.m: Gemma Fallon, loc. m: John Phelan, a. loc. m: Luke Johnston, 1st a.d: Clegg, 2nd a.d: Mark Goddard, Guy Heeley, 3rd a.d: Catherine Dunne, sc. super: Libbie Barr, cast: Mary Selway, Simone Ireland, crowd cast: Dunne, Nell Wright, dop: Ken MacMillan, a. c: Seamus Corcoran, c. op: Andy Chmura, focus puller: David Fitzgerald, clapper loader: Adrienne Dollard, grip: Jimmy Waters, ed: Jim Jympson, a. ed: Simon Harris, p.dsgn.: Jim Clay, art d: Chris Seagers, a. art d: Phil Harvey, set dec: Judy Fair, p. buyer: Mark Filmmell, draugtsperson: Miraphora Mina, scenic artists: Brian Bishop, Doug Bishop, props, master: Debbie Alexander, ward. mistress: Rhona McGuirke, Frances Miles, cost: Anushia Nieradzik, chief make-up: Dorka Nieradzik, make-up artists: Carmel Jackson, Elaine Davis, dial. coach: Brendan Gunn, titles/opticals: General Screen Enterprises, m: Michael Kamen, m.p: London Metropolitan Orchestra, The chieftains, Ronan Brown, a. conductor: Liam Bates, m. ed: Dina Baton, Christopher Brooks, m. co-ord: Bill Whelan, m. cnslt: Bones Howe, songs: 'You're the One' by Michael Kamen, Shane MacGowan, perf. by Marie Brennan, MacGowan; 'The Girl Can't Help It' by Bobby Troup, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'C'Mon Everybody' Eddie Cochran, Jerry Capehart, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'I Hear You Knocking' by Dave Bartholomew, Pearl King, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'Memories Are Made of This' by Terry Gilkyson, Richard Dehr, Frank Miller, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'Little Things Mean a Lot' by Edith Linderman, Carl Stutz, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'Love is a Many Splendored Thing' by Paul Francis Webster, Sammy Fain, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'Hawaiian War Chant' (Ta-Hu-Wa- Hu-Wai)' by Johnny Noble, Leleiohaka, English lyr: Ralph Freed, perf. by Long John Jump Band; 'Bo Weevil' by Antoine Domino, Dave Bartholomew, perf. by Fats Domino; 'The Girl Can't Help It' by Bobby Troup, perf. by Little Richard; 'Little Things Mean a Lot' by Edith Linderman, Carl Stutz, perf. by Kitty Kallen, s. ed: Peter Pennell, a.s. ed: Steve Spencer, dial. ed: Alan Paley, a. dial. ed: David Barren, footsteps ed: Jupiter Sen, s: Brian Simmons, Stephen P McLaughlin (m), m. dub. rd: Brian Masterson, boom op.: Keith Batten, re-rd. mix: Gerry Humphreys, stunt co-ord: Martin Grace, stunts: Patrick Condren, Gabe Cronnelly, cnstr. co-ord: John Bohan, cnstr. super: Steve Bohan, legal/fmacial services: Eugene Fanning of Arthur Cox, unit publicist: Carolyn Jardine, stills: David Appleby, Jonathan Hession, distr: Rank.
    Art directionSEAGERS, Chris
    HARVEY, Phil
    Costume designNIERADZIK, Anushia
    Production designCLAY, Jim
    Genre/CategoryHistorical Drama
    Period Drama
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleGUILTRIP
    Production companyTemple Films
    Fandango
    Smile Productions (Italy)
    SponsorMC4
    LamSept Cinema (France)
    Euskal Media SA (Spain)
    Bórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    Eurimages Fund of the Council of Europe
    Country of originIreland
    France
    Italy
    Spain
    ProducerGUINEY, Ed
    PROCACCI, Domenico
    PEDERSOLI, Giuseppe
    SAIRE, Jean-Pierre
    BAILLY, Jean-Pierre
    LEMEUNIER, Lise
    DirectorSTEMBRIDGE, Gerard
    Script/AdaptationSTEMBRIDGE, Gerard
    PhotographyO'CONNOR, Eugene
    Sound recordingWILLIS, Simon
    EditingFINLAY, Mary
    YEATES, Ben
    BURROWS, David
    Executive producerSTONEMAN, Rod
    BRADLEY, Stephen
    COLLINS, David
    Music composerPOWER, Brendan
    Music performancePOWER, Brendan (Harmonica)
    MOORE, Des (Guitar)
    HAYES, David (Keyboard)
    ECCLES, Noel (percussion)
    Songs'The Candy Store on the Corner' by Bob Hilliard, perf. by Dickie Rock; 'My Own Peculiar Way' by Nelson, perf. by Joe Dolan; 'My Coo Ca Choo' by Peter Shelley, perf. by The Alvin Purple Experience; 'I'm the Leader of the Gang' by Glitter/Leander, perf. by The Alvin Purple Experience.
    CastAndrew Connolly (Liam), Jasmine Russell (Tina), Peter Hanly (Ronnie), Michelle Houlden (Michele), Frankie McCafferty (Frank), Pauline McLynn (Joan), Mikel Murfi (Petey), Fintan Lee (kid), Rebecca Chapman-Murphy (baby Michael), Ray McBride (security man), Eamonn Hunt (armoury sergeant), Victor Wheatly (Brady's barman). Jimmy Keogh (man in toilet), Sean Murphy (Tiemey's barman), Dave Bell (man in shop), Brid Ní Chumhaill (Sadie), the Alvin Purple Experience (band in Cassidy's).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration87
    Format35mm
    Release date1995
    CopyIFA
    SummaryOn a housing estate in a small Irish town, a young married woman, Tina, is putting her baby to bed as she waits anxiously for her husband, Liam, an army corporal, to return home. When he eventually arrives, he is unpredictable and aggressive after a night out drinking. Tina tries to calm him down by giving him a present of a compact disc player which she got in town earlier in the day. He remains tense and agitated and wakes up the baby to play with it. He demands to know what Tina has been doing while he was at work. In flashback, the events of their respective days are revealed. Tina wanders around the town, meets Joan, a gossip, a young boy who hassles her for money, and Ronnie, who runs an electrical goods shop. Liam's day, by contrast, sees him target Michele at the barracks as she goes to see her brother Frank. Later, Liam inveigles his way into Frank and his friend Petey's company so that he can meet Michele again. When he meets her it turns out that she is Ronnie's wife, but he obsessively pursues her. After going home with Ronnie, Liam steals his car and then picks up Michele as she walks on the street. He brings her into the army barracks where he tries to make love to her. When she laughs at him for his impotence, he smashes her head against a gun implacement and kills her. With the completion of the flashback sequences, Liam is home with Tina, and as dawn breaks the new day is likely to see Liam arrested by the authorities and the end of their marriage. (V).
    NoteWorld premiere, Venice Film Festival Sept 1995; IR Rel 1/10/1995 (premiere, Cork Film Festival); 17/11/1995 (general release). This film was shot on location in Ireland at Maynooth and Leixlip, Co Dublin, and in Dublin city on a budget of about £lm. This film won the Best Screenplay Award at the 1995 Thessaloniki Film Festival; and at the 1995 International Film Festival in Amiens, it was winner of the Youth Jury Best Film Award, Best Actor Award (Andrew Connolly), and Best Actress Award (Jasmine Russell).
    ReferenceDublin Event Guide 8-21/11/1995:6,7; EH 16/11/1995:22; FI June-July 1995:10-11; FI No. 50, Dec 1995-Jan 1996:24-6, 35-6; FW No. 23, Winter 1995:40; II 15/4/1995; 17/11/1995:28; IT 21/4/1995:15; IT 22/9/1995:13; IT 13/10/1995:13; IT 28/10/1995:W12; IT 10/11/1995:13; IT 17/11/1995:13; Screen International 2/6/1995:34; SI 19/11/1995:15L; ST Magazine 3/9/1995:16; ST Magazine 8/10/1995:16.

    For better. For worse. Forever? Guiltrip. Promotional programme for the film Guiltrip. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    Irish Independent, 15/4/95, ‘Stembridge work moves into focus’, writer Gerard Stembridge interviewed about his career move into directing films like Guiltrip (Lorcan Roche).

    Irish Times, 21/4/95:15, ‘Going on a Guiltrip’, report on progress being made in filming Guiltrip (Michael Dwyer).

    Screen International, 2/6/95, short preview of film Guiltrip and details of financial backing for the low budget film (Paddy Barrett).

    Film Ireland, Jun/Jul. 1995:10-11, ‘Points of view’, interview with directors of photography Eugene O'Connor who worked on Guiltrip and Billy Williams who worked on Driftwood (Paul Power).

    Irish Times (Sound and Vision), 13/10/95:13, ‘A chilling and pertinent debut’,
    favourable review of the film Guiltrip from the Cork Film Festival (Michael Dwyer).

    RTE Guide, 3/11/95:64-5, ‘The Guiltripper/A Woman Scorned’, director Gerard Stembridge and actress Jasmine Russell interviewed about the film Guiltrip (Michael Doherty).

    Dublin Event Guide, 8-21/11/95:7, ‘Film Business: Getting out and doing it’,
    Guiltrip's producer Ed Guiney talks about making low budget films (Derek Snowe).

    Dublin Event Guide, 8-21/11/95:6, review (Laoise Mac Reamoinn).

    Irish Times (Sound and Vision), 10/11/95:13, ‘Gerry goes on’, future plans for Gerard Stembridge, director of Guiltrip (Michael Dwyer).

    Evening Herald, 16/11/95:22, ‘Married blitz’, review (Paul Byrne).

    Evening Standard, 16/11/95:20, ‘Jasmine's taking a trip to success’, interview with actress Jasmine Russell, star of the film Guiltrip (Mary Carr).

    Irish Times (Sound and Vision), 17/11/95:13, ‘Just do it’, interview with Ed Guiney, producer of Guiltrip; includes review of film (Helen Meany, Michael Dwyer).

    Film Ireland, Dec. 95-Jan.96:3, ‘Family affair’, interview with director Gerard Stembridge about his film Guiltrip (Shane Barry).

    Hot Press, 7/2/96:52, short review.

    Irish Times (Education and Living), 19/5/98:11, ‘In The Schools...Gerard Stembridge’, director of Guiltrip, Gerard Stembridge talks about his school days and education (Yvonne Healy).

    The Guardian, 10/7/98, short review of the film Guiltrip on video release (Rob Mackie).

    Guiltrip Press Pack.Publicity: intro, short synopsis, credits, biographies and filmographies of crew and cast, and director's notes.

    Sunday Independent (Living and Leisure), 22/10/00:33L, TV preview (Sarah Caden).

    Irish Times (Magazine), 24/10/00:69 (Tony Clayton-Lea).

    Variety, 18/09/95:101, positive review of the Irish film Guiltrip, directed by Gerry Stembridge. It also gives a brief synopsis of the film and the main performances, including the production credits.

    Positif, April 1996:40 - 41, ‘L'Actualite - Guiltrip’, positive French-language review of the Irish film Guiltrip, directed by Gerry Stembridge, which discusses the themes and images explored in the film (Eithne O'Neill).
    KeywordsFamily
    Domestic Abuse
    Irish Army
    Soldiers
    Mothers
    Working Class Housing Estates
    Relationships
    Rape
    Masculinity
    Production creditsp.c: Temple Films. With Fandango, Smile Productions (Italy), MC4 and La Sept Cinema (France), Euskal Media SA (Spain). In association with Bord Scannan na hEireann/Irish Film Board, and supported by the EuFilmages fund of the Council of Europe, p: Ed Guiney, exec. p: Rod Stoneman (Bord Scannan na hEireann), Stephen Bradley, David Collins, co-p: Domenico Procacci (Fandango), Giuseppe Pedersoli (Smile), Jean-Pierre Saire, Jean-Pierre Bailly, Lise Lemeunier (MC4), d/sc: Gerard Stembridge, 1st a.d: Brendan Geraghty, 2nd a.d: Lee Rooney, 3rd a.d: Maria O'Connor, trainee a.d: Joy Giovannelli, addtl trainees: Glen Delaney, Deirdre Mulrooney, line p: Noelette Buckley, dop: Eugene O'Connor, steadicam op: Peter Robertson, focus puller: P J Dillon, clapper loader: Simon Walsh, trainee a.c: Russell Gleeson, dolly grip: Paul Tsan, p.dsgn.: David Wilson, art d: Mark Lowry, art dept a: Julian King, ed: Mary Finlay, 1st a. ed: Ben Yeates, 2nd a. ed: David Burrows, prop.buyer: Olwen Weekes, props mast: Alan Dunne, stand-by props: David Wallace, dressing props: Ronan Callanan, loc. m: Luke Johnston, loc. a: Nell Wright, p. co-ord: Dairne O'Sullivan, p. accnt: Michael Garland, accnt. a: Deborah Keogh, m: Brendan Power, musians - Power (harmonica), Des Moore (guitar), David Hayes (keyboard), Noel Eccles (percussion), songs: 'The Candy Store on the Corner' by Bob Hilliard, perf. by Dickie Rock; 'My Own Peculiar Way' by Nelson, perf. by Joe Dolan; 'My Coo Ca ChoO'by Peter Shelley, perf. by The Alvin Purple Experience; 'I'm the Leader of the Gang' by Glitter/Leander, perf. by The Alvin Purple Experience, cost: Marie Tiemey, ward. mistress: Louise Keating, cost: Helen Kane, make-up: Alessandro Bertolazzi, make-up a: Nicola Scott, Tara McCue, hair: Brid Broadberry, a. hair: Bemie Dooley, Eileen Buggy, p. super: Lesley McKimm, p.a: Liam Beatty, Carina Guiney, s. ed: Simon Gershon, Andre Schmidt, Jon Hemming (dial), s: Simon Willis, Tim Martin (mus), Hugh Drumm (band), a. engr: Ger McDonnell, m. rd: Bow Lane Studios, boom op.: Barry O'Sullivan, Ollie Clince, 3rd man: David Harris, a. video op: Noel Donnellon, John Gleeson, intern: Mandy Cassidy, sc. super: Kathleen Weir, addtl grip: Ivan Tsan, Paul Green, Harry Purdue, jimmy jib op: Keith Brooks, gaffer: Tony Swan, best boy: Albert Cassells, generator op: Niall Mannion, elec. truck driver: Derek Swan, a. elec: Garrett Baldwin, armourer: John McKenna, sp. effs. super: Conor Coughlan, sp. effs. a: Michael Keams, James Brady, cnstr. m: Mick Deegan, stand-by carpenter: Mick Keams, carpenter: Gerry Deegan, painter: Bobby Richardson, security: Christy Doody, Willie Butler, stills: Pat Redmond, unit publicist: Kate Bowe, chaperones: Amy Rowan, Anabele Vivo Martin, post.p.super: Lesley McKimm, mix: Mike Narduzzo (Tele-Cine, London), ADR: Dermot Moynihan (Moynihan Russell), a. voices: Ailish Connolly, Steve Curran, Conor Evans, Anne Kent, Claire Mullan, Mark O'Halloran, Ann Rowan, Foley art.: Lucy Fawcett, Jason Swanscott, neg. cutter: Sylvia Wheeler, grader: Colin Coole, titles/opticals: General Screen Enterprises, title dsgn: Pauline Hume, ed. facilities: The Loopline, s. transfer: Screen Scene, studio facilities: Arena construction, computer services: Sargent Discs (London), legal adv: James Hickey, Matheson Ormsby Prentice Solicitors, financial services: Eugene Horgan (ACC Bank), financial adv: Eamonn Griffin (Griffin & Co).
    Art directionLOWRY, Mark
    Costume designTIERNEY, Marie
    KANE, Helen
    Production designWILSON, David
    Genre/CategorySocial Drama
    Urban Drama
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleNOTHING PERSONAL
    ALL OUR FAULT
    FANATIC HEART
    Production companyChannel Four Films
    Little Bird Productions
    SponsorBórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    British Screen
    Country of originGreat Britain
    Ireland
    ProducerCAVENDISH, Jonathan
    SEAWARD, Tracey
    DirectorO'SULLIVAN, Thaddeus
    Script/AdaptationMORNIN. Daniel
    PhotographyPOPE, Dick
    Sound recordingLINDSAY, Peter
    EditingPARKER, Michael
    PARNELL, Bill
    GARDNER, Giles
    Executive producerMITCHELL, James
    Music composerAPPLEBY, Philip
    Songs'Hitchin' A Ride' by Mitch Murray, Peter Callander, perf. by Vanity Fair; 'You're The First, The Last, My Everything' by Barry White, Tony Sepe, Sterling Radcliffe, perf. by Barry White; 'Sing Baby Sing' by Peretti, Creatore & Weiss, perf. by The Stylistics; 'You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet' by Randy Bachman, perf. by Bachman Turner Overdrive; 'Coz I Luv You' by Holder, Lee perf. by Slade; 'Nothing From Nothing' by Billy Preston, Bruce Fisher, perf. by Billy Preston; 'You Can Get It If You Really Want' by and perf. by Jimmy Cliff; 'In The Summertime' by Ray Dorset, perf. by Mungo Jerry; 'Rocket Man', 'Candle in the Wind' by Elton John, Bemie Taupin, perf. by Elton John; 'All Right Now' by Andy Fraser, Paul Rodgers, perf. by Free; 'Billy McFadzean' perf. by Cathy White; 'Once Upon A Dream' by Nome
    Paramor, Richard B Rowe, perf. by Billy Fury,
    CastJames Frain (Kenny), lan Hart (Ginger), John Lynch (Liam), Gary Lydon (Eddie), Ruaidhri Conroy (Tommy), Jenifer Courtney (Kathleen), Michael Gambon (Leonard), Gareth O'Hare (Michael), Ciaran Fitzgerald (young Liam), Anthony Brophy (Malachy), Gerard McSorley (Cecil), B J Hogg (Jake), Maria Doyle Kennedy (Ann), Jim Duran (Billy), Andrew Roddy (1st nationalist), Stephen Kennedy (Danny), Danny McElhinney (pub bomber), Lynne James (Gloria), Seamus Ball (Jimmy), Joe Rea (Joe), Cathy White (Lizzie), Lydia Courtney (Penelope), Alan Burke (Ginger's brother), Amanda Maguire (Susan), Colm O'Brien (young Kenny), Noah Eli Davis (scruffy young man), Robbie Doolin (drunk fella), Frank McCusker (1st man), Oliver Maguire (Marty), Ali White (Brenda), Frankie McCafferty (Lizzie's husband), George Shane (Sammy), Glen Healy (soldier), Janet Moran (waitress).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourMetrocolor
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration85/87
    Footage7655
    Format35mm
    Production date1994
    Release date1995
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryOn the night before a cease-fire by Republican and Loyalist paramilitaries in Belfast in 1975, a bomb destroys a Protestant pub. Passers-by, including Liam from Republican West Belfast, rescue the survivors. Elsewhere in the city. Republican and Loyalist paramilitary leaders, Cecil and Leonard respectively, meet to negotiate the cease-fire. Afterwards, Leonard tells Loyalist commander Kenny to rein in his men. Although uneasy about the cease-fire and viewing it as a sell-out, Kenny is concerned at the behaviour of his militant and psychotic right-hand man, Ginger. A street battle erupts on the dividing 'Peace Line' between the two communities. During the riot a fifteen-year-old Catholic is burnt to death with a petrol bomb by Ginger. With the cease-fire agreed, Leonard tells Kenny to do away with Ginger. In the confusion of the riot, Liam goes down a wrong alley and is beaten up. Dazed, he is taken in by a Protestant nurse, Ann, who is in fact Lenny's estranged wife. Liam's children, Kathleen and young Liam, become worried when their father fails to return home. Kathleen and her older friend Michael decide to search for him even if it means crossing the Peace Line. Meanwhile, Ginger and Eddie, another Loyalist, encourage teenager Tommy to join the organisation by appointing him the doorman of a paramilitary-run drinking club. They also take him on one of their night patrols during which they kidnap Liam and bring him to the club for questioning. As Liam is being violently interrogated, tension escalates between Kenny's political Loyalism and Ginger's anti-Catholic sectarianism. During the interrogation, Kenny recognises Liam as a childhood friend, accepts he is innocent of paramilitary involvement and releases him. As Liam is being freed on a street near the dividing line between the two communities, Michael appears with a gun. He sees the Loyalists with Liam and as he is about to shoot, he accidentally kills Kathleen when she tries to stop him firing. As the Loyalists take off in their car. Ginger cheers at the child's death. Kenny is appalled and fires at him, thus attracting the attention of a passing British Army patrol, which fires on their vehicle, killing them. As Kathleen and Kenny are being buried on different sides of the same cemetery, Liam and Ann offer condolences to each other, while the opposing paramilitary figures look on. (V). In Belfast in 1975 a ceasefire is being negotiated between republican leader Cecil (Gerard McSorley) and his loyalist counterpart Leonard (Michael Gambon), after which the latter tells one of his commanders, Kenny (James Frain, far right), to rein in his men. While uneasy about the ceasefire, Kenny is concerned about his right-hand man, militant and psychotic Ginger (Ian Hart), who during a street riot kills a Catholic youth with a petrol bomb. Leonard tells Kenny to do away with Ginger. In the meantime, Liam (John Lynch), wanders in a daze from the riot into a loyalist area, where he is cared for by Anne (Maria Doyle Kennedy), Kenny's estranged wife. Ginger and another loyalist, Eddie (Gary Lydon), kidnap and assault Liam, but during his interrogation Kenny recognises Liam as a childhood friend and releases him. Liam's daughter Kathleen's (Jeni Courtney) is accidentally killed, while Kenny is shot by the British army after he shoots Ginger. As Kathleen and Kenny are being buried on different sides of the same cemetery, Liam and Ann offer condolences to each other, while the opposing paramilitary figures look on.
    NoteIR Rel 16/7/1995 (world premiere, Galway Film Fleadh). Aka FANATIC HEART. Working title ALL OUR FAULT. Made on location in Ringsend, Dublin. Winner of the Best Supporting Actor Award (lan Hart) at the 1995 Venice Film Festival.
    The IFA holds rushes from this film on VHS.
    ReferenceFI No. 48 Aug-Sept 1995:30; FW No. 22, July 1995:16-18;
    IT 23/6/1995:13; S&S Vol. 6, No. 2, Feb 1966:50-51.
    DistributorFilm Four International
    KeywordsTroubles
    Sectarianism
    Paramilitaries
    Protestants
    Catholics
    Loyalists
    Republicans
    Nationalists
    LocationRingsend
    Dublin
    Production creditsp.c: Channel Four Films. With the participation ofBord Scannan na hEire- ann/Irish Film Board. British Screen presents A Little Bird Production, p: Jonathan Cavendish, Tracey Seaward, exec. p: James Mitchell, d: Thaddeus O'Sullivan, sc: Daniel Mornin based on his novel All Our Fault, dop: Dick Pope, c. op: Des Whelan, 2nd c. op: Vie Purcell, focus puller: Kenny Byrne, Ciaran Barry, Alan Butler, clapper loader: Donal Caulfield, grip: Luke Quigley, trainee c: Declan King, p.m: Howard Gibbins, p. co-ord: Lisa Parker, secretary to p: Andrea Connor, p.a: Will Waller, 1st a.d: Lisa Mulcahy, 2nd a.d: Peter Agnew, 3rd a.d: Barbara Mulcahy, trainee a.d: Catherine O'Flaherty, Robert Trench, Maria O'Connor, p.dsgn.: Mark Geraghty, ed: Michael Parker, 1st a. ed: Bill Pamell, 2nd a. ed: Giles Gardner, songs/mus extracts: 'Hitchin' A Ride' by Mitch Murray, Peter Callander, perf. by Vanity Fair; 'You're The First, The Last, My Everything' by Barry White, Tony Sepe, Sterling Radcliffe, perf. by Barry White; 'Sing Baby Sing' by Peretti, Creatore & Weiss, perf. by The Stylistics; 'You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet' by Randy Bachman, perf. by Bachman Turner Overdrive; 'Coz I Luv You' by Holder, Lee perf. by Slade; 'Nothing From Nothing' by Billy Preston, Bruce Fisher, perf. by Billy Preston; 'You Can Get It If You Really Want' by and perf. by Jimmy Cliff; 'In The Summertime' by Ray Dorset, perf. by Mungo Jerry; 'Rocket Man', 'Candle in the Wind' by Elton John, Bemie Taupin, perf. by Elton John; 'All Right Now' by Andy Fraser, Paul Rodgers, perf. by Free; 'Billy McFadzean' perf. by Cathy White; 'Once Upon A Dream' by Nome Paramor, Richard B Rowe, perf. by Billy Fury, super, s. ed: Nick Adams, s: Peter Lindsay, a.s. ed: Sam Southwick, art d: Fiona Daly, a. art d: Clodagh Conroy, art dept. trainee: Claire Doherty, gaffer: Con Dempsey, best boy: Kieron Dempsey, elec: Brendan Wall, David Dumey, genny op: Brian Sheridan, boom op.: Mervyn Moore, s. trainee: Deborah Gordon, scenic artist: Romek Delimata, practical spark: Niall Mannion, loc. m: Konrad Jay, unit m: Reggie Blain, loc. a: Lizzie Turvey, cast. d: John & Ros Hubbard, cast. a: Greg Kyle, dial. coach: Brendan Gunn, sc. super: Jean Bourne, trainee sc. super: Emer Conroy, cost: Consolata Boyle, a. cost: Magdalen Rubalcava, cost. trainee: Loma Marie Mugan, Roisin Hall, ward. mistress: Anne O'Halloran, ward. a: Allison Byrne, ward. trainee: Judith Devlin, chief make-up artist: Maire O'Sullivan, a. make-up: Lynn Johnston, trainee make-up: Margot Wilson, chief hair: Bemadette Dooley, a. hair: Eileen Buggy, trainee hair: Lorraine Glynn, prop. buyer: Sunny Mulligan, prop. mast: Eamonn O'Higgins, dressing prop: Daragh Lewis, Triona Coen, chargehand: Derek Wallace, stand-by prop: Nuala McKeman. cnstr. m: Russ Bailey, carpenter: Graham Waters, Paul Keogh, Tony Walsh, Nick McManus, Mick Keams, master painter: Owen Mumane, painter: Gerald Richardson, Tony Mumane, Robbie Reilly, stagehand: Gerry Quigley, stand-by carpenter: Brendan Shorthall, stand-by painter: Gary O'Donnell, stand-by rigger: Jimmy Merrigan, stunt co-ord/arrg: Nick Gillard, stunts: Dominic Hewitt, Donal O'Farrell, Alan Walsh, Marc Cass, Riky Ash, Julian Spencer, Ray De-Haan, Andreas Petrides, SFX super: Terry Shubert, SFX tech: Dominic Tuohy, Brendan Byrne, Aiden Byrne, sp. effs: Martin Gutteridge, armourer: John McKenna, p. accnt: Louise Westaway, a. accnt: Sheila Farrell, Kathleen Ryan, unit publicist: Phil Symes, titles/opticals: General Screen Enterprises, stills: Jonathan Hession, post.p. composer: Philip Appleby, distr: Film Four International.
    Art directionDALY, Fiona
    CONROY, Clodagh
    Costume designBOYLE, Consolata
    RUBALCAVA, Magdalen
    Production designGERAGHTY, Mark
    Genre/CategoryPolitical Thriller
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleTONGUE
    Production companyDun Laoghaire College of Art and Design
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerMcCARTHY, Daragh
    DirectorMULLAN, Mary
    Script/AdaptationMULLAN, Mary
    PhotographyTIERNAN, Darran
    DOYLE, Ronan
    DRENNAN, Susan
    Sound recordingNUGENT, Jim
    McCULLOUGH, Ivan
    EditingMULLAN, Mary
    LITTON, Anthony
    HAELY, Maurice
    O'LEARY, Anne
    SUTTON, Amanda
    Music composerMcKEON, Stephen
    Songs'Tongue' perf. by REM; 'Searching' perf. by China Black; 'Whispering Grass' perf. by The Ink Spots.
    CastAlexandra Haughey (Sorcha), Maura O'Malley (grandmother), Clare
    Dowling (Deirdre, Sorcha's sister), Brian Kelly (Sam, Sorcha's brother),
    Maeve Leonard (mother). Tony McCormack (father with Sorcha at the
    wake), Eva Coffee (aunt at the wake), Tommy-Wayne Christie (uncle at
    the wake), Richard Mullaly (boy on road), David Mullaly (boy on bicycle),
    LanguageEnglish
    Soundsound
    Duration15
    Format16mm
    Release date1995
    SummaryFive-year-old Sorcha has an older sister, Deirdre, who is due to get married shortly. To Sorcha's annoyance, her sick grandmother is put in her bed, but the family is oblivious to the discord between them. The next morning Sorcha withholds medication from her grandmother and she dies. A wake is held for her grandmother, but Sorcha imagines there is a monster in the wardrobe. At Deirdre's wedding Sorcha tells her older sister that she killed granny, but Deirdre picks her up and hugs her. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 26/6/1995 (Irish Film Centre).

    This film was awarded a Fuji Scholarship 1995.
    KeywordsFamily
    Childhood
    Grandmothers
    Death
    Wakes
    Murder
    Monsters
    Production creditsp.c: Dun Laoghaire College of Art and Design, p: Daragh McCarthy, d/sc/ed: Mary Mullan dop: Darran Tiernan, light: Gabriel Levy, a. light: David Brown, c. op: Ronan Doyle, a.c: Susan Drennan, m. score: Stephen McKeon, songs: 'Tongue' perf. by REM; 'Searching' perf. by China Black; 'Whispering Grass' perf. by The Ink Spots, s: Jim Nugent, a.s: Ivan McCullough, p.dsgn.: Noel McEntee, Lisa Smith, Paul Palmer, grip: Fionn Comerfbrd, Ivora Cusack, graphics: Adrian Corrigan, Paddy Geraghty, Feargal O'Dea, p.m: Imogen Murphy, a.d: Paddy Barren, cont: Higel Bunyan, a. ed: Anthony Litton, super, ed: Maurice Healy, Anne O'Leary, Amanda Sutton, make-up: Fiona Hogan, Patsy Giles, stills: Michael Durand.
    Production designMCENTEE, Noel
    SMITH, Lisa
    PALMER, Paul
    LightingLEVY, Gabriel
    BROWN, David
    Genre/CategoryShort Film Drama
    Student Film

    TitleDISAPPEARANCE OF FINBAR, THE
    Production companyFirst City Features Ltd
    Samson Films Ltd
    Victoria Film AB
    Film Four International
    SponsorMidnight Sun Cultural Film and Television AB
    Pandora Cinema
    Bord Scannan na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    Country of originIreland
    Great Britain
    ProducerOHLSSON, Bertil
    BRUCE-CLAYTON, Martin
    COLLINS, David
    STAELMOSE, Soren
    STONEMAN, Rod
    DirectorCLAYTON, Sue
    Script/AdaptationCLAYTON, Sue
    BOLGER, Dermot
    PhotographySERRA, Edward
    WOOSTER, Arthur
    Sound recordingLINDSKOG, Mats
    EditingDUFFNER, J. Patrick
    STRACHAN, Alan
    KELLEHER, Michael
    PEARSON, Jamie
    LYNCH, Gaye
    Music composerSPILLANE, Davy
    MAHONEY, Michael
    Songs'Moving Them Little Doggies Alone' by and perf. by Chris Meehan; 'The Ballad of Finbar Flynn' by George McFall, Michael Mahoney, featuring Gets/z
    Loose; 'Love is Here' by Rob Brown, Mahoney, Sue Clayton, perf. by CJ
    and the Little Extras; 'The Ballad of Finbar Flynn' Swedish disco version
    arrg. by Max Lorentz; 'Hopeinen Kuu' original version 'Guarda Che
    Luna' by Malgoni Gualtiero; 'Hiljainen Kylatie' by Pedro de Punta, arrg.
    by Pedro Hietanen; 'Tangokavaljeeri' original version 'Tango Kavaljeren'
    by Sylvain Jules; 'litin Tiltu' (trad. Finnish) arrg. by Hietanen.
    CastLuke Griffin (Danny), Lorraine Pilkington (Katie), Jonathan Rhys- Myers (Finbar Flynn), Sean Lawlor (Michael Flynn), Chris Meehan, Toner Quinn, Phil Calley, Fran McPhail, Pete Cummins, Pat Henry, Gerard Cullen (Roscommon Cowboys), Jake Williams (young Finbar), Robert Hickey (young Danny), Eleanor Methven (Pat Flynn), Marie Mullen (Ellen Quinn), Don Foley (Eoin Quinn, grandpa), Conor Fitzgerald (Fergal Flynn), Aoife Doyle (Jodie), Laura Brennan (Sinead), Tina Kellegher (Ms Byrne), Sean McGinley (Roche), Barry McGovem (Action Committee chairman), Ciara Wong (Wong Li, girl in chip shop). Deny Power (barman), Larry Murphy (bouncer), Joe Savino (Luke, talent scout), Rob Brown (rock singer), Louise Lotighman, Pamela Flood (pop video dancers), Jan Myrbrand (immigration officer), Lina Englund (girl in bar), Per Mattsson (Karl), Li Wen (Chinese man), Zheng Wei (Chinese woman), Juhani Haapala (man in store), Lille-Mor Falk (woman in store), Mikael Toyra (big Finnish driver), Kent Sturk (man in kiosk), Kurt Johansson, OlofMukka (singing miners), Sten Ljungren (Finnish barman), Antti Reini (Antti), Thomas Heddengran (Mattie), Ennart Johansson (Pauli), Thomas Laustiola (Jukka), Fanny Risberg (Abbi), Sif Ruud (Johanna), Pedro Hietanen, Jiri Lappalainen, Allan Isberg, Heikki Virtanen, Peter Lerche, Reino Laine (Pedro's heavy gentlemen), E Kki Junkkarinen, Seppo Kantonen (tango singers), Ciaran Fitzgerald (young Finbar), Paul Taynor (deputy chairman), Peter Vollebregt (Swiss coach), Mal Whyte (Crimeline director). Jasmine Russell (TV host), Fanche Mahe (young Danny), Geoffrey O'Toole (1st footballing kid). Mark Dunne (2nd footballing kid), Ellen Flood (neighbour), Gladys Sheehan (Madge Brady).
    Colourcol
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration100
    Format35mm
    Release date1996
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryFeeling trapped in the close community where he lives in Dublin,the working class suburb of Tallaght, eighteen-year-old Finbar Flynn climbs the half-finished flyover that overhangs his housing estate... and disappears. No word is heard and no body is found. For three years the community investigates, mourns, parties and finally elevates Finbar to cult status. Danny, his reluctant best friend, determines to discover the truth behind Finbar's disappearance. This leads him on a journey to snow-covered northern Finland where in a tango hall the pair reminisce about their lives in Dublin. In the meantime, the woman with whom Danny falls in love, who had previously been Finbar's lover, provides an echo of their Irish rivalry over Katie, and a displacement perhaps of their own close male bonds.
    NoteFilmed on location in Dublin, Stockholm, and in Lapland. The Irish Film Archive holds a cutting copy and rushes from this film on VHS.
    ReferencePublicity including cast and crew lists, short synopsis, synopsis, production background, cast and crew biographies, press quotes and interest shown in film Disappearance of Finbar by film festivals. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    The Guardian, 23/10/98:9, review of the film Disappearance of Finbar (GW).

    8th Galway Film Fleadh programme, 1996:21.
    DistributorFilm Four International (GB)
    KeywordsWorking Class Communities
    Youth
    Tallaght
    LocationDublin
    Stockholm
    Lapland
    Production creditsp.c: First City Features Ltd, Samson Films Ltd, Victoria Film AB, pres: Film Four International. In association with Midnight Sun Cultural Film and Television AB, Pandora Cinema, Bord Scannan na hEireann, p: Bertil Ohlsson, Martin Bruce-Clayton, co-p: David Collins (Ireland), Soren Staermose (Sweden), exec. p: Jonathan Olsberg, Ole Sondberg, (Bord Scannan na hEireann) Rod Stoneman, d: Sue Clayton, sc: Dermot Bolger, Clayton from The Disappearance of Rory Brophy by Carl Lombard, dop: Eduardo Serra, c. op: Peter Robertson, focus puller: Lasse Karlsson, clapper/loader: Manne Lindvall, key grip: Ame Carlsson, chief gaffer: Ulf Bjork, s. mix: Ronald Bailey, s. maintenance: Andrew Griffiths, ed: J Patrick Duffner, a. ed: Alan Strachan, post.p. super: Stephen Barker, m: Davy Spillane, a. m: Michael Mahoney, songs: 'Moving Them Little Doggies Alone' by and perf. by Chris Meehan; 'The Ballad of Finbar Flynn' by George McFall, Michael Mahoney, featuring Gets/z Loose; 'Love is Here' by Rob Brown, Mahoney, Sue Clayton, perf. by CJ and the Little extras; 'The Ballad of Finbar Flynn' Swedish disco version arrg. by Max Lorentz; 'Hopeinen Kuu' original version 'Guarda Che Luna' by Malgoni Gualtiero; 'Hiljainen Kylatie' by Pedro de Punta, arrg. by Pedro Hietanen; 'Tangokavaljeeri' original version 'Tango Kavaljeren' by Sylvain Jules; 'litin Tiltu' (trad. Finnish) arrg. by Hietanen, cast: Nuala Moiselle, Patsy Pollock, film cnslt: Peter Hald, 1st a.d: Daniel Bergman, Guy Travers, GB co-ord: Catherine Jardine, p. accnt: Pia Janols, Irish crew - p.m: Seamus Mclnemey, p. co-ord: Cathy Handelman, loc. m: Manus Hingerty, dsgn cnslt: Mark Geraghty, art d: (Ireland) Ned McLoughlin, Conor Devlin, a. art d: Brendan Rankin, 2nd a.d: Robert Quinn, 3rd a.d: John Burns, trainee a.d: Daisy Cummins, set runner: Hannah Quinn, p. accnt: David Sheehy, a. accnt: Sile Domey, prop. buyer: Tina Brophy, prop. master: Cos Egan, stand-by props: Rene Knol, Noel Walsh, dressing props: Dave Peters, trainee props: Neil Duggan, cnstr. m: Russ Bailey, cnstr. super: Dave Whelan, master painter: Tommy Lavelle, painters: My Leffler (Sweden), Chris O'Shaughnessy, Joseph Gaynor, carpenters: Larry O'Toole, Manus Daly, Paschal Farrell, George Joyce, riggers:Willie O'Brien, Jimmy Merrigan, stagehand: John Purdy, grip: John Murphy, gaffer: Philip Fitzsimons, best boy: Stephen Doyle, elec: Albert Cassells, cost: Marie Tierney, ward. mistress: Sheila Fahy, ward. trainee: Louise Keating, make-up: Moma Ferguson, a. make-up: Jennifer Hegarty, hair: Oria Carroll, a. hair: Lorraine Glynn, sp. effs. super: Maurice Foley, choreo: Cindy Cummins, tango teacher: Liz Smith, dial. coach: Brendan Gunn, stand-ins: Cathy Pearson, Keith Foston, pop video c: Robertson, pop video ed: Jorgen Andreason, video playback op: Bill Dowling, p. secretary: Janette Hamill, office runner: Sam Knox-Johnston, a. to David Collins: Susan Hamett, a. to Bertil Ohlsson: Niamh O'Dea, Swedish crew - p. super: Monica Steenberg, p. co-ord: (Stockholm) Anita Rytting, cast: (Sweden) Louise Thuren, 2nd a.d: Kathrine Windfeld, Marita Koivisto, loc. m: Dan Lundstrom (Lapland), art d: Bengt Froderberg, a. art d: Linda Jansson, props, master: Goran Nilsson, cnstr. m: Johan Sjolin, stand-by props: Anders Olausson, painter: My Leffler, props buyer: (Stockholm) Johan Hamesk, a. props: (Stockholm) Jenny Malmsten, (Lapland) Sonja Lindblom, Jan Haglof, Joakim Lundstrom, cost: Kersti Vitali, a. cost: Jaana Fomin, make-up: Maria Strid, a. make-up: Anna Lena Melin, tango choreo: Jan Astrom, Rosario Rojas, co-ord: Lapland) Annette Nija, unit m: Mariana Paavonen, a. unit m: Mia Avellone, p.a: Anna Johansson, p. secretary: Mia Zaar, publicity: Cinema Sweden, Ylva Swedenborg, stunts: (Lapland) Kent Sturk, dialect coach: Ingvar Selberg, 2nd unit - dop: Arthur Wooster, p.m: Hans Loonerheden, p. co-ord: Agneta Perman, c. op: Tim Wooster, s: Mats Lindskog, loc. m: Tobias Astrom, a. ed: Michael Kelleher, Jamie Pearson, Gaye Lynch, post.p. s: Movietrack, s. dsgn: Tim Lewiston, dub. mix: Richard King, script adv: Richard Burridge, titles/opticals: General Screen Enterprises, international PR: Jane Gibbs, unit writer: Libby Shearon, c. trainee: Kate Slade, stills: Alex Bailey, GB distr: Film Four International.
    Art directionMcLOUGHLIN, Ned
    DEVLIN, Conor
    RANKIN, Brendan
    Costume designTIERNEY, Marie
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleORDINARY DECENT CRIMINAL
    Production companyLittle Bird Productions
    Icon Entertainment International
    Tatfilm
    Trigger Street Productions
    Miramax Films
    SponsorBórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    The Greenlight Fund
    Filmstiftung NRW
    Country of originIreland
    Germany
    USA
    Great Britain
    ProducerCAVENDISH, Jonathan
    DirectorO'SULLIVAN, Thaddeus
    Script/AdaptationSTEMBRIDGE, Gerard
    PhotographyDUNN B.S.C., Andrew
    Sound recordingHORGAN, Kieran
    EditingANDERSON A.C.E., William
    Music composerALBARN, Damon
    Songs'Special Brew'
    Words & Music by Damon Albarn
    Used by kind permission of EMI Music Publishing Ltd
    Produced and Performed by Damon Albarn
    Damon Albarn appears courtesy of Food and EMI Records Ltd.
    'Come Together'
    Words & Music by Damon Albarn
    Used by kind permission of EMI Music Publishing Ltd.
    Produced and Performed by Damon Albarn
    Damon Albarn appears courtesy of Food and EMI records Ltd
    'Film Ballad'
    Words & Music by Damon Albarn
    Used by kind permission of EMI Music Publishing Ltd
    Performed by Damon Albarn
    Produced by Damon Albarn and Stephen Street
    Damon Albarn appears courtesy of Food and EMI Records Ltd
    'EuroDisco'
    Words & Music by Amanda McKinnon/ Steve Clark/ John Clark
    Used by kind permission of Universal Music Publishing Ltd
    Performed by BIS
    courtesy of Wiiija Records
    'Fire in My Heart'
    Words & Music by Huw Bunford/ Cian Ciaran/ Dafydd Leuan/
    Guto Pryce/ Gruff Rhys
    Used by kind permission of Universal Music Publishing Ltd
    Performed by SUPER FURRY ANIMALS
    courtesy of Creation Records Ltd/ Sine
    'Gopher Mambo'
    Words and Music by Billy May/ Conrad Gozzo
    Used by kind permission of Universal Music Publishing Ltd
    Performed by YMA SUMAC
    courtesy of EMI Records Ltd
    'I Want You'
    Words and Music by Michael Head
    Used by kind permission of Morrison Leahy Music Ltd
    Performed by SHACK
    courtesy of London Records 90 Ltd.
    Licensed by kind permission of the Film & TV Licensing Division,
    part of the Universal Music Company
    'Mother of Pearl'
    Words and Music by Brian Ferry
    Used by kind permission of BMG Songs Ltd
    Performed by BRIAN FERRY
    courtesy of Brian Ferry
    'Superfinger'
    Words and Music by Magnus Uwe Box/ Sarah Matthews/ Jason
    Meherin/ Paul Russell
    Used by kind permission of Sony/ ATV Music Publishing Ltd &
    Low Finger Partnership
    Performed by LOWFINGER
    courtesy of Geffen Records/ Polydor UK Ltd
    Licensed by kind permission of The Film & TV Licensing
    Division, part of the Universal Music Company
    'One Day At A Time'
    Words and Music by Mari John Wilkin/ Kris Kristofferson
    Used by kind permission of the Valentine Music Group
    Performed by GLORIA
    courtesy of Outlet Recording Company Ltd
    Also performed by Michael Lynch and Gang
    'Just When I Needed You The Most'
    Words and Music by Randy Vanwarmer
    C. Terraforma Music/ Fourth Floor Music
    Used by kind permission of Warner Chappell Music
    Performed by Michael Lynch and Family
    'Been Caught Stealing'
    Words and Music by Eric Avery/ Perry Farrell/ David Navarro/
    Stephen Perkins
    Used by kind permission of EMI/ Virgin Music Ltd
    Performed by JANE'S ADDICTION
    courtesy of Warner Music (UK) Ltd
    'Carolan's Draught'
    Traditional arranged by Arty McGlynn
    Used by kind permission of Emerald Music
    Performed by ARTY McGLYNN
    courtesy of Emerald Records
    'The Floating Crowbar/ The Story of Munster'
    Traditional arranged by Arty McGlynn
    Used by kind permission of Emerald Music
    Performed by ARTY McGLYNN
    courtesy of Emerald Records
    'O Salutaris Hostia'
    Composed by C.Saint-Saens
    Performed by the choir of Trinity College, Cambridge,
    directed by Richard Marlow
    courtesy of BMG Conifer Ltd
    'Bluer Than The Blues'
    Words and Music by Ray Davies
    Used by kind permission of JW Media Music Ltd
    CastKevin Spacey (Michael Lynch), Linda Fiorintino (Christine Lynch), Peter Mullan (Stevie). Stephen Dillane (Noel Quigley), Helen Baxendale (Lisa), David Hayman (Tony Brady), Patrick Malahide (commissioner), Gerard McSorley (Harrison), David Kelly (Fr Grogan), Gary Lyndon (Tom Rooney), Paul Ronan (Billy Lynch), Colin Farrell (Alec), Vincent Reagan (Shay Kirby), Tim Loane (Jerome Higgins), Christoph Waltz (Peter), Billy Murphy (Barry), Tony Coleman Con), Barry Barnes (Larry), Anthony Brophy (Liam), Paul Roe (Luke), Paul Hickey (Ger), Tim McGuire (Lenny), Joe Gallagher (dole office clerk), Herbert Knaup (De Heer), Alan Devlin (Lord Mayor), Jer O'Leary (Padraig Lynch), Hugh B O'Brien (Fintan Doorley), Gerard Lee (desk seargent), Conor Evans (first judge), Des Braiden (second judge) Conor Mullins (McHale), Enda Oates (Brian), Anne Cassin (news reporter), Dave Fanning (radio presenter), Ann O'Neill (country shop keeper ), Jonathan Shankey (man outside bank), Bronco McLoughlin (Mr Harmless), Angela McLoughlin (Mrs Harmless), Tamzin Shaw (Mrs Hippy), Ross Dungan (Tommy Lynch), Sarah Barret (Breda Lynch), Alex Hayes (Shane Lynch), Darragh Mullen (Eddie), Maeve De Blacam (Niamh), Eva Barret (Oonagh), Mary O'Driscoll (judge's daughter), Michael Hayes (judge's daughter's boyfriend), Rory Egan, Leonard Hayden, Brendan Morrisey, Sarah Pilkington, Mario Rosenstock (journalists)
    ColourTechnicolor
    SoundDolby Digital
    Duration100
    Format35mm
    Release date2000
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryCriminal Michael Lynch is closely modelled on Dubliner Martin Cahill, and this film follows the main events of his criminal career, especially the paintings robbery and the jewellery warehouse theft, his defiance of the police, playing hide-and-seek with his garda nemesis Quigley, his facial disguises and exposing his buttocks to the gardai, queuing for state unemployment benefit, and being a family man who visits his two 'wives', sisters Christine and Lisa. In the climactic scene, Lynch is being double-crossed by the IRA, but he and fellow gangster Brady hold up the IRA thieves. When the police surround the building a man who looks like Lynch appears from it and is shot dead. Later, the sisters identify the body as Lynch's, but in fact it was the IRA leader, and the gangster is still free.
    NoteSight and Sound 4:61
    ReferenceS&S 2000 6:49. Emer Rockett, 'Ordinary Decent Criminal', in Brian McFarlane, ed., The Cinema of Britain and Ireland, London: Wallflower Press, 2005:239 - 48.
    DistributorUnicorn Distributors Limited
    KeywordsCrime
    Gangs
    Working class people
    Robberies
    Art theft
    Marriage
    Sisters
    Police
    IRA
    Martin Cahill
    Dublin
    Production creditsp.c.: Icon Entertainment international Presents A Little Bird Production in association with Tatfilm and Trigger Street Productions. Produced in Association with Miramax Films, Bord Scannan na hEireann/The Irish Film Board, The Greenlight Fund, Filmstiftung NRW. p: Jonathan Cavendish, d: Thaddeus O'Sullivan, sc: Gerard Stembridge, exec.p: James Mitchell, Christine Ruppert, co-p: Martha O'Neill, dop: Andrew Dunn B.S.C., ed: William Anderson A.C.E., p.d.: Tony Burrough, cost: Jane Robinson, original score composed by Damon Albarn, casting directors: Ros and John Hubbard, exec.p.s for, Icon Entertainment international: Ralph Kamp, Paul Tucker, exec.p. for Bord, Scannan na hEireann/ The Irish Film Board: Rod Stoneman, assoc.p.: Margaret Moggan, Finance and legal: exec.s: Jonathan Kelly, Annette Waldron, script cnslt: Maggie Pope, p.m.: Dara McClatchie, 1st a. d.: Deborah Saban, p.accnt.: Andrew Lowe, loc.m.: Adrian McCarthy, p.co-ord.: Janette Hamill, assistant p.co-ord.: Moyra D'Arcy, assistant to the p: Karen Katz, p.trainee: Sarah Joyce, production runner: Tara Hegarty, assistant to the d: Ciara Walshe, assistant accnts: Adrienne Curran, Siobhan Southwell, Orla McGowan, p.accnt. (Germany): Petra Junk, dialogue Coach, Brendan Gunn, unit publicist: Susan D'Arcy, stills ph: Tom Collins, Publicity ( Irish ): Clarence Pictures, Publicity a.: Clare Sweeney, assistant loc.m.: Michael Casey, Leanara Frawley, Location co-ord.: Rowena Kelly, 2nd a. d.: Marian Barlow, 2nd a. d.: Olivia Lloyd, 3rd a. d.: Ciara O'Sullivan, crowd co-ord.: Jill Dempsey, trainee a.d.s: Denise Lyons, Ermer Clonan, cast a.: Abi Harris, stand-ins: Steve Morphew, Clare Keogh, Patrick Lynch, c.op.: Mike Proudfoot, Steadycam/ 'B' c.op.: Keith Sewell, focus puller 'A' c: Ciaran Kavanagh, clapper loader 'A' c: Owen Farrell, focus puller 'B' c: Tim Fleming, clapper loader 'B' c: Des Doyle, c.trainees: Grainne MacAnthony, Julian Nikolai Eberth, sc.super: Emer Conroy, key grip: Luke Quigley, c.grip: trainee: Luke Quigley Jnr., Playback op.: Bill Dowling, gaffer elec: Patrick Miller, best boy: Vincent Madden, elec: Billy Doyle, Paul Fegan, Pat Ryder, generator op.: Stephen Bruen, Practical elec: Des Troy, Lighting Department trainee: Nina Erfle, s: Kieran Horgan, boom op.: Noel Quinn, s.trainee:Charles Brand, art d.: Clodagh Conroy, Set dresser: Dominic Smithers, property buyer: Keavy Lalor, standby art d.: Richard Fields, graphic.dsgn.:Lisa Smyth, draughtsman: Conor Dennison, storyboard artist: Romek Delimata, art dept trainees: Una Magee, Frank Monahan, Kathryn McDonagh, ward.super: Ger Scully, assistant cost: Dulcie Scott, ward.a. s.:Gabriel O'Brien, Judith Williams, Ciara James, Oona McFarland, ward. trainees: Franziska Horn, Maura McDonald, chief make-up artist: Morna Ferguson, chief hair: Lorraine Glynn, assistant hair: Una O'Sullivan, assistant make-up: Lynn Johnson, props masters: Triona Coen, Sam Stokes, standby props: Colin G. Mutch, dressing props: Christopher Cutler, Charlie Johnson, Will Cann, trainee props: Olivia Quigley, standby rigger: James Merrigan, standby carpenter: Thomas Burke, standby stagehand: Gerard Quigley, cnstr.man.: David Whelan, super.carpenter: Paschal Farrell, carpenters: Brian Geoghan, David Norris, Matthew Kirwan, Michael Murphy, John Greene, master painter: Gerard Richardson, painters: Thomas O'Shaughnessy, Bobby Richardson, riggers:Kevin Killeen, Michael Freaney, stagehand: John Purdy, construction driver: Daithi Curran, 1st a. ed: Gavin Buckley, Associate ed: Christine Marier, CoNíorming ed: Lionel Johnson, Celia Haining, assistant CoNíorming ed: Andrew Perrier, Louisa Drysdale, trainee assistant ed: Liam Anderson: Sally Anne Duffy, post-p.super: Stephen Law, post.p.Accountancy: Axium UK Ltd.-David Kerney, post-p.co-ord.: Polly Duval, music super.s: Toni Halliday, Michael Lustig, score produced by Damon Albarn, m.ed.:Terry Delsing, Music Programmer: Tom Girling, score engineered& mixed by Austin Ince, Chris Brown, Tom Girling, Jason Cox, assistant engnr: Ian Robertson, original Songs recorded at 13 & Sarm Studios, London. orchestral Music arranged & conducted by Gary carpenter, Choir: London Community Gospel Choir, a. Musicians contracted by Hilary Skewes, Mike Smith, score Co-ordinated by: Niamh Byrne, CMO Management international Ltd, super.s.ed.:Mike Wood, dial.ed.: Howard Halsall, ADR ed: Nigel Stone, Foley ed: Juipter Sen, s.assts: Rauf Bayraktar, Nigel Scott, Foley art.: Jason Swanscott, Diane Greaves, Felicity Cottrell, re-rd.mix.: Paul Carr, assistant re-rd.mix.: Robert Farr, sp.effs.: Team FX, SFX tech: Brendan Byrne, Aidan Byrne, Kevin Kearns, SFX driver: Derek Shane, chief stunt.co-ord. Patrick Condren, Stunt Driving co-ord.: Jim Dowdall, stunt perf.: Paddy Condren, Tony Condren, Joe Condren, Brendan Condren, Yvonne Nolan, Philippe Zone, Eamon Kelly, Norman Kelly, Seamus Kent, Bronco Mc Loughlin, Anna Stuart, Emma Condren, Emily Condren. action vehicles: co-ord.s: Karl Moore-Lewy, Liam S.Kelly. action vehicle a.s.:Joe McCann, Dave Hill, Michael F.Selby. armourer: Joe Condren, unit nurses: Trudi McHugh, Marita O'Flaherty. transport captain: Dan Breen Jnr. unit drivers: Tony Mullally, George McGlashan, Mitch Masterson, props driver: Paul Smallwood, Neil Duggan, wardrobe truck driver: Kevin Higgins, make-up & hair driver: Gary Bond, standby props truck driver: Jason Clarke, camera truck driver: Peter Davison, standby construction truck: Harry Hill, Honeywagon/ dining bus: driver: Hugh Wasson, 2 Way driver: Ozzy Dorrian, Camper and Caravan drivers: Andy Thornton, Steven Thornton, Winnebago driver: Stuart Sharp, facilities driver: Anthony Carroll: tracking vehicles & Low loader: Kelly Film Services. 2nd unit: 2nd unit d: Ivan Zacharias, 2nd unit p: Lesley Cavendish, 2nd unit dop: Jan Velicky, 1st a. d.: Liz Gill, 2nd a. d.: David Cain, loc.m.: Naoise Barry, Liz Kenny, loc.a.:Glenn Delaney, focus puller: Keith Durham, clapper loader: Paul Hannan, grip: Paul Tsan, sc.super: Catherine Morris, s: Karl Merren, action vehicle co-ord.: Stephen O'Carroll, trainee assistant d.: Nigel Burton, s.trainee:Stephen McLoughlin, caterers: Fitzers Catering, camera equipment: Panavision Ireland, Car Hire: Argus Car and Van Rentals, Costumiers: Angels & Bermans, Carlo Manzi's. a. Costume: Jil Sander, Armand Basi, couriers: Aer Fast international Ltd. electrical equipment: Cine Electric, film stock: Kodak. Dolby Digital in selected Theatres., Kodak Motion Picture Film, cameras and lenses Panavision Ireland. Completion guarantee provided by: international Film Guarantors, Inc., insurers: Near North Entertainment, A.Huber & Co., Network Insurance. legal services: A+L Goodbody, Dublin, Erickson+Halloran, Los Angeles, Dr Stefan RU11, Germany, financial services: Gandon Capital Markets, KPMG Corporate Finance. Consultants: Michael O'Higgins B.L, Declan Fahy, Michael Kelleher, Alex Tracey. laboratories: Technicolor, ProCine Filmtechnik GmbH, travel agent: Flair Travel. Cutting Room Hire: Goldcrest post.p.Facilities/ Clearcut Pictures, Avid Suite: Oculus, telecine: Midnight Transfer, colour by: Technicolour, London, Laboratory Liaison: John Ensby, Colour Timer: John Stanborough, negative cutter: Sylvia Wheeler, re-recorded at Goldcrest post.p.Facilities, Dolby cnslt: James Seddon, a. dialogue: Ardmore Sound, post.p.sc:Sapex Scripts, titles dsgned by Man-Made. Titles created by Men In White Coats. opticals: General Screen Enterprises. special visual effs: Mill Film. Digital VFX super: Karl Mooney. Digital VFX p: Paul Edwards, 2D Digital Compositor: Michael Illingworth. Digital Matte Paintings: Simon Whicker. VFX ed: John Seymour. I/O super: Tim Caplan. Video crews Provided by Windmill Lane. TV Graphics inserts by Dynamo. Supported by The National Lottery through The Arts Council Of England. Filmed on location in Ireland. Produced with the support of incentives for the Irish film industry provided by the Government of Ireland. The Producers Wish To Thank The Following: AIB Bank, Foster Place, Dublin, An Garda Siochana, Dublin, Michael Andre, David Aukin, Bank Of Irish, College Green, Dublin, Bruce Davey, Department of Defence, Collins Barracks, Arbour Hill, Dublin, Dublin Corporation, Honourable Society of King's Inns, Dublin, Laurence Kaye, Dieter Kosslick, Jack Lechner, Cameron McCracken, Ian Neil, Simon Perry, The Pigeon House Trust, Dublin, Allon Reich, The Residents of St. Joseph's Mansions, Dublin, Rover Group Ltd. The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Michael Schmid-Ospach, Manuela Stehr, Paul Webster, The events, characters and firms depicted in this motion picture are fictitious. Any similarity to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental and unintentional. Ownership of this motion picture is protected by copyright laws and other applicable laws, and any unauthorised duplication, distribution or exhibition of this motion picture could result in Criminal prosecution as well as civil liability. Little Bird. 1999 Unicorn Distributors Limited.
    Art directionCONROY, Clodagh
    Costume designROBINSON, Jane
    RightsLittle Bird Productions
    Tatfilms
    Icon Productions
    13 Merrion Square, Dublin 2
    info@littlebird.ie
    Tel: +353 1 661 4245
    Fax: +353 1 662 4647
    Sales Agent: ICON International - +44 171 5434300 / fax. +44 171 5434301
    Production designBURROUGH, Tony
    Genre/CategoryGangster Film
    Crime Caper

    TitleRUN OF THE COUNTRY, THE
    Production companyOne Two Nine Productions
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerYEATS, Peter
    BOSWELL, Ruth
    DirectorYEATS, Peter
    Script/AdaptationCONNAUGHTON, Shane
    PhotographySOUTHON, MIke
    EditingHODGSON, Paul
    Executive producerWOOLL, Nigel
    O'SULLIVAN, Morgan
    Associate producerCONNAUGHTON, Shane
    Music composerMILLAR, Cynthia
    BERNSTEIN, Emilie (orchestrations)
    Music performanceIrish Film Orchestra
    Songs'Oh Boy!' by Sunny West, Bill Tilgham, Norman Petty, 'Stay' by Maurice Williams, 'I Need a Pickaxe to Break Your Heart of Stone' by Susan Marder, Hummie Mann, perf. by Titanic Cinq; 'Pied Piper' by Leo Moran, Dave Carton, 'Hay Wrap' by Moran, Dave Carton, Pearse Doherty, John Donnelly, John Burke, perf. by The Saw Doctors; 'Crazy' by Willie Nelson, perf. by Patsy Cline.
    CastAlbert Finney (father). Matt Keeslar (Danny), Victoria Smurfit (Annagh), Anthony Brophy (Prunty), David Kelly (Father Gaynor), Dearbhla Molloy (mother), Carole Nimmons (Mrs Prunty), Vinnie McCabe (Annagh's uncle), Trevor Clarke (barman), Kevin Murphy (big man), Michael O'Reilly (Bouncer Patterson), P J Brady (Carolan), Micheal Doherty (Dolan), Declan Mulholland (farmer). Dawn Bradfield (Daphne), Paddy McGuinness (lookout), Christy Mahon (man). Pat Kinevane (McQuade), Joe Hanly (Monkey), Maureen Dow (Mrs McKenna), Eileen Ward (Mrs Lee), Thomas Lappin (Rennicks), Robin Hines (soldier), Antoine Byrne (wench), Seamus O'Rourke (man at Annagh's), Joan Sheehy (Widdy McGinn), Noel Smith (Goblin Gilmour), Hugh B O'Brien (Danny's uncle), Aine Ní Mhuiri (Danny's aunt). Sissy Connolly (elderly lady), Mary Reilly (woman). the Titanic Cinq (band).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration108/109
    Footage9759
    Release date1995
    TX channelRTE 2
    TX date16/12/2000
    CopyIFA
    SummaryIn a small community on the Irish border, after the death of his mother, Danny, an eighteen-year-old boy, argues bitterly with his father, the local garda sergeant, and decides to leave home. He moves in with his friend, Prunty, who lives on a nearby farm. Danny is shy and naive, and Prunty resolves to teach him a few lessons about life. Their wild antics enrage the local priest and appal Danny's father. Danny spots a beautiful young woman first when their car breaks down, and later when he dangles from a crane after a bungee jump. She is Annagh Lee, who lives with her well-to-do family north of the border. He eventually meets her at an illegal cock fight and invites her to the cinema. They start an affair, but she becomes pregnant and Danny's father refuses to countenance paying for an abortion. Prunty offers to help the couple raise the money for the trip to England. When he, Danny and a friend are digging peat Prunty loses his footing, falls into a bog and is killed when a tractor topples over on him. At his funeral, Danny learns that he was in the IRA. Annagh's family arrange for her to be sent away. She and Danny sneak away to spend time together before they're separated for good. During the night, she miscarries. He visits her home to declare his love for her, but is set upon by her relatives who beat him up, and tar and feather him. He is found the next morning in a shed by his father. The two are reconciled. The father is delighted that Danny has finally decided to leave the rural backwaters and start a new life elsewhere. He had hoped that Danny might go to America, but respects his son's decision to stay in Ireland and go to university in Dublin. (V; Adapted from S&S Jan 1996:47-8).
    NoteUSA Rel 22/9/1995; IR Rel 12/1/1996 (general release). Shane Connaughton kept a diary of the production which was published as A Border Country (1995).
    ReferenceFI No. 50, Dec 1995-Jan 1996:36-7; IT 22/4/1995:W2; IT 12/8/1995:W3;
    SI 31/12/1995:8; SI 14/1/1996:15L.
    DistributorRank
    Castle Rock Entertaiment
    Turner Entertainment
    KeywordsYouth
    Adolescence
    Troubles
    Family
    Rural Ireland
    Garda
    Father Son Relationships
    LocationBorder Counties
    Production creditsp.c: A One Two Nine Production. A Peter Yates Film, pres: Castle Rock Entertainment, p: Peter Yates, Ruth Boswell, exec. p: Nigel Wooll, co-exec. p: Morgan O'Sullivan, assoc. p: Shane Connaughton, d: Yates, 2nd unit d: Toby Yates, a.d: Lisa Mulcahy, Suzanne Nicell, Mary Gough, sc: Connaughton from his novel The Run of the Country (London: Hamish Hamilton, 1991), sc. super: Nikki Clapp, dop: Mike Southon, aerial c: Adam Dale, c. op: Philip Sindall, 2nd unit c. op: Rickie Gauld, ed: Paul Hodgson, p.d/set dec: Mark Geraghty, art d: David Wilson, p. co-ord: Clare St John, p.m: Mark Huffam, m: Cynthia Millar, orchestrations: Emilie Bernstein, m.p: Irish Film Orchestra, m. ed: Andrew Glen, m. cnslt: Arlene Fishbach, songs/m. extracts: 'Oh Boy!' by Sunny West, Bill Tilgham, Norman Petty, 'Stay' by Maurice Williams, 'I Need a Pickaxe to Break Your Heart of Stone' by Susan Marder, Hummie Mann, perf. by Titanic Cinq; 'Pied Piper' by Leo Moran, Dave Carton, 'Hay Wrap' by Moran, Dave Carton, Pearse Doherty, John Donnelly, John Burke, perf. by The Saw Doctors; 'Crazy' by Willie Nelson, perf. by Patsy Cline, super, s. ed: Don Sharpe, ADR ed: Archie Ludski, Foley ed: Anthony Phelan, s. mix: Ken Weston, m. rd: Brian Masterson, s. re-rd. mix: Otto Snel, Michael A Carter, sp. effs. super: lan Wingrove, stunt co-ord: Eddie Stacey, loc. m: John Phelan, cost: Rosemary Burrows, chief make-up: Alan Boyle, chief hair: Dee Corcoran, cast: Ros Hubbard, John Hubbard, Linda Lowy (USA), Mikie Heilbrun (New York associate), post.p. co- ord: Samantha Thomas, titles/opticals: Peerless Camera Company, distr: Rank-Castle Rock/Turner.
    Art directionWILSON, David
    Costume designBURROWS, Rosemary
    Production designGERAGHTY, Mark
    Genre/CategoryPolitical Thriller
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleLAST BUS HOME, THE
    Production companyBandit Films
    Beyond Films
    SponsorEuropean Script Fund (MEDIA Programme of the European Union)
    Bórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    Irish Screen
    WDR Television
    Radio Telefís Éireann/RTE
    Country of originIreland
    ProducerDONOVAN, Paul
    GOGAN, Johnny
    DirectorGOGAN, Johnny
    Script/AdaptationGOGAN, Johnny
    PhotographyMATHER, James
    Sound recordingCROSS, Ray
    EditingCREED, Catherine
    Executive producerFLYNN, James
    Music composerCOUGHLAN, Cathal
    Songs'Teenage Kicks'
    written and Composed by J J O'Neill
    Performed by The Undertones
    Reproduced by Permission of Westbank Songs Ltd
    Administered by MCA Music Ltd
    courtesy of The Undertones
    by arrangement with Castle Copyrights Ltd

    'Teenage Kicks'
    written and Composed by J J O'Neill
    Reproduced by Permission of Westbank Songs Ltd
    Administered by MCA Music Ltd
    Performed by Brian F. O'Byrne

    'Enemies'
    written & Composed by Philip Chevron
    Performed by The Radiators
    Published by Rockin'Music c/o IQ Music Ltd
    courtesy of Ace Records Ltd

    'Are You There Moriarty?'
    Composed by L. Tierney
    Performed by Sean Mooney
    Published by Waltons Ltd
    taken from the album 'Irish Cream'
    C. 1954 EMI Records Ltd
    under exclusive licence from EMI Commercial Markets

    'Are You There Moriarty?'
    Composed by L. Tierney
    Performed by Brian F. O'Byrne
    arranged + Produced by Cathal Coughlan
    Published by Waltons Ltd

    'Forces of Vicktry'
    written + Composed by Linton Kwesi Johnson
    C. 1980 Blue Mountain Music
    Performed by Linton Kwesi Johnson
    courtesy of Island Records Ltd
    by kind permission of the
    Polygram Commercial marketingDivision

    'Young People Of Ireland'
    'Waiting For A Bus'
    'Dead But Not Gone'
    'Birdwoman'
    written + Composed by Cahal Coughlan and Johnny Gogan
    Performed by Brian F O'Byrne
    arranged + Produced by Cahal Coughlan
    Published by Top Deck Music Ltd/ Mucho Loco Music Ltd

    'Dancing At The Barricades'
    written + Composed by Urethria
    Performed by Rob Allum
    Published by Top Deck Music Ltd/ Mucho Loco Music Ltd

    'Baby Dolls'
    written + Composed by Cathal Coughlan
    Performed by Anthony Brophy
    Published by Top Deck Music Ltd/ Mucho Loco Music Ltd

    'Lick My Eyes'
    'Hovering Craft @ Babylon'
    written/ Composed + Performed by his pointy hand
    Published by Top Deck Music Ltd/ Mucho Loco Music Ltd

    'Troy'
    Composed by Sinead O'Connor
    Performed by Sinead O'Connor
    Published by EMI Music Publishing Ltd
    taken from the album 'The Lion and the Cobra'
    C. 1990 EMI Records Ltd
    Under exclusive licence from EMI Commercial Markets

    'The Last Bus Home'
    written + Composed by Johnny Gogan
    Performed by Anthony Brophy
    arranged by Cathal Coughlan
    Published by Top Deck Music Ltd/ Mucho Loco Music Ltd
    CastAnnie Ryan (Reena), Brian F O'Byrne (Jessop), Anthony Brophy (Billy), John Cronin (Petie), Barry Comerford (Joe), Gemma Craven (Reena's mother), Donal O'Kelly (Richie), Brendan Coyle (Steve Burkett), Garrett Keogh (Reena's father), Anne Marie Byrne (Reena's Gran), Niall O'Brien (Jessop's father), David Wilmott (bus conductor), David Carey (Petie's father), Anne Kent (Petie's mother), Eileen Walsh (Carole), Kieran Hennessy (Des), Dan Hutchinson (punk 1), Kenin Potter (punk 2), John-Paul De Faul Robert Cummins (New Romantics), Stuart Clarke (1st bar owner), Simon Dalton (skinhead 1/ lone dancer), Ronan O'Donnell (skinhead 2), Vincent Groves (bar begrudger), Nancy Kavanagh (Mae), Paul Roe (police sergeant), Maeve Widger (cashier), Michael Garland (taxi driver), Oisin O'Siochru (priest), Rosie Gogan-Keogh, Collette Dunphy, Niamh Murray, Emma Jennings (Reena's sisters), Niamh O'Brien (catering/piano player)
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Format35mm
    Release date1997
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummarySet in the Dublin of the late 1970s, in an Ireland still emerging from the constrictions of Catholicism and nationalism, the dream of forming a rock band is an escape, a liberation in itself. Johnny Gogan's story from the edge finds our friends riding on the crest of the punk explosion, trying to make their break and hit the big time. A raw and Vibrant drama of loyalty, secrets and ambition while the music played on, and tragedy seemed a world away. For freedom forces them to confront their lives as individuals, a far harder prospect than riding the guitar solo of musical anarchy.
    NoteThe Irish Film Archive holds a rough cut and rushes of this film on VHS. Screened at the 9th Galway Film Fleadh, 8 - 13 July 1997.
    ReferenceIrish Times, 1997, ‘The good, the bad, and the...’, mention of film, especially music, in article reviewing the Cannes Film Festival (Michael Dwyer).

    Galway Film Fleadh programme, July 1997:56.

    Irish Times (Sound and Vision), 7/5/99:13, review (Michael Dwyer).

    Sunday Tribune (Review), 9/5/99:6, ‘Laughing Matters’, positive review (Ciaran Carty).

    Sunday Independent (Living and Leisure), 9/5/99:14L, ‘When the Misanthropy is Missable’, short review of the Last Bus Home (Ronan Farren).

    Dublin Event Guide, 12-25/5/99:8, mixed review (John White).

    Synopsis, biographies, cast and crew list, biographies, production notes, project appraisal - Beyond Films, Press clippings.

    Sunday Tribune (Review), 16/5/99:6, ‘Celtic Cannes’, pushing Irish projects at the Cannes Film Festival. Backing for the Last Bus Home was saught at Cannes in 1995. The film went on national release in Ireland last week (Ciaran Carty).

    Film Ireland, Aug/Sept 1997:34, review.

    VHEI Ireland, 04/2000-02/03/00, short review of the The Last Bus Home released on video.

    Sunday Tribune (Art Life), 16/04/00:6, video review (Ciaran Carty).

    Irish Times (Weekend), 29/04/00:21, short VHS release review (Hugh Linehan).

    In Production, October 2003 Volume 6 Number 5:19.
    KeywordsPunk Music
    Popes
    1980s
    Urban Drama
    Homosexuality
    Relationships
    Youth
    LocationDublin
    Wicklow
    Production creditsp.c.: Beyond Films, Bandit Films Productions, spon: European Script Fund (MEDIA Programme of the European Union), Bord Scannan na hEireann/Irish Film Board, Irish Screen, WDR Television, Radio Telefís Éireann, p: Paul Donovan, d/sc: Johnny Gogan, story ed.: Joe O'Byrne, original m. : Cathal Coughlan, light. c.: James Mather, p.dsgn.: Frank Conway, ed: Catherine Creed, s.dsgn: Terry Comer, cost: Marie Tierney, make-up.dsgn.: Rosie Blackmore, exec.p.: Michael Garland, p.m.: Margaret Jennings, p.co-ord.: Jane McNally, p.trainee: Emma Jennings, co-p.: Johnny Gogan, 1st a.d.: David Murphy, 2nd a.d.: Paul Barnes, 3rd a.d.: Conor O'Toole, trainee a.d.: Lisa McLoughlin, trainee a.d.: Philip Tottenham, trainee: Darragh Keogh, assistant to the d: Jane Gogan, sc.super: Kathleen Weir, cast.: Gillian Reynolds, accnt: Kevin Donegan, accnts a.: Mary Brennan, c.op.: Robbie Ryan, focus puller: Darryl Byrne, clapper loader: Des Doyle, trainee clapper loader: Donata Ferrario, grip: Philip Murphy, camera truck driver: Douglas, s: Ray Cross, boom op.: Danny Crowley, cost.super: Liz Treacy, cost.a.: Helen Kane, hair: Gudrun Thoruardardottir, loc.m.: Kieran Hennessy, loc.a.:Joan Conway, assistant art d.: Louise McAvin, Annabel Konig, trainee art d.: Ruth Winick, prop buyer: Audrey Corr, prop master: Alan Dunne, dressing props: David Wallace, stand-by props: June Connon, props trucks: Conor Moynihan, stand-by props truck, drivers: David Shipsey, Dave Kemple, cnstr. m.: Tom Dowling, master painter: Tommy Lavelle, painter: Joe Gaynor, carpenter: Mick Kearns, rigger: Paul Treacy, construction driver: Maurice Thompson, gaffer: Stephen McCarthy, gennie driver: Martin Holland, elec: Sean Cahill, Sean Creagh, stills ph: Pat Redmond, assistant ed: Ruth Allison, fight co-ord: Simon Dalton, super.s.ed.: Terry Cromer, s.ed.: Pat Stokes, a.s.ed.: Keith Alexander, dub.mix.: Aad Wirtz, m.super: Don Gallacher, music engineers: Bill Carey, Philip Erb, Steve Dray, original score: Cathal Coughlan, guitars: Nick Bunker, Peredur ap Gwynnedd, clarinet/bass flute: Renaud Pion, drums: Nick Allum, bass guitar/accordion: Nick Bagnall, titles: Information Design, minibus driver: John Butler, lighting: Cine Electric, cameras: Panavision, legal adv.: Mary Swords of Arthur Cox Solicitors, auditors: Bastow Charleton, insurance: Network Insurances, caterer: Film Foods, courier: Wells Cargo, laboratory: Technicolor, telecine and neg cut: Mike Fraser Ltd, ADR + Foley: Drop-in Recording Studios, Dublin, loc.m.rec.: Audio Engineering, Dublin, songs recorded at Sonica Studios, Brixton, score recorded at Phillip Erb's, Kilburn. a. recording at Waterhouse Studios, Stratford, dubbing studio: Interact Sound Ltd.; developed with the support of the European Script Fund, an initiative of the Media Porgramme of the European Union; produced in association with Bord Scannan na hEireann/ Irish Film Board, Irish Screen, WDR Television, RTE/ Radio Telefís Éireann, exec.p. for the Irish Film Board: James Flynn, exec.p. for Irish Screen: Kevin Menton. Produced with the support of investment incentives for the Irish Film Industry provided by the Government of Ireland. Distributed with the support of the Media Porgramme of the European Union. international sales: Beyond Films Ltd. thanks to: Deco, Derek, Beano and Elaine, Evanser, Plop, Trevor Giordai, the Film Action Plan, IFC/IFI, Dublin Bus, Peter Lamont at National Irish Bank, Howth Transport Museum, Guinness, Tennants, Beamish and Crawford, Coca Cola Bottling Co, Session Hire, Gallagher's, P J Carroll's, Hall of Fame, Virgin, Home Charm, Blue Light, Courtyard Studios, Gebhard Henke, Gemma Hill, Cathal Black, Jane Gogan, Orla Walsh, Jonathan Donovan. In fond memory of Tiernan MacBride. Save as specifically acknowledged herein or below the characters and events depicted in this film are fictitious, any similarity to actual persons either living or dead is purely coincidental. Shot on location in Dublin and Wicklow and at Ardmore studios. A Bandit Films Production.
    Costume designTREACEY, Liz
    Rights1997 Bandit Films Ltd
    Production designCONWAY, Frank
    LightingMATHER, James
    Genre/CategoryPeriod Drama
    Feature Film Drama

    TitleNEPHEW, THE
    Production companyIrish Dreamtime
    Nephew Productions
    World 2000 Entertainment
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerBROSNAN, Pierce
    ST CLARE, Beau
    DirectorBRADY, Eugene
    Script/AdaptationO'NEILL, Jacqueline
    STEELE, Sean P.
    PhotographyCONROY, Jack
    Sound recordingWILLIS, Simon J.
    EditingDUFFNER, Patrick J.
    Executive producerPALMIERI, Tom
    O'SULLIVAN, Morgan
    SOMERS, Marguerite
    SOMERS, Bernard
    Associate producerPALORMO, Cynthia A.
    Music composerMcKEON, Stephen
    Songs'Smoke On The Water'
    written by J. Lord/ R. Blackmore/ I. Gillan/ R. Glover/ I. Paice/
    B. Feldman & Co. Ltd. T/ as/ HEC Music/
    EMI Music Publishing Ltd
    Performed by Deep Purple
    Recording Licenced courtesy of EMI Records Ltd/ Warner Bros.
    Records Inc.
    by arrangement with Warner Special Products.

    'Dancing In The Moonlight'
    written by Philip Lynott
    C. 1978 Pippin The Friendly Ranger/ PolyGram Music Publishing
    Ltd
    Performed by Thin Lizzy
    Recording courtesy of Mercury Records Ltd
    by kind permission of
    PolyGram Commercial marketingDivision.

    'Goodbye Yellow Brick Road'
    written by Elton John and Bernie Taupin
    C. 1973 Dick James Music Ltd
    Performed by Elton John
    Recording courtesy of Mercury Records Ltd
    by kind permission of
    PolyGram Commercial marketingDivision.

    'Whiskey In The Jar'
    Trad. Arr. Stephen McKeon.

    'Nothing Else'
    written by Darius Keeler and Roya Arab
    C. 1996 Island Music Ltd
    Performed by Archive
    Recording courtesy of Island Records Ltd
    by kind permission of
    PolyGram Commercial marketingDivision.

    'Whisky In The Jar'
    written by Philip Lynott, Eric Bell and Brian Downey
    C. 1972 Pippin The Friendly Ranger/ PolyGram Music Publishing
    Ltd
    Performed by Thin Lizzy
    Recording courtesy of Decca International
    by kind permission of
    PolyGram Commercial marketingDivision.

    'Walk In The Light'
    written by Lundy/ Irwin
    Licensor: Kevin Mayhew Ltd.

    'Fun For Me'
    written by Roisin Murphy and Mark Brydon
    Published by Chrysalis Music Ltd
    Performed by Moloko
    courtesy of The Echo Label Ltd.

    'The Evil That Men Do'
    Words and Music by G. Hutchinson/ K. Gulley
    C. 1996 Tee Girl Music (BMI)/ Phront Street Music (BMI)/
    Pimp Clinic Muzick (BMI) c/o I.Q. Music Ltd
    Produced by Cold 187 um
    for Black Owned Entertainment Inc.
    Performed by Above The Law
    courtesy of Tommy Boy Music Ltd.

    'What's Goin' Down'
    written by Matt Elliss/ Stephen Wright/ Ian Dury/ Chas Jankel
    Published by Warner-Chappell Music Ltd
    Performed by Honky
    Recording Courtesy of
    Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

    'The Voice'
    written by Brendan Graham
    C. 1996 Acorn Music, Irish,
    Peer Music (UK) Ltd, 8-14, Verulam St., London WCIX 8LZ
    Performed by Eimear Quinn
    Licensed under permission from
    Acorn Music Ltd/ Polydor/ CNR Music International

    'Who Is He And What Is He To You ?'
    written by Withers/ McKenny
    Published by EMI Music Publishing Ltd
    Performed by Bill Withers
    Recording Courtesy of
    Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

    'Whisper A Prayer To The Moon'
    written by Eleanor McEvoy
    Published by EMI Music Publishing Ltd
    Performed by Eleanor McEvoy
    Recording Courtesy of
    Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

    'You're The One'
    written by Michael Kamen and Shane MacGowan
    Published by Sony Music Publishing
    Perfect Songs Ltd
    Performed by Shane MacGowan and The Popes
    Recording courtesy of ZTT Records Ltd.
    CastNiall Toibin (Sean Post), Sinead Cusack (Brenda O'Boyce), Luke Griffin (Peter O'Boyce), Phelim Drew (Patsy), Donal McCann (Tony Egan), Pierce Brosnan (Joe Brady), Tony Rohr (crony#1), Jimmy Keogh (crony# 2), Marcus Lynch (crony# 3), Birdy Sweeney (old codger), Aonghus Og McAnally (red haired kid), Hill Harper (Chad Egan-Washington), Aislin McGuckian (Aislin Brady), Lorraine Pilkington (Rachel), David Quinn (Dermot O'Boyce), William Clements (Conor O'Boyce), Des Braiden (Father O'Malley), Moira Hoey (Bridie), Billy Traynor (Bridie's daughter), Kathrina Shine (Sister Josie), Viva Silverthorne (Sister Florence), Sean Fox (Lucky Mick), Gerry Fox, Gavin Povey, Eilish Lennon, Antoine O'Farachin, Monica Artilles (David Downs (wake musicians), Monica Artilles (Spanish tourist ), Charlotte Brosnan (Swedish tourist), Fraggle (Groucheen).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    SoundDolby Digital
    Duration105
    Footage9368
    Format35mm
    Release date1998
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryTony Egan, a well-respected farmer on Inis Dora, an island off the coast of Ireland, receives a letter from his dying younger sister Karen who has lived in the USA for 20 years. It is her wish that her 17-year-old son Chad scatters her ashes on Inis Dora. Chad comes to live temporarily with Tony. He meets Aislín, the daughter of Tony's enemy, the publican Joe Brady. Chad, who is black, and Aislín (who is dating Peter, the son of Karen's best friend, Brenda) spend the day together walking around the island. Tony tells Chad that when Karen moved away she and Joe were lovers. Tony and Joe urge Chad and Aislín not to see each other but they continue to do so. Chad discovers love letters written by his mother to Joe but hidden in his uncle's house. Chad visits Brenda who tells him that she and Tony became lovers after Karen left the island and that Peter is Tony's son. Tony is furious with Chad when he discovers his nephew's nude drawing of Aislín and Chad catches the ferry to leave the island. Before the boat leaves, Tony asks Chad to forgive him, and Chad, Tony, Joe, Brenda and Aislín scatter Karen's ashes over the island.
    NoteScreened at the 10th Galway Film Fleadh, 7-12 July 1998.
    ReferenceS&S 1998 9:50
    DistributorUnited International (UK)
    KeywordsIrish-America
    African -Americans
    Migration
    Islands
    Family feuds
    Relationships
    Rural Ireland
    Farmers
    Production creditsp.c.: Irish Dreamtime, World 2000 Entertainment, p: Pierce Brosnan, Beau St Clare, d: Eugene Brady, sc: Jacqueline O'Neill, Sean P. Steele from a story by Eugene Brady, Doug Mayfield, Jacqueline O'Neill, dop: Jack Conroy, ed: J. Patrick Duffner, p.dsgn: John De Cuir, m: Stephen McKeon, cast: Ros Hubbard, John Hubbard, line p: Jerry Baerwitz, exec.p: Tom Palmieri, Morgan O'Sullivan, Marguerite Somers, Bernard Somers, assoc.p.: Cynthia A. Palormo, p.m.: Kevan Barker, 1st a. d: David Brown, 2nd a. d: John Burns, c.op: Des Whelan, focus puller: John Conroy, clapper/loader: Stewart Whelan, clapper/loader trainees: Brian Cregan, Catherine Roche, gaffer: Con Dempsey, best boy: Kieran Dempsey, generator op./elec: Brian Sheridan, elec: Nicolas Fitzgerald, Billy Doyle, J.J.Heeley, grip: Luke Quigley, grip: trainee: Richard Egan, story cnslt: Wesley Burrows, U.S. cast: Louis Di Giaimo, co-p.: Doug Mayfield, Consultant to Nephew Productions, Jonathan Dana, production cnslt: Lloyd Phillips, art d.: Jim Furlong, assistant art d.:Martin Goulding, assistant to p.dsgn.: George Maya, set dsgn.: Jim Harkin, assistant buyer: Sheelagh Power, prop master: Dave Peters, dressing props: John Porter, Eoin Lewis, Gary Murray, stand-by props: Paddy Murray, Triona Coen, props trainee: David Flanagan, art dept. trainee: Irene O'Brien, art dept. runner: Alex Smith, sketch artist: James Hanley, unit still photographer: Jonathan Hession, special still photographer: Nancy Ellison, s: Simon J. Willis, boom op.: Noel Quinn, Third Man: Conor O'Toole, sc.super: Tasha Chapman, sc.super. trainee: Sabine Wuehrer, loc.m.: Seamus Collins, David Byrne, loc.trainees: Jill Dempsey, Karl Dawson, Patrick Conroy, Keith Foston, 3rd a. d.: Gordon Wycherley, trainee assistant d.: Ciara O'Sullivan, stand-ins: Daisy Fortune, Raul Dourado, Eamon Kelly, Donal O'Farrell, Alan Archibald, unit nurse: Eileen Conroy, cost: Maeve Paterson, ward mistress: Ann Stokes, ward.a. s.:Frances Boston, Louise Keating, Fleur Brady, ward. trainee: Susan O'Connor Cave, U.S. ward.: Sandra Hernandez, chief hair: Bernadette Dooley, assistant hair: Eileen Buggy, Hill Harper's Wig Designed by Victoria Woods, Lea Woods, chief make-up artist: Ken Jennings, make-up a.: Lynn Johnston, cnstr.man.: Tommy Bassett, chargehand carpenter: Gerry Drew, carpenters: Barry Cunningham, Joe Delahunty, Alex Bassett, chargehand plasterer: Des O'Neill, plasterers: Colm O'Neill, Dermot Butler, James Irwin, chargehand painter: Bobby Scott, painter: Sean Scott, chargehand rigger: Pascal Jones, riggers:Neil Crawford, Danny Reilly, stagehand: Martin Gray, stand-by carpenter: Vivion O'Brien, stand-by painter: Christopher O'Shaughnessy, stand-by rigger: Jimmy Merrigan, stand-by stagehand: Gerry Quigley, stunt super: Bronco Mc Loughlin, sp.effs. super: Maurice Foley, sp.effs. tech: Mick Doyle, Brendan Walsh, Marty Kelly, animal wrangler: Animal Magic, p.co-ord: Liza Buckley, p.accnt.:Con Cremins, assistant p.accnt.:Jean Wainwright, unit publicist: Gerry Lundberg, World 2000 Coordinators: Auveen O'Sullivan, Tara O'Sullivan, assistant to Mr.Brosnan: Adrian Bell, assistant cast: Mary Maguire, Daniel Hubbard, cast a.: Melissa Fulham, dialogue coach: Poll Moussoulides, p.trainees: Susan Somers, Oonagh McMorrow, transportation captain: Gerry Fearon, unit Car drivers: Tony Cullen, Matt Kelly, mini bus drivers: Jimmy Devlin, Martin Dempsey, camera truck driver: Dracey Jobbing, props truck drivers: Christy Clifford, Johnny Gilbert, wardrobe truck driver: Austin Kelly, make-up bus driver: Philip Malone, construction truck driver: John Gibbins, dining bus driver: Albert Wilson, Honey Wagon driver: Derek Smith, facilities generator driver: Bernard Corish, mini bus provided by: Al Morris. 2nd unit: p.m.: John Mc Donnell, p.co-ord: Amanda J. Scarano, 1st a. d.: Robert Quinn, 2nd a. d.: Hannah Quinn, dop: Peter Robertson, focus pullers: Alan Butler, Dave Fitzgerald, clapper/loaders: David Grennan, Russell Gleeson, hair: Carol Dunne, make-up artist: Rosie Blackmore. post.p.: 1st a. ed: Ben Yeates, Lightworks a.: Sinead McGoldrick, 2nd a. eds: Mairead Mc Ivor, Ruth Allison, super.s.ed.:Patrick Drummond, post.p. co-ord: Amanda J. Scarano, dub.mix.: Pat Hayes, assistant dub.mix.: John Fitzgerald, s.ed.s: Paddy Gibbons, Joe Gilmore, assistant s.ed.: Caoimhe Doyle, runner: Lorcan Berney, Los Angeles ADR: David Giammarco, Dennis Drummond, Foley art.: Andy Malcolm, Goro Koyama, post.p. cnslt: Paul Lowin, m.super: Brian Justice, exec.m.cnslt:: Bonnie Greenberg, Lisa Brown, music clearance: Just Songs, music orchestrator and conductor: Kevin Townend, m.scoring: Andrew Boland, negative cutter: Mike Fraser, grader: Chris Bannister, completion bond: Film Finances, Inc, U.S. legal counsel: Sol Rosenthal Irish legal counsel: James Hickey, Ruth Hunter. cameras and lenses provided by Panavision Ireland. grip: & electric equipment provided by Cine Electric Ltd., Irish, post.p. Facilities provided by Post 22, Irish ADR & re.rd.Facilities provided by Ardmore Sound, Ireland. a. ADR provided by Interlock Studios, Los Angeles. Foley recording Facilities provided by Deluxe, Toronto. original Processing and prints by Technicolor. General Screen Enterprises, London Film & Digital Studios. titles dsgned by Janice Mordue. music recorded at Windmill Lane Recording Studios, Dublin. transportation Equipment provided by Irish Film Locations. Catering provided by Film Foods Ltd. Studio Facilities provided by Ardmore Studios, Ireland. special thanks: Anglo Irish Bank, Tom Maguire, Arthur Anderson, Deborah Nasholm, Branching Out Florists, The People of Roundwood, The Commissioners of Ireland Lights, Riada Stockbrokers, Deloitte & Touche, Susan 'Suds' Sennett, Chris Dickens, Howard Smith, Richard Duggan, Fred Specktor, John O'Sullivan. Dolby in selected theatres. Cameras and lenses Panavision Ireland. Developed with the support of the European Script Fund, an initiative of the Media Programme of the European Union. Produced with the support of investment incentives for The Irish Film Industry provided by the Government of Ireland. Filmed on location in Ireland. The story, characters and events in this film are entirely fictitious. Any similarity to actual persons, living or dead, or to actual events is purely coincidental. Ownership of this motion picture is protected by copyright and other applicable laws. Any unauthorised duplication, distribution or exhibition of this motion picture could result in Criminal prosecution as well as civil liability. This film is dedicated to Chad Brady. Produced in Ireland by Nephew Productions for Irish Dream Time. Inc., and World 2000 Entertainment Ltd. .
    Art directionFURLONG, Jim
    Costume designPATTERSON, Maeve
    RightsWorld 2000 Entertainment Limited 1997.
    Production designDE CUIR, John
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Rural Drama

    TitleMAD DOG MORGAN
    MAD DOG
    Production companyMad Dog Productions
    Motion Picture Productions
    Country of originAustralia
    ProducerTHOMAS, Jeremy
    DirectorMORA, Philippe
    Script/AdaptationMORA, Philippe
    PhotographyMOLLOY, Mike
    Sound recordingHAMMOND, Ken
    EditingSCOTT, John
    Associate producerBRENNAN, Richard
    Music composerFLYNN, Patrick
    CastDennis Hopper (Daniel Morgan), Jack Thompson (Detective Manwaring), David Gulpilil (Billy), Frank Thring (Superintendent Cobham), Michael Pate (Superintendent Winch), Wallas Baton (Macpherson), Bill Hunter (Sergeant Smith), John Hargreaves (Baylis), Martin Harris (Wendlan), Robin Ramsay (Roget), Graeme Blundell (Italian Jack), Gregory Apps (Arthur), Liza Lee-Atkinson (barmaid), Elaine Baillie (farm girl), Don Barkham (Morrow), Kurt Beimel (Doctor Dobbyn), David Bracks (McLean), Liddy dark (Alice), Peter Collingwood (Judge Barry), Peter Cummins (Gibson), John Derum SBSte (Evans), Gerry Duggan (Martin), Max Fairchild (prisoner), Chuck Faulkner (Sergeant Montford), Judith Fisher (Mrs Warby), Alan Hardy (Bob), Isobel Harley (Mrs Macpherson), David John (John Evans), Norman Kaye (swagman), Hugh Keays-Byrne (Simon), Kevin Leslie (Maples), Robert McDarra (parole officer), David Mitchell (Haley), Christopher Pate (Roget's assistant). Grant Page (Maginnity), Philip Ross (Watson), Bruce Spence (Heriot), Peter Thompson (mayor), Roger Ward (trooper). Ken Weaver (Bond), Harold Baigent, Clare Balmford, Natalie Bate, Tony Bazell, Bill Bennett, John Bowman, Tom Broadbridge, John Cousins, Gail Evans, Reg Evans, Cliff Ellen, Tom Parley, Jon Finlayson, John Gaden, Terry Gill, Andrew Gilmore, Ken Grant, Fred Greenwood, Don Kerr, Jeremy Kewley, Harry Lister, Gerard Maguire, Gary Meadows, Dennis Miller, Warwick Randall, Arthur Rudkin, Peter Sherwood, John Smythe, Elie Wishart.
    ColourEastmancolor
    Soundsound
    Duration95/102/110
    Format35mm
    Panavision
    Release date1976
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryIn 1854, Dan Morgan attacks a man who has been informing to the 'traps' on those without prospecting licences. Later, he goes to Chinatown to smoke opium and sees an attack on the Chinese prospectors, but he escapes as Chinatown bums and the Chinese are being killed. He holds up an Italian immigrant and takes clothes he needs. After his arrest, the Castlemaine magistrate sentences him to twelve years imprisonment for armed robbery because Superintendent Cobham wants cheap labour to build roads. He is branded with an M for malefactor. In prison he is raped by other prisoners and a guard acquiesces in the attack. He works at breaking stones in a quarry and felling trees. He is released for good behaviour in 1860 after serving six years. He steals a horse, is chased and shot at. Wounded, he is found by an Aborigine, Billy Bowan, who looks after him. Morgan asks Billy to go with him and together they cross the Murray River into New South Wales. Morgan becomes an expert bushman under Billy's tutelage as he roams the Riverina and northern Victoria areas. In 1863 Morgan and Billy hold up Magistrate Baylis but let him go when they discover he has no money. Baylis pursues them a few days later and he is shot by Morgan. The New South Wales police offer a reward for him and begin intensive efforts to catch the bushranger. During the following year, Morgan holds up rich sheep farmers and gains the support of farm workers and sheep shearers by the way he humiliates the wealthy landowners. In June 1864, Morgan unintentionally shoots Sam Watson, a wealthy squatter, at Round Hill Station. Morgan sends a station hand, John McLean, for a doctor but discovers that he has ridden for the police. Tracking him through the bush, he finds McLean and kills him. In response to the anger of the local authorities, the New South Wales police intensify their efforts to catch Morgan and offer a reward of £1,000 for his capture dead or alive. Mocking the police through his appearance at public events, Morgan becomes an infamous household name. Billy remains his sole trusted companion, while the Victorian press and the police taunt him to cross the river into Victoria. Morgan accepts the challenge and crosses the Murray River in April 1865. Lacking the local support available to him in New South Wales, the Victoria police under Superintendent Cobham mount a massive hunt for him and Billy is captured. Morgan attempts to escape back across the border, but he is ambushed at Macpherson's Peechelba Station, not far from the border, by forty men led by an old adversary. Detective Manwaring. Shot in the neck, Morgan dies five hours later. Cobham severs Morgan's scrotum to make a tobacco pouch and, believing that Morgan is part ape, he orders that Morgan's head be cut off and sent to a professor of anatomy in Melbourne for examination. (V).
    NoteAU Rel June 1976 (Sydney and Melbourne Film Festivals); 9/7/1976 (general release, Pitt Centre, Sydney); FR Rel May 1976 (Cannes Film Festival); USA Rel 22/9/1976 (New York; 102 mins); GB Rel ca. Nov 1978 (8,494 ft, 95 mins). GB title MAD DOG. This film was shot on location in the area of the New South Wales-Victoria border where Morgan operated, including scenes in his cave hide-out in the bush of the Yambla Range. The film cost AU$450,000. A 'novelisation' of this film was written by Bob Ellis and Anne Brooksbank, Mad Dog Morgan (Blackburn, Victoria: Chartwell Press; London: Corgi Books, 1976). 'Mora develops a complex multi-level analysis, which examines a number of interlocking themes, including the nineteenth century debate on the origin of species, twentieth century assumptions about the institutional creation of criminality and madness, and colonial class conflict, incorporating both the British-Irish tensions and split between European decadence and the purity of the antipodean 'noble savage'. (Beryl Davidson and John Langer, Cinema Papers Sept 1976). Daniel Morgan (1833-1865) was born in Sydney of poor Irish convict parents and joined the gold msh in New South Wales and Victoria in 1853 when twenty years old. Unsuccessful at gold prospecting, he drifted into petty crime and became known as the Sydney Native. In 1854 he held up a shepherd at Castlemaine, Victoria and began a career as a bushranger. Caught two weeks later, he was sentenced to twelve years in jail. He served six years in harsh conditions, including the first two in chains, but he was released in 1860. In the goldfields again, he witnessed the attack on Chinese miners (30 June 1861) by other miners. Two weeks later, eight miners were killed by troopers sent to suppress the violence.
    ReferenceAge (Melbourne) 13/9/1976:2; Australian 10/7/1976; Canberra Times
    22/6/1976:11; Canberra Times 16/9/1976 (ad); Cinema Australia April 1976; Cinema Papers June-July 1976:66-9; Cinema Papers Sept-Oct 1976:112-14, 188; Cinema Papers Jan-Feb 1979:192-3; Filmnews Aug 1976:1, 10; Herald (Melbourne) 10/9/1976:15; MFB Nov 1978:221-2; Positif July-Aug 1976:183-4; Sunday Mirror 11/7/1976; Sun-Herald 11/7/1976; Time 18/10/1976; Var 5/5/1976:19; Var 29/9/1976:26 (ad).






    MPG; Pike and Cooper 1980, No. 454.
    DistributorBritish Empire Films (AU)
    Trident-Barber (GB)
    KeywordsIrish Diaspora
    Irish Australians
    Migration
    Gangsters
    Crime
    1850s
    LocationAustralia
    Production credits.c: Mad Dog Pty. For Motion Picture Productions. A Film by Philippe Mora, p: Jeremy Thomas, d: Philippe Mora, assoc. p/p.m: Richard Brennan, sc: Mora from the book Morgan: the Bold Bushranger by Margaret Carnegie (Melbourne: The Hawthorn Press, 1974), dop: Mike Molloy, c. op: John Seale, focus puller: Peter Rogers, clapper/loader: Robert Marden, 2nd unit c: Ron Homer, ed: John Scott, a. ed: Peter Whitmore, art d: Robert Hilditch, addtl research: Carnegie, p. super: Peter Beilby, a.d: Michael Lake, m: Patrick Flynn, trad. songs: Danny Spooner, Aboriginal songs/didgeridoo: David Gulpilil, s: Ken Hammond, super. dub. ed: Bob Cogger, a. dub. ed: Andre Fleuren, s. mix: Peter Fenton, m. rd/s. mix: Union Sound, lab: Colorfilm (Australia) Pty Ltd, cont: Gilda Barachi, 2nd a.d: Chris Maudson, 3rd a.d: William Mora, p. co-ord: Jenny Woods, cost: Bruce Finlayson, a. ward: Wendy Robinson, make-up: Liz Michie, 2nd make-up: Trish Cunliffe, hair: William Kenrick, sp. artwork: Ivan Durrant, stills: Angus Forbes, boom op.: Joe Spinelli, key grip: Graeme Mardell, grip: Noel McDonald, gaffer: Brian Bansgrove, best boy: Paul Gantner, props master: Monte Fieguth, stand-by props: Robert Jones, props buyer: Barry Adler, cnstr. m: Danny Bumett, carpenter: David Munro, elec: lan Plummer, Simon Purtin, wrangler: Ken Grant, a. wrangler: Vicki Grant, Ruth Beazley, loc. liaison: Neville Lowe, stunts: Grant Page, p. accnt: Geoffrey Pollock, secretary: Penelope Wells, neg. matching: Margaret Cardin, titles: Optical & Graphic, title backgrounds: S T Gill, AU distr: British Empire Films; GB distr: Trident-Barber.
    Art directionHILDITCH, Robert
    Costume designFINLAYSON, Bruce
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Historical Drama
    Period Drama
    Gangster Film

    TitleOPPORTUNISTS, THE
    Production companyEureka Pictures
    Country of originIreland
    USA
    ProducerLYONS, John
    PERELL, Tim
    DirectorCONNELL, Myles
    Script/AdaptationCONNELL, Myles
    PhotographyMANIACI, Teodoro
    Sound recordingVARGA, Thomas
    EditingKEIR, Andy
    Executive producerDEMME, Jonathan
    FORREST, David
    LYONS, John S.
    Music composerHOFFMAN, Kurt
    Songs'Ransome's Car Music' - Yo La Tengo; 'Open the Gates' - Blood; 'Alone in the House' - Joe Flood; 'Swimming Pool Blue' - Joe Flood; 'The Ballad of Red Buckets' - Georgia Hubley, Ian Kaplan, James McNew; 'Can't Win' - Lester Johnson, Clifton Knight, David Richardson; 'Cogle El Gusto' - Ramon Rosado; 'One More River To Cross' - Freddie Scott, Scott Turner;
    CastChristopher Walken (Victor 'Vic' Kelly), Peter McDonald (Michael 'Mikey' Lawler, aka Michael Kelly), Anne Pitoniak (Aunt Diedre 'Dee'), Kate Burton (Rest Home Sister), Jim Mayzik (Rest Home priest), Vera Farmiga (Miriam Kelly), Donal Logue (Pat Duffy), Cyndi Lauper (Sally Mahon), Paul D'Amato (Dylan), Wally Dunn (Harry), Olek Krupa (Ted Walikaki), Chuck Cooper (Arnon Morris), John Ortiz (Ismail Espinoza), Brandon Vega (Tony Del Toro), Patrick Fitzgerald (Kevin, a policeman), Rosalyn Coleman (Kevin's partner), Claudia Shear (Gladys, Ransome's secretary), Jerry Grayson (Tom Ransome), Tom Noonan (Mort Stein), Ronnie Farer (Mrs. Ransome), Ismael Ramirez (guard #1), George Smurra (guard #2), Kia Goodwin (young nurse), Mark Greenfield (painter), Erika Greene (Dylan's wife).
    Colourcol
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration89
    Format35mm
    Release date2000
    SummaryVic Kelly is a cantankerous, struggling car mechanic with a safe-cracking past (he raided the Williamsburg Savings Bank 20 years earlier), has a lot of debt, is behind on the rent and payments for his aunt's Catholic rest home, while his daughter is judgemental. His girlfriend runs a bar and offers to loan him the money she has saved for remodeling, but Vic is reluctant to take it, as well as a job in the bar. Michael, an unknown cousin, arrives from Dublin, and the two team up for one last heist.
    NoteScreened at the Dublin Film Festival 2000.
    DistributorOverseas Filmgroup
    KeywordsIrish-America
    Migration
    Robberies
    Bars
    Car mechanic
    Father-daughter relationships
    Production creditsp.c.: Eureka Pictures, p: Tim Perrell, John S. Lyons, co-p: Martin Fink, William Perkins, Richard E. Johnson, exec.p: Jonathan Demme, David Forrest, John S. Lyons, Beau Rogers, Peter Saraf, Edward Saxon, d/sc: Myles Connell, dop: Teodoro Maniaci, a.c.: Marc Hillygus, ed: Andy Keir, a.ed.: Beth Moran, p.dsgn.: Debbie DeVilla, art d.: Niclas Berry, m: Kurt Hoffman, m.super: Michael Hill, set.dec.: Siobhan Flaherty, cost: Kasia Walicka-Maimone, a.cost.:Cara Czekanski, songs: 'Ransome's Car Music' - Yo La Tengo; 'Open the Gates' - Blood; 'Alone in the House' - Joe Flood; 'Swimming Pool Blue' - Joe Flood; 'The Ballad of Red Buckets' - Georgia Hubley, Ian Kaplan, James McNew; 'Can't Win' - Lester Johnson, Clifton Knight, David Richardson; 'Cogle El Gusto' - Ramon Rosado; 'One More River To Cross' - Freddie Scott, Scott Turner; cast: Kathleen Chopin, make-up/hair: Mia Thoen, psst.p.super: Howard Gertler, p.m.: William Perkins, p.super: Libby Richman, a.d.: Amanda Slater, Aida Rodgers, Samantha Lavin, set dresser/props: Laura Ballinger, Kathy Cook, David Ellis, Michael Houston, Nik Leshay, Daniel Maldonado, Adrian Mol, Sean O'Connell, Dylan Sheridan, s.mix: Thomas Varga, score mix: Sean Haney, boom op: Scott Edelson, s.re-rd.mix: Robert Fernandez, s.ed.: Andrew Kris, Mary Ellen Porto, Foley: Nancy Cabrera, ADR: Dave Paterson, sp.effs. co-ord: Drew Jiritano, stunt.co-ord: Manny Siverio, musicians: viola: Junah Chung, drums: Dickie Dworkin, reeds/accordion: Kurt Hoffman, trumpet: Frank London, guitar: David Strauss, violin: Krzysztof Witek, Garo Yellin, vibraphone: Bill Ware III, bass: David Philips, p.sec: Debora Degnan, stills: Ismael Ramirez, loc.m.: Matthew A. Schwartz, 2nd a.c.: Amy Silverman, sc.super.:David Welch.
    Art directionBERRY, Niclas
    Costume designWALICKA-MAIMONE, Kasia
    Production designDE VILLA, Debbie
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleDOGPOUND SHUFFLE
    Production companyBulldog Productions
    Country of originCanada
    ProducerBLOOM, Jeffrey
    KASTNER, Eliot
    PAPPAS, George
    DirectorBLOOM, Jeffrey
    Script/AdaptationBLOOM, Jeffrey
    PhotographyFISHER, Gerry
    Sound recordingSIMMONS, Brian
    BARKER, Ken
    EditingWEATHERLEY, Peter
    Associate producerHOLT, Denis
    Music composerWHITE, David
    Songs'If I'm Going to See You Tomorrow' by David White, Bloom, sung by Lynne
    Marta; 'Instant Cleanser' by White, Bloom, sung by White, harmonica
    played by Norton Buffalo
    CastRon Moody (Steps), David Soul (Pritt), Ray Stricklyn (Mr Lester Jr), Pamela McMyler (pound lady), Raymond Sutton (pound attendant), Robert Ruth (bartender), Claudine Melgrave (head maid), Willie Jyne Whiteside (1st bum), John Mayes (2nd bum). Jack Ammon (3rd bum), Otto Lowy (1st cop), Wally McSween (2nd cop), Robert Underwood (4th bum), Gordon Robertson (5th bum), David Stein (jail guard), Tom Snelgrove (boxcar drunk), Ollie Olson (sleeping drunk). Jack Leavy (1st bouncer), Leo Leavy (2nd bouncer), Frank Johnson (man in laundro- mat), Lori Rutherford (girl in laundromat), Gabriel Bloom (boy in laun-' dromat), Alice Lee (Chinese cook), Ivor Haries (Sam, butler), Dorothy) Goldrick (lady on stairs). Bill Reiter (bus depot clerk), Thomas Hauff) (sailor), Susan Kennedy (Spot's new mistress), Graeme Campbell (Spot's new master)
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourEastman Colour
    Soundsound
    Duration88
    Footage7977
    Format35mm
    Release date1974
    SummaryIn Vancouver, Canada, an elderly Irish hobo, Steps, is picked up along with other hobos by the police and spends the night in jail. He is a former- vaudevillian who performs with his terrier. Spot. On release from jail in the morning. Steps finds that Spot has been taken to the dog pound where he is told that he must pay a fee of $30 to get the dog out. Penniless, he teams up with ex-boxer and harmonica-playing young hobo, Pritt. With Steps' tap-dancing and Pritt playing harmonica, they perform in a bar, but they are annoyed at having to share the tips with the bar owner. The following night, they are ejected from an expensive restaurant as they begin to perform. However, one of the restaurant's clients, Mr Lester Jr, invites them to perform at a party he is giving at his father's house. The party is attended by wealthy friends of Lester and the performers are a great success. Arriving back at the pound with the money required to retrieve Spot, they find that the dog has been given to a family after the dog was seen performing by the children. The pound's supervisor tries to justify giving the dog away and claims it is for the best. Deciding against leaving town. Steps remains behind, while Pritt leaves for Oregon. Steps returns to the pound and breaks in. He is found by the pound's attendant who calls the police. Pritt also arrives there, having abandoned his decision to leave! Vancouver, and after a vicious fight with the attendant, the two escape with the address of Spot's new owners. They find Spot, free him with a whistley and all three head off to perform in Australia. (V)
    NoteGB title: SPOT
    ReferenceMFB 1976:129.lvi11
    DistributorScotia-Barber (GB)
    KeywordsHobos
    Dogs
    Vaudville Artists
    LocationVancouver
    Canada
    Production creditsp.c: Bulldog Productions, p/d/sc: Jeffrey Bloom, assoc. p: Denis Holt, exec. p: Elliott Kastner in association with George Pappas, p. super: James H Brown, a.d: James Scott, William Braden-McIlvride, c: Gerry Fisher, ed: Peter Weatherley, art d: Tony Pratt, m/m.d: David White, songs: 'If I'm Going to See You Tomorrow' by David White, Bloom, sung by Lynne Marta; 'Instant Cleanser' by White, Bloom, sung by White, harmonica played by Norton Buffalo, choreo: Jack Baker, s. ed: James Shields, s: Brian Simmons, Ken Barker, dog trainer: Joe Homok,
    Art directionPRATT, Tony
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleANTS IN HIS PANTS
    COME UP SMILING
    Production companyCinesound Features Pty Ltd
    Cinesound Pictures
    Country of originAustralia
    ProducerHALL, Ken G.
    DirectorFRESHMAN, William
    Script/AdaptationFRESHMAN, William
    PhotographyHEATH, George
    Sound recordingCROSS, Clive
    EditingSHEPPARD, William
    Songs'That's the Way to Handle Your Man' by Bob Geraghty, Ronald Whelan; 'Poor Little Sheep' lyr: Will Mahoney, Whelan, m. arrg: Geraghty, Henry Krips; 'Come Up Smiling' lyr: Harry Alien, m. arrg: Krips,
    CastWill Mahoney (Barney O'Hara), Shirley Ann Richards (Eve Cameron), Jean Hatton (Pat Delaney), Evie Hayes (Kitty Katkin), Sydney Wheeler (Worthington Howard), Alee Kellaway ("the Killer'), Guy Hastings (Colonel Cameron), John Reeling (John Wynyard), Ronald Whelan (Max), Harry Abdy (Sharkey), Lou Vernon (Signer Rudolpho), Harold Meade (Sir James Hall), Charles Zoli (Rudolpho's valet). Bob Geraghty (pressman). Jack Dunleavy (referee), George Lloyd, Chips Rafferty (men in crowd).
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration65/71/77
    Footage6580
    Format35mm
    Release date1939
    CopyNFSA
    SummaryBarney O'Hara, an Irish tenor and travelling carnival showman, his niece Pat, an aspiring opera singer, and their manager, Worthington Howard, entertain visiting Colonel Cameron and his daughter. Eve. They sing a peculiar version of 'Mother Machree' and 'Ants in his Pants', the title of which is the cue for a mischievous boy to put ants in Barney's pants, a prank which, to the amusement of the audience, causes Barney to hop around the stage. A boxer named 'The Killer' is accidentally knocked out by Barney and this leads to a feud between the two men. After Pat is disappointed at being unable to receive singing lessons from Signor Rudolpho, Barney, Pat and their manager take to the road again. While resting in the countryside, the travellers meet Eve, who invites them to her birthday party which Rudolpho is due to attend. At the party, Barney hesitantly renews his acquaintance with the colonel since he had accidentally hit him in the eye during his confrontation with 'The Killer'. The colonel is delighted to see Barney and seeks to encourage him in a boxing career. He later fights at a venue which the colonel owns. At the party. Pat sings and impresses Rudolpho with her ability. However, Pat damages her throat during the singing, and physician Sir James Hall diagnoses that she needs an operation which will cost 300 guineas. Barney sees a notice for a boxing competition with a prize of £500, but he doesn't realise that 'The Killer' is the opponent. Meeting 'The Killer' near the fight venue, Barney tries to run away, but 'The Killer' is knocked out by a ladder. Thinking that Barney has knocked out 'The Killer' a second time, interest is generated in the approaching contest. It is arranged that Barney practise for the fight at a ladies' gym where Kitty, an associate of 'The Killer's' manager, is the dance and exercise coach. Afraid that their prize money is in jeopardy, 'The Killer's' handlers arrange for Barney to be kidnapped during a military parade, an arrangement with which he is quite happy to co-operate. Eve's fiance and his friends discover the kidnappers' hideout and, much to Barney's displeasure, he is brought to the boxing arena in time for the fight. During the contest, Barney's manager tries to discomfort 'The Killer', but on the brink of defeat Barney is aroused when he hears detested bagpipers which drive him to anger and eventually to win the bout. Later, Pat leaves by aeroplane to study singing, while Barney and Kitty become engaged. (V).
    NoteAU Rel 3/11/1939 (Strand Theatre, Hobart); 29/12/1939 (Sydney); GB Rel 1940 (65 mins). Copy: NFSA (cut by Ken Hall for television screening). After the film's premiere with the title COME UP SMILING, the film was retitled ANTS IN HIS PANTS and a song added to explain the title. Valerie West worked on this film, but her duties have not been determined. Will Mahoney was an American vaudeville comedian who toured Australia with his wife, Evie Hayes, and manager. Bob Geragthy, in 1938. Argus (Melbourne) 6/5/1940:5; Film Weekly (Sydney) 10/11/1938; Film Weekly
    Reference12/1/1939; Film Weekly 6/4/1939; Film Weekly 7/12/1939; Film Weekly
    20/12/1939; Film Weekly 4/1/1940; MFB Dec 1940:182; Sydney Morning Herald 1/1/1940:4; Var 19/7/1939. Canberra News 5/4/1971; MPG; Pike and Cooper 1980, No. 308.
    KeywordsVaudville
    Tenors
    Entertainment
    Irish Australians
    Irish Diaspora
    Migration
    Production creditspc: Cinesound Features Pty Ltd. A Cinesound Picture, p: Ken G Hall, d- William Freshman, sc: Freshman from original story by John Addison Chandler [Ken G Hall], c: George Heath, art d: Eric Thompson, ed: William Sheppard, songs: 'That's the Way to Handle Your Man' by Bob Geraghty, Ronald Whelan; 'Poor Little Sheep' lyr: Will Mahoney, Whelan, m. arrg: Geraghty, Henry Krips; 'Come Up Smiling' lyr: Harry Alien, m. arrg: Krips, s: Clive Cross, m.d: Krips, a.d: Whelan, p.m: John Soutar, Harry Strachan, sp. effs: J Alan Kenyon, cast: George Cross, ward: Dorothy Richards.
    Art directionTHOMPSON, Eric
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Comedy

    TitleADAM'S WOMAN
    RETURN OF THE BOOMARANG
    Production companySBP Films (Sydney )
    Motion Pictures International
    North American
    TV (Los Angeles)
    Louis F. Edelman Productions
    Country of originAustralia
    USA
    ProducerEDELMAN, Louis F.
    DirectorLEACOCK, Philip
    Script/AdaptationFIELDER, Richard
    PhotographyBUTLER, Wilmer C.
    Sound recordingENNIS, Paul
    EditingBUCKLEY, Anthony
    Music composerYOUNG, Bob
    DENTON, Kit
    CastBeau Bridges (Adam Beecher), Jane Merrow (Bess Maguire), John Mills (Sir Philip MacDonald), James Booth (Bart Dyson), Andrew Keir (Sergeant O'Shea), Tracy Reed (the duchess), Peter O'Shaughnessy (Magistrate Edward Barrett), John Warwick (Lord Croydon), Harry Lawrence (Muir), Katy Wild (Millie), Mark McManus (Nobby), Tim Elliot (Morgan), Stewart Ginn (Williams), Harold Hopkins (Cosh), Tom Oliver (Stacey), Helen Morse (Maggie), Doreen Warburton (Fat Anne), Judith Fisher (Hetty), Alexandra Hynes (Agnes), Clarissa Kaye (matron), Peter Collingwood (chaplain). Ken Goodlet (Corporal Rains), Alexander Hay (Doctor Martineau).
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration91/115
    Format35mm
    Panavision
    Release date1969
    CopyNFSA
    SummaryIn 1840, amongst the English criminals transported to Australia is John Graham of Dublin who was sent there for inciting rebellion. He is sentenced to death for attempted murder and is hanged. Adam Beecher, son of an American banker, is also transported to Sydney after being wrongfully convicted in Liverpool. He escapes, but is caught with a prostitute in a brothel and is given two hundred lashes. Afterwards, he is given poitin (moonshine) by a sympathetic Irish guard. Sergeant O'Shea intercedes on behalf of Adam, who says he is innocent and Adam's death sentence is commuted to twenty years in prison. Conflict is fuelled by the local magistrate Barrett, a representative of the landlords, who are challenging the governor. Sir Philip MacDonald, for his radical ideas, including his proposals for redistribution of land. MacDonald argues that the land is doomed unless convicts are given a stake in it. Barrett goes to a women's factory prison for a maid. He chooses 'a wild Irish', Bess Maguire, who stole two loaves of bread and whom he later abuses. Adam is offered a pardon if he will settle in pioneer land and take a wife with him. He chooses Bess because of her rebellious nature. Accompanied by Sergeant O'Shea, they settle on land granted to them and named after Kilmoran, Co Clare, though the local village was burned down when the previous occupants couldn't pay extortion money to Bart Dyson, one of the local bushrangers and an escaped convict. Dyson announces himself as their new landlord, but later offers to help Adam escape. However, he intends to trade Adam's recapture for his own benefit. After being threat ened with being returned to prison by O'Shea, Adam agrees to work the land. Adam and Bess till the land and build a house, while O'Shea brings sheep for them. Bess keeps her distance from Adam, and eventually tells how at sixteen she was raped by sailors on the convict ship. After further trouble from Dyson, Adam decides to leave, but Bess offers herself to him as a means of having him stay. He leaves, but he is double-crossed by Dyson and returns the following day when he saves Bess from rape. A sexual relationship develops between them. MacDonald, now the Governor of New South Wales, visits the area and makes Bess a free woman following an attack by Barrett on her. Adam tells her that his || father never married his mother and he feels an outsider as a result, g MacDonald hopes that a town will be built by the ex-convicts and a com munity begins to be established. At the governor's mansion, visiting Crown commissioner Lord Croydon makes Barrett a knight, but Barrett is later accused of monetary and sexual crimes. The bushrangers are seen as enemies of the settler convicts and Adam and O'Shea join forces in an attack on the bushrangers' camp. Bess becomes pregnant. Croydon and Barrett arrive at Kilmoran where there is a community dance in progress. Adam attacks Barrett following a drunken assault on his wife. Barrett convinces Croydon to revoke Adam's pardon. Adam plans to leave once more, but O'Shea intercepts him and a fight ensues between them. Adam says that O'Shea is in love with Bess. During an attack on Kilmoran by Dyson's bushrangers, soldiers are joined by townspeople in defence of the town. The bushrangers are killed except for Dyson. Adam chases Dyson and almost kills him, but O'Shea stops him. Bess declares that they will build the town anew, but Adam is pessimistic, as he has not received a pardon, and leaves again, knowing that revengeful Barrett has imposed a death sentence on him for escaping. Adam is captured on the way to the docks and imprisoned. Bess goes to see Governor MacDonald and he is given a pardon. Adam returns to the farm and is reunited with Bess. (V). HI
    NoteAU Rel 19/3/1970 (Centre Cinema, Canberra); GB Rel ca. Mar 1978
    (8,150 ft, 91 mins). Note: Aka RETURN OF THE BOOMERANG. This film was shot near Nowra, New South Wales.
    ReferenceMFB Mar 1978:39-40; Pike and Cooper 1980, No. 376.
    DistributorColumbia-Warner
    KeywordsIrish Diapora
    Irish Australians
    Australian History
    Migration
    1800s
    1798 Rebellion
    LocationAustralia
    Production creditsp.c: SBP Films (Sydney )/Motion Pictures International/North American TV (Los Angeles). A Louis F Edelman Production, p: Louis F Edelman, d: Philip Leacock, assoc. p/p. super: Arthur M Broidy, sc: Richard Fielder from a story by Lowell Barrington, c: Wilmer C Butler, c. op: John McLean, art d: Dennis Gentle, ed: Anthony Buckley, sp. effs: Milton Rice, a.d: William Owens, cont: Rita Cavill, m/m.c: Bob Young, songs: Kit Denton, cost: Wendy Dickson, make-up: Dan Greenway, hair: Robert Hynard, stills: Harry Britton, s: Paul Ennis, s. ed: Tim Wellbum, gaffer: Anthony Tegg, horsemaster: John Shaw, stunt co-ord: Al Wyatt, cast: Gloria Payten, distr: Columbia-Warner.
    Art directionGENTLE, Dennis
    Costume designDICKSON, Wendy
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Historical Drama

    TitleNIGHT LIKE THIS, A
    Production companyBritish & Dominions Film Corp
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerWILCOX, Herbert
    DirectorWALLS, Tom
    Script/AdaptationTRAVERS, Ben
    LIPSCOMBE, W.P.
    WALLS, Tom
    PhotographyYOUNG, F.A.
    Music performanceRoy Fox's Band
    FOX, Roy
    CastRalph Lynn (Clifford Tope), Tom Walls {Michael Mahoney},
    Winifred Shotter (Cora Mellish), Mary Brough (Mrs Decent), Robertson
    Hare (Miles Tuckett), Claude Hulbert (Aubrey Scott), Boris Ravensky
    (Kosky), C V France (the mailer), Joan Brierley (Molly Dean), Norma
    Varden (Mrs Tuckett), Kay Hammond (cocktail shaker).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration73/74
    Footage6600
    Format35mm
    Release date1932
    SummaryMichael Mahoney is an Irishman working as a London policeman who, being keen on promotion, determines to get at the truth concerning a gambling and night club. He is soon involved in the affairs of Clifford Tope, a foreign nincompoop who wants to help in the recovery of a necklace held by the club proprietors against gambling debts incurred by the beautiful dancer Cora Mellish and her idiotic beau, Aubrey Scott. Aubrey has taken the necklace from his aunt without permission, thus causing distress to the maid. Tope is anxious to end the blackmail of Cora, but he leaves the work and danger in doing so to policeman Mahoney. (Bio 23/3/1932:19).
    NoteGB Rel 29/8/1932. Re-issued in 1937.
    ReferencePicturegoer 27/8/1932.
    Gifford 09110: Mar 1932.
    DistributorWoolf & Freedman Film Service.
    KeywordsPolicemen
    Irish in Britain
    Migration
    Irish Diaspora
    Gambling
    LocationLondon
    Production creditsp.c: British & Dominions Film Corp, p: Herbert Wilcox, d: Tom Walls,
    sc: Ben Travers, W P Lipscombe, Walls from the play by Travers,
    c: F A Young, art d: L P Williams, m: Roy Fox's Band, m. arrg: Lew
    Stone, songs played by Roy Fox, GB distr: Woolf & Freedman Film
    Service.
    Art directionWILLIAMS, L.P.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Theatrical Adaptation

    TitleLILY OF KILLARNEY
    BRIDE OF THE LAKE
    Production companyJulian Hagen Productions
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerHAGEN, Julius
    DirectorELVEY, Maurice
    Script/AdaptationFOWLER MEAR, H.
    PhotographyBLYTHE, Sydney
    LUFF, William
    Sound recordingHONRI, Baynham
    EditingHARRIS, Jack
    Songs'Father O'Flynn', 'Hunting Song', 'The Moon Has Raised Her
    Lamp Above', 'Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms', 'The
    Dear Little Shamrock', 'My Sheep Do and I', 'My Little Irish Gig',
    'Ireland in Spring'.
    CastGina Malo (Eileen O'Connor), John Garrick (Sir Patrick Cregan), Stanley Holloway (Father O'Flynn), Leslie Pen-ins (Sir James Corrigan), Sara Allgood (Mrs 0'Connor), Dennis Hoey (Myles-na-Copaleen), D J Williams (Danny Mann), Dorothy Boyd (Norah Cregan), Hughes is Macklin (Sean), A Bromley Davenport (Lord Kenmore), Pat Noonan (commandant), John Mortimer (Tim O'Brien), Pat Williams (McGinty), Pamela May (Ann Chute), Percy Honri, the Sherman Fisher girls.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration86/87/88
    Footage7850
    Format35mm
    Release date1934
    CopyNFTVA
    LFA
    SummaryAt dinner at his mansion. Castle Cregan, Sir Patrick Cregan wonders about the late arrival of Fr O'Flynn, who has been thrown from his horse. After he arrives, Sir Patrick insists that he sing the song, 'Father O'Flynn', written about himself when he was in Donegal. Sir Patrick, a generous but increasingly impoverished landlord, owes £10,000 to Sir James Corrigan. Corrigan is willing to cancel the debt if Sir Patrick's sister, Norah, marries him, but she tries to politely distance herself from Corrigan. Sir Patrick challenges Corrigan to a horse race for two days hence to cancel the debt between them or for him to lose the castle. One of the race's rules is that if either of them fails to appear the race is forfeit. Fr O'Flynn talks with Sir Patrick about the secret engagement he arranged for Sir Patrick with a young peasant girl, Eileen 0'Connor. The secrecy is needed to ensure that Sir Patrick's uncle. Lord Kenmore, does not know about the impending marriage. He assures Fr O'Flynn that he will not marry the wealthy Ann Chute, which would solve the family's financial problems. Norah tries to encourage her brother to marry Ann, but he tells her that he is not in love with her despite their being childhood friends. Danny Mann, whose family has served the Cregans for two hundred years, rows Sir Patrick across a lake to see Eileen. Eileen and her mother argue that Sir Patrick should come out into the open about their relationship. Her mother favours another suitor, outlaw and smuggler Myles-na-Copaleen. Sir Patrick tells Eileen that he is due to meet Kenmore the next day to get the stake needed for the race with his horse 'Colleen'. Meanwhile, Corrigan meets McGinty in a pub where he is told that while his horse is better than Sir Patrick's, he weighs a stone heavier. As Myles and Tim Murphy are landing smuggled goods in their cave hideout, Myles mocks Corrigan, who as the local magistrate, has failed to apprehend him. They hear Myles' rival for Eileen, Sir Patrick, singing about her as he is rowed back across the lake by Danny. A wanted poster declaring £100 reward for Myles encourages Tim Murphy to give Corrigan information about Myles' whereabouts. He advises Corrigan to watch Mrs O'Connor's cottage because Myles is in love with Eileen. Meanwhile, Corrigan fears he may lose the race and conspires to have Sir Patrick delayed as the time for the race time nears. When he meets his uncle in a town prior to a hunt. Lord Kenmore refuses to give Sir Patrick any more money unless he marries itrat Ann. Also in the town is Myles, who sends Eileen a message asking her to go to America with him, but she declares her love for Sir Patrick. Attempting to catch Myles at the O'Connors' cottage, Corrigan sees Sir Patrick and Eileen together and decides that Myles will not be there. Sir Patrick's employee, Danny Mann, decides to kill Eileen by drowning to allow Sir Patrick to marry Ann and thus save the estate. While taking Eileen across the lake Danny tries to drown her but she is saved by Myles. Danny also survives and finds his way to Sean's house. On the following day, Mrs 0'Connor goes to see Fr O'Flynn and tells him that Eileen has on been missing all night. While Corrigan is informed about Eileen's disappearance, Fr O'Flynn telephones Sir Patrick with the news. Corrigan finds out from Mrs 0'Connor about Eileen and Sir Patrick. As a means of keeping Sir Patrick out of the race, Corrigan decides to issue a warrant for his arrest and accuses him of abducting Eileen. Sean finds Fr O'Flynn and brings him to Danny who dies after he confesses to Eileen's murder, believing he has killed her. As Sir Patrick is being arrested, Fr O'Flynn arrives to tell him that Eileen is probably at Myles' cave. Escaping with Fr ), O'Flynn's help. Sir Patrick rides to get Eileen. Myles and Sir Patrick fight over Eileen, but Sir Patrick then helps Myles escape to America through misleading the police. Corrigan expects to win the race by default, but Sir Patrick arrives just before the starting time. Sir Patrick wins the race and eliminates his debt. Thus, the marriage between Sir Patrick and Eileen may proceed. (V).
    NoteRe-issued in 1937. USA title BRIDE OF THE LAKE. While the film is generally credited with being derived from The Colleen Bawn by Dion Boucicault, a viewing of it indicates that it originates with Benedict's opera which is based on the same story. See note with LILY OF KILLARNEY (GB 1922). Limerick Film Archive holds a 16mm print of this film.
    ReferenceFilm Booking Guide 1932 (2nd quarter) p. 4; KW 11/1/1934; MFB 1944:96-97; Picturegoer Weekly 11/8/1934; Gifford 09472:/1/1934.
    DistributorAssociated Producers and Distributors
    Ambassador Film Productions
    Dawn Trust Film Library
    KeywordsRace Horses
    Anglo Irish
    Ascendancy
    Class Conflict
    Production creditsp.c: Julian Hagen Productions; Twickenham Film Studios Productions, p: Julius Hagen, d: Maurice Elvey, sc/adapt/dial: H Fowler Mear from the opera Lily of Killamey by Sir Julius Benedict (1862), c: Sydney Blythe, a.c: William Luff, art d: James Carter, ed: Jack Harris, a.d: Fred Merrick, songs: 'Father O'Flynn', 'Hunting Song', 'The Moon Has Raised Her Lamp Above', 'Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms', 'The Dear Little Shamrock', 'My Sheep Do and I', 'My Little Irish Gig', 'Ireland in Spring', m.d: William L Trytel, s: Baynham Honri, unit in Ireland - Fred White, George Dewhurst, hair: Charles, GB distr: Associated Producers and Distributors; Ambassador Film Productions; Dawn Trust Film Library.
    Art directionCARTER, James
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleDANNYBOY
    Production companyPanther
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerMITCHELL, Oswald
    SANDERSON, Challis
    DirectorMITCHELL, Oswald
    SANDERSON, Challis
    Script/AdaptationMITCHELL, Oswald
    BARR-CARSON, H.
    PITT, Archie
    PhotographyDICKENSON, Desmond
    Songs'The Londonderry Air'
    CastFrank Forbes-Robertson {Pat Clare}, Dorothy Dickson (Jane Kaye), Archie Pitt (Silver Sam), Ronnie Hepworth {Danny}, Denis O'Neil (Mike), Cyril Ritchard (Joe Martin), Fred Duprez (Leo Newman), Paul Neville (Mr Maloney), Herbert Cameron (Piper Patterson), Sydney Thomton (Mrs Maloney), Bessie Slater (Mrs Harris), Henry de Bray (Moniker Max), Marcel de Haes and his band.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration83
    Footage7575
    Format35mm
    Release date1934
    SummaryPat Clare, a musician separated from his wife, Jane, an actress, is forced to play in the street to provide for his small son, Danny. Silver Sam, the owner of a doss house, guides him to a good pitch, and Leo Newman, a theatrical agent, recognises his talents and is quick to employ him as a nov- elty attraction in a night club. By a coincidence, Jane, who is searching for Pat and Danny, is starring in one of Leo's productions, which is backed by Joe Martin, a wealthy youth. Leo eventually recognises Pat as Jane's hus- band, but he keeps them apart for fear that the truth should result in Martin losing interest in Jane. His efforts, however, prove abortive, and Jane, Danny and Pat are reunited on New Year's Eve, when Pat conducts a vagabonds' band at the night club.
    NoteRe-issued in 1937 with 1,275 ft. cut. An extract from this film was included in HIGHLIGHTS OF VARIETY No. 19 (1940). This film was re-made in 1941 as DANNY BOY.
    ReferenceMPB July 1934:49; MFB Sept 1934; Picturegoer Weekly 27/10/1934:28.
    Gifford 09583: July 1934; MPG.
    DistributorButcher's Film Service (GB)
    KeywordsIrish Diaspora
    Irish in Britain
    Family
    Music
    Entertainment
    Vagabonds
    Doss Houses
    Street Musicians
    Production creditsp.c: Julian Hagen Productions; Twickenham Film Studios Productions, p: Julius Hagen, d: Maurice Elvey, sc/adapt/dial: H Fowler Mear from the opera Lily of Killamey by Sir Julius Benedict (1862), c: Sydney Blythe, a.c: William Luff, art d: James Carter, ed: Jack Harris, a.d: Fred Merrick, songs: 'Father O'Flynn', 'Hunting Song', 'The Moon Has Raised Her Lamp Above', 'Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms', 'The Dear Little Shamrock', 'My Sheep Do and I', 'My Little Irish Gig', 'Ireland in Spring', m.d: William L Trytel, s: Baynham Honri, unit in Ireland - Fred White, George Dewhurst, hair: Charles, GB distr: Associated Producers and Distributors; Ambassador Film Productions; Dawn Trust Film Library.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleEVENSONG
    Production companyGaumont-British Picture Corp
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerCUTTS, Graham
    DirectorSAVILLE, Victor
    Script/AdaptationKNOBLOCK, Edward
    FARNUM, Dorothy
    PhotographyGREENE, Max
    Sound recordingO'DONOGHUE, A.C.
    EditingLUDWIG, Otto
    Songs'Love's Old Sweet Song', Alfred Nathan, George Oppenheimer, 'I Wait for You', Mischa Spoliansky, Knoblock
    CastEvelyn Laye {Maggie McNeil/Irela}, Fritz Kortner (Kober), Alice
    Delysia (Madame Valmond), Carl Esmond (Count Ehrenburg/Archduke
    Theodore), Emlyn Williams {George Murray}, Conchita Supervia
    (Baba), Muriel Aked (Tremlowe), Denys Val Norton (Sovina), Patrick
    O'Moore {Bob McNeil}, Arthur Sinclair {Pa McNeil}, Browning
    Mummary (solo tenor).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration82/83/87/88
    Footage76477666
    Format35mm
    Release date1934
    CopyNFTVA
    SummaryIn early 20th-century Ireland, Pa McNeil, opposes his daughter, Maggie, pursuing a singing career despite assurances from her friend, George Murray, that she could become a great opera singer. Maggie and George elope to Paris where she studies singing under Madame Valmond. Valmond and her friend, Kober, decide that Maggie is ready for a professional engagement, and Kober, who wants to be Maggie's manager, suggests that she change her name to Irela. Irela and George argue over their respective careers but they are interrupted by Kober who announces that Maggie has an audition at the Opera. Despite George's attempts at dissuasion Maggie attends the audition where she sings 'They Call Me Mimi' from La Boheme. George arrives with the intention of shooting Maggie, but he leaves a note wishing her well after failing to carry out his plan. Maggie's career blossoms, and she is amorously pursued by Count Ehrenburg, but she rejects his advances. In Vienna she meets Archduke Theodore, but he is already engaged in a marriage of state, and the Emperor orders Irela to leave the country. As the Archduke is explaining this to Irela, news arrives of the shooting of Archduke Ferdinand in Sarajevo, signalling the start of World War One. Irela sings for the mobilising troops, one of whom is George. He is injured in the war and dies of his wounds. After the war, Baba 1'Etoile's career rivals that of Irela. As Baba's popularity with audiences increases, Kober advises Irela to retire and suggests she marry Theodore, whose wife has died. When Theodore again asks her to marry, Irela refuses, thinking he is doing so out of pity for her. She is planning a tour of South America, but Kober says that she can no longer sing well enough to do such a tour. After he leaves, Baba's singing is heard in the room and Irela plays one of her recordings to try to drown it out. As she attempts to put on her Queen of Song crown, which had been given to her in Vienna many years before, she collapses and dies. (V; NFTVA synopsis).
    NoteGB Rel Sept 1934; USA Rel 16/11/1934 (New York); 15/12/1934 (general release). Copy: NFTVA (35mm, 7,647 ft, 84 mins).
    AFI Catalog 1931-1940:2536 reports that modem sources
    indicate that Michael Balcon worked on this film in a production capacity.
    ReferenceFD 14/11/1934:7; Film Pictorial Vol. 6, No. 144, 24/11/1934:20; FW Vol. 12, No. 319, 23/11/1934:34-36; HR 20/11/1934:3; MFB Sept 1934:67; MPH 3/11/1934:37; NYT 17/11/1934:12; Picturegoer Vol. 4, No. 183, 24/11/1934:26; Picture Show Vol. 32, No. 813, 1/12/1934:15, 26; Var 25/9/1934:13; Var 20/11/1934:15. Gifford 0963 l:0ct 1934.
    DistributorGaumont-British Distributors (GB)
    Fox Film Corp (USA)
    KeywordsOpera Singers
    Irish Diaspora
    Migration
    World War I
    Production creditsp.c: Gaumont-British Picture Corp, p: Graham Cutts, d: Victor Saville, sc/dial: Edward Knoblock, screen adapt: Dorothy Famum based on the play Evensong by Knoblock, Beverley Nichols (1st perf, London, 30/6/1932), which was adapted from Nichols' novel, c: Max Greene, ed: Otto Ludwig, art d: Alfred Junge, selections from La Boheme by Giacomo Puccini, libretto by Giuseppe Giacosa, Luigi Illica; La Traviata: m: Giuseppe Verdi, libretto by Francesco Maria Piave, songs: 'Love's Old Sweet Song', Alfred Nathan, George Oppenheimer, 'I Wait for You', Mischa Spoliansky, Knoblock, m.d: Louis Levy, s: A C O'Donoghue, cost: Cathleen Mann, GB distr: Gaumont-British Distributors; USA distr: Fox Film Corp.
    Art directionJUNGE, Alfred
    Costume designMANN, Cathleen
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Theatrical Adaptation

    TitleFATHER O'FLYNN
    Production companyButcher's Film Service
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerNOY, Wilfred
    DirectorNOY, Wilfred
    TENNYSON, Walter
    PhotographyRODWELL, Stanley
    Songs'Ave Maria' sung by Tom Burke; 'Macushla',
    'Let's Fall in Love', 'Father O'Flynn', 'I Know Two Bright Eyes'
    CastTom Burke (Father O'Flynn), Jean Adrienne (Macushla), Robert Chisholm (Nigel), Henry Oscar (Westmacott), Denis O'Neil (Flannigan), Ralph Truman (Fawcett), Johnnie Schofield (Cassidy), Dorothy Vernon (Bridget O'Loveley), Billy Holland (Muldoon), Ethel Revnell & Gracie West, Stanley Kirkby, Louis Goodrich, Esme Lewis, Robert Hobbs, Clifford Buckton, lan Wilson, Sherman Fisher girls.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration82/66
    Format35mm
    Release date1935
    SummaryMacushla, daughter of a criminal, is adopted by Fr O'Flynn. She is in love with a squire's son, but his father opposes the relationship because her father is a criminal. When he re-appears, Macushla's father persuades her to go to England with him. He opens a gambling house there with money which rightly belongs to her. Fr O'Flynn and her lover come in search of Macushla. She is rescued following a fight. The squire withdraws his opposition and agrees to the marriage of the young couple. (Adapted from MFB 1935:168).
    Note66 mins (USA). The plot is based on the song 'Father O'Flynn'. Exteriors were filmed in Ireland.
    ReferenceKW 7/11/1935; KW 25/4/1940; TC 24/4/1940.
    Gifford 09869: Nov 1935; MPG.
    DistributorButcher's Film Service (GB)
    J. H. Hoffberg (USA)
    KeywordsIrish in Britain
    Migration
    Criminals
    Priests
    Gamblingh
    Irish Diaspora
    LocationEngland
    Production creditsp.c: Butcher's Film Service, p: Wilfred Noy, d: Noy, Walter Tennyson,
    c: Stanley Rodwell, songs: 'Ave Maria' sung by Tom Burke; 'Macushla',
    'Let's Fall in Love', 'Father O'Flynn', 'I Know Two Bright Eyes',
    GB distr: Butcher's Film Service; USA distr: J H Hoffberg.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleIRISH FOR LUCK
    Production companyWamer Bros-First National
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerSHER, Irving
    DirectorWOODS, Arthur
    Script/AdaptationWOODS, Arthur
    Songs'Where the River Shannon Flows', 'Macushla', 'The Mountains of Moume', 'I
    Know Where I'm Going', 'Off to Philadelphia', 'Cockles and Muscles'
    CastAthene Seyler ("the Duchess'), Margaret Lockwood (Eileen O'Hare),
    Patric Knowles (Terry O'Ryan), Gibb McLaughlin (Thady), Edward
    Rigby (Hon Denis Maguire), Eugene Leahy (O'Callaghan), George Dillon
    (Mooney), Terry Conlin (Costello).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration68
    Footage6141
    Format35mm
    Release date1936
    SummaryAn impoverished Irishwoman known as 'The Duchess' adopts her orphaned niece, Eileen O'Hare, although she is poor. 'The Duchess' succeeds in keeping her creditors at bay, and even deceives a Dublin bank when her allowance ceases by re-opening her overdrawn accnt.. Eileen also goes to Dublin where she befriends a street performer, Terry O'Ryan. 'The Duchess' takes the two entertainers, along with the family retainer, Thady, to London where they get a spot on the 'In Town Tonight' talent programme. Initially unsuccessful, they return to Ireland where 'The iaHafi Duchess' discovers that she has inherited £50 and the two young sa&w entertainers are offered a contract. (Adapted from MFB 1936:212).
    ReferenceGifford 10135: Dec 1936; MPG.
    DistributorFirst National Film Distributors Ltd (GB)
    KeywordsMigration
    Irish Diaspora
    Irish in Britain
    Street Entertainers
    Musicians
    Talent Competitions
    Radio
    LocationDublin
    London
    Production creditsp.c: Warner Bros-First National, p: Irving Asher, d: Arthur Woods,
    sc: Woods, Brock Williams from a story by L A G Strong, songs: 'Where
    the River Shannon Hows', 'Macushla', 'The Mountains of Moume', 'I
    Know Where I'm Going', 'Off to Philadelphia', 'Cockles and Muscles', GB
    distr: First National Film Distributors Ltd.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Comedy

    TitleMINSTREL BOY, THE
    Production companyButcher-Dreadnought
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerMORGAN, Sydney
    DirectorMORGAN, Sydney
    Script/AdaptationWENTWORTH WOOD, Joan
    PhotographyCARVER, Francis
    Sound recordingMcNALLY, Frank
    EditingWILLIAMSON, Cecil
    Songs'The Best Things in Life', 'Love's a Racketeer' sung by Chili Bouchier; 'When Loves are So Many' sung by Fred Conyngham; 'Tango Town' sung by Xenia and Boyer; 'McDougall, McNab and McKay' by Conyngham, Basil Langton, Pat Kavanagh; 'I Love the Moon', 'The Minstrel Boy' by Conyngham; 'Moonlight Madonna', 'Sweet Muchacha' by Percival Mackey's Band
    CastFred Conyngham {Mike}, Chili Bouchier (Dee Dawn), Lucille Lisle
    (Angela Shelley), Kenneth Buckley (Austin Ravensboume), Marjorie
    Chard (Lady Ravensboume), Basil Langton {Ed}, Granville Darling
    {Pat}, Pat Kavanagh {Terry}, Mabel Twemlow (Lady Pont), Dorothy
    Vernon (the charwoman), Roland Walters (crooner), Xenia and Boyer
    (speciality dancers).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration79/80
    Footage7185
    Format35mm
    Release date1937
    SummaryAngela Shelley is engaged to her aristocratic cousin Austin Ravensboume, but his mother. Lady Ravensboume, who had been through it all thirty years earlier, is sympathetic to Angela as she is not in love with Austin. At the Shamrock Club, Mike and his fellow Irishmen, the Minstrel Boys, are broadcasting. He is infatuated by Dee Dawn, a singer. The Minstrel Boys are engaged to play at a country dance where Angela and Mike fall in love. Angela confides her feelings to Lady Ravensboume and leaves the house early the next morning. Mike gives Angela a lift to town and the next Austin and his mother hear about them is that the couple are on their honeymoon. On their return from the honeymoon, Angela is disillusioned when she sees Mike's untidy flat and the pile of girls' photographs with affectionate inscriptions on them. Mike reassures Angela that these girls do not count in his life. When Dee re-enters Mike's life, Angela is distressed, especially when, after visiting Lady Ravensboume at her town house, Angela finds Dee in Mike's arms at the Club. Mike insists that the kiss with Dee meant nothing to him and he then sings to her and wins her forgiveness. Angela remains jealous of Dee, especially when Dee insists on singing the song Mike dedicated to Angela. With foreboding, Angela turns off the radio as the song is playing, and when Mike fails to return that night she fears that the relationship is finished. However, Mike had agreed to drive Dee to her country cottage, and while there. Dee siphons off the car's petrol as a means of stopping him returning to London. Refusing to be entrapped by her, Mike walks to the nearest garage and gets a lift back to town. A bitter quarrel between Angela and Mike follows, and Angela, worn out with anxiety and suspicion, refuses to believe him and tells him that it was only his voice she loved. She returns to the Ravensboumes' home and the sympathy of Austin and his mother. Meanwhile, Mike and the band are listless and the Shamrock Club is empty of patrons. He receives notice from the management that their engagement is to terminate that week. Mike's band is broadcasting and Angela seizes the opportunity to return to the flat to collect some personal effects. Finding a farewell note from Mike, she rushes to the bedroom which is filled with gas and where she finds Mike lying unconscious. She smashes the windows and pleads with him to speak to her. He regains consciousness and they embrace. (Adapted from production company synopsis).
    ReferenceKW 2/9/1937; MFB 1937:166.
    Gifford 10315: Sept 1937.
    DistributorButcher's Film Service (GB)
    KeywordsEntertainers
    Irish in Britain
    Migration
    Vaudville
    Variety
    Production creditsp.c: Butcher-Dreadnought, p/d: Sydney Morgan, sc: Joan Wentworth Wood from a story by Morgan, c: Francis Carver, art d: Fred Leach, ed: Cecil Williamson, p.m: John Milton, m.d: Percival Mackey, original songs by Mackey: 'The Best Things in Life', 'Love's a Racketeer' sung by Chili Bouchier; 'When Loves are so many' sung by Fred Conyngham; 'Tango Town' sung by Xenia and Boyer; 'McDougall, McNab and McKay' by Conyngham, Basil Langton, Pat Kavanagh; 'I Love the Moon', 'The Minstrel Boy' by Conyngham; 'Moonlight Madonna', 'Sweet Muchacha' by Percival Mackey's Band, s: Frank McNally, cost: Revillon Freres, Eve Valere, Bivall, GB distr: Butcher's Film Service.
    Art directionLEACH, Fred
    Costume designRevillon Freres
    VALERE, Eve
    Bivall
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Drama

    TitleROSE OF TRALEE
    Production companyButcher Hope-Bell Productions
    Country of originGreat Britain
    DirectorMITCHELL, Oswald
    Script/AdaptationMITCHELL, Oswald
    Songs'Mountains 0' Moume', 'Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms', 'Did Your Mother Come From Ireland?' sung by Fred Conyngham; 'Down on Finnigan's Farm' sung by Talbot O'Farrell; 'Come Back to Erin', 'Daddy Wouldn't Buy Me a Bow-Wow' sung by Binkie Stuart; 'Rose of Tralee' sung by Danny Malone
    CastBinkie Stuart {Rose O'Malley}, Fred Conyngham {Paddy O'Malley}, Kathleen O'Regan {Mary O'Malley}, Sydney Fairbrother {Mrs Florrie Thompson}, Talbot O'Farrell {Tim Kelly}, Patrick Ludlow (Frank), Dorothy Dare (Jean Hale), Danny Malone {singer}, C Denier Warren (Henry Collett), Scott Harold (Mr Gleeson), Dorothy Vernon (Mrs Crawley), Paul Hanson (Mr Hale), Jack Lester (American announcer), Hamilton Keene (Al Benson), Henry Adnes (Cohen), Grenville Darling (Commissionaire), Harvey Brinton.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration78/80
    Footage7207
    Format35mm
    Release date1937
    SummaryThrough the influence of Jean Hale, Patrick O'Brien, an Irish ballad singer, makes a successful debut on American radio under the name 'Paddy O'Malley'. Meanwhile in London, his wife Mary struggles to look after their four-year-old daughter Rose. She meets Irish cafe owner Tim Kelly who introduces her to his Irish landlady, Florrie Thompson, who takes them into her house. Rose soon wins the affection of Kelly and Mr Cohen, the local pawnbroker, who also lodges in the house. Mary explains to Home that her husband has been in America for three years, is trying to make good, and that they have lost touch with each other. Although Paddy is tempted with further engagements in America, he decides to return to England to find Mary and Rose. In London, Paddy meets his former agent, Henry Collett, who tells him that it will be difficult to trace his wife, but he agrees to help him. Paddy's position becomes more complicated when Jean Hale follows him to London. She tells him that she is in love with him, and he is obliged to tell her that he is married and is searching for his wife. Jean is sympathetic and declares that should his wife not want him back she will be waiting for him. At the end of a Christmas Eve broadcast, Paddy asks all the children who are listening to write to him at Henry Collett's address. Collett destroys a postcard received from Rose before it reaches Paddy, explaining to his assistant that if Paddy finds his wife and daughter, the ensuing scandal would ruin his reputation and his bookings would be cancelled. When recording in a studio, Paddy meets Rose, but is unaware of her identity. To show that she also has talent. Rose sings a chorus of 'Come Back to Erin'. Paddy asks Collett to take her name and address, but Collett is horrified to discover that she is Rose O'Brien and has her removed from the studio. Rose attracts the attention of Al Benson, a band leader, who decides to present her as a 'surprise item' with his band at the Royal Hotel on Saint Patrick's Day. Collett receives cables from Paddy's New York agent offering a large commission if he can persuade Paddy to go back to America. Collett is unable to get Paddy to agree to go to America and seeks Collett can continue searching for his wife. Before Jean and Paddy sail for America, Jean learns for the first time that Paddy has a daughter and that Collett is trying to prevent them meeting. Jean sends a note to Paddy, telling him what she knows. Paddy is unable to obtain Rose's address as Collett has already destroyed it. On Saint Patrick's Night, Paddy is searching for Mary and Rose, while they are going to the Royal Hotel with Florrie, Kelly and Cohen. Rose delights the audience with her singing and is followed by Danny Malone singing 'Rose of Tralee'. Tired and disheartened, Paddy enters the balcony of the hotel ballroom. A telegram from Jean tells him that for the sake of his child she is sailing back to the USA. Recognising Paddy, Rose goes to the balcony and Mary notices her going there and follows her. On the last strains of 'Rose of Tralee', Paddy is reunited with Mary and Rose. (Adapted from production company synopsis).
    NoteRe-issued in 1940 (distr: New Realm Pictures), 5,702 ft, 24 mins cut). Re-made in 1942 (see below).
    ReferenceKW 15/4/1939; KW 18/5/1940; MFB 1937:76; MPH 12/11/1938; TC 17/5/1940. Gifford 10242: Apr 1937; MPG.
    DistributorButcher's Film Service (GB)
    KeywordsMusic Hall
    Variety
    Singers
    Irish in Britain
    Irish America
    Migration
    Radio Stars
    Jews
    LocationLondon
    America
    Production creditsp.c: A Butcher Hope-Bell production, p: Norman Hope-Bell, d: Oswald Mitchell, sc: Mitchell from a story by Mitchell, lan Walker, Kathleen Tyrone, m. arrg/m. rd: W Debroy Somers, songs: 'Mountains 0' Moume', 'Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms', 'Did Your Mother Come From Ireland?' sung by Fred Conyngham; 'Down on Finnigan's Farm' sung by Talbot O'Farrell; 'Come Back to Erin', 'Daddy Wouldn't Buy Me a Bow-Wow' sung by Binkie Stuart; 'Rose of Tralee' sung by Danny Malone, GB distr: Butcher's Film Service.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleWINGS OF THE MORNING
    Production companyNew World Pictures Ltd
    Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerKANE, Robert
    DirectorSCHUSTER, Harold D.
    TRYON, Glenn
    Script/AdaptationGERAGHTY, Dan
    MEEHAN, John
    MACNAMARA, Brinsley
    WAKEFIELD, Gilbert
    PhotographyRENNAHAN, Ray
    CARDIFF, Jack
    IMUS, Henry
    EditingDARK, James P.
    Music composerBENJAMIN, Arthur
    Songs'If All Those Endearing Young Charms', 'Killamey', sung by John McCormack; 'Mother Machree' sung by Henry Fonda
    CastAnnabella (Marie), Leslie Banks (Lord Clontarf), D J Williams (Mairik), Philip Sydney Frost (Valentine), Pat Noonan (police sergeant), Hermione Damborough (gypsy dancer). Modern story - Annabella (Maria), Henry Fonda (Kerry Gilfallen), Stewart Rome (Sir Valentine MacFarland), Harry Tate (Paddy), Irene Vanbrugh (Marie), Helen Haye (Jenepher), Edward Underdown (Don Diego), Mark Daly (Jimmy), Sam Livesey (Angelo), Nicholas Nadejine (Benito), E V H Emmett, Captain R C Lyle (racing commentators), Steve Donoghue (himself), John McCormack (himself), Hermione Damborough (dancer), Emmanuelo (Don Frasco, Spanish jockey), Evelyn Ankers, Anthony Bushell, Niall MacGinnis, Dorothy Dewhurst, John Hepworth, Edana Rubinstein.
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    Soundsound
    Duration85/87/88
    Footage75007704
    Format35mm
    Release date1937
    CopyNFTVA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryAt a gypsy encampment in Ireland in the 1880s, Royal Irish Constabulary members harass the gypsies, including Marie and her father, Mairik, the King of the Gypsies. Lord Clontarf arrives and dismisses the RIC men. During a dinner at the castle. Lord Clontarf becomes infatuated with Marie. Over the following weeks the couple fall in love, but they are ostracised by Clontarf s family and friends. They get married, but even five years later Marie still feels an outsider amidst her husband's family and friends. On a riding trip, Clontarf is thrown from his horse and killed. Later, Marie is forced to leave the castle. As she leaves with her rather and other gypsies from Destiny Bay, the encampment which had been given to them by Lord Clontarf as a safe haven, a curse for three generations is put on the Clontarf family. Fifty years later in the 1930s during the Spanish Civil War, Marie's great- granddaughter, Maria, the Duchess of Leyra, is forced to flee from Spain disguised as a man, Don Mario, leaving behind Don Diego, the Duke of Montreal de Campo to whom she is engaged. She arrives at Destiny Bay, the gypsy encampment in Ireland. Still dressed as a man, Maria trades a prize racehorse, 'Wings of the Morning', with Canadian Kerry Gilfallen, who is visiting his cousin. Sir Valentine MacFarland, a relative of Lord Clontarf, and who knew Marie when he was young. Maria later becomes annoyed when she discovers she has traded a good horse for a string of poor ones. Attempting to get 'Wings' back, Maria goes to see Kerry, and, still in male attire, finds to her embarrassment that she is talking to him while he is taking a bath. Kerry agrees to give the horse back, but when they go to get it they discover that it has broken out of the stables. They find the horse at a bam on a hilltop but, due to heavy fog, they are forced to spend the night there. During the course of the night, Maria becomes attracted to Kerry, who still thinks she is a man. As they are about to swim in a river the next morning, Kerry discovers that Don Mario is really Maria. Marie, who has also returned to Destiny Bay, meets Sir Valentine and she is addressed as Lady Clontarf. She tells him that she always promised she would return and that she has entered 'Wings' in the Derby. She also tells Sir Valentine that she has to go abroad and that she intends to put Maria in a convent while she is away. Sir Valentine offers to allow her stay at the castle, while Kerry agrees to train the horse. Kerry is opposed to Maria staying in the house, but when he sees her in a dress he changes his mind. At a wishing well, Kerry and Maria make a wish. Later, at a party for Maria, Kerry introduces John McCormack, who sings three songs. Don Diego, Maria's fiance, arrives and tells Kerry that he plans to marry Maria. Later in the garden Maria apologises to Kerry, and tries to explain that the marriage is arranged. In London before the Derby, Kerry announces that he has engaged jockey Steve Donahue to ride his horse 'Destiny Bay'. Maria arrives and tells Kerry that her jockey Don Fresco is not allowed to ride because of registration difficulties. Donahue also arrives and Kerry tells him that he is to ride Marie's horse 'Wings', as she intends to use the prize money for Maria's dowry. At Epsom Downs for the Derby, the odds on 'Wings' lengthen as Marie is dying and the owner of a Derby winner must be alive. In the race, 'Wings of the Morning' beats 'Destiny Bay'. However, an objection is lodged, but 'Wings' is awarded the race as Marie is still live. Don Diego indicates that if 'Wings' doesn't win he will have no money, as his family has lost everything in Spain. Maria is repulsed by his mercenary attitude to their marriage. Kerry goes back to Ireland and Maria is disappointed when she can't find him. Maria goes to the place where she earlier refused to swim with Kerry. He is there, and she jumps into the water and tells him she wants to marry him. (V).
    NoteUSA Rel 19/2/1937; IR Rel ca. 30/7/1937. Re-issued in 1945. Working title THE SPORT OF KINGS. This film was also adapt- ed from a second, undetermined short story by Donn Byme. New World ; Pictures Ltd was a British subsidiary of Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. This film was partly filmed at Killamey. Produced at Denham Studios, England. This was the first Techhicolor feature film made in Britain or Ireland.
    ReferenceBox 6/2/1937; DEM 31/7/1937:3; DV 29/1/1937:3; FD 2/2/1937:7; FW Vol. 18, No. 449, 22/5/1937:27, 28; HR 15/6/1936:14; HR 22/6/1936:10; HR 29/6/1936:10; HR 14/8/1936:18; HR 22/10/1936:6; HR 2/11/1936:13; HR 4/1/1937:4; IPh Dec 1936:8,13,27-8, 30; KW 28/1/1937; Liberty 13/2/1937; London Reporter Vol. 2, No. 1, 29/5/1936; MFB Vol. 4, No. 41, May 1937:99; SI 1/8/1937:10; MPW 20/3/1937:52, 55; New Statesman and Nation 22/5/1937; NYT 12/3/1937:19; People's World 3/10/1937; People's World 14/8/1937; Picturegoer Vol. 7, No. 325, 14/8/1937:29; TC Vol. 48, No. 3523, 27/1/1937; Var 17/3/1937:14. AC Vol. 67, No. 2, Feb 1986:36-40; AFI Cat 1931-1940:2604-5; F&F No. 360, Sept 1984; Giffbrd 10176: Feb 1937; KW 14/3/1940; KW 16/8/1945; MPG; TC Vol. 54, No. 4389, 13/3/1940; TC Vol. 65, No. 5224, 10/8/1945.
    DistributorTwentieth Century-Fox Film Corp (GB)
    Keywords1800s
    1930s
    Curses
    Gypsies
    Spanish Civil War
    Duchesses
    Cross Dressing
    Horse Racing
    Production creditsp.c: New World Pictures Ltd, controlled by Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp, p: Robert T Kane, d: Harold D Schuster, Glenn Tryon, adapt/sc: Tom Geraghty, from the story 'Tale of the Gypsy Horse' by Donn Byrne (publ. in Destiny Bay, London, 1928), sc: John Meehan, Brinsley Macnamara, Gilbert Wakefield, Technicolor c: Ray Rennahan, c. op: Jack Cardiff, Henry Imus, col. d: Natalie Kalmus, art d: W Ralph Brinton, ed: James B dark, a.d: Colin Lesslie, m.d: Muir Mathieson, m. score: Arthur Benjamin, songs: 'If All Those Endearing Young Charms', 'Killamey', sung by John McCormack; 'Mother Machree' sung by Henry Fonda, cost: Rene Hubert, distr: Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
    Art directionBRINTON, Ralph W.
    Costume designHUBERT, Rene
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Historical Drama
    Musical
    Literary Adaptation

    TitleMY IRISH MOLLY
    IRISH SWEETHEART
    LITTLE MISS MOLLY
    Production companyArgyle Talking Pictures
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerARGYLE, John
    DirectorBRYCE, Alex
    Script/AdaptationWALKER, Ian
    BRYCE, Alex
    PhotographyPALMER, Ernest
    ANSCOMBE, R.
    Sound recordingRUDOLF, A.E.
    EditingBICKERTON, F.H.
    Songs'Farmyard Frolics' by Christine Makgill; 'Eileen Alannah', 'Ireland, Mother Ireland', 'I'll Be Off to Philadelphia in the Momin', 'Kathleen Mavoumeen', 'I'll Be Off to Tipperary in the Morning'
    CastBinkie Stuart (Molly Martin), Tom Burke (Danny Gallagher), Philip
    Reed (Bob Miller), Maureen O'Hara [nee Fitzsimons] (Eileen O'Shea),
    Maire O'Neill (Mary O'Shea), C Denier Warren (Chuck Burr), Maureen
    Moore (Hannah Delaney), Franklyn Kelsey, Pat Williams, Leo McCabe.
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration69/70
    Footage6300
    Release date1938
    CopyNFTVA
    LFA
    SummaryMolly, an orphan, whose father, Tom, has died, comes to the south-west of Ireland from Bristol with an English solicitor to live with her aunt Hannah Delaney and her uncle Liam at Greenacres, in Ballyvore, a rural ge. Unhappy there, she runs away to live with another aunt, Mary O'Shea. Bob and Chuck, two Americans in search of a local story for the New York Mercury, are staying with Mary. Mary's daughter, Eileen, has a sweetheart, Danny, who migrates to the USA and works in New York as a taxi driver, but is then laid off without explanation. Without work, he becomes a street singer. With Chuck's and Bob's help, Molly, accompanied by Eileen, also go to New York where Molly appears on a radio programme, 'The Shamrock Baby Food Hour'. Embarrassed at his joblessness, Danny avoids Eileen, while she and Bob fall in love. Danny decides to return to Ireland, where he hopes to work in Dublin. Molly and Eileen also have to go home when Aunt Hannah threatens to prosecute Aunt Mary for abducting Molly. Danny, aided byjarvey Patrick Brannigan Murphy, confronts Hannah and Liam about their attitude to Molly. Danny fights Liam, who admits that Mary has equal rights to look after Molly. As a result, Molly is allowed to live with Mary. Danny realises that Eileen is in love with Bob and reveals that he has been given a job running a garage in Dublin. He tells Eileen that he saw her with Bob on the night of the broadcast, and she admits her love for Bob. Bob and Chuck arrive, and Eileen and Bob embrace. (V).
    NoteAka IRISH SWEETHEART; USA title LITTLE MISS MOLLY. Limerick Film Archive holds a 16mm print of this film.
    ReferenceMFB 1938:277; TC 21/12/1938.
    Gifford 10561: Dec 1938.
    DistributorAssociated British Pictures Corporation (GB)
    Educational Films Corporation of America (USA)
    Production creditsp.c: Argyle Talking Pictures, p: John Argyle, d: Alex Bryce, sc: lan Walker, Bryce from an original story by J F Argyle, a. dial: W G Fay, c: Ernest Palmer, R Anscombe, sets: Duncan Sutherland, ed: F H Bickerton, a.d: George Collins, Jack Martin, p.m: H G Inglis, m.d: Guy Jones, songs: 'Farmyard Frolics' by Christine Makgill; 'Eileen Alannah', 'Ireland, Mother Ireland', 'I'll Be Off to Philadelphia in the Momin', 'Kathleen Mavoumeen', 'I'll Be Off to Tipperary in the Morning', s. super: H Benson, s: A E Rudolf, GB distr: Associated British Pictures Corporation; USA distr: Educational Films Corporation of America.
    Production designSUTHERLAND, Duncan

    TitleLET'S BE FAMOUS
    Production companyEaling Studios
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerBALCON, MIchael
    DirectorFORDE, Walter
    Script/AdaptationMacDOUGAL, Roger
    MACKINNON, Allan
    PhotographyNEAME, Ronald
    DINES, Gordon
    Sound recordingDALBY, Stephen
    EditingPITT, Ray
    Music composerPHILLIPS, Van
    Songs'I've Got A Hunch Happy Days Are Here Again', 'I Ran Into
    Love', 'The Moon Remembered', 'Whistle When You Want Me', m/lyr:
    Noel Gay, lyr: Frank Eyton, Ralph Butler
    CastJimmy O'Dea {Jimmy Houlihan}, Betty Driver (Betty Pinbright), Sonnie Hale (Finch), Patrick Barr (Johnnie Blake), Basil Radford (Watson), Milton Rosmer (Albert Pinbright), Lena Brown (Polly Pinbright), Carry Marsh (Walton, BBC official), Alf Goddard (Battling Bulger), Henry Hallatt (Grenville), Hay Plumb (announcer/stage j||| manager). Franklin Bellamy (Ali Benali), Jack Vyvyan (photographer).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration81/83
    Footage7316
    Format35mm
    Release date1939
    CopyNFTVA
    SummaryJimmy Houlihan, an Irish postmaster and singer, is signed up by a travelling BBC representative. En route to London Jimmy meets up with Polly and Betty, a mother and daughter from Lancashire. Polly is due to enter the same competition as Jimmy, while Betty, a winner of a crooning competition, has been signed up by Blake, an advertising agent, to sing on his Continental radio programme. Finch, a rival agent, becomes Jimmy's mentor after Jimmy's disappointment at the BBC. After a parachute jump, Jimmy and Betty take over the control room of a French radio station where they use special effects to give a commentary on the English counties as seen from the Scottish express train. (V; MFB 1939:40).
    NoteGB Rel 22/2/1939 (trade show), 3/7/1939; IR Rel ca. 20/10/1939.
    Re-released 1945 (distr: Premier).

    This film was made at Baling Studios, London.
    ReferenceKW 2/3/1939; SI 22/10/1939:8. Ban- 1980:182; Brown, ed, 1977:38-39; Gifford 10586: Mar 1939; KW 18/1/1945; TC 16/1/1945.
    DistributorAssociated British Film Distributors (GB)
    KeywordsIrish in Britain
    Migration
    Irish Diaspora
    Singers
    Radio Stars
    Postmasters
    BBC
    Talent Competitions
    LocationEngland
    Production creditsp.c: Ealing Studios, p: Michael Balcon, assoc. p: S C Balcon, d: Walter Forde, sc: Roger MacDougall, Allan MacKinnon, c: Ronald Neame, Gordon Dines, ed: Ray Pitt, art d: Oscar F Wemdorff, m.d: Ernest Irving, songs: 'I've Got A Hunch Happy Days Are Here Again', 'I Ran Into Love', 'The Moon Remembered', 'Whistle When You Want Me', m/lyr: Noel Gay, lyr: Frank Eyton, Ralph Butler, incidental m: Van Phillips, s. super: Eric Williams, s: Stephen Dalby, p.m: Harry Hand, GB distr: Associated British Film Distributors.
    Art directionWERNDORFF, Oscar F.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Comedy

    TitleIT HAPPENED ONE SUNDAY
    Production companyAssociated British Pictures Corporation
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerSKUTEZKY, Victor
    DirectorLAMAC, Karel
    Script/AdaptationSKUTEZKY, Victor
    GOTFURT, Frederic
    BLACK, Stephen
    PhotographyEMMOTT, Basil
    Music composerWILLIAMS, Charles
    Music performanceQueen's Hall Light Orchestra
    Songs'Valley of Dreams', 'H.M.S. Polka', m: Harry Parr-Davies, lyr: Phil Park
    CastBarbara White {Moya Malone}, Robert Beatty (Tom Stevens), Marjorie Rhodes (Mrs Buckland), Ernest Butcher (Mr Buckland), Judy Kelly (Violet), Irene Vanbrugh (Mrs Bellamy), Kathleen Harrison (Mrs Purkiss), Moore Marriott (hospital porter), C V France (magistrate), Paul Demel (Cassio), Marie Ault (Madame), Breffni O'Rourke (chief engineer), Robert Adams (Gorilla Jim), Charles Victor (Frisco Joe), Frederick Piper (Jake), Philip Godfrey (Alf), Kathryn Beaumont (Jill), Arthur Hambling, David Keir, Vie Wise, Patric Curwen, Hal Gordon, Toni Edgar Bruce.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration99
    Footage8923
    Format35mm
    Release date1943
    SummaryMoya Malone, an Irish servant girl, comes to England from Ireland to seek employment in domestic service. She is befriended by Mrs Buckland, a Liverpool greengrocer. Moya eventually gets a job through the local registry office and goes to work at the house of Mrs Bellamy. As Moya arrives in Liverpool, Tom Stevens, a tough young Canadian Merchant Navy man, arrives back in port from a hazardous Atlantic crossing. Before going ashore, Tom is warned by his Chief Engineer to stay clear of loose-moral friends, but before long he meets an ex-girlfriend who introduces him to a bookie-clerk and they go to an all-in wrestling contest. With the fights fixed, Tom finds himself in debt. To raise money, he pawns his seaman's book. Realising too late that he has been duped, Tom gets into a fight and is hospitalised. Meanwhile, Moya is working at Mrs Bellamy's, where one evening she agrees to look after Mrs Bellamy's grand-daughter, Jill, while her French governess is out. Moya tells Jill the 'Cinderella' story. Falling asleep, Moya dreams that she is Cinderella and that she is proposed to by Prince Charming, a handsome young man. The next day, Moya tells the story of the dream to the imaginative Mrs Buckland, who reinterprets the story as reality. Mrs Buckland tells her that the Prince Charming comes to her shop and Moya, fascinated, insists on more details. Mrs Buckland creates a 'Mr Brown' who is in the Merchant Navy and, under pressure from Moya, she adds that 'Mr Brown' will not be coming to the shop for some time as he is in hospital. On a Sunday afternoon, Moya arrives at the hospital and asks for Mr Brown. She meets Mr Brown, in reality Tom Stevens, who is recovering from the injuries he received at the wrestling booth. He carries the name 'Mr Brown' as his identity card because it was exchanged at the pawning of the seaman's card. As a result, Tom and Moya meet and fall in love. When he is discharged from hospital, Tom asks Moya to marry him. She accepts, and Tom goes to make arrangements with the Registrar. Faced with the problem of identifi- cation, Tom has to retrieve his seaman's book. Despite quarrels and misun- derstandings with Moya he gets his book back. When all seems well between them, Tom, who deserted the Fire Service in the pre-Blitz days to go to sea, is arrested. He pleads guilty, but a lenient magistrate dismisses the case so that he can marry Moya before his ship sails. He returns to find Moya ill as a result of worrying that he has left her. She recovers and they are married. (Adapted from production company synopsis).
    NoteThis film was made at Welwyn Garden City Studios.
    ReferenceKW 18/5/1944; MFB 1944:87; MPH 26/8/1944; TC 12/5/1944.
    Gifford 10953: Mar 1944; S&S Suppl. Mar 1948.
    DistributorPathe Pictures Ltd (GB)
    KeywordsDomestic Servants
    Irish in Britain
    Migration
    Merchant Navy
    Class Conflict
    Music Hall
    LocationEngland
    Production creditsp.c: Associated British Pictures Corporation, p: Victor Skutezky, d: Karel Lamac, sc: Skutezky, Frederic Gotfurt, Stephen Black from the play She Met Him One Sunday by Skutezky, c: Basil Emmott, m/m.c: Charles Williams conducting The Queen's Hall Light Orchestra, m.c: Phil Green conducting Phil Green's Concert Orchestra, theme songs: 'Valley of Dreams', 'H.M.S. Polka', m: Harry Parr-Davies, lyr: Phil Park, GB distr: Pathe Pictures Ltd.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Romance
    Theatrical Adaptation

    TitleSPRING SONG
    SPRINGTIME
    Production companyBritish National Films Ltd
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerJACKSON, Louis H.
    DirectorTULLY, Montgomery
    Script/AdaptationTULLY, Montgomery
    SEYMOUR, James
    PhotographyPALMER, Ernest
    Sound recordingADAMS, George
    EditingKIMICK, Monica
    Music composerMAY, Hans
    Songs'I Love the Moon' by Paul A Rubens; 'My Little Grey Home in the West' by Hermann Lohr
    CastCarol Raye {Janet Hill/Janet Ware}, Peter Graves (Group Captain Tony Winster), Leni Lynn (Vera Dale), Lawrence O'Madden (Johnnie Ware}, Alan Wheatley (Menelli), George Camey (stage doorman), Finlay Cume (Cobb), Jack Billings (dancer), Maire O'Neill (dresser), Netta Westcott (Lady Norchester), David Home (Sir Anthony), Lois Maxwel (Penelope Cobb), Diana Calderwood (Mary Norchester), Peter Penn (Camngton), Howard Douglas (stage manager), Harold Franklin (shop assistant), Melville Crawfurd (friend, pilots room), Kathleen Heath (barmaid, theatre bar), Albert Chevalier (1st guard, airfield), Alan Reid (undergraduate), Gordon Edwards (stage manager), Griffiths Moss (butler Norchesters' house), Charles Paton (stage doorman), Horace Kenney (cab driver), Gerard Kempinski (manager, Picardy Hotel), David Keir (broker, pawn shop), Richard Molinas (croupier), Roy Sergeant (messenger boy), Charles Banks (conductor, theatre band), Emanuel Francois (waiter, gambling club), Joseph Fisher (driver), Walter Anton (singing shepherd), George Bailey, John Fraser, Judith Kozubei, Geraldine O'Brien (singers), John Serret (waiter, Picardy Hotel).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration86/87
    Footage7816
    Format35mm
    Release date1946
    SummaryR.A.F. Officer, Group Captain Tony Winster, D.F.C, tries to persuade the star of the Sackville Theatre, Janet Ware, to go with him to supper after the show, although they are total strangers to each other. His shock tactics succeed and he brings her to dine and dance. Finally, however, Janet asks for an explanation and Tony silently shows her a piece of jewellery, the Norchester Brooch. Janet tells him she has never seen it before. He tells Janet that he is a Norchester and that he has bought the brooch back at a Red Cross Sale to which it had been donated by Janet Ware. Janet is bewildered but promises to ask her father. Tony then asks her to keep the brooch and wear it, explaining that it is a tradition of the Norchesters that they give it to the girl they intend to marry. Janet is amused by this sudden and unconventional proposal but agrees to wear the brooch for the rest of the evening. Tony takes her home and she invites him in to meet her father, Johnnie Ware, a theatrical producer. All goes well until Johnnie notices the brooch his daughter is wearing. He asks to see it and Janet explains about Tony Winster and the Red Cross Sale, asking if her father can clear up the mystery. Johnnie then angrily orders the astonished Tony out of the house, forbidding him to see Janet again. After this unexpected development. Tony goes, and Janet demands an explanation from her father of his rudeness to their guest. Johnnie quietly starts to tell the story of the Norchester Brooch. In 1911, Janet's mother, another Janet, and young Tony Norchester meet on Boat Race Night at the Sackville Theatre where Janet is performing. Their boisterous behaviour stops the show and young Janet slaps Tony when he interrupts her song. Despite the unorthodox way they meet, the two quickly fall in love. For Tony the relationship is a wild adventure, while for Johnnie Ware, a comedian who really loves Janet, it is a tragedy he is powerless to stop. Eventually the Spring romance ends in tragedy when Tony has a gambling debt and the Norchester Brooch is pawned as a means of clearing the debt. Returning to the present, Johnnie tells Janet that this is the reason he is determined she will not become involved with another Norchester. Forbidden to see Janet, Tony goes away, and Johnnie thinks history is repeating itself. Janet sees a newspaper headline in which Tony is reported as risking his life as he tests a new jet plane at high speeds. Janet races across country and the couple are reunited at dawn on an airfield. (Adapted from production company synopsis).
    NoteUSA title SPRINGTIME. Made and produced at National Studios,
    Elstree.
    ReferenceKW 17/10/1946; KW 19/12/1946; MFB 1946:149; MPH 26/10/1946; TC
    11/10/1946. Gifford 11088:Nov 1946.
    DistributorAnglo-American Film Corporation Ltd (GB)
    KeywordsWorld War II
    Irish in Britain
    Migration
    Production creditsp.c: British National Films Ltd, p: Louis H Jackson, d: Montgomery Tully, sc: Tully, James Seymour from an original story by Lore, Maurice Cowan, dop: Ernest Palmer, c. op: Moray Grant, p. super: Fred A Swann, art d: Wilfrid Arnold, a.d: Robert Asher, ed: Monica Kimick, m.c/m.d: Hans May, lyr: Alan Stranks, songs: Leni Lynn, 'I Love the Moon' by Paul A Rubens; 'My Little Grey Home in the West' by Hermann Lohr, rd. d: Harold V King, s: George Adams, ward. super: Maude Churchill, make-up: Henry Hayward, hair: A G Scott, dance d: Jack Billings, flying scenes: De Hand Aircraft Co, GB distr: Anglo-American Film Corporation Ltd.
    Art directionARNOLD, Wilfred
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Romance

    TitleCOURTNEYS OF CURZON STREET, THE
    COURTNEY AFFAIR, THE
    Production companyImperadio Pictures Ltd
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerWILCOX, Herbert
    DirectorWILCOX, Herbert
    Script/AdaptationPHIPPS, Nicholas
    PhotographyGREENE, Max
    WALKER, Robert
    Sound recordingROSS, Bert
    EditingNEWTON, Flora
    CAMPBELL, Vera
    Music composerCOLLINS, Anthony
    Songs'The Broken Doll', 'Soldiers in the Park', 'Roses of Picardy', sung by Anna Neagle; 'Lily Marlene', 'Whispering', 'Ramona', 'Soldiers of the Queen', 'Lily of Laguna', 'Honeysuckle and the Bee'
    CastAnna Neagle (Catherine O'Halloran}, Michael Wilding (Sir Edward Courtney), Gladys Young (Lady Courtney), Coral Browne (Valerie), Michael Medwin (Edward Courtney), Daphne Slater (Cynthia), Jack Watling (Teddy Courtney), Helen Cherry (Mary Courtney), Ethel O'Shea (Mrs O'Halloran), Bernard Lee (Colonel Cascoyne), Percy Walsh (Sir Frank Murchison), Alice Gachet (Louise), Terry Randall (Pam), Kenneth Warrington (theatre manager), James Kavanagh (Irish priest}, Peter Hobbes (housemaster. Charterhouse), Martin Case (Mary Courtney's husband), Thora Hird (Kate, stage dresser). Max Kirby (Algie Longworth).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration112/120
    Footage10860
    Format35mm
    Release date1947
    SummaryIn 1900 Irish lady's-maid Catherine O'Halloran marries her English employer's son, Edward Courtney, a lieutenant in the Guards. The match is disapproved of by Victorian society. After a period she feels she is ruining her husband's military career and leaves him to return to Ireland where their son is born. He serves with the military in India and endeavours to forget Catherine. To support her son and herself, Catherine goes on the stage and eventually becomes a famous actress under an assumed name. She and Edward do not meet again until 1914 when she is in France entertaining the troops. They find they are still in love and resume their married life together and Edward meets his son for the first time. When he grows up, their grandson marries a factory worker in 1944. (Adapted from production company synopsis; MFB 1947:61).
    NoteRe-issued in 1950 (30 mins cut).
    USA title THE COURTNEY AFFAIR. Filmed at London Film
    Studio, Shepperton, Middlesex. This film won the Daily Mail National
    Film Award, 1947; Picturegoer Annual Film Award, 1948; and was Top
    Moneymaker, 1947.
    ReferenceKW 10/4/1947; TC 9/4/1947. Gifford 11126: May 1947.
    DistributorBritish Lion Film Corporation (GB)
    KeywordsVictorian Society
    Irish in Britain
    Migration
    Irish Diaspora
    Class Conflict
    Singers
    Entertainers
    World War I
    Production creditsp.c: Imperadio Pictures Ltd, p/d: Herbert Wilcox, sc: Nicholas Phipps from a story by Florence Tranter, dop: Max Greene, c. op: Robert Walker, p.m: George Maynard, art d: William C Andrews, ed: Flora Newton, Vera Campbell, a.d: Frank Holland, stage ensembles: Philip Buchel, Betty Buchel, m. score: Anthony Collins, songs: 'The Broken Doll', 'Soldiers in the Park', 'Roses of Picardy', sung by Anna Neagle; 'Lily Marlene', 'Whispering', 'Ramona', 'Soldiers of the Queen', 'Lily of Laguna', 'Honeysuckle and the Bee', d. of s: Bert Ross, make-up: Harold Fletcher, hair: Helen PeNíold, GB distr: British Lion Film Corporation.
    Art directionANDREWS, William C.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Historical Drama
    Period Drama

    TitleHILLS OF DONEGAL, THE
    Production companyButcher-Empire Productions
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerARGYLE, John
    DirectorARGYLE, John
    Script/AdaptationDRYDEN, John
    PhotographyGRANT, Arthur
    Sound recordingMEYERS, John
    EditingRICHARDS, Ted
    Executive producerROY, Ernest G.
    Songs'The Hills of Donegal', 'Eily Mavouneen', 'Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms', 'The Low Back' d Car', 'The Harp That Once Thru' Tara's Halls', extracts: 'La Traviatd', 'The Bartered Bride' (by Bedrich Smetana, 1866), recordings by David Java and Hisn Gypsy Orchestra, 'Gypsy Dance' by Margherita Stanley
    CastDinah Sheridan (Eileen Hannay), James Etherington (Michael
    O'Keefe), Moore Marriott (Old Jake), John Bentley (Terry O'Keefe),
    Brendan Clegg (Paddy Hannay), Irene Handl (Mrs MacTavish), Tamara
    Desni (Carole Wells), Maire O'Neill (Hannah), Bob Arden (Daniel), The
    Gaelic Irish Dancers, Green Flag Ceilidh Band.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration86
    Footage7717
    Format35mm
    Release date1947
    SummaryEileen Hannay, a promising young singer, gives up her stage career to marry Terry O'Keefe, a cousin of her stage partner, Michael, who is also in love with her. The couple go to Ireland, where Eileen has inherited the family estate, Curranmore, Donegal. Their high hopes are dashed when they arrive at the dilapidated castle, which is empty of furniture and there are no funds for its restoration. They stay at a farmhouse near the castle, and Eileen determines she will devote herself to restoring the castle and the lands she loves. Terry is disappointed as he relied on the new circumstances to make himself financially solvent and rid himself of ex-girlfriend Carole Wells, whom he abandoned for Eileen. He suggests to Hannah, a superstitious Irish housekeeper, that they could sell the estate, but she is horrified at the idea and tells him he must never sell the castle or else he will regret it bitterly. A quarrel develops between Eileen and Terry over the sale of the castle. She tells him she will never sell it. Part of her motivation is that she wants to solve the mystery of her parents' death at the castle twenty years earlier. As a child she was sent to England following the tragedy. At the castle, Eileen meets Daniel, a strange man from a gypsy encampment in the valley. As he is about to tell her the history of Curranmore, Terry and Paddy, Eileen's twelve-year-old cousin, arrive and cut short Daniel's story. Paddy takes Terry off to explore the dungeons of the castle. When Carole gets a dud cheque from Terry, Michael offers to redeem it, but she insists on taking legal action against him. At Curranmore, Terry, who is lonely and worried, resorts to drinking, and Eileen becomes increasingly unhappy. She is consoled by young Paddy, whose boyish enthusiasm and amusing antics with Old Jake the handyman keep up her spirits. When Paddy is injured in a riding accident, he meets Daniel who carries the injured boy to the farmhouse. When Terry sees Daniel he becomes jealous and causes a rift with Eileen which ends in Terry leaving for Belfast. In the meantime, Michael has warned Terry that Carole is brewing trouble for him. Reluctantly, Michael also tells Eileen about Carole. Though upset at the way Terry is making Eileen unhappy, he tries to cheer her up. Terry arrives in Belfast and goes to the theatre where Carole and Michael are opening in The Bartered Bride opera. Terry has been drinking heavily and becomes violent in his attempt to settle with Carole. The struggle ends with Carole falling to her death. Panic-stricken, Terry obeys Michael's advice to leave the theatre before anyone sees him. Michael is detained by the police for questioning following the inquest and Eileen visits him in prison. He assures her that all will be well if Terry comes to see him, but Terry has returned to Donegal, where he is in hiding. Michael persuades Eileen to return to Donegal, until the case is over, and reluctantly she agrees. As the gypsies are leaving the valley, Daniel meets Eileen to say goodbye. Their relationship is now much closer as Mrs MacTavish has told Eileen that her parents' deaths in which Daniel's father figured was the result of a 'jealousy murder'. Daniel and Eileen know that they are, in fact. closely related, and he also knows that Curranmore holds a material secret that can change Eileen's life. Daniel ass2ia takes her to the castle and together they descend to the dungeons. He shows her the castle's secret, which can restore the crumbling house to its former glory. They are interrupted when Terry, gaunt and haggard, appears from the shadows with a revolver. Terry is killed in the struggle. Eileen can then resume both her singing career and her relationship with Michael, (Adapted from production company synopsis),
    NoteRe-issued in 1951 (distr: Sherwood).
    Made at Nettlefield Studios, Walton-on-Thames.
    ReferenceKW 28/8/1947; MFB 1947:127; Picturegoer 20/12/1947; TC 22/8/1947; TC 25/1/1951. Gifford 11150: Sept 1947; MPG.
    DistributorButcher's Film Service Ltd (GB)
    KeywordsEntertainers
    Music Hall
    Irish in Britain
    Irish Diaspora
    Migration
    Inheritance
    Castles
    Anglo-Irish
    Gypises
    Production creditsp.c: A Butcher-Empire Production, p: John Argyle, exec. p: Ernest G Roy, d: Argyle, sc: John Dyrden, dop: Arthur Grant, lighting d: Geoffrey Faithfull, ed: Ted Richards, art d: Charles H Gilbert, m.d: Percival Mackey, songs: 'The Hills of Donegal', 'Eily Mavouneen', 'Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms', 'The Low Back' d Car', 'The Harp That Once Thru' Tara's Halls', extracts: 'La Traviatd', 'The Bartered Bride' (by Bedrich Smetana, 1866), recordings by David Java and His Gypsy Orchestra, 'Gypsy Dance' by Margherita Stanley, s: John Meyers, p.m: E S Laurie, GB distr: Butcher's Film Service Ltd.
    Art directionGILBERT, Charles H.
    LightingFAITHFULL, Geoffrey
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Comedy

    TitleOLD MOTHER RILEY'S NEW VENTURE
    OLD MOTHER RILEY'S NEW LOOK
    OTHER MOTHER RILEY
    Production companyHarry Reynolds Productions Ltd
    Country of originGreat Britain
    DirectorHARLOW, John
    Script/AdaptationWEST, Con
    MARKS, Jackie
    PhotographyWILSON, James
    Sound recordingTURTLE, Fred
    Associate producerGILLING, John
    Music composerMELACHRINO, George
    Songs'I'll Take Your Home Again, Kathleen'
    'Galway Bay'
    Sung by Wilier Neal, Kitty McShane
    CastArthur Lucan {Mother Daphne Snowdrop Riley}, Kitty McShane {Kitty Riley}, Chili Bouchier (Cora Gayne), Maureen Riscoe (Mabel), Wilier Neal (David Thompson), Sebastian Cabot (potentate), Wilfred Babbage (Major Gayne), John Le Messurier (Karl), C Denier Warren (Matthew Hillick), Arthur Gomez (chef), Paul Sheridan (Saunders), Fred Groves (James Grigsby), Grace Arnold (prison governor), Howard Douglas (Doctor Collins), Hugh Dempster (drunk), Gordon Littman (1st aide), Robert Moore (Allan), George Street (Walters).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration69/79
    Footage7127
    Format16mm
    35mm
    Release date1949
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryFollowing a distressing series of robberies, the proprietor of a hotel
    decides to go on holiday, and puts Mrs Riley, a dishwasher, in charge.
    After a diamond belonging to a potentate is stolen, Mrs Riley is suspected
    of theft and is arrested by the police. After escaping from jail, she catches
    the thieves. (Adapted from MFB 1949:137).
    NoteTwelfth film in 'Old Mother Riley' series.
    Aka OLD MOTHER RILEY'S NEW LOOK. USA title OLD MOTHER
    RILEY (1952). Re-issued in 1953 as MOTHER RILEY'S NEW VENTURE.
    ReferenceKW 21/7/1949; MFB Vol. 16, No. 188, Aug 1949:137; TC Vol. 73, No. 5830, 19/7/1949:6. Gifford 11376: July 1949; KW 5/3/1953; MPG; TC Vol. 80, No. 6707, 2/3/1953:10.
    DistributorRenown Pictures Corporation (GB)
    Bell (USA)
    KeywordsDish Washers
    Detectives
    Diamond Robberies
    Irish in Britain
    Migration
    Mothers
    Daughters
    Music Hall
    Production creditsp.c: Harry Reynolds Productions Ltd, p: Harry Reynolds, assoc. p: John Gilling, d: John Harlow, sc: Con West, Jackie Marks, a. scenes: Harlow, c: James Wilson, c. op: Oscar Bovill, p.m: Stanley Couzins, a.d: Pat Kelly, art d: George Paterson, cont: Shirley Barnes, super, ed: Douglas Myers, cutter: Adam Dawson, m: George Melachrino, m.d: Eric Robinson, songs: 'I'll Take Your Home Again, Kathleen', 'Galway Bay', sung by Wilier Neal, Kitty McShane, s: Fred Turtle, ward: Amy C Binney, hair: Doreen Hart, make-up: Harry Hayward, Marjorie Green, GB distr: Renown Pictures Corporation; USA distr: Bell.
    Art directionPATERSON, George
    Costume designBINNEY, Amy C.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Comedy

    TitleALLIGATOR NAMED DAISY, AN
    Production companyRaymond Stross Productions
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerSTROSS, Raymond
    Script/AdaptationDAVIES, Jack
    PhotographyWYLER, Reginald
    EditingGUTHRIDGE, John D
    Executive producerST JOHN, Earl
    THOMPSON, J. Lee
    Songs'In Love for the Very First Time' by Paddy Roberts
    CastDonald Sinden (Peter Weston), Diana Dors (Vanessa Colebrook), Jean Carson {Moira}, James Robertson-Justice (Sir James Colebrook), Stanley Holloway (general), Roland Culver (Colonel Weston), Margaret Rutherford (Prudence Croquet), Avice Landone (Mrs Weston), Stephen Boyd (Albert), Richard Wattis (Hoskins), Henry Kendall (valet), Michael Shepley (judge), Charles Victor (police sergeant), George Woodridge (police constable), Ernest Thesiger (Notcher), Wilfrid Lawson {Irishman}, Patrick Cargill (steward), Ronnie Stevens (singer), Don Cameron (vocalist), George Moon (Al), Maurice Kaufmann (Ed), Arnold Bell (customs man), Charles Carson (general in great hall), Myrette Morven (general's wife), Joan Young (woman in tweeds), John Vere (bishop), Martin Miller (band leader), Colin Freer (garage boy), guest artistes - Jimmy Edwards, Gilbert Harding, Frankie Howerd, Ken Mackintosh and his Band.
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    Soundsound
    Duration88
    Footage7975
    FormatVistaVision
    35mm
    Release date1955
    SummaryPeter Weston, a songwriter, is given an alligator. Daisy, which he tnes to get rid of, but eventually decides to keep it when an Irish girl, Moira, extends her love of animals to the alligator. Vanessa, daughter of Sir James Colebrook, is engaged to Peter, but after the alligator wrecks a party at the Colebrooks' mansion she breaks it off. Later she makes up with Peter. Sir James, who has developed a liking for the animals, organises an alligator rally to popularise the notion of having them as pets, but the event ends in chaos. Meanwhile, Peter and Moira have become close, while Vanessa falls in love with Moira's brother. (Adapted from MFB 1956:6).
    NoteMade at Pinewood Studios.
    ReferenceDFR 28/11/1955; KW 1/12/1955; TC 28/11/1955; Var 28/12/1955.
    Gifford 12153: Dec 1955.
    DistributorRank Film Distributors (GB)
    KeywordsIrish in Britain
    Migration
    Irish Diaspora
    Production creditsp.c.: Raymond Stross Productions, p: Raymond Stross, exec. p: Earl St John, J Lee-Thompson, sc: Jack Davies from a novel by Charles Terrot, dop: Reginald Wyer, c. op: David Harcourt, p.m: Jack Swinburne, p. controller for Pinewood Studios: Arthur Alcott, art d: Michael Stringer, a.d: Pat Marsden, ed: John D Guthndge, cont: Tilly Day, m. arrg/m.d: Stanley Black, songs: Sam Coslow, 'In Love for the Very First Tme' by Paddy Roberts, choreo: Alfred Rodngues, s: John Mitchell Gordon K McCallum, m. rd: Ted Drake, s. ed: Roger Chemll, cost super: Yvonne Caffin, Jean Carson's dresses by: Kitty Preston, make-up- George Blackler, sp. effs: W Wamngton, GB distr: Rank Film Distributors.
    Art directionSTRINGER, Michael
    Costume designCAFFIN, Yvonne
    Production designMITCHELL GORDON, John
    McCALLUM, K.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Comedy
    Literary Adaptation

    TitleMARCH HARE, THE
    Production companyAchilles Productions
    British Lion Film Corporation
    SponsorB&A Productions
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerOSTRER, Bertram
    FENNELL, Albert
    DirectorMORE O'FERRELL, George
    Script/AdaptationWELLESLEY, Gordon
    MACKINNON, Allan
    PhotographyHILDYARD, Jack
    Sound recordingAMBLER, S.T.
    LAW, Red
    EditingPILKINGTON, Gordon
    Music composerGREEN, Philip
    CastPeggy Cummins (Pat Maguire), Terence Morgan (Sir Charles Hare), Wilfrid Hyde White (Colonel Keen), Martita Hunt (Lady Anne), Cyril Cusack (Lazy Mangan), Derrick de Mamey (Captain Marlow), Charles Hawtrey (Fisher), Maureen Delany (Bridget), Ivan Samson (Hardwick), Macdonald Parke (Mr Maguire), Peter Swanick (Nils Svenson), Charles Wade (Tim Doughty), John Gilbert (Frank Connor), Fred Johnson (Joe Duffy), Bernard Rook (Slater), Reginald Beckwith (insurance broker), Stringer Davis (doctor), Clem Lister (Collins, commissionaire), Alan Rolfe (1st Epsom attendant), David Cattanach (2nd Epsom attendant), Charles Morgan (English starter), Neville Phillips (stablehand), Victor Platt (driver). Harry Towb (Dooley), Raymond Glendenning (commentator), Jack Cunningham (Irish starter), Edward Lexy (bookie).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourEastmancolor
    Soundsoun
    Duration85
    Footage7653
    FormatCinemascope
    35mm
    Release date1956
    CopyNFTVA
    SummaryAfter his horse 'Enchanting' fails to win at Royal Ascot race meeting, Irishman Sir Charles Hare is forced to sell his estate, Wolfshill, Kildare, to pay his debts. Charles' aunt. Lady Anne, and her friend Colonel Keen realise that the horse was pulled by the jockey who had been bribed by Hardwick, a big bookmaker, whose own horse won the race. In the pub, horse trainer Lazy Mangan declares that he will become manager again of the stables. The Colonel and Lady Anne buy a foal at the auction of Charles' horses. They employ Mangan to train it and intend giving it as a present to Charles when the foal matures. Mangan brings the foal to a wood where he asks the Queen of the Fairies for the magic word for the foal and rears the foal on eggs and cream. An American, Maguire, buys Charles' estate and installs an English horse trainer. Captain Marlow, and a Cockney stablelad. When Charles is mistaken for an employee by Maguire's daughter. Pat, he accepts a job as her groom. After they become friendly. Pat tells Charles that she is going away for two years, but she is surprised when he kisses her. Maguire imports a horse 'Starlight' for the Cambridgeshire, while Marlow is in league with Hardwick, the new owner of 'Enchanting' against whom 'Starlight is running. Marlow tells Hardwick that he will lose a large sum if 'Enchanting' does not win. 'Starlight' beats 'Enchanting' in the Cambridgeshire, but the horse is disqualified after a complaint which Maguire and Lady Anne realise comes from one of the jockeys who are working with Hardwick. Charles returns from spending six months in South America. By now, the foal, named 'The March Hare', has matured under Mangan's training and Lady Anne and Colonel Keen give it to him. Charles decides that someone other than the alcoholic Mangan should train the horse. Upset, Mangan tells him that he won't have the word. The horse won't race until he receives the fairy word and Charles relents and re-employs Mangan. Mangan calms the horse with the secret word and it wins the race. Pat appears at the racetrack after being away for two years. That night in Dublin, Charles asks her to marry him, but she refuses his offer. Mangan becomes ill and Colonel Keen is worried that he will forget the magic word, but Mangan tells him that he promised never to tell the word to anyone. The horse disappears and Mangan tries to explain that he took him to see the fairies. When he woke up the following morning the horse was gone. When the horse is found, it is ill, but it recovers. Lady Anne and Colonel Keen are concerned^ that the by-now teetotal Mangan is forgetting the fairy word. Keen tries to insure against Mangan's loss of memory, but he is thrown out of the insurance company office as a crackpot. Hardwick fires an employee. Fisher, when he is told that five bets of £5,000 each and at 20/1 have been placed on 'The March Hare' in the Derby. Hardwick tells Marlow to return to Ireland and sabotage the horse's chances of winning. After a misunderstanding about her having another boyfriend is cleared up, Charles asks Pat to marry him and she agrees. At the Derby, a jockey, Connor, brings a message from Maguire to say that 'The March Hare's' jockey. Birch, has been injured in a car crash. With the telephone lines cut, Charles is unable to contact Maguire in Ireland about the substitute jockey. Maguire appears at the racetrack and tells Charles that he fired Connor months earlier. It proves too late to replace Connor, but despite the jockey's attempts to hold him back, 'The March Hare' wins the Derby. Charles wins £250,000 on the race and tells Pat that he intends buying the estate from her father. (V).
    NoteFilmed on location in Ireland at the McGrath stables, Co Wicklow, in Wicklow town, at Glendalough, and in Dublin, and at Shepperton Studios, England.
    ReferenceDFR 27/4/1956; KW 3/5/1956; MFB 1956:77; TC 27/4/1956; Var 9/5/1956. Gifford 12202: Apr 1956.
    DistributorBritish Lion Film Corporation (GB)
    KeywordsAnglo-Irish
    Horse Racing
    Production creditsp.c: Achilles Productions. Made in association with British Lion Film Corporation, pres: B & A Productions, p: Bertram Ostrer, Albert Fennell, d: George More O'Ferrall, sc: Gordon Wellesley, Allan MacKinnon from the novel Gamblers Sometimes Win by T H Bird, a. dial: Paul Vincent Carroll, dop: Jack Hildyard, c. op: Peter Newbrook, art d: Tony Masters, p.m: Albert Becket, a.d: John Pellatt, ed: Gordon Pilkington, cont: Betty Forster, m/m.c: Philip Green, songs sung by Joseph McNally, Jean Campbell and the George Mitchell Choir, s. super: John Cox, s: S T Ambler, Red Law, ward: Bill Walsh, Miss Cummins' dresses: Julie Harris, make-up: Ernie Gasser, hair: Ida Mills, GB distr: British Lion Film Corporation.
    Art directionMASTERS, Tony
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Literary Adaptation

    TitleJOHNNY NOBODY
    Production companyViceroy Films Ltd
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerSLOAN, John R.
    DirectorPATRICK, Nigel
    Script/AdaptationKIRWAN, Patrick
    PhotographyMOORE, Ted
    Sound recordingBRADBURN, Arthur
    MILNER, Wally
    EditingFOOT, Geoffrey
    Executive producerALLEN, Irving
    BROCCOLI, Albert R.
    Music composerGOODWIN, Ron
    Songs'Johnny Nobody', 'Fine Girl, Y'are' sung by Joe Lynch, Paddy MacGowan; 'The Moonshiner' lyr: Delia Murphy
    CastNigel Patrick (Father Carey), Yvonne Mitchell (Miss Floyd), Aldo Ray (Johnny Nobody), William Bendix (Mulcahy), Cyril Cusack (prosecuting counsel), Bemie Winters (photographer), Niall MacGinnis (defending counsel), Noel Purcell (Brother Timothy), Eddie Byrne (landlord). Jimmy O'Dea (postman), John Welsh (judge), Michael Brennan (Superintendent Lynch), Joe Lynch (tinker), Gearoid Ó Lochlainn (abbot), Ann Clery (ge woman), Frank Howard (usher), Danny Cummins (newsvendor). Deny O'Donovan (country woman), J G Devlin (caretaker), Christopher Casson (Father Bernard), Norman Rodway (Father Healey), May Craig (tinker's mother), Gerald Sullivan (young man), Geoff Golden (conductor), Seamus Healy (farmer), Desmond O'Neill (countryman), Vincent Dowling (train bar- man), Gerard Healy (clerk of the court), Tom Irwin (journalist), T P McKenna, Eddie Golden, Ronnie Walsh, Frank O'Donovan, James Neylin, Philip O'Flynn, Ausdn Meldon (garda), Joe Lynch, Michael O'Duffy, Dominic Behan (ballad singers).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration88
    Footage7935
    Format35mm
    Warwickscope
    Release date1960
    CopyIFA
    SummaryIn the Irish village of Monavullagh, drunken author Mulcahy, an Irishman returned from the USA, denounces religion as the publican and the postman try to silence him. He advises the patrons of the pub to sin moderately and a fight follows as he is thrown out. The postman rushes to Fr Carey and tells him that Mulcahy is blaspheming. Mulcahy publicly declares that there is no God and denounces what he calls the gers' superstitions. He calls on God to strike him down. He goes to the church with the gers following him and calls again for God to strike him down. At that moment a mysterious man who calls himself 'Nobody' appears and shoots Mulcahy dead. He says that a voice called on him to shoot him down. A policeman arrives and takes Nobody away. He is committed for trial. Fr Carey takes a parishioner, Biddy, to task for pagan practices following her expression of interest in Nobody's 'miracle'. Fr Carey goes to see Nobody in prison and is told that a voice told him to kill Mulcahy. Fr Carey says that thousands of donations are being sent for his defence. Contrary to the popular belief, Fr Carey declares that he has no doubt but that Nobody killed Mulcahy. The defence counsel tries to establish that the crime was a miracle and was the result of the direct intervention of God. Because of his theological training, Fr Carey is asked to offer his opinion whether or not Nobody acted as an instrument of God's will. The judge adjourns the trial for the week-end and says he will give his ruling on the admissibility of the question on the following Monday. Fr Carey meets a reporter, Miss Floyd, who is accompanied by a photographer who photographs him contrary to the judge's ruling. Fr Carey goes to see Brother Timothy and Fr Bernard, a teacher from his youth. Fr Bernard tells him that a miracle is above reason and that the cult which is developing around the event may be heresy. One of the many letters received by Fr Carey is an anonymous one posted in a remote Atlantic village named Inishgashel. Fr Carey decides to go to Inishgashel to investigate. Miss Floyd arrives in Monavullagh shortly after Fr Carey has left and is interested in why he went to Inishgashel. On his way to Inishgashel, Fr Carey crashes his car into a pond in the road after being directed into a bog. Miss Floyd appears on the road and gives him a lift. After receiving information about an artist from a strange old man they go to a big house, Kilgregory. At the house, Miss Floyd reveals herself as Nobody's wife, Mrs Mark Wheeler, and the author of the biblical quotations included in the anonymous letter he received. She is also the owner of the house. She explains that she wants him to stay at the house until her husband is acquitted. Miss Floyd claims that the reason why Mulcahy was killed was that he had stolen the topic of Nobody's forthcoming book on which he had been working for ten years. Fr Carey says that it was a calculated murder and he was envious of Mulcahy. She says that he should leave the people believe their superstitions. To stop Carey from giving evidence at the trial. Miss Floyd reports that he broke into the house and stole from it. He is arrested by the police, but he escapes from the police station and gets across a bog. He is brought into a travellers' camp and an old woman confirms he is a priest, not the impostor the police claim he is. The police raid the travellers camp but fail to find Fr Carey. He jumps onto a moving train going to Dublin. At the resumed trial, the judge rules that the theological question directed to Fr Carey is inadmissible. At Camckmines en route to Dublin, Fr Carey is spotted by the police who give chase. In Dublin, Mrs Wheeler sees Fr Carey and tries to run him down with her car. He reaches the court just after Nobody is pronounced innocent. Fr Carey appeals to the judge, but Nobody is discharged. Shortly afterwards. Nobody is stricken by a heart attack after he declares that no power on earth can stop him walking out a free man. (V).
    NoteGB Rel Nov 1961; USA Rel 23/11/1965 (New York).
    Filmed in Dublin, Enniskerry, Co Wicklow, and at Ardmore Studios, Bray, Co Wicklow.
    ReferenceDC 3/11/1961; IT 19/2/1962:10; KW 2/11/1961; MFB 1961:166.
    AFI Cat 1961-1970:557; Gifford 13019: Oct 1961; Var 1/12/1965.
    DistributorBritish Lion Film Corporation-Columbia Pictures Corp (GB)
    KeywordsMiracles
    Blasphemy
    Priests
    Writers
    Irish-Americans
    Murder
    Trials
    Courtrooms
    Theology
    Production creditsp.c: Viceroy Films Ltd, p: John R Sloan, exec. p: Irving Alien, Albert R Broccoli, d: Nigel Patrick, sc: Patrick Kirwan from the story 'The Trial of Johnny Nobody' by Albert Z Carr (Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine Nov 1950), dop: Ted Moore, c. op: Joh Winbolt, art d: Tony Inglis, ed: Geoffrey Foot, p.m: William Hill, a.d: Ted Sturgis, m/m.c: Ron Goodwin, songs: 'Johnny Nobody', 'Fine Girl, Y'are' sung by Joe Lynch, Paddy MacGowan; 'The Moonshiner' lyr: Delia Murphy, s: Arthur Bradburn, Wally Milner, s. ed: Jim Groom, cast: Maureen Halligan, James Liggat, stills: Joe Pearce, make-up: Paul Rabiger, hair: Helga Budina, ward: Eileen Long, cont: Helen Whitson, GB distr: British Lion Film Corporation-Columbia Pictures Corp.
    Art directionINGLIS, Tony
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleIN SEARCH OF THE CASTAWAYS
    SEARCH OF THE CASTAWAYS, THE
    CASTAWAYS
    Production companyWalt Disney Productions
    Country of originGreat Britain
    USA
    ProducerDISNEY, Walt
    DirectorSTEVENSON, Robert
    Script/AdaptationHAWLEY, Lowell S.
    PhotographyBEESON, Paul
    Sound recordingMESSENGER, Dudley
    McCALLUM, Gordon
    EditingSTONE, Gordon
    Associate producerATTWOLL, Hugh
    Music composerALWYN, William
    CastMaurice Chevalier (Jacques Paganel), Wilfred Brambell {Bill Gaye}, Hayley Mills (Mary Grant), George Sanders (Thomas Ayerton), Wilfrid Hyde-White (Lord Glenarvan), Michael Anderson Jr (John Glenarvan), Antonio Cifatiello (Thalcave), Keith Harrishere (Robert Grant), Jack Gwillim (Captain Grant), Ronald Fraser (guard), Inia Te Wiata (Maori chief), Norman Bird, Michael Wynne, Milo Sperber, Barry Keegan, George Murcell, Mark Dignam, Roger Delgado, Maxwell Shaw, Andreas Malandrinos, David Spenser.
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    Soundsound
    Duration100
    Format35mm
    Release date1961
    CopyNFTVA
    SummaryIn 18th-century England, French scientist Professor Paganel finds a floating bottle with a note he believes was written by missing Captain Grant. Paganel and Grant's two teenage children, Mary and Robert, ask shipping magnate Lord Glenarvan, the owner of Captain Grant's ship, to finance an expedition to find Grant. The expedition gets underway with Paganel, Mary, Robert, Glenarvan and his son, John, sailing for South America. In the Andes they are sent down a glacier following an earthquake. A giant condor snatches Robert, but Thalcave, an Indian chief, rescues him and tells the party he knows the whereabouts of Captain Grant. After surviving a tidal wave and a storm, they discover that Thalcave was mistaken about the whereabouts of Grant. They leave for Australia and meet Thomas Ayerton in Melbourne. He shows them evidence that Grant is in New Zealand. They sail with Ayerton, unaware that he was a member of Grant's crew and who led a mutiny on the ship. Ayerton, a gunrunner, leads another mutiny and sets the group adrift. They are captured by Maoris, and are imprisoned with Irishman Bill Gaye, a member of Captain Grant's crew. They escape to a volcano where they set off an avalanche which triggers a volcanic eruption. They find Captain Grant, overcome Ayerton and the mutineers, and sail for home. (Adapted from AFI Catalog 1961-1970:529; MFB 1962:171).
    NoteUSA Rel ca. 16/11/1962 (New York); 21/12/1962 (general release). Aka THE SEARCH OF THE CASTAWAYS; CASTAWAYS.
    DistributorVista Distribution Co (USA)
    KeywordsIrish Diaspora
    Migration
    Production creditsp.c: Walt Disney Productions, pres: Walt Disney. A Walt Disney production, p: Walt Disney, assoc. p: Hugh Attwooll, d: Robert Stevenson, 2nd unit d: Peter Bolton, sc: Lowell S Hawley from the novel Les eNíants du Capitaine Grant: Voyage autour du monde by Jules Verne (Paris, 1867-8), light, c: Paul Beeson, c. op: David Hal-court, a. c: Michael Reed, focus puller: Alee Mills, super, art d: Michael Stringer, art d: Ernest Archer, set dresser: Vernon Dixon, chief draughtsmen: Norman Donne, Terence Marsh, Roy Dorman, scenic artists: A Van Montagu, Peter Wood, ed: Gordon Stone, assembly cutter: Robin Clarke, 1st a. ed: Barry Peters, 2nd a. ed: Tony Hunt, m: William Alwyn, m.d: Muir Mathieson, songs: Richard M Sherman, Robert B Sherman, guitar accomp: Michael Anderson Jr, s. ed: Peter Thomton, s: Dudley Messenger, Gordon McCallum, boom op.: J W N Daniel, sound c: Ken Barker, a.d: Peter Bolton, David Anderson, Terence Churcher, Richard Jenkins, p.m: Peter Manley, cont: Pam Carlton, p. secretary: Jean Walter, cost: Margaret Furse, ward. master: John Briggs, ward. mistress: Brenda Dabbs, chief make-up: Harry Frampton, hair: Barbara Ritchie, sp. effs: Sydney Pearson, Jim Hole, Charles Willoughby, cnstr. super: Alee Officer, cnstr. m: Gus Walker, Jock Lyall, stills: Laurie Ridley, cast. d: Maude Spector, props buyer: Ron Quelch, props, chargehand: Paddy Bennett, elec. super: Harry Black, animals: Jimmy Chipperfield, Peter Ellenshaw unit - d: Peter Ellenshaw, light, c: Ray Sturgess, c. op: Godfrey Godar, focus puller: Michael Sarafin, chief draughtsman: Norman Dorme, Roy Dorman, 1st a.d: Eric Rattray, 2nd a.d: Grania O'Shannon, 3rd a.d: Ron Jackson, unit m: Clive Reed, cont: Kay Rawlings, miniatures/sp. effs: Norman Dorme, Roy Dorman, Ted Clements, cnstr. super: Bob Groves, stills: John Jay, props, chargehand: P Weymouth, elec. super: Reg Blackburn, sp.effs. unit - d: Ellensahw, c: Martin Shorthall, matte/sketch artist: Alan Maley, matte artist: Chris Cully, grip: T Stubbs, USA distr: Vista Distribution Co.
    Art directionSTRINGER, Michael
    ARCHER, Ernest
    Costume designFUSE, Margaret
    LightingBEESON, Paul
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Literary Adaptation
    Childrens Drama
    Adventure
    Period Drama

    TitleHARD DAY'S NIGHT, A
    Production companyProscenium Films
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerSHENSON, Walter
    DirectorLESTER, Richard
    Script/AdaptationOWEN, Alun
    PhotographyTAYLOR, Gilbert
    Sound recordingBIRD, H.L.
    DALBY, Stephen
    EditingJYMPSON, John
    TOMLING, Pamela
    Associate producerO'DELL, Denis
    Music composerLENNON, John
    McCARTNEY, Paul
    Music performanceBeatles, The
    Songs'A Hard Day's Night', 'I Should Have Known Better', 'I Wanna Be Your Man', 'All My Loving', 'If I Fell', 'Can't Buy Me Love', 'And I Love Her', 'I'm Happy Just to Dance with you', 'Tell Me Why', 'She Loves You', 'I'll Cry Instead', 'This Boy' (instrumental), song by George Harrison: 'Don't Bother Me'.
    CastJohn Lennon (John), Paul McCartney (Paul), George Harrison (George), Ringo Starr (Ringo), Wilfrid Brambell {Johnny McCartney/grandfather}, Norman Rossington (Norm), John Junkin (Shake), Victor Spinetti (TV director), Anna Quayle (Millie), Dereck Guyler (police inspector), Kenneth Haigh (Simon), Richard Vernon (man on train), Michael Trubshawe (club les manager), Eddie Malin (hotel waiter), Robin Ray (TV floor manager), Lionel Blair (TV choreographer), Alison Seebohm (secretary), David Jaxon (young boy), Marianne Stone (society reporter), David Langton (actor), Clare Kelly (barmaid), Julian Holloway (Adrian), Derek Nimmo (Leslie Jackson), Jeremy Lloyd (man at party), John Bluthal (car thief), Patti Boyd (girl on train), Roger Avon, Margaret Nolan, Terry Hooper, Bridget Armstrong, Rosemarie Frankland, Brian Epstein.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration85/90
    Footage76507858
    Format35mm
    Release date1964
    CopyNFTVA
    SummaryPursued by fans, The Beatles pop group, John, Paul, George and Ringo, accompanied by their manager Norm, his assistant Shake and John's Irish-born grandfather, Johnny McCartney, take a train from Liverpool to London to appear on a television show. Norm's worries are increased as Grandfather fuels seeds of dissension amongst the members of the group. In London, the television director becomes concerned as the group fails to appear for rehearsals. When Grandfather points to the limitations of being a teenage idol, Ringo deserts the group. Grandfather himself is arrested outside the theatre where the show is due to take place and he meets Ringo at the police station. After being arrested. Grandfather declares that he'll go on hunger-strike and claims to be 'a soldier of the Republic'. Grandfather also sings 'A Nation Once Again' for the bewildered policemen. Grandfather and Ringo escape from the police station and are chased by the police. With Ringo restored to the group, the show is a success. (V).
    NoteUSA Rel ca. 6/7/1964 (New York), 11/8/1964 (general release); GB Rel July 1964.
    ReferenceBNFC Vol. 2, 1964; FD Vol. 125, No. 10, 16/7/1964:7; Films in Review Vol. 15,
    No. 8, Oct 1964:503; HR Vol. 181, No. 23, 21/7/1964:3; KW No. 2962, 9/7/1964:11; MFB Vol. 31, No. 367, Aug 1964:121; MPH Vol. 232, No. 3, 5/8/1964:97; S&S 1964:196; Var 15/7/1964. AFI Cat 1961-1970:454-5; Filmfaust No. 40/41, 1984:31; Films in Review Vol. 40, No. 4, Apr 1989:213-219; Films in Review Vol. 40, No. 5, May 1989:269-277;
    Gifford 13408: June 1964; HR Vol. 271, No. 46, 18/5/1982:29, 40; HR Vol. 295, No. 30, 19/1/1987:28; Premiere Vol. 8, No. 3, Nov 1994:58, 59; Screen International No. 273, 3/1/1981:6; Screen International No. 451, 23/6/1984:45; S&S Vol. 3, No. 5, May 1993:14-18; Video Trade Weekly No. 125, 11/5/1984:3.
    DistributorUnited Artists Corp
    KeywordsRock Music
    Pop Music
    Irish in Britain
    Irish Diaspora
    Grandfathers
    LocationEngland
    Production creditsp.c: Proscenium Films, p: Walter Shenson, assoc. p: Denis O'Dell, d: Richard Lester, sc: Alun Owen, dop: Gilbert Taylor, c. op: Derek V Browne, art d: Ray Simm, titles: Robert Freeman, ed: John Jympson, Pamela Tomling, m.d: George Martin, songs by John Lennon and Paul McCartney: 'A Hard Day's Night', 'I Should Have Known Better', 'I Wanna Be Your Man', 'All My Loving', 'If I Fell', 'Can't Buy Me Love', 'And I Love Her', 'I'm Happy Just to Dance with you', 'Tell Me Why', 'She Loves You', 'I'll Cry Instead', 'This Boy' (instrumental), song by George Harrison: 'Don't Bother Me', s: H L Bird, Stephen Dalby, s. ed: Gordon Daniel, a.d: John D MerFilman, cont: Rita Davison, cost: Julie Harris, Beatles' ward: Dougie Millings & Son, make-up: John O'Gorman, hair: Betty Glasgow, distr: united Artists Corp.
    Art directionSIMM, Ray
    Costume designHARRIS, Julie
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical
    Rock Film

    TitleNED KELLY
    Production companyWoodfall Ltd
    Country of originGreat Britain
    DirectorRICHARDSON, Tony
    Script/AdaptationRICHARDSON, Tony
    JONES, Ian
    PhotographyFISHER, Gerry
    Sound recordingMASTERS, Ian
    KEEN, Peter
    EditingREES, Charles
    Music composerSILVERSTEIN, Shel
    Songs'Ned Kelly', 'Son of a Scoundrel', 'Shadow of the Gallows', 'Lonigan's Widow', 'Stoney Cold Ground', 'The Kellys Keep Comin', 'Marchin' in the Evenin', 'Blame it on the Kellys', 'Pleasure of a Sunday Afternoon', 'Hey Ned', sung by Waylon Jennings, 'She Moved Through the Fair' (Irish trad.) sung by Glen
    Tomasetti, 'The Wild Colonial Boy' (Irish trad.) sung by Mick Jagger.
    CastMick Jagger (Ned Kelly}, Alien Bickford {Dan Kelly}, Geoff Gilmour (Steve Hart), Mark McManus (Joe Byrne), Serge Lazareff (Wild Wright), Peter Sumner (Tom Lloyd), Ken Shorter (Aaron Sherritt), James Elliott (Pat O'Donnell), Clarissa Kaye (Mrs Kelly}, Diane Craig {Maggie Kelly}, Susan Lloyd {Kate Kelly}, Alexi Long {Grace Kelly}, Bruce Barry (George King), Janne Wesley (Caitlyn), Ken Goodlet (Superintendent Nicholson), Frank Thring (Judge Barry), Nigel Lovell (Standish), Martyn Sanderson {Fitzpatrick}, Robert Bruning (Sergeant Steele), John Laws (Kennedy), Liam Reynolds (Lonigan), Lindsay Smith (Mclntyre), John Gray (Stratton), Reg German (Bracken), John Hopkins (O'Connor), Peter Whittle (Devine), Anne Harvey (Mrs Devine), Bill Charlton (Richards), Graham Keating (1st trooper), Ben Blackeney (tracker). Bill Hunter (officer), Alexander Cann (Mclnnes), Gerry Duggan (Father O'Hea), John Dease (Whitty), Patsy Dance (Mrs Whitty), Erika Crowne (Mrs Farrell), Tony Bazell (Mr Scott), Andrew Sanders (Farrell), Jessica Noad (Mrs Scott), Colin Tilley (bank clerk), Tim Van Rellim, Patrick McCarville (sportsmen), Kamahl (Gloster), Ronald Golding (Casement), Gordon McDougal (Tarleton), Clifford Neate (Living), Brian Niland (Mackie), Doreen Warburton (Mrs Jones), Gary Fisher (Jack Jones), Karin Altman (Jane Jones), David Copping (Mr Cumow), Penny Stehli (Mrs Cumow), Francis Yin (sympathiser), Shirley May Donald (Mrs Byrne), Mary Marshall (Mrs Barry), Claire Balmford (Nell Sherritt), Kurt Beimel (Anton Wicks), Moshe Kedem (Baumgarten), Keith Peterson (referee), Terry Erwin (Chinese), Harry Kelly (Aborigine), Jack Alien (Melbourne), Michael Boddy.
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    SoundSound
    Duration103
    Footage9315
    Format35mm
    Release date1970
    CopyNFTVA
    SummaryAfter spending three years in jail, young Irish-Australian Ned Kelly returns to his family home, where his widowed mother is 'engaged' to American George King, a horse-thief and gambler. His sister Maggie is unhappily married and his brother Jim is in jail for theft. Ned provokes local cattle rancher Whitty and is then tricked into drunkenness with doped drink by the apparently friendly Irish policeman Fitzpatrick. Ned is fined and released. Ned works in a saw mill where Fitzpatrick tries to recruit him as an informer. He rejects the police pressure and decides to abandon his job in favour of horse-stealing with King, his brother Dan and other friends who steal Whitty's horses. While the gang are in the outback, the police pressure the now-pregnant Mrs Kelly. Fitzpatrick breaks into the Kellys' home and harasses Dan who has just been released from jail. When Fitzpatrick molests Kate, Dan grabs him and he is wounded when his gun accidentally discharges. He promises not to reveal what happened, but a large force of policemen arrive and arrest Mrs Kelly. She is charged with attempted murder and is sentenced to three years in jail. Ned offers to surrender if his mother is released, but the police reject his offer, believing the gang will be caught soon. At Stringybark Creek, the gang kill three policemen in self-defence. Ned is now wanted for murder with a price of £2,000 offered for the death or capture of the Kelly gang. Ned writes a statement about the oppression of his Irish forebears who were transported to Van Diemen's Land. The gang rob coaches and the bank at Euroa. They kidnap a group of prominent citizens. Ned tells them he is the victim of an unjust system and gives one of them a letter to deliver to a Member of Parliament. The police retaliate by arresting their friends and supporters who benefited from the proceeds of the Euroa bank robbery. During another bank raid, Ned bums the mortgages of smallholders which are owned by large landowners. Ned tells a group of supporters they are at war with the whole English world and that they will raise the green flag of Ireland in favour of the Republic of Victoria. The police employ Aborigine trackers to hunt down the gang. Ned sends his girlfriend, Caitlyn, away as the police close in on them. Ned finds out that Aaron Sherritt is an informer and he orders him killed. In pursuit of his political goals, Ned has body armour made for himself and his men, which is to be used as protection against the police after he derails a police train as it approaches Glenrowan. At the Glenrowan hotel, schoolteacher Cumow tricks Ned into leaving the hotel and manages to stop the train before it reaches the point where the tracks have been lifted. The police attack the hotel, and following their motto that they will not be taken alive, Ned's brothers shoot each other simultaneously. Ned is captured, tried and sentenced to death. He is hanged at the age of twenty five, unrepentant to the end with his motto, 'Such is life'. (V).
    NoteGB Rel June 1970; AU Rel 28/7/1970 (Glenrowan); USA Rel 10/6/1970 (Denver, Colorado). Filmed mainly around the town of Braidwood, New South Wales, Australia. Post-production work was done in England. See note with THE STORY OF THE KELLY GANG (Aus 1906). MPG mistakenly reports that MAD DOG MORGAN (Aus 1976), see above, is from the same material. Though an Irish-Australian bushranger like Kelly, Morgan was a different person.
    ReferenceCinema Papers Dec 1969; F&F Vol. 16, No. 11, Aug 1970:41-42; HR 17/10/1969; HR 10/6/1970; KW No. 3272, 27/6/1970:8; MFB Vol. 37, No. 439, Aug 1970:158-159; MPH Vol. 240, No. 22, 1/7/1970:475; TC No. 9819, 3/7/1970:8; Var 17/6/1970:16. AFI Cat 1961-1970:760; Gifford 14074: May 1970; Pike and Cooper 1980, No. 379.
    DistributorUnited Artists Corp (GB)
    KeywordsKelly Gang
    Gangs
    Irish Diapora
    Irish Australians
    Australian History
    Migration
    Irish Diaspora
    LocationAustralian
    Production creditsp.c: Woodfall Ltd, p: Neil Hartley, d: Tony Richardson, sc: Richardson, lan Jones, dop: Gerry Fisher, art d: Andrew Sanders, p.d/cost: Jocelyn Herbert, m/lyr: Shel Silverstein, songs: 'Ned Kelly', 'Son of a Scoundrel', 'Shadow of the Gallows', 'Lonigan's Widow', 'Stoney Cold Ground', 'The Kellys Keep Comin', 'Marchin' in the Evenin', 'Blame it on the Kellys', 'Pleasure of a Sunday Afternoon', 'Hey Ned', sung by Waylon Jennings, 'She Moved Through the Fair' (Irish trad.) sung by Glen Tomasetti, 'The Wild Colonial Boy' (Irish trad.) sung by Mick Jagger, m.d: Ron Haffkine, p. super: Gavrik Losey, ed: Charles Rees, a.d: Andrew Grieve, s: lan Masters, Peter Keen, dub. Gerry Humphreys, s. mix: Tony Jackson, distr: united Artists Corp.
    Art directionSANDERS, Andrews
    Production designHERBERT, Jocelyn
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Historical Drama
    Biopic

    TitleFLIGHT OF THE DOVES
    Production companyRainbow Productions
    Columbia Pictures Corp
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerNELSON, Ralph
    DirectorNELSON, Ralph
    Script/AdaptationGABRIELSON, Frank
    NELSON, Ralph
    PhotographyWAXMAN, Harry
    Sound recordingSUTTON, Peter
    HUMPHREYS, Gerry
    EditingJYMPSON, John
    Associate producerGILMORE Jr., William S.
    Music composerBUDD, Roy
    Songs'You Don't Have To Be Irish To Be Irish' m: Budd, lyr: Alf Elson, 'The Far Off Place' by Budd, Brendan O'Douil, sung by Dana.
    CastRon Moody (Hawk Dove), Jack Wild (Finn Dove), Dorothy McGuire (Mary Magdalene St Bridget O'Flaherty/Granny O'Flaherty), Stanley Holloway (Judge Liffy), Helen Raye (Derval Dove), William Rushton (Tobias Cromwell), Dana (Sheila), John Molloy (Mickser), Barry Keegan (Powder), Brendan O'Reilly (Michael), Noel Purcell (the rabbi), Tom Hickey (Garda Pat Flynn), Niall Toibin (Sergeant O'Casey).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourEastmancolor
    SoundSound
    Duration101
    Footage9110
    Format35mm
    Release date1971
    SummaryIn England, thirteen-year-old Finn Dove and his seven-year-old sister Derval leave home to get away from their brutal stepfather, Tobias Cromwell. They decide to go to Ireland where their grandmother, Mary O'Flaherty, lives in a cottage in a picturesque setting. When Cromwell discovers that the children are heirs to an annual sum of $10,000, he intensifies his efforts to get them back. The children's uncle, Hawk Dove, a master of disguise, also hears about the fortune and discovers that if the children die, or can't be found, the money goes to him. The children stowaway on a boat to Dublin where they are pursued by the police, but are helped by a rabbi. They take part in the Saint Patrick's Day parade. Disguised as an English police officer. Hawk Dove arrives with Cromwell in possession of a court order for the children and apparently to help the police with the investigation. The children get help from a bootlegger, Mickser, who had given the them a lift, but they run away when they see him calling the police. Later, the children hide on Mickser's truck as it heads towards Galway. They are mistaken for travellers' children and they get away again. They are helped by a group of travellers, but like Mickser, they are mainly interested in the reward for the children. Their grandmother appeals on television for them to come to her in Galway. Derval and Finn are also apparently helped by an English journalist, Heather Marblestone, who is Hawk Dove in disguise. Hawk Dove takes the children to a dangerous ruin and tries to kill them, but he falls into the sea himself. The children arrive at their grandmother's cottage. When the police try to take the children into care, the locals place themselves between the cottage and the police. Their grandmother also resists Cromwell's attempts to take the children back to England. Meanwhile disguised as a local, Hawk Dove appears at the house and takes the children to a bam where he plans to kill them, but at the last moment he abandons his efforts to harm them. The children tell him he can have the money as they have all they want with their grandmother. Hawk Dove tells Judge Liffy that the court order is bogus as he delivered it to Cromwell in one of his disguises. Cromwell accepts that the children can stay with their grandmother and Judge Liffy rules that they can stay with her. Hawk Dove lice escapes once more when he takes a policeman's uniform and bicycle. (V).
    NoteFilmed on location in Ireland.
    ReferenceF&F Sept 1971; Filmfacts Vol. 14, No. 11,1971; HR 21/8/1970; HR 5/4/1971; KW Cenz 5/7/1971; KW 25/7/1971; MFB 1971:142; TC 14/7/1970; TC 9/7/1971; Var 31/3/1971.

    ‘Former Olympics athlete impresses as the 'New Image' Irishman’. Press release: giving details of who's who in the cast (Alan Arnold). Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    ‘Doves moves into Northern Ireland’. Press release: describing film location and surroundings (Alan Arnold). Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    ‘Stand up the real Ron Moody: a biographical feature’. Press release: details of actor Ron Moody's character(s), how the appear in the plot and biographical details (Alan Arnold). Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    ‘Ralph Nelson: biography’, press release: giving details on filmmaker Ralph Nelson's life and work. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    ‘Dorothy McGuire to Ireland for Ralph Nelson's "Flight of the Doves", actress to come to Ireland to star in film. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    ‘Stanley Holloway to guest star as Irish judge in Ralph Nelson's Flight of the Doves’, press release: Well known actor to join the cast. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    ‘16th Century abbey setting for Doves night scenes’, press release: description of film location, its history and surroundings. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    ‘Doves over Dublin - and Nelson on the Liffey’, press release: descriptions of film locations used in Dublin. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    ‘Doves in scenes at the port of no return’, press release: description of the Co. dublin port used as film location. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    Kinematograph Weekly, 25/7/70:2, ‘Videotape and a 'UN' crew for 'Flight of the Doves'’, US producer/director Ralph Nelson begins shooting 'Flight of the Doves' in Ireland (Rod Cooper).
    DistributorColumbia Pictures (GB)
    KeywordsChildren
    Irish in Britain
    Orphans
    Stepfathers
    Travellers
    Gypsies
    Tinkers
    Inheritance
    Chases
    LocationIreland
    Production creditsp.c: Rainbow, A Rainbow Production, pres: Columbia Pictures Corp. p/d: Ralph Nelson, assoc. p: William S Gilmore Jr, sc: Frank Gabrielson, Nelson from the novel Flight of the Doves by Walter Macken (London: Macmillan, 1968), dop: Harry Waxman, c. op Ron Maasz, p.m: Robert Watts, art d: Frank Arrigo, a.d: Philip Parslow, ed: John Jympson, m/m.d: Roy Budd, songs: 'You Don't Have To Be Irish To Be Irish' m: Budd, lyr: AlfElson, 'The Far Off Place' by Budd, Brendan O'Douil, sung by Dana, s: Peter Sutton, Gerry Humphreys, s. ed: Rusty Coppleman, p. secretary: Rhonda Grogan, make-up super; Mark Reedall, ward super: Ted Parvin, props, master: Ray Mercer Jr, publicity: Alan Arnold, cast. d: Don Geraghty, distr: Columbia Pictures.
    Art directionARRIGO, Frank
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Literary Adaptation
    Childrens Drama
    Adventure

    TitleDOCTOR AND THE DEVILS, THE
    Production companyBrooksfilms Productions
    Dr Barrington Cooper/Burton Gintel/Jonathan Sanger Production
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerSANGER, Jonathan
    DirectorFRANCIS, Freddie
    Script/AdaptationHARWOOD, Ronald
    THOMAS, Dylan
    PhotographyTURPIN, Gerry
    WARWICK, Norman
    EditingMERY-CLARK, Laurence
    Executive producerBROOKS, Mel
    Associate producerHELMAN, Geoffrey
    LUSTIG, Jo
    STONE, Barbara
    STONE, David C.
    Music composerMORRIS, John
    Music performanceNational Philharmonic Orchestra
    Songs'Tainted Hands' and incidental music by In Tua Nua; 'Whisper And I Shall Hear' by M Piccolomini, C Hubi-Newcombe, perf. by Twiggy,
    CastTimothy Dalton (Doctor Thomas Rock), Jonathan Pryce {Robert Fallon}, Twiggy (Jenny Bailey), Julian Sands (Doctor Murray), Stephen Rea {Timothy Broom}, Phyllis Logan (Elizabeth Rock), Lewis Fiander (Doctor Thomton), Beryl Reid {Mrs Flynn}, T P McKenna {O'Connor}, Patrick Stewart ^ (Professor Macklin), Sian Phillips (Annabella Rock), Philip Davis (Billy Bedlam), Philip Jackson (Andrew Merry-Lees), Danny Schiller (Praying Howard), Bruce Green (Mole), Toni Palmer (Rosie), David Bamber (Cronin), Nichola McAulifie (Alice), Deidre Costello (Nelly), Terry Neason (Kate), Paul Curran (Tom, the porter), Merelina Kendall (Mrs Webb), Dermot Crowley (Mr Webb), Sarah Melia (Nora Webb), Stephen Yardley (Joseph), John Horsley (Doctor Mackendrick), Jack May (Doctor Stevens), Rachel Herbert (Mrs Stevens), Simon Shepherd (Harding), David Parfitt (Billings), Simon Adams (Green), Jeff Rawle (Lambert), Morgan Sheppard (landlord), Jennifer Jayne (barmaid), Moira Brooker (Molly, the maid), P G Stevens (priest), Roy Evans (sewerman), Peter Burton (customer), Leonard Maguire (nightwatchman), Hedger Wallace (doctor). Ray Dunbobbin (tinker), Martin Herring (messenger), Shaun Curry (policeman), David Grahame (old man), Kevin Duffield (Daniel), Ray Armstrong, Sam Baruett (prison guards).
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration92
    Footage8294
    FormatPanavision
    35mm
    Release date1985
    SummaryIn Edinburgh in the late 18th century, Dr Thomas Rock lectures to a class of students at the Academy of Anatomy and reiterates his commitment to materialism. Irishmen Robert Fallon and Timothy Broom opportunistically rob a grave of its body and sell it to Dr Rock's assistant Murray. Dr Rock argues in favour of a change in the law to allow experiments to be made on human corpses. Penniless, Fallon and Broom kill Daniel, an ill lodger at their house. They sell the body to Rock, who regards the body as the best he has had in years. At the Academy of Anatomy, traditionalist Dr Macklin has few students while Rock's lectures prove very popular. Jealous of his popularity and opposed to Rock's experiments on humans, Macklin plots Rock's censure before the medical council. Summoned before the council. Rock defends his use of human specimens in his lectures. Fallon and Broom continue to supply Rock with corpses. After twelve bodies have been delivered to Rock, his assistant, Murray, tells him that he believes the people have been murdered, but Rock dismisses his concern. By now, Murray has fallen in love with Jenny Bailey, a prostitute friend of Fallon and Broom. The two men befriend and then kill Irishwoman Mrs Flynn. Another lodger, Mrs Webb comes across Mrs Flynn's severed finger from which Fallon and Broom had stolen a ring. She informs a policeman. Broom tells Fallon that the game is up and that they should run away. Fallon wants to kill Jenny and another prostitute, Alice, but Broom tells him he just wants to murder them, not collect the money. When Alice is brought by Fallon to Rock's house, a servant, Tom, accuses Fallon of murder. Rock belatedly realises that Alice has been murdered. Murray rushes to Jenny after Tom tells him that Fallon intends to return with her companion. As Jenny fights off Fallon, Murray arrives and overpowers him. Rock acknowledges that the two men were murderers. Broom turns King's Evidence and plans to testify that Rock paid him to commit the murder. Rock is summoned before the medical faculty and continues to defend his actions. The council have been told that Rock will not face criminal proceedings and his role will be kept quiet to protect the medical profession. Fallon is sentenced to death and hanged, while Broom disappears. (V).
    NoteMade at Lee International Studios, Shepperton, Middlesex, England. Other film versions of the real-life Irishmen Burke and Hare are THE BODY SNATCHER (USA 1945), THE GREED OF WILLIAM HART (GB
    1948), THE FLESH AND THE FIENDS (GB 1959), THE ANATOMIST (GB 1961) and BURKE AND HARE (GB 1971).
    ReferenceMFB 1986:205-7.
    DistributorTwentieth Century-Fox Film Corp (GB)
    PeopleBurke and Hare
    KeywordsVictorian Society
    Irish in Britain
    Irish Diaspora
    Grave Robbers
    Body Snatchers
    Doctors
    Murder
    LocationEdinburgh
    Production creditsp.c: Brooksfilms. A Brooksfilms Production in association with Dr Barrington Cooper, Burton Gintel. A Jonathan Sanger Production, p: Jonathan Sanger, exec. p: Mel Brooks, assoc. p: Geoffrey Helman, Jo Lustig (Brooksfilms), Barbara Stone, David C Stone, d: Freddie Francis, sc: Ronald Harwood from an original screenplay by Dylan Thomas (London: J M Dent & Sons, 1953), dop: Gerry Turpin, Norman Warwick, c. op: Gordon Hayman, p.dsgn.: Robert Laing, p. co-ord: Bi Benton, loc. m: Derek Whitehurst, art d: Brian Ackland-Snow, set dec: Peter James, ed: Laurence Mery dark, sc. super: Pamela Davies, 1st a.d: Peter Bennett, 2nd a.d: Andrew Warren, 3rd a.d: Simon Haveland, focus puller: Tim Ross, c. loader: Ken Groom, c. grip: Ken Atherfold, boom op.: Steve O'Brien, a. art d: Kit Surrey, 1st a. ed: Jeremy Gibbs, 2nd a. ed: Adam Unger, dial. ed: Peter Bond, m/m.c: John Morris, The National Philharmonic Orchestra, orch: Jack Hayes, songs/m: 'Tainted Hands' and incidental music by In Tua Nua; 'Whisper And I Shall Hear' by M Piccolomini, C Hubi Newcombe, perf. by Twiggy, s. mix: Ken Weston, s. ed: Alan Paley, dub. mix: John lies, a.s. ed: Jeremy Strachan, props, master: Tony Teiger, sp. effs: Alan Bryce, a. sp. erfs: Philip Knowles, cost: Imogen Richardson, ward. super: Bridget Sellars, ward. master: Norman Dickens, make-up dsgn: Naomi Donne, a. make-up: Miri Ben-Shlomo, hair dsgn: Sally Sutton, a. hair: Aileen Seaton, cast: Maggie Cartier, cast. a: Suzanne Crowley, a. to p: Corinne Cartier, a. to d: Frances Richardson, best boy: George Parish, chief elec: Wick Finch, cnstr. co-ord: Bob Cross, accnts: Beryl Golding, stills: Tom Hilton, distr: Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
    Art directionACKLAND-SNOW, Brian
    Costume designRICHARDSON, Imogen
    Production designLAING, Robert
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Horror Film

    TitleCOURIER, THE
    Production companyEustace Films
    Palace Pictures
    City Vision Films
    SponsorBórd Scánnán na hEireann/Irish Film Board
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerMcLOUGHLIN, Hilary
    WOOLLEY, Stephen
    DirectorLEE, Joe
    DEASY, Frank
    Script/AdaptationDEASY, Frank
    PhotographyBERISTAIN, Gabriel
    Sound recordingHAYES, Pat
    EditingTRIGG, Eric
    D'ALTON, Annette
    SUTTON, Amanda
    THOMAS, Sarah
    Executive producerJORDAN, Neil
    POWELL, Nik
    HAMBLEY, John
    Music composerMACMANUS, Declan
    Songs'Burn Clear' by Alan Byrne, Tom Dunne, Ray Harmon,
    Eamonn Ryan, perf. by Something Happens; 'The Courier - It's a Dangerous Game' by Joe Jewell, Chris Dignam, Tony McGuinness, perf. by Asian; 'Kill
    the One You Love' by John Brereton, arrg. by Nigel White, perf. by Lord John White; 'Love Don't Work This Way' by Hothouse Flowers, 'She Came from There' by Something Happens, 'Silly Dreams' by Cry Before Dawn, 'Walk to the Water' by U2, 'Who Cares' by Martin McHugh, Michael Ivory, perf. by Too Much for the White Man, 'Wild White Horse' by Liam Ó Maonlai, Fiachna Ó Braonain, Peter O'Toole, perf. by Hothouse Flowers.
    CastPadraig O Loinsigh (Mark), Cait O'Riordan (Colette), Gabriel Byrne (Val), lan Bannen (McGuigan), Patrick Bergin (Christy), Andrew Connolly (Danny), Michelle Houlden (Sharon), Mary Ryan (Carol), Dave Duffy (Dunne), Joe Savino (video editor), Caroline Rothwell (receptionist), Stuart Dunne (Tony), Martin Dunne (Alfie), Mick Egan (barman). Mark Flanagan (Sharon's baby), Anne Enright (pregnant girl), Lucy Vigne-Welsh, Ger Ryan (assistants in jewellers'). Owen Hyland (schoolboy), Kevin Doyle (boy at Val's shop), Albert Fahy (Val's assistant). Alee Doran (man in pub), Aidan Murphy (boy picked up by Val), Aisling Cronin (girl in Alfie's), Robbie Graden (busker), Toni O'Neill (dancer), David Nolan (policeman), Maurice O'Donoghue (Special Branch detective). Tony Coleman, Shay Ledwidge (Special Branch men), Stephen Dunne, Lynn Cahill (housebuyers).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    Soundsound
    Duration81/85
    Footage7651
    Format35mm
    Release date1988
    CopyIFA
    SummaryDublin criminal Val visits a woman in a housing complex and gives her money. Threateningly, he speaks to one of his men, Danny, a drug addict, and Christy. Later, a jewellery store is robbed by Danny and Christy. While making a delivery in Dublin, motorcycle messenger Mark visits the bank where an old friend, Colette, Danny's sister, works. Her brother was once a close friend of Mark's and he and Colette begin to date. Val is being targeted by police detective McGuigan, who brings Danny in for questioning. McGuigan asks his help in catching Val. Danny tells him that jewels are being traded for heroin. When Val finds out that Danny has co-operated with the police, he smashes a light bulb into one of his eyes. Following an accident, Mark realises that he has been used as a courier to ferry drugs and drugs money between Val and his clients. Danny goes to see Mark and they renew their friendship. The next day, Danny dies after taking poisoned heroin supplied by Val. By now close to Colette, Mark determines to wreak revenge on Val. He infiltrates Val's organisation and joins up with Christy for a proposed robbery on the bank where Colette works. He uses his role as a courier to plant drugs on Val so that McGuigan can arrest him. Val sees McGuigan arrive and gets rid of the drugs before he can arrest him. Realising that Mark is responsible, Val sends Christy to his home to take revenge. Carol, manager of the courier office, apologises to Val for Mark's action. Colette arrives at Mark's house while Christy waits upstairs to kill Mark. Mark arrives home and gets Colette out of the house when he realises Christy is there. Sharon, another courier, arrives at Mark's house to warn him about Val and is shot by Christy who thinks she is Mark. Mark talks with McGuigan and accuses him of being responsible through neglect for Danny's death. Mark attacks the club where Val has been with a boy. Colette takes McGuigan to the bank where she works as Christy is fleeing after robbing it. Christy tries to kidnap Colette but then tells McGuigan the location of Val's hide-out. At the hide-out, Val disarms and wounds Mark after he holds him up. McGuigan arrives and one of his men kills Val. Two housebuyers buy Mark's house. Mark and Colette decide to leave the city. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 10/2/1988 (world premiere); TX UTV ca. 14/3/1990. Filmed on location in Dublin and at MTM Ardmore Studios, Bray, Co Wicklow. A novelisation of the screenplay by Frank Deasy was published as The Courier by Gerald Cole (London: Metheun, 1988).
    ReferenceIT 27/1/1988:12; IT 12/2/1988:14; SI 31/1/1988:17; SI 14/2/1988:17; ST 7/2/1988:19.

    The Courier: production notes. Background to the production of The Courier.
    Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    ‘Captives: Frank Deasy, writer’. Brief biography of Frank Deasy, director of The Courier. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    Film Base News, Apr/May 1988:14-5, critical discussion of The Courier (Johnny Gogan, Mike Collins).

    Film Base News, Jan/Feb 1988:3, ‘Courier release’, brief outline of background of The Courier.

    Irish Times, 12/2/88:1, ‘Courier fails to deliver’, review (Ray Comiskey).

    Irish Times, Feb 1988, ‘Irish connections’, brief preview of The Courier (Ray Comiskey).

    Irish Times, 27/1/88:12, ‘Three young Dubliners and their film’, interview with directors, Frank Deasy and Joe Lee, and producer, Hilary McLoughlin about The Courier (Ray Comiskey).

    Irish Times, 1988, ‘Do we need these seamy films?’, reader's letter criticising Irish films including The Courier, Joyriders et al.(Christopher Hickey).

    Irish Times, 5/6/87:1, ‘Dublin girl with £800,000 to spend’, interview with Hilary McLoughlin, producer of The Courier, on her life and work in the film industry (Kathryn Holmquist).

    Monthly Film Bulletin, Feb 1988:41, review (Philip Strick).

    The Guardian, 18/02/88:1, review (Tim Pulleine).

    City Limits, 1988, review. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    In Dublin, 18/02/88:1, review.

    Dublin Opinion, 03/88:1, review (Djinn Gallagher).

    Elle, 1988, review (Elissa Van Poznak). Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    Irish Press, 7/1/88:1, ‘Irish Film a Big Hit’, 'The Courier' an international success even before it was released in Ireland (Philip Molloy).
    DistributorPalace Pictures (GB)
    KeywordsCrime
    Criminals
    Drugs
    Jewel Heists
    Robberies
    Working Class Communities
    LocationDublin City
    Production creditsp.c: Eustace Films and Palace Pictures present a City Vision Film. Developed and produced with the assistance of Bord Scannan na hEireann/Irish Film Board, p: Hilary McLoughlin, co-p: Stephen Woolley, exec p: Neil Jordan, Nik Powell, John Hambley, d: Joe Lee, Frank Deasy, sc: Deasy, dop: Gabriel Beristain, c. op: Peter Cavaccuiti, 2nd unit c. op: Seamus Deasy, 2nd unit a.c: Aidan Murphy, focus puller: Des Whelan, grip: John Murphy, clapper loader: Alan Butler, trainee clapper loader: Paco Hayes, 1st a.d: Martin O'Malley, 2nd a.d: Gay Brabazon, 3rd a.d: Konrad Jay, trainee a.d: Hugh Linehan, John Halpin, Lisa Mulcahy, John McDonnell, p.m: Mary Alleguen, art d: David Wilson, ed: Derek Trigg, Annette D'Alton, a. ed: Amanda Sutton, Sarah Thomas, 2nd a. ed: Rebecca Curthoys, Keith Durham, David Barren, trainee a. ed: Brendan Geraghty, Blaithin Gallagher, cont: Jean Bourne, m: Declan MacManus, orch: Fiachra Trench, m. assoc: Ross MacMahon, songs: 'Bum Clear' by Alan Byrne, Tom Dunne, Ray Harmon, Eamonn Ryan, perf. by Something Happens; 'The Courier - It's a Dangerous Game' by Joe Jewell, Chris Dignam, Tony McGuinness, perf. by Asian; 'Kill the One You Love' by John Brereton, arrg. by Nigel White, perf. by Lord John White; 'Love Don't Work This Way' by Hothouse Flowers, 'She Came from There' by Something Happens, 'Silly Dreams' by Cry Before Dawn, 'Walk to the Water' by U2, 'Who Cares' by Martin McHugh, Michael Ivory, perf. by Too Much for the White Man, 'Wild White Horse' by Liam Ó Maonlai, Fiachna Ó Braonain, Peter O'Toole, perf. by Hothouse Flowers, s. ed: Nigel Gait, a.s. ed: Paul Conway, Des Irvine, s. mix: Pat Hayes, boom op.: Pat Doyle, dub. mix: Rupert Scrivener, storyboard artist: Lee, loc. m: Seamus Byrne, cast: Susie Figgis, cost: Consolata Boyle, ward. mistress: Maeve Patterson, a. ward: Ann Stokes, make-up: Rosie Blackmore, 2nd unit make-up: Marie McLoughlin, hair: Anne Dunne, props buyer: Sunny Mulligan, dressing props: Derek Wallace, P J Smith, Harry Bradshaw, stand-by props: Nuala McKeman, Rene Knol, cnstr. m: Russ Bailey, carpenter: Eddie Cunningham, Lorcan O'Toole, stand-by carpenter: Vivion O'Brien, painter: Owen Munane, stand-by painter: Dave Rath, stagehand: Andy Lee, gaffer: Louis Conroy, elec: Jim Farrell, Pat Ryder, generator op: Brian Sheridan, sp. efts: Gerry Johnston, armourer: Pat McMahon, stunt co-ord: Dominic Hewitt, stunts: Alan Walsh, Mary Casey, Therese DonneUy, Paul Kelly, Professional Stunts Irish, legal adv: James Hickey, p. accnt: Paul Myler, a. to d: Margaret Moggan, a. to p: Brendan Geraghty, p. secretary: Karen Hodge, post-sync. engnr: Peter Smith, grader: Terry Lee, titles: Graham Humphries, stills: Tom Collins, GB distr: Palace Pictures.
    Art directionWILSON, David
    Costume designBOYLE, Consolata
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Crime Drama

    TitleJOYRIDERS
    Production companyGranada Film Productions
    British Screen
    Little Bird Productions
    Walsh Smith
    Film Four International
    SponsorNational Film Development Fund
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerHAYTER, Emma
    DirectorWALSH, Aisling
    Script/AdaptationSMITH, Andy
    WALSH, Aisling
    PhotographyBERISTAIN, Gabriel
    Sound recordingHORGAN, Kieron
    HULME, Paul
    Associate producerCAVENDISH, Jonathan
    Music composerLINDES, Hal
    BRITTEN, Tony
    Songs'Goodbye Jimmy Goodbye' lyr: Jack Vaughn, m: Sydney Bron,
    perf. by Mary Carewe; 'Heartache', 'Without Leaving A Trace', 'You
    Move Too Slowly For Me' by Tony Britten, perf. by Bill McGilloray;
    'Daytime Loving', 'My Teacher' by Tony Britten, perf. by Mary
    Carewe; 'When Irish Eyes Are Smiling', lyr: Chauncey Olcott, George
    Graff, m: Ernest Ball, perf. by Mary Carewe; 'The Tinsel And The Neon'
    by Andy Smith, perf. by Patricia Kerrigan; 'Do Bhf Bean Uasal' (trad.)
    perf. by Sean 6 Se; 'Searching For Black', 'The Girl Who Cares' by and
    perf. by The Pleasure Cell; 'Let Him Go, Let Him Tarry' by Cliff
    Gordon, Max Maurice, Carl Tale, arrg. by Tony Britten, perf. by Mary
    Carewe; 'Carrickfergus' (trad.) arrg/perf. by The Hothouse Flowers,
    CastPatricia Kerrigan (Mary Rynn), Andrew Connolly (Perky Rice), Billie Whitelaw (Tammy O'Moore), David Kelly (Daniel Tracey), John Kavanagh (hotel manager), Deirdre Donoghue (Dolores Flynn), Tracy Peacock (Finbar Flynn), Rolf Saxon (1st American sailor). Otto Jarman (2nd American sailor), Gerard 'Mannix' Flynn, Sean Lawlor (thugs in gents toilet), Gina Moxley (Mary's neighbour), Jim Bartley (Tony), Stuart Dunne (Hank the barman), Martin Dunne (vocalist), Des Moore, Chris Kneavey, John Drummond, Desi Reynolds (band), Eanna MacLiam (Perky's pal in pub), Ronan Wilmot (Tyrone), Doreen Keogh (nun).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration96
    Footage8682
    Format35mm
    Release date1988
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryMary Flynn leaves home with her daughters, Dolores and Finbar, after being beaten by her husband. Her one suitcase is stolen and with no money left, she abandons the children at a railway station and telephones the police to tell them where they are. Later, in a cafe she is harassed by two American sailors until Perky Rice comes to her aid. Perky is a petty criminal who is under pressure from toughs when a deal goes wrong. Needing to get out of town, he steals a car. With Mary, he heads for Kilkee, Co Clare, where she spent her honeymoon. En route, they stop at a dance where Mary displays her talent as a singer when she performs a country and western song. When they reach Kilkee, Perky says goodbye to Mary and leaves. She gets a job at a hall where tea-dances take place. She befriends one of the employees, Tammy O'Moore, a former country singer and now an alcoholic. She resists the advances of the hotel manager and a proposal of marriage from a customer. Perky returns and takes Mary with him again. They meet Daniel Tracey, an elderly widower who lives on an isolated farm. Perky helps out on the farm and fixes an old tractor. Missing the children, Mary asks Perky to take her back to Dublin to get them. Back in the city, her own home is empty, but a neighbour tells her that the children are in an orphanage. Mary and Perky break into the orphanage and take the children away. Perky steals another car, but he tells Mary that he became nervous while taking it now that he has something to lose. Perky, Mary, Finbar and Dolores head west out of the city towards Daniel's farm. (V).
    NoteIR Rel ca. 14/10/1988. Filmed on location in Ireland.
    ReferenceGuardian 21/4/1988; ID 17/3/1988:8-9; IT 17/10/1988; MFB 1989:139, review (Kim Newman); SI 16/10/1988:17; ST 16/10/1988:19.

    Irish Press, 2/3/88, ‘Aisling's big film break in her own city’, on location report about film (Sile Yeats).

    Irish Times, 31/3/88, ‘On the set with Joyriders’, interview with director Aisling Walsh on the film's background (Ray Comiskey).

    Screen International, 16/4/88:38, ‘A smooth journey for Ireland's Joyriders’, report of film near completion (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Stage and Screen, Oct. 1988:40, ‘Who's who in the film and details of gala premiere in the Savoy, Dublin’ (Ruth Riddick).

    Irish Times, 13/10/88, ‘A new film talent takes her bow’, interview with director Aisling Walsh about how she got into filmmaking (Kathy Sheridan).

    Channel 4's Viewing figures 1990/1991, 1992, viewing figures including film (John Pym).
    DistributorPathe (Cannon) (GB)
    KeywordsFamily
    Domestic Violence
    Wives
    Children
    Country Music
    Criminals
    Orphanages
    Production creditsp.c: Granada Film Productions. In association with British Screen. A Little Bird Production. In association with Walsh Smith. Developed with the assistance of the National Film Development Fund. Made in association with Film Four International, p: Emma Hayter, assoc. p: Jonathan Cavendish, d: Aisling Walsh, sc: Andy Smith from a story by Walsh, Smith, dop: Gabriel Beristain, c. op: Des Whelan, focus: Alan Butler, clapper loader: Ivan Meagher, trainee: Brendan Dempsey, grip: John Murphy, 2nd unit c: Patrick Duval, 2nd unit focus: Declan Emerson, 2nd unit grip: Malcolm Huse, p. exec: Sue Austen, p. super: David Brown, p. co-ord: Lorraine Stierle, p.m: Gemma Fallen, loc. m: Grania 0'Shannon, a. loc. m: John McDonnell, sc. super: Jean Bourne, cast: Di Carting, 1st a.d: David Brown, 2nd a.d: Mick Rowland, 3rd a.d: Konrad Jay, trainee a.d: Lisa Mulcahy, ed: Thomas Schwalm, 1st a. ed: Imogen Pollard, Michael Kelliher (Ireland), art d: David Wilson, p.dsgn.: Leigh Malone, m: Hal Lindes, Tony Britten, m. cnslt: Ray Williams, songs: 'Goodbye Jimmy Goodbye' lyr: Jack Vaughn, m: Sydney Bron, perf. by Mary Carewe; 'Heartache', 'Without Leaving A Trace', 'You Move Too Slowly For Me' by Tony Britten, perf. by Bill McGilloray; 'Daytime Loving', 'My Teacher' by Tony Britten, perf. by Mary Carewe; 'When Irish Eyes Are Smiling', lyr: Chauncey Olcott, George Graff, m: Ernest Ball, perf. by Mary Carewe; 'The Tinsel And The Neon' by Andy Smith, perf. by Patricia Kerrigan; 'Do Bhf Bean Uasal' (trad.) perf. by Sean 6 Se; 'Searching For Black', 'The Girl Who Cares' by and perf. by The Pleasure Cell; 'Let Him Go, Let Him Tarry' by Cliff Gordon, Max Maurice, Carl Tale, arrg. by Tony Britten, perf. by Mary Carewe; 'Carrickfergus' (trad.) arrg/perf. by The Hothouse Flowers, choreo: June Glazier, s: Kieran Horgan, Paul Hulme (m.), boom op.: Paul Delaney, trainee s: Brendan Campbell, dub. ed: 'Budge' Tremlett, Brigitte Arnold (dial.), Foley ed: Laurie McDowell, dub. mix: Hugh Strain, De Lane Lea Sound Centre, cost: Nic Ede, ward. mistress Grainne Keeley, make-up: Rosie Blackmore, hair: Dee Corcoran, a. to p: Chiz Dube, p. accnt: Kevin Freemantle, a. accnt: Alan Gavin, props buyer: Sunniva Mullligan, props, master: Eamonn O'Higgins, chargehand props: Nuala McKernan, Derek Wallace, props, dresser: Rene Knol, Bobby Dunne, stand-by props: Owen Monahan, Peter Gallagher, cnstr. m: Russ Bailey, titles: Plume Design, unit stills: Paddy Monaghan, special stills: David James, publicity: Carolyn Jardine Publicity, GB distr: Pathe (Cannon).
    Art directionWILSON, David
    Costume designEDE, Nic
    Production designMALONE, Leigh
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Road Movie

    TitleHIDDEN AGENDA
    Production companyInitial Film and Television Production
    Hemdale Film Corporation
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerFELLNER, Eric
    O'BRIEN, Rebecca
    DirectorLOACH, Ken
    Script/AdaptationALLEN, Jim
    PhotographyTUCKNER, Clive
    Sound recordingOKIN, Simon
    HOLDAWAY, Graeme
    EditingMORRIS, Jonathan
    Executive producerDALY, John
    GIBSON, Derek
    Music composerCOPELAND, Stewart
    Songs'Joe McDonnell' lyr: Brian Warfield, re-arranged: Ron Kavana, perf. by Kavana, Terry Woods; 'Young Ned of the Hill' by and perf. by Kavana, Woods
    CastFrances McDormand (Ingrid Jessner), Brian Cox (Kerrigan), Brad Dourif (Paul Sullivan), Mai Zetterling (Moa), Maurice Roeves (Harris), Robert Patterson (lan Logan), Bernard Bloch (Henri), George Staines (tall man), Michelle Fairley (Teresa Doyle), Brian McCann (Frank Molloy), Des McAleer (Sergeant Kenendy), Mandy Mcllwaine (RUC poicev/oman), Ivan Little (TV reporter), Llew Gardner (TV announcer), Patrick Kavanagh (Alee Nevin), John McDonnell (Labour MP), Kate Smith (news reporter), Victoria D'Angelo (journalist), John BeNíield (Maxwell), John Keegan (Detective Sergeant Hughes), Jim Norton (Brodie), lan McElhinney (Jack Cunningham), Maureen Bell (Mrs Molloy), Stephen Bridgen (army major), Kym Dyson (Carol), Oliver Maguire (Superintendent Fraser), Jim McAllister (Liam Philbin), Ron Kavana, Terry Woods (musicians), Bernard Archard (Sir Robert Neil), Gerry Fearon (taxi driver).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourEastmancolor
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration108
    Footage9729
    Format35mm
    Release date1990
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryIn Belfast, as an Orange parade is in progress outside, a group of international civil-liberties campaigners: Ingrid Jessner, American lawyer Paul Sullivan, Henri and Moa, are interviewing ex-prisoners as they prepare a report on allegations of ill-treatment by British security forces in Northern Ireland. When Paul goes to the street he is covertly given a sound cassette by a man called Harris, who is being chased by a group of men. At a press conference at which the lawyers present their preliminary findings, Teresa Doyle, a reporter with Republican News, offers the investigators photographic evidence of the British govern- ment's shoot-to-kill policy, but she is told they don't want to be used for political ends. Paul arranges a meeting with Harris, but as he is being driven to the meeting in Dungannon by a republican, Frank Molloy, their car is fired at and both men are shot dead. The police announce that the car was evading a checkpoint and as a result it was fired on. A British CID Inspector, Kerrigan, is appointed head of the investigation as a foreigner has been shot. His work is treated with hostility by his RUC opposite number, Brodie, who resents the intrusion of an outsider into his area of operations. Kerrigan quickly discovers that the police report which states that Molly drove through a checkpoint is a fabrication. He is told by a Northern Ireland friend and ex-policeman. Jack Cunningham, that the three officers who shot Molloy and Paul are a covert group of Special Branch officers known as a Special Support Unit who are out of control. Ingrid tells Kerrigan that she found an empty cassette box amongst Paul's possessions and gives him a list of names she also found there. They visit Mrs Molloy, who tells them the house had been searched recently and that all the cassettes had been removed. At the Molloys', Ingrid sees a photograph of Harris, who is an ex-Special Branch officer. When Kerrigan interviews the officers who carried out the shooting, one of them admits that they were told by a senior officer, Frazer, to lie to the CID. They had also been told before they mounted the operation that the two men in the car were armed and to expect to be shot at. Through Teresa Doyle, Ingrid and Kerrigan arrange to meet Harris at a Republican drinking club. That night, British army and RUC men raid Teresa's flat and arrest her. The trail begins to leads to Brodie, who is impeding their enquiries. In exasperation, Kerrigan storms into Brodie's office. Brodie doesn't co-operate, citing the need to protect sources. Brodie refuses to give him any information about the tape and Kerrigan tells him that he believes army intelligence were involved. At the club, Harris tells Ingrid and Kerrigan that he worked in the 1970s for a secret disinformation operation jointly run by the CIA and MI5 which sought to characterise Prime Minister Harold Wilson as a KGB agent. When Alee Nevin, the closest political ally of the future Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher, began to use the material in speeches which ultimately benefited Thatcher, he began to question the function of his group. As a result he was moved from his job. He says that a high level conspiracy of business, military and right wing political leaders existed, details of which are contained on the tape. Harris wants to have the information published and agrees to a further meeting in Dublin where he will produce the tape. Kerrigan is summoned to a meeting with Sir Robert Neil of MI5. At Neil's he meets Alee Nevin and outlines what he already knows. Nevin recalls that in the 1970s he was one of a group of people who got together to act to correct what they perceived as an unstable society. Kerrigan argues in favour of proceeding with the case and is told by Neil to prosecute those who carried out the shooting. He is also told not to continue any further with the case and is shown compromising photographs of himself and Ingrid at the club. Ingrid meets Harris in Dublin and is given the tape shortly before he is abducted. The tape contains conversations about the conspiracy which were taped at Nevin's home. Brodie arrives in Kerrigan's office to tell him that Harris was abducted and killed by the IRA. Ingrid meets Kerrigan just as he is about to return to England having decided that his career will not be sacrificed to the investigation. She tells him she believes it was British Intelligence who killed Harris. He declares that he does not want to be involved in what is a political rather than a police matter. Ingrid tells him she doesn't have the tape and leaves the airport. (V).
    NoteFR Rel May 1990 (Cannes Film Festival); IR Rel 2/3/1991 (Dublin Film Festival). Filmed on location in Ireland and England. This film opens on an overhead shot of Belfast and zooms in on an Orange parade going through the city. Superimposed on these images are two quotes: 'The entire ownership of Ireland, moral and material, up to the sun and down to the centre, is vested of right in the people of Ireland.' (James Fintan Lalor, 1807-49). 'Northern Ireland is part of the United Kingdom, as much as my constituency is.' (Margaret Thatcher, 1981). The film ends with a third quote, this time from the former MI5 agent, Frank Miller: 'It is like layers of an onion, and the more you peel them away, the more you feel like crying. There are two laws running in this country: one for the security services and one for the rest of us.'
    ReferenceGuardian 17/5/1990; IT 5/3/1991:10; MFB 1990:18-19.

    Monthly Film Bulletin, March 1987, ‘Ken Loach - Politics, protest and the past’, TV career and filmography of Ken Loach, director of the film Hidden Agenda (Julian Petley).

    Irish Times, 15/12/89:16, ‘Loach's Northern Ireland thriller’, report of the completion of shooting the film Hidden Agenda (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Times, 17/5/90, ‘Cannes hots up over new political thriller on North’, director Ken Loach and writer Jim Allen defend their film Hidden Agenda at a Cannes press conference (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Times, 18/5/90:10, ‘Provocative political thriller’, review from Cannes of the political thriller Hidden Agenda (Michael Dwyer).

    Sight and Sound, Summer 1990:199-200, ‘For ten days...’, review of Irish films at Cannes, including Hidden Agenda (I.C.).

    Film Base News, Sep./Oct. 1990:13-7, ‘In The Name Of The Law’, writer Jim Allen interviewed about his work, Ken Loach, Northern Ireland and the film Hidden Agenda (Patsy Murphy, Johnny Gogan).

    Film Base News, Sep./Oct. 1990:21, review (Johnny Gogan).

    Screen International, Dec. 1990:22, review (Leonard Klady).

    Monthly Film Bulletin, Jan. 1991:18-9, crew and cast lists, plot synopsis and review of the film Hidden Agenda (Verina Glaessner).

    Circa, May-June 1991:36-41, ‘Hidden Agenda - politics and the thriller’, detailed analysis of the film Hidden Agenda with bibliography (John Hill).

    Irish Times (Weekend), 18/4/98:1-2, ‘Woman of substance’, profile and interview with actress Frances McDormand who starred in Hidden Agenda (Michael Dwyer).

    Sunday Independent, 19/4/98, ‘Emotions run amok on a vehicle named desire’, feature on stage career of Frances McDormand, who starred in the film Hidden Agenda (Madeleine Keane).

    Sunday Tribune, 10/5/98:17, ‘The kindness of strange roles’, feature on stage career of actress Frances McDormand, who starred in the film Hidden Agenda (Lise Hand).

    Irish Times, 5/3/91:10, ‘Truth, fiction and Hidden Agenda’, interview with scriptwriter Jim Allen about the film (Mark Brennock).

    Times Literary Supplement, 25/1/91:16, ‘Commentary’, review of Hidden Agenda (Noel Malcolm).

    Production notes for Hidden Agenda. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.
    DistributorEnterprise (GB)
    LocationBelfast
    Dublin
    Production creditsp.c: Initial Film and Television Production. In association with Hemdale Film Corporation, pres: John Daly, Derek Gibson for Hemdale Film Corporation. An Initial Production, p: Eric Fellner, co-p: Rebecca O'Brien, exec. p: John Daly, Derek Gibson, d: Ken Loach, sc: Jim Allen, c: Clive Tickner, p. co-ord: Karin Padgham, p.m: Ginny Roncoroni, 1st a.d: Peter McAleese, 2nd a.d: Julia Kennedy, Cilia Ware, Gay Brabazon (Dublin), focus puller: Jeremy Hiles, Fraser Lawson, grip: Alan Rank, 2nd c. op: Steven Alcom, Jeremy Gee, Simon Werry, Nigel Willoughby, sc. super: Penny Eyles, ed: Jonathan Morris, p.dsgn.: Martin Johnson, art d: Nigel Phelps, scenic artist: Jan Lee, loc. m: Desi Hughes, John McDonnell (Dublin), loc. finder: Guy Tannahill, a. loc: Paul Kielty, cast: Susie Figgis, a. cast: Abi Cohen, signwriter: John Bulley, sp. effs: Vendetta Effects, m: Stewart Copeland, solo flute: Andy Fendon, songs: 'Joe McDormell' lyr: Brian Warfield, re-arranged: Ron Kavana, perf. by Kavana, Terry Woods; 'Young Ned of the Hill' by and perf. by Kavana, Woods, s: Simon Okin, Graeme Holdaway (m), boom op.: Paul Botham, dub. ed: Kevin Brazier, dub. mix: Gerry Humprheys, a. dub ed: Paul Clegg, fbotsteps/fbley ed: Tony Pound, a. footsteps ed: Cora Durkan, cost: Daphne Dare, ward: Wendy Knowles, a. ward: Nancy GraNíield, make-up super: Louise Fisher, title dsgn: Peter Watson, opticals: Frameline, research: Liz Nash, Pat Harper, tech. adv. Fred Holroyd, Wilf Knight, p.a: Heather Harper (office), Brendan ||SB Byrne (Belfast), p. accnt: Bobbie Johnson, a. accnt: Kevin Freemantle, p. buyer: Graham Tew, props, master: Philip McDonald, cnstr. m: pS Stephen Hargreaves, gaffer: Steve Costello, stills: David Appleby, UK publicity: Jonathan Rutter DDA, TV sequence shot at Molinare Studios, d: David Crossman, GB distr: Enterprise.
    Art directionPHELPS, Nigel
    Production designJOHNSON, Martin
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleCOMMITMENTS, THE
    Production companyBeacon Communications Inc
    First Film Company Ltd
    Dirty Hands Productions
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerRANDALL-COOPER, Roger
    MYLES, Lynda
    CLEMENT, Dick
    LA FRENAIS, Ian
    ABRAHAM, Marc
    DirectorPARKER, Alan
    Script/AdaptationCLEMENT, Dick
    LA FRENAIS, Ian
    DOYLE, Roddy
    PhotographyTATTERSALL, Gale
    Sound recordingWINTER, Clive
    EditingHAMBLING, Gerry
    CAHUNCEY, Carolyne
    Executive producerBERNSTEIN, Armyan
    ROSENBERG, Tom
    HARRIS, Souter
    Songs'Mustang Sally' by Bonnie Rice, 'Too Many Fish in the Sea' by Norman Whitfield, Edward Holland; 'Mr Pitiful' by Otis Redding, Steve Cropper, perf. by The Commitments; 'Bye Bye Baby' by Mary Wells, perf. by The
    Commitments; 'Show Me' by Joe Tex, 'Take Me to the River' by Al
    Green, Mabon Hodges, 'The Dark End of the Street' by Dan Penn, Chips
    Moman, 'Hard to Handle' by Alvertis Isbell, Alien Jones, Otis Redding,
    'Chain of Fools' by Don Covay, perf. by The Commitments; 'I Never
    Loved a Man' by Ronnie Shannon, perf. by The Commitments; 'Try
    Little Tenderness' by Harry Woods, Jimmy Campbell, Reg Connelly, perf.
    by The Commitments; 'In the Midnight Hour' by Wilson Pickett, Steve
    Cropper, perf. by The Commitments; 'Treat Her Right' by Gene Kurtz,
    Roy Head, perf. by Robert Arkins; 'Fiddle Jig' (trad) perf. by Benedict
    Fox; 'Spring Hill Mining Disaster' (trad) perf. by Aidan O'Halloran;
    'Cathy's Clown' by Don Everiy, perf. by Cahir O'Doherty; 'Twenty Four
    Hours From Tulsa' by Hal David, Burt Bacharach, perf. by And And! And;
    'Destination Anywhere' by Nickolas Ashford, Valerie Simpson, perf. by
    Niamh Kavanagh, Angeline Ball, Maria Doyle, Bronagh Gallagher;
    'Needles and Pins' by Sonny Bono, Jack Nitzsche, perf. by And And! And;
    'Letter From America' by Charles Reid, Craig Reid, perf. by The
    Proclaimers; 'I Can't Stand the Rain' by Donald Bryant, Ann Pebbles,
    Bernard Miller, perf. by Angeline Ball; 'Can't Help Falling in Love' by
    Luigi Creatore, George Weiss, Hugo Peretti, perf. by Colm Meaney; 'On
    the Good Ship Lollipop' by Sidney Clare, Richard A Whiting, perf. by
    Anne-Marie Scannell; 'In a Wrong World' by Alan Parker, Paul Bushnell,
    perf. by Conor Malone; 'Blood Blood! Blood' by Alan Parker, Paul
    Bushnell, perf. by Jezz Bell; 'Clare Jig' (trad) perf. by Colm Mac Con-
    lomaire; 'Beauty Queen' by and perf. by Emily Dawson; 'Poppa Joe' by
    Mike Chapman, Nicky Chinn, perf. by Dave Kane, Kristel Harris, Maria
    Place; 'Shoulder of the Road' by and perf. by Daragh McCarthy; 'Uileann
    Pipe Music' (trad) perf. by Brian MacAodha; 'I Dreamed a Dream' by
    Claude-Michel Schonberg, Alain Boublil, Herbert Kretzmer, Jean-Marc
    Natel, perf. by Tricia Smith; 'Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now' by John
    Man-, Steven Morrissey, perf. by Canice William; 'Baton Rouge' by Alan
    Parker, Paul Bushnell, perf. by Patrick Foy, Alan Murray, Jody Campbell;
    'Who's Sorry Now' by Bert Kalmer, Harry Ruby, Ted Snyder, perf. by
    Philomena Kavanagh; 'Only the Lonely' by Roy Orbison, Joe Melson,
    perf. by Eamon O'Connor; 'Please, Please, Please' by James Brown,
    Johnny Terry, perf. by James Brown with the Fabulous Flames; 'Slip
    Away' by Wilbur Tyrell, Marcus Daniels, Armstrong Williams, perf. by
    Robert Arkins, Angeline Ball, Maria Doyle, Bronagh Gallagher; 'Moon
    River' by Johnny Mercer, Henry Mancini; 'All You Need Is Love' by John
    Lennon, Paul McCartney, 'Nowhere to Run' by Brian Holland, Lamont
    Dozier, Edward Holland, perf. by Niamh Kavanagh, Angeline Ball, Maria
    Doyle, Bronagh Gallagher; 'I Can't Turn You Loose' by Otis Redding,
    'Do Right Woman Do Right Man' by Dan Penn, Chips Moman, perf. by
    Niamh Kavanagh, Angeline Ball, Maria Doyle, Bronagh Gallagher; 'A
    Whiter Shade of Pale' by Keith Reid, Gary Brooker, perf. by Michael
    Aheme, Robert Arkins; 'I Don't Like Mondays' by Bob Geldof, perf. by
    Dave Finnegan; 'Hail Queen of Heavens' (trad) perf. by Maura O'Malley;
    'Theme from SHAFT' by and perf. by Isaac Hayes; 'Jimmy Mo Mhile Stor'
    (trad) perf. by Maria Doyle; 'Fame' by Michael Gore, Dean Pitchford;
    'Mouthful of Lies' by Daniel Bintii, Gerry Leonard, perf. by Avant-Garde-
    A-Clue; 'I've Got Dreams to Remember' by Otis Redding, Zelma
    Redding, Joe Rock, perf. by Andrew Strong, Angeline Ball, Maria Doyle,
    Bronagh Gallagher,
    CastRobert Arkins (Jimmy Rabbitte), Michael Aheme (Steven Clifford), Angeline Ball (Imelda Quirke), Maria Doyle (Natalie Murphy), Dave Finnegan (Mickam Wallace), Bronagh Gallagher(Bemie McGloughlin), Felim Gormley (Dean Fay), Glen Hansard (Outspan Foster), Dick Massey (Billy Mooney), Johnny Murphy (Joey 'the Lips' Pagan), Kenneth McCluskey (Derek Scully), Andrew Strong (Deco Cuffe), Colm Meaney (Mr Rabbitte), Anne Kent (Mrs Rabbitte), Andrea Corr (Sharon Rabbitte), Gerard Cassoni (Darren Rabbitte), Ruth Fairclough (Linda Rabbitte), Lindsay Fairclough (Tracey Rabbitte), Michael O'Reilly (Greg), Liam Camey (Duffy), Ger Ryan (pawnbroker). Mark O'Regan (Father Molloy), Phelim Drew (Roddy, the reporter), Sean Hughes (Dave from Eejit Records), Philip Bredin (Ray), Aoife Lawless (Imelda's sister). Lance Daly (kid with harmonica), Conor Malone (protest song singer), Jezz Bell (heavy metal singer), Colm Mac Con lomaire (fiddler auditioner), Emily Dawson (punk girl singer), Dave Kane, Kristel Harris, Maria Place (Coconuts Trio), Brian MacAodha (Uileann pipe player), Tricia Smith (Les Miserables singer), Canice William (Smiths' song singer), Patrick Foy, Alan Murray, Jody Campbell (Cajun Trio), Eanna MacLiam (failed drug buyer), Philomena Kavanagh (Rabittes' neighbour), Peter Rowen (shy skateboard auditioner), Eamon O'Connor (Only De lonely singer), Maura O'Malley (Joey's mother), Blaise Smith (pool-hall manager), Derek Herbert, Owen 0'German (Duffy's sidekicks). Pat Leavy (unemployment official), John Cronin (kid with horse), Rynagh O'Grady (Bemie's mother), Sheila Flitton (church cleaner), Michael Bolger (community cen- tre kid), Mick Nolan (Imelda's father), Eileen Reid (Imelda's mother). Bob Navan (Regency pub barman), Derek Duggan (photographer), Paddy O'Connor (rock salmon man), Paul Bushnell, Jim Corry, Larry Hogan, Bernard Keelan (Avant-Garde-A-Clue Band), Ronan Hardiman (dance hall manager), Mikel Murfi (music journalist), Josylen Lyons (Deco's fan), Winston Dennis (man in limousine), Alan Parker (Eejit record producer), Paul Bushnell (Eejit engineer).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourEastmancolor
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration118
    Footage10954
    FormatPanavision
    35mm
    Release date1991
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryIn Dublin, aspiring band manager. Jimmy Rabbitte, attends a wedding reception where his friends Derek and Outspan are playing. Unimpressed by their music, he is attracted to the singing of a guest, Deco. Derek and Outspan ask him to manage the band, and he agrees provided they sack the keyboard player and change to soul music. Jimmy's newspaper advertisement brings a wide assortment of musical imitators to the house. Gradually he chooses the band: Dean, while having a good musical ear does not know how to play the sax; Billy is an aggressive drummer; Derek and Outspan the guitarists; and Steven as pianist. Jimmy goes to see Deco, a bus conductor, and convinces him to become the lead singer. Middle-aged Joey 'The Lips' Fagan arrives on a Suzuki motorcycle at the Rabbittes' home. He claims to have played with Elvis, Otis Redding, The Beatles and James Brown. He joins the band and becomes their spiritual leader. Jimmy also recruits three backing vocalists: Bemie, Natalie, and Imelda. Joey names the band The Commitments and Jimmy insists they play only soul and rhythm and blues. They rehearse with determination and their first gig in a north Dublin community centre is attended by friends and relatives. Even Jimmy's sceptical father, who is devoted to the music of Elvis, is impressed, and it is a success until a power failure ends the gig. As they become more accomplished they build up a following at pub gigs. Off-stage, though, tensions develop between the members of the band. Jimmy has a relationship with each of the three girls to the envy of the other band members. As Dean becomes more accomplished on the sax, he begins to incorporate jazz rhythms into the music. Joey and Jimmy are outraged at this sacrilege of soul music. Loud-mouthed Deco irritates everyone else and Billy eventually resigns from the band. Mickham, the band's bouncer and roadie, takes over as drummer. Soul great Wilson Pickett is due to play in Dublin on the night of a Commitments' gig. Joey declares that he will ask him to jam with them at the gig afterwards. With SK a record producer expressing interest in putting out a single by the band, and Jimmy having attracted the attention of a music journalist, the Commitments' gig ends in disaster. Wilson Pickett fails to appear and the suppressed tensions within the group come to the surface and they split up. On his way home, a limousine carrying Wilson Pickett stops to ask Jimmy where The Commitments are playing. Distressed at first at the lost opportunity. Jimmy later reflects on Joey's observation that no matter what, the band raised everyone's expectations of life. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 19/9/1991. Filmed on location in Dublin.
    ReferenceEP 9/10/1991:5; IT 15/6/1990:8; IT 11/8/1990:W1-2; IT 14/9/1991:W10; IT 20/9/1991:6; IT 19/10/1991:10; S&S 1992:45; SI 1/7/1990:26; ST 22/9/1991:27.

    Publicity: synopsis, Alan Parker's notes, cast and credits, biographies, songs and music credits. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    Irish Stage and Screen, Oct/Nov 1991:7-8, Interview with director Alan Parker, writer Roddy Doyle and the cast of the film about life post-production (Sylvia Thompson).

    Sight and Sound, Oct 1991:45, Crew, cast and song lists, plot synopsis and favourable review (Tom Charity).

    Irish Times, 20/9/91, ‘Dublin salutes Doyle success’, report of The Commitments European premiere in Dublin (Christine Newman).

    Irish Times, 11/8/90:2, ‘Parker's chosen few’, director Alan Parker on the casting procedure for The Commitments; includes quotes from each cast member (Michael Dwyer).

    Sunday Times, 17/6/90:2, ‘Stars wanted: rednecks and southsiders needn't apply’, interview with director Alan Parker and writer Roddy Doyle just after casting The Commitments (Lise Hand).

    The Big Ticket, Feb 1995:30-1, ‘The Road to Hollywood’, director Alan Parker talks about his career, The Commitments and Roddy Doyle (Nick Webb).

    Film Ireland, Sept/Oct 1991:18, review (Brian Guckian).

    Irish Times (Weekend), 10/8/91:3, ‘Roll out the stretch limos’, report of American premiere of The Commitments (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Times, 22/3/91:8, ‘Things looking good for The Commitments’, report from Hollywood on pre-release interest shown in The Commitments (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Times, 15/6/90:2, ‘Alan Parker goes casting’, interview pre-casting The Commitments, with director Alan Parker about his career (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Times, 1992, Reel News: ‘The Commitments starts US launch in LA next week’, report of release of The Commitments in America and France (Michael Dwyer).

    Spin, Oct 1991:1, ‘Images: Total commitment’, short review and interview with Alan Parker and Andrew Strong about The Commitments (Jim Greer).

    Sunday Tribune, 8/5/94:1, ‘Ireland in the can’, short interviews with Eanna Mac Liam and Johnny Murphy, actors in The Commitments (Djinn Gallagher, Colin Kerr).

    Sunday Times (Culture), 29/11/98:12, ‘Blagger's Guide...Roddy Doyle’, short profile of novelist Roddy Doyle (Shane Hegarty).

    Times Literary Supplement, 18/10/91:1, ‘Dublin's Brand New Bag’, review of The Commitments (Nick Hornby).

    Independent on Sunday, 6/10/91:20, ‘Parker Finds his Soul in Dublin’, review of The Commitments (Anthony Lane).

    Eire-Irleand, Fall 1993 Vol. 28, no. 3:147-158, ‘Celtic Soul Brothers’, essay on the relationship between the Irish and African Americans. It is argued that music is the focus for a link between the Irish and African-Americans in The Commitments, Rattle and Hum and Cal (Lauren Onkey).

    Films in Review, Jan/Feb 1992:50-51, review (Edmond Grant).

    Birmingham International Film & TV Festival, 20/9-5/10/91, preview of The Commitments, the closing film at the Seventh Birmingham International Film and Television Festival. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    US press release for The Commitments (1992). Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    Sunday Tribune, 16/04/00:19, ‘First Soul Sister Proves She's Got the Commitment’, interview with actress Angeline Ball, currently playing Mrs Grogan in a stage version of The Plough and the Stars. She talks about TV roles and her film career since The Commitments (Ann Marie Hourihane).

    Irish Times, 09/05/00:4, ‘Singer Loses Action Over 'Commitments' Song’, singer who wrote and recorded a song which featured in The Commitments has lost her claim for damages and breach of copyright

    Irish Tatler, 06/2000:34-36, ‘Playing Ball’, interview with actress Angeline Ball. She talks about her determination to avoid roles similar to the part she played in The Commitments (Suzanne Power).

    Irish Times, 10/03/01:6, ‘The Deportees. Chapter One: The Real Slim Shady’, the first chapter in the sequel to The Commitments which will be published in serial form each month in Metro Eireann (Roddy Doyle).

    Irish Times (Magazine), 24/03/01:65, preview of The Commitments from the TV listings (Tony Clayton-Lea).

    Sunday Independent (Living and Leisure), 23/09/01:13L, ‘Not curtains yet for this 'groovy chick'’, interview with Maria Doyle Kennedy (Aine O Connor).

    Irish Times (Weekend), 19/05/01:3, ‘Embracing our diversity’, an extract on an essay arguing that multiplicity is the key to Irish identity (Declan Kiberd).

    Irish Times (Magazine), 01/12/01:10-11, ‘Acting Natural’, interview with actress Maria Doyle Kennedy. She talks about her acting and singing career. (Tony Clayton-Lea)

    Irish Times (The Ticket), 15/7/05:32, ‘Commitments issues’, 'The Commitments' voted the best film ever made in Ireland in online poll that attracted over 10,000 responses (Michael Dwyer).
    Distributor20th Century-Fox (GB)
    KeywordsWorking Class Communities
    Soul Music
    LocationDublin
    Production creditsp.c: Beacon Communications Inc. A First Film Company Ltd/Dirty Hands Production. An Alan Parker Film, pres: Beacon, p: Roger Randall-Cutler, Lynda Myles, co-p: Dick Clement, lan La Frenais, Marc Abraham, exec. p: Armyan Bernstein, Tom Rosenberg, Souter Harris, line p: David Wimbury, d: Alan Parker, sc: Clement, La Frenais, Roddy Doyle from the novel The Commitments by Doyle, (London: Seeker & Warburg, 1992), dop: Gale Tattersall, c. op: Michael Roberts, 2nd c. op: Edward J Adcock, focus puller: Eamonn O'Keefe, clapper/loader: Brendan Galvin, grip: John Murphy, trainee c: Ciaran Barry, Jim Jolliffe, John Maguire, p. co-ord: Valerie Craig, Cate Arbeid, p.m: Laurie Borg, loc. m: Martin O'Malley, a. loc: Robert Walpole, Hugh Linehan, cast: John Hubbard, Ros Hubbard, a. cast: Rachel Fallen, Jessica Felton, 1st a.d: Bill Westley, 2nd a.d: Gerry Toomey, Mick Walsh, 3rd a.d: Cliff Lanning, Paul Bames, trainee a.d: Belinda McCullagh, Adam Lee, s. mix: Clive Winter, opticals: Cinema Research Corporation, ed: Gerry Hambling, a. ed: Carolyne Chauncey, 2nd a. ed: James Cozza, Isobel Stephenson, Dermot Diskin, p.dsgn.: Brian Morris, art d: Mark Geraghty, Arden Gantly, set dec: Karen Brookes, gaffer: Peter Bloor, props, master: Tommy Alien, chargehand prop: Derek Wallace, props buyer: Ronnie Skinner, sp. effs: Maurice Foley, m. super: G Mark Roswell, m. arrg: Paul Bushnell, m. mix: Kevin Killen, m. co-ord: John Hughes, m. liaison: Barbara Galavan (Dublin), songs: 'Mustang Sally' by Bonnie Rice, 'Too Many Fish in the Sea' by Norman Whitfield, Edward Holland; 'Mr Pitiful' by Otis Redding, Steve Cropper, perf. by The Commitments; 'Bye Bye Baby' by Mary Wells, perf. by The Commitments; 'Show Me' by Joe Tex, 'Take Me to the River' by Al Green, Mabon Hodges, 'The Dark End of the Street' by Dan Penn, Chips Moman, 'Hard to Handle' by Alvertis Isbell, Alien Jones, Otis Redding, 'Chain of Fools' by Don Covay, perf. by The Commitments; 'I Never Loved a Man' by Ronnie Shannon, perf. by The Commitments; 'Try Little Tenderness' by Harry Woods, Jimmy Campbell, Reg Connelly, perf. by The Commitments; 'In the Midnight Hour' by Wilson Pickett, Steve Cropper, perf. by The Commitments; 'Treat Her Right' by Gene Kurtz, Roy Head, perf. by Robert Arkins; 'Fiddle Jig' (trad) perf. by Benedict Fox; 'Spring Hill Mining Disaster' (trad) perf. by Aidan O'Halloran; 'Cathy's Clown' by Don Everiy, perf. by Cahir O'Doherty; 'Twenty Four Hours From Tulsa' by Hal David, Burt Bacharach, perf. by And And! And; 'Destination Anywhere' by Nickolas Ashford, Valerie Simpson, perf. by Niamh Kavanagh, Angeline Ball, Maria Doyle, Bronagh Gallagher; 'Needles and Pins' by Sonny Bono, Jack Nitzsche, perf. by And And! And; 'Letter From America' by Charles Reid, Craig Reid, perf. by The Proclaimers; 'I Can't stand the Rain' by Donald Bryant, Ann Pebbles, Bernard Miller, perf. by Angeline Ball; 'Can't Help Falling in Love' by Luigi Creatore, George Weiss, Hugo Peretti, perf. by Colm Meaney; 'On the Good Ship Lollipop' by Sidney Clare, Richard A Whiting, perf. by Anne-Marie Scannell; 'In a Wrong World' by Alan Parker, Paul Bushnell, perf. by Conor Malone; 'Blood Blood! Blood' by Alan Parker, Paul Bushnell, perf. by Jezz Bell; 'Clare Jig' (trad) perf. by Colm Mac Con- lomaire; 'Beauty Queen' by and perf. by Emily Dawson; 'Poppa Joe' by Mike Chapman, Nicky Chinn, perf. by Dave Kane, Kristel Harris, Maria Place; 'Shoulder of the Road' by and perf. by Daragh McCarthy; 'Uileann Pipe Music' (trad) perf. by Brian MacAodha; 'I Dreamed a Dream' by Claude-Michel Schonberg, Alain Boublil, Herbert Kretzmer, Jean-Marc Natel, perf. by Tricia Smith; 'Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now' by John Man-, Steven Morrissey, perf. by Canice William; 'Baton Rouge' by Alan Parker, Paul Bushnell, perf. by Patrick Foy, Alan Murray, Jody Campbell; 'WhO's Sorry Now' by Bert Kalmer, Harry Ruby, Ted Snyder, perf. by Philomena Kavanagh; 'Only the Lonely' by Roy Orbison, Joe Melson, perf. by Eamon O'Connor; 'Please, Please, Please' by James Brown, Johnny Terry, perf. by James Brown with the Fabulous Flames; 'Slip Away' by Wilbur Tyrell, Marcus Daniels, Armstrong Williams, perf. by Robert Arkins, Angeline Ball, Maria Doyle, Bronagh Gallagher; 'Moon River' by Johnny Mercer, Henry Mancini; 'All You Need Is Love' by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, 'Nowhere to Run' by Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, Edward Holland, perf. by Niamh Kavanagh, Angeline Ball, Maria Doyle, Bronagh Gallagher; 'I Can't Turn You Loose' by Otis Redding, 'Do Right Woman Do Right Man' by Dan Penn, Chips Moman, perf. by Niamh Kavanagh, Angeline Ball, Maria Doyle, Bronagh Gallagher; 'A Whiter Shade of Pale' by Keith Reid, Gary Brooker, perf. by Michael Aheme, Robert Arkins; 'I Don't Like Mondays' by Bob Geldof, perf. by Dave Finnegan; 'Hail Queen of Heavens' (trad) perf. by Maura O'Malley; 'Theme from SHAFT' by and perf. by Isaac Hayes; 'Jimmy Mo Mhile Stor' (trad) perf. by Maria Doyle; 'Fame' by Michael Gore, Dean Pitchford; 'Mouthful of Lies' by Daniel Bintii, Gerry Leonard, perf. by Avant-Garde- A-Clue; 'I've Got Dreams to Remember' by Otis Redding, Zelma Redding, Joe Rock, perf. by Andrew Strong, Angeline Ball, Maria Doyle, Bronagh Gallagher, musicians and vocalists - Michael Aheme, Robert Arkins, Angeline Ball, Conor Brady, Fran Breehan, Paul Bushnell, Ronan Dooney, Maria Doyle, Dave Finnegan, Eamonn Flynn, Bronagh Gallagher, Carl Geraghty, Felim Gormley, Glen Hansard, Niamh Kavanagh, Dick Massey, Kenneth McCluskey, Andrew Strong, cost: Penny Rose, ward super: Janty Yates, ward mistress: Maeve Patterson, a. ward: Ann Stokes, lan Wheatherley, make-up super: Peter Frampton, hair: Aaron Glynn, stills: David Appleby, sc. super: Libbie Barr, a. to Alan Parker: Lisa Moran, a. to producers: Sophie Thomley, boom op.: Allan Brereton, Jack Armstrong, titles: Pacific Title, opticals: Cinema Research Corp. super s. ed: Eddy Joseph, s. ed: Clayton Collins, a.s. ed: Leonard Green, Foley ed: Chuck Michael, s: Clive Winner, set rd. engnr: Tim Martin, ADR rd: Ted Swanscott, s. re-rd: Andy Nelson, Tom Perry, Steve Pederson, s. cnslt: Joe O'Herlihy, multi-track crew: Terry Cromer, Julian Douglas, Jim Phelan, p. accnt: Patrick Isherwood, p.a: Amy Hubbard, Tara Mullen, Anneliese O'Callaghan, Reuben Seid, art dept. a: Linda Hederman, cnstr. m: Tommy Bassett, publicity: Alien Burry, Libby Shearon; Dennis Davidson Associates, distr: 20th Century-Fox.
    Art directionGERAGHTY, Mark
    GANTLEY, Arden
    Costume designROSE, Penny
    Production designMORRIS, Brian
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Drama
    Comedy

    TitleHEAR MY SONG
    Production companyVision Productions
    Limelight Productions
    Windmill Lane Productions
    British Screen
    Channel Four
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerOWEN, Alison
    DirectorCHELSOM, Peter
    Script/AdaptationCHELSOM, Peter
    DUNBAR, Adrian
    PhotographyGIBSON, Sue
    Sound recordingLINDSAY, Peter
    EditingWALSH, Martin
    Executive producerFIELDS, Simon
    RUSSELL, Russ
    CHAPPIE, John Paul
    Associate producerBROWN, David
    Music composerALTMAN, John
    Music performanceJohn Altman Jazz Orchestra
    Songs'Hear My Song' by Pepper, Klose, Luckesch (EMI); 'Nancy with the Laughing Face' by Van Heusen, Silvers (Chappell); Take You Home Again Cathleen' by Westendorf, arrg: Parry (EMI); 'Blaze Away (We'll Make a Bonfire of Our Troubles)' by Hozman, Kennedy (EMI); 'Movin' by Dunbar, Altman; 'Count Your Blessings' by Temple, Morgan (Ascherberg Hopaood Crew); 'Goodbye' by Graham, Stolz (Wamer Chappell); 'Music for a Found Harmonium' by Jeffes, arrg: McGlynn (Editions Penguin Cafe); 'Come Back to Sorrento' by De Curtis, Aveling (Ricordi).
    CastNed Beatty (Josef Locke), Adrian Dunbar (Mickey O'Neill), Shirley Anne Field (Cathleen Doyle), Tara Fitzgerald (Nancy Doyle), William Hootkins (Mr X), Harold Berens (Benny Rose), David McCallum (Jim Abbott), John Dair (Derek), Stephen Marcus (Gordon), Britta Smith (Kitty Ryan), Gladys Sheehan (Grandma Ryan), Gina Moxley (Brenda Ryan), Norman Vaughan (himself), James Nesbitt (Fintan O'Donnell), Phil Kelly (Ronnie Lavelle), Jean Blanchflower (Ronnie's mum), John Neville Rufus Altman (Oscar Harrison), Joe Cuddy (Frank Cinatra), Ruaidhri Conroy (Grandson Ryan), Aiden Grennell (compere). Donna McReady (young Cathleen), Terry Mulligan (young Jo), Terry Adams (dressmaker), Terence Orr (receiver), Bal Moane (brewery man), Laurie Morton (Molly), Brian McGrath (barman), Jim Mooney (drunk in pub), Jimmy Keogh, Liam O'Callaghan, Paddy Cole, Maurice Blake, Tony Morando (Jo's boys), Anna Manahan (Mrs McGlinchy), Tommy Lack (old musician), Agnes Bemelle (receptionist), Mary McLeod (librarian). Pat Laffan (1st taxi driver), Frank David Kelly Beggs (taxi drivers), Vernon Midgley (voice of Josef Locke), Brian Hoey (voice of Mr X), Marie Mullen (Micky's mum), Brian Flanagan (young Micky O'Neill), Constance Cowley (nurse).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration105
    Footage9450
    Format35mm
    Release date1991
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryYoung Micky O'Neill is told by his ill mother not to die gasping for breath. She says he has nothing for the journey but his wits. As an adult in 1983, Micky is running Hartley's, a night-club in Liverpool. He is under pressure from the owners, the Ryans, who are threatening to fire him as door receipts are down. Micky books Mr X who passes himself off as the legendary Irish tenor Josef Locke, who escaped to Ireland to avoid tax evasion charges twenty five years before when policeman Jim Abbott nearly caught him. When the Ryans hear of the booking, they change their minds about firing Micky. Nancy Doyle, Micky's girlfriend, and her mother Kathleen, are amongst the capacity crowd on opening night. Cathleen had been elected Miss Dairy Queen in 1958 when Locke performed in Liverpool and she had been his lover until he left the country. Also at the performance are the Ryans and Jim Abbott, now the Chief Constable, who tells Micky that Mr X is not Locke. Nevertheless, the show is a success and the rest of the audience believe that Mr X is Locke. Micky tells Mr X that Cathleen is supposed to be an old girlfriend. Recalling her time with Locke, Cathleen is overwhelmed by memories until she becomes upset when Mr X tries to embrace her. She arrives at Micky's celebration and denounces Mr X as an impostor. Everyone, including Nancy, are outraged and she and her mother leave. Before they close down the club Micky is fired by the Ryans, one of whom gives him a black eye. Disillusioned and broke, Micky goes to Dublin where he looks up an old friend, Fintan O'Donnell, who reluctantly agrees to help him find the real Locke. They eventually find him in the countryside where he lives as a farmer. Disinterested in Micky's proposal, a group of Locke's friends try to discover his motivation for wanting Locke to perform in Liverpool, Only when he is held by his legs over a cliff does he admit that it is for Nancy's sake. Micky explains the whole story to Locke, who agrees to go back because Cathleen has remained his true love. Micky reopens the club for a free concert while Locke re-assembles his old band. Nancy forgives Micky, the concert is a success, despite Jim Abbott being there, and with the help of Mr X, Locke escapes again, this time with Cathleen. (V).
    NoteFR Rel ca. 12/4/1991 (world premiere, Cannes Film Festival); IR Rel
    5/3/1992 (Dublin Film Festival).
    Filmed on location in Ireland. Ned Beatty received a Golden
    Globe nomination for his performance in this film.
    ReferenceIT 17/4/1991:10; Observer 15/3/1992:62; S&S Mar 1992:47; SI 19/4/1992:6.

    References below are held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the IFI.

    Publicity: cast and crew lists, synopsis, production details, cast and filmmakers details of the film Hear My Song.

    Irish Times, 26/11/90:12, ‘Locke played in a different key’, interview with actor Ned Beatty, star of Hear My Song and Why Lockerbie? (Harry Browne).

    Film Ireland, May/June 1992:18, review (Ian Palmer).

    Sight and Sound, March 1991:47, Hear My Song, crew and cast lists, plot synopsis, and review of the film Hear My Song (Tom Charity).

    Production Ireland, 1992:10-1, 33-5, ‘Hear My Story’, executive producer Russ Russell talks about making the film Hear My song and the lessons to be learned from it (Russ Russell).

    Irish Times, 3/4/92, ‘A sweet song of success’, interview with Peter Chelsom, director of the film Hear My Song (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Times, 3/4/92:10, ‘Stage-Irish and proud of it’, favourable review of the film Hear My Song, which represented Ireland at Cannes (Michael Dwyer).

    The Guardian, 16/10/99:6, ‘Josef Locke ends his song, aged 82’, article on the death of Josef Locke who inspired the Peter Chelsom film, Hear My Song (John Ezard).

    The Guardian, 16/10/99:22, obituary for Josef Locke who inspired the Peter Chelsom film, Hear My Song (Stephen Dixon).

    Irish Times, 16/10/99:5, ‘Tenor Josef Locke dies at 82’, article on the death of Josef Locke who inspired the Peter Chelsom film, Hear My Song (Roisin Ingle).

    Irish Times, 16/10/99:18, ‘A Robust Performer with a Derry Air’, obituary for Josef Locke who inspired the Peter Chelsom film, Hear My Song.

    Sunday Independent, 17/10/99:14, obituary for Josef Locke who inspired the Peter Chelsom film, Hear My Song (Gus Smith).

    TV Times, 5-11/92:30, video review (Judith Jacobs).

    TV Times, 12-18/9/92:8, a special edition of Hear My Song is available on video for the blind and partially sighted.

    Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the IFI.
    DistributorPalace Pictures (GB)
    Miramax Film Corp (USA)
    KeywordsSingers
    Tenors
    Irish in Britain
    Tax Evasion
    Production creditsp.c: A Vision Production. For Limelight Productions. A Limelight Production for Windmill Lane Productions, British Screen, Channel Four, pres: Film Four International, British Screen, Windmill Lane Productions, p: Alison Owen, exec. p: Simon Fields, Russ Russell, John Paul Chappie, assoc. p: David Brown, d: Peter Chelsom, sc: Chelsom, Adrian Dunbar from a story by Chelsom, sc. super: June McDonald, dop: Sue Gibson, c. op: Peter Versey, focus puller: Shane O'Neill, clapper loader: Donal Gilligan, trainee clapper loader, P J Dillon, key grip: Luke Quigley, a. c: Des Whelan, Peter Dorney, 2nd unit d: Peter Diamond, 1st a.d: Crispin Reece, 2nd a.d: Michael Rowland, 3rd a.d: Lisa Mulcahy, trainee a.d: Julian Bolger, ed: Martin Walsh, 1st a. ed: Daryl Jordan, 2nd a. ed: Mark Harris (London), Bemadette Moloney (Dublin), p.dsgn.: Caroline Hanania, art d: Katharine Naylor, a. art d: Annie Siggins, Frank Flood, scenic artist: Lyn Whiteread, sp. effs: Maurice Foley, m: John Altman, m.p: The John Altman Jazz Orchestra, Johnny Van Derrick (violin), John Etheridge (guitar), Mitch Dalton, Jack Emblow (accordion), Irish band - Arty McGlynn, Nollaig Casey, Carnal Hayden, keyboards: Craig Pruess, Nick Glennie-Smith, Simon Chamberlain, a. studio m: Noel Eccles (percussion), Neil Martin (cello/keyboards), Liam O'Flynn (uileann pipes), songs: 'Hear My Song' by Pepper, Klose, Luckesch (EMI); 'Nancy with the Laughing Face' by Van Heusen, Silvers (Chappell); Take You Home Again Cathleen' by Westendorf, arrg: Parry (EMI); 'Blaze Away (We'll Make a BoNíire of Our Troubles)' by Hozman, Kennedy (EMI); 'Movin' by Dunbar, Altman; 'Count Your Blessings' by Temple, Morgan (Ascherberg Hopaood Crew); 'Goodbye' by Graham, Stolz (Wamer Chappell); 'Music for a Found Harmonium' by Jeffes, arrg: McGlynn (Editions Penguin Cafe); 'Come Back to SorrentO'by De Curtis, Aveling (Ricordi), s. ed: Glenn Freemantle, a.s. ed: Michael, dial. ed: Phil Bothomley, a. dial. ed: Bob Robinson, Foley ed: Peter Holt, s: Peter Lindsay, Geoff Young (m.), Paul Hulme, boom op.: Mervyn Moore, chief dub mix: John Hayward, dub. mix: Nic Le Messurier, David Anderson, cast: Jane Frisby, cost: Lindy Hemming, ward: Rhona McGuirke, a. ward: Wendy Asher, a. cost: Debbie Scott (London), make- up: Toni Delany, a. make-up: Ailbhe Lemass, hair: Anne Dunne, a. hair: Carol Dunne, titles/opticals: The Optical Partnership, props buyer: Joe Nevin, art dept. trainee: Fiona Daly, p. co-ord: Fiona Traynor, Sally Woodward (Limelight), Jeanne Liscombe (Liverpool), p.m: Gemma Fallen, producer's secretary: Maggie Mooney, producer's a: Caspar Campbell, loc. m: John McDonnell, Jud Cooper (Liverpool), a. loc. m: Robert Quinn, post.p. super: John Downes, stunt co-ord: Peter Diamond, Mark Boyle, stunts: Terry Cade, Dorothy Anne Ford, Steve Emerson, animal trainers: Cyril Eager (cows), Tom Eager, dog handler: Mary Owen, bird handler: Jim Furlong, p. accnt: Paul Myler, accnts a: Margaret Moggan, Keith O'Malley, stills: Tom Collins, GB distr: Palace Pictures, USA distr: Miramax Film Corp.
    Art directionNAYLOR, Katherine
    Costume designHEMMING, Lindy
    Production designHANANIA, Caroline
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Drama
    Comedy

    TitleMIRACLE, THE
    Production companyPromenade Film Productions
    Palace Pictures
    Film Four International
    British Screen
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerWOOLLEY, Stephen
    MORRIS, Redmond
    DirectorJORDAN, Neil
    Script/AdaptationJORDAN, Neil
    PhotographyROUSSELOT, Philippe
    Sound recordingNICOLSON, Colin
    EditingVAN WIJK, Joke
    Executive producerPOWELL, Nik
    WEINSTEIN, Bob
    WEINSTEIN, Harvey
    Music composerDUDLEY, Anne
    Music performancePro Arte Orchestra of London
    Songs'Stardust' composed by Hoagy Carmichael, written by Mitchell Parish, played by Wynton Marsails, arrg: Robert Freedman; 'Hemando's Hideaway' composed by/authors: Richard Adler, Jerry Rose; 'Secret Love' composed by: Sammy Fain, written by Paul Francis Webster; 'If I Ruled the World' composed by Cyril Omadel, author: Leslie Bricusse; 'Baubles Bangles and Beads' composed by/authors: Robert Wright, George Forrest; 'You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To' composed by/author: Cole Porter; 'Quando Quando Quando' Italian author: A Testa, English author: Pat Boone; 'You've Got That Look', 'Boys in the Backroom' composed by Frederick Hollander, written by Frank Loesser; 'The Power of the Petticoat' composed by Nick Ingman, written by Neil Jordan, Beverly D'Angelo, Donal McCann; 'The Johnny Jump Up' (trad).
    CastBeverly D'Angelo (Renee Baker), Donal McCann (Sam Coleman), Niall Byrne (Jimmy Coleman), Lorraine Pilkington (Rose), J G Devlin (Beausang), Cathleen Delany (Miss Strange), Tom Hickey (Tommy), Shane Connaughton (Rose's father), Mikkel Gaup (Jonner), Sylvia Teron (muscular lady), Anita Reeves (ballroom singer), Ruth McCabe (wardrobe mistress), Ger O'Leary (barman), Sam's Band - Earl Gill (trumpet), Johnny Devlin (saxophone), Chris Kenevey (piano). Tommy Donoghue (drums). Destry Rides Again - Stephen Brennan (Johnny/Destry), Martin Dunne (Kent), Stanley Townsend (Washington), Dermod Moore (Brunowski), Mary Coughlan (Mrs Brunowski), Mal Whyte (mayor), Darragh Kelly (1st cowboy), Alan Archibold (2nd cowboy). the Clane Musical Society (chorus).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourEastmancolor
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration97
    Footage8694
    Format35mm
    Release date1991
    CopyIFA
    IFA (VHS)
    SummaryIn the Irish seaside town of Bray, Co Wicklow, two fifteen-year-olds, Jimmy and Rose, are hanging out together inventing stories about people they see. The distant Miss Strange and her suitor, Mr Beausang, and a group of nuns are incorporated into their narrative. Jimmy' s father, Sam, is & musician who invites his son to join the band for the summer. He has reared Jimmy by himself since the death of his mother. Jimmy and Rose become intrigued by the arrival of a glamorous blonde. Jimmy and Rose take a keen interest in the newly-arrived woman, Renee Baker, and follow her by train to the Olympia Theatre, Dublin where she is playing the role of Frenchy in a production of Destry Rides Again. When a circus arrives in Bray, Rose, by now jealous of Jimmy's interest in Renee, meets up with the elephant trainer, the gruff Jonner, whom she decides to humanise. As Jimmy's infatuation for Renee grows, he makes sexual advances to her, but she declares that she is too old for him. Increasingly disturbed. Jimmy leaves the stage as he is playing with his father's band. He takes a job playing saxophone for the contortionist at the circus. After attending a performance of Destry Rides Again, Jimmy goes to a party where he accompanies Renee on piano while she sings 'Stardust'. Back in Bray, Renee distances herself again from Jimmy when he tries to kiss her in a hall of mirrors and Sam looks on silently. When Sam and Jimmy attend a performance of Destry separately, Renee admits to Jimmy that she knows his father. Sam and Jimmy have a row when Sam tells his son that he must not see her again. Nevertheless, in church with Rose, they pray that he will be able to seduce Renee. Meanwhile, Sam goes to see Renee and questions why she came back, as Jimmy has been told that his mother is dead. He tells her that it was to see Jimmy and not him. Jimmy brings Rose to see Renee in the show and they observe Sam talking with her. Sam thanks Renee for not revealing that she is Jimmy's mother. Jimmy invites Renee to hear him play and she goes to the gig. She is disturbed when she sees Jimmy playing with Sam. She storms out and Jimmy also leaves. At Jimmy's home where he has brought Renee, she leaves hurriedly when Jimmy tries to kiss her. In the handbag she leaves behind. Jimmy finds photographs of Renee and Sam together. Sam confirms that Renee is his mother, something he was vaguely aware of all along. Wishing to break down barriers. Jimmy introduces Mr Beausang to Miss Strange. Meanwhile, Rose imposes her will on Jonner, makes him jealous of Jimmy and eventually has sex with Jonner. Renee reappears at the house and she tells Jimmy the story of her teenage relationship with Sam, her pregnancy and her return to America after his birth. Distressed, Jimmy goes to a church where he complains to the statues that someone should have told him about his mother, and he then falls asleep. When he wakes up he finds an elephant in the church. While having sex with Jonner, Rose stole his keys and later released all the circus animals. The circus employees try to round up the animals, but Rose has thrown the keys of the animal cages into the sea. Rose and Jimmy stroll on the promenade once more inventing stories. (V).
    NoteGer Rel ca. 25/2/1991(Berlin Film Festival); IR Rel 19/4/1991. Screened at the 9th Galway Film Fleadh, 8 - 13 July 1997.
    Filmed on location in Bray, Co Wicklow, Dublin, and at Ardmore Studios. THE MIRACLE was awarded the Prize of the German Art Film Theatre Association at the 1991 Berlin Film Festival.
    ReferenceEP 13/4/1991:6; II 28/4/1990:13; IT 1/3/1991:10; IT 12/4/1991:10;
    MFB 1991:107; SI 28/4/1990:13; SI 21/4/1991:23; SP 13/4/1991:6.
    DistributorPalace Pictures (GB).
    KeywordsYoung People
    Adolescence
    Fathers
    Sons
    Musicians
    LocationBray
    Dublin
    Production creditsp.c: Promenade Film Productions. For Palace Pictures. In association with Film Four International, British Screen, pres: Palace Pictures, Film Four International and British Screen. A Palace/Promenade Production. A Neil Jordan Film, p: Stephen Woolley, Redmond Morris, exec. p: Nik Powell, Bob Weinstein, Harvey Weinstein, d/sc: Neil Jordan, sc. super: Laerke Pederson, dop: Philippe Rousselot, c. op: Mike Roberts, focus puller: Shane O'Neill, clapper loader: Brendan Galvin, grip: John Murphy, trainee a.c: P J Dillon, a. c: James Davis, 1st a.d: David Brown, 2nd a.d: Gay Brabazon, 3rd a.d: Lisa Mulcahy, trainee a.d: Dougal Cousins, Charlotte Somers, p. super: Elizabeth Karlsen (Palace), p. co-ord: Niamh Nolan, trainee p. co-ord: Margaret Moggan, p.m: Gemma Fallon, art d: David Wilson, a. art d: Annie Siggins, art dept. trainee: Bairbre Murray, ed: Joke Van Wijk, a. ed: Dan Gane, 2nd a. ed: Mary Finlay, score orchestrated and conducted by Anne Dudley, played by The Pro Arte Orchestra of London, band and stage music arranged and conducted by Nick Ingman, solo saxophone by Courtney Pine, songs: 'Stardust' composed by Hoagy Carmichael, written by Mitchell Parish, played by Wynton Marsails, arrg: Robert Freedman; 'HemandO's Hideaway' composed by/authors: Richard Adler, Jerry Rose; 'Secret Love' composed by: Sammy Fain, written by Paul Francis Webster; 'If I Ruled the World' composed by Cyril Omadel, author: Leslie Bricusse; 'Baubles Bangles and Beads' composed by/authors: Robert Wright, George Forrest; 'You'd Be So Nice To Come Home TO'composed by/author: Cole Porter; 'Quando Quando QuandO' Italian author: A Testa, English author: Pat Boone; 'You've Got That Look', 'Boys in the Backroom' composed by Frederick Hollander, written by Frank Loesser; 'The Power of the Petticoat' composed by Nick Ingman, written by Neil Jordan, Beverly D'Angelo, Donal McCann; 'The Johnny Jump Up' (trad), s. mix: Colin Nicolson, boom op.: Tony Cooke, a. boom op: Jackie Crawfbrd, super, s. ed: Kant Pan, a.s. ed: Martyn Robinson, dial. ed: Christopher Ackland, a. dial. ed: Joe Gilmore, dub. mix: Robin O'Donoghue, p.dsgn.: Gemma Jackson, loc. m: John McDonnell, loc. a: Robert Quinn, cast: Susie Figgis, a. cast: Abi Cohen, Imelda Sheehan, sp. effs. super: Maurice Foley, cost: Sandy Powell, ward. super: Rhona McGuirke, a. ward: Wendy Asher, make-up: Toni Delany, a. make-up: Ailbhe Lemass, make-up effs. dsgn: Nick Dudman, hair: Anne Dunne, trainee hair: Carol Dunne, title dsgn: Richard Morrison/Plume Partners, stunt arrg: Martin Grace, stunts: Eddie Powell, Sarah Franzl, props, master: Eamonn O'Higgins, dressiing props: Derek Wallace, Owen Monahan, chief elec: Philip Fitzsimons, best boy: Con Dempsey, lion trainer: Albert Moore, elephant trainer: John Roberts, circus: Fossett Brothers Circus, director's a: Brenda Rawn, p. accnt: Paul Myler, Palace accnt: Michael Garland, p. buyer: Sunny Mulligan, cnstr. m: Russ Bailey, legal adv: Katy McGuinness, stills: Tom Collins, publicity: John Battsek, Frontline Publicity, Destry Rides Again Patrick Mason (director), stage lighting dsgn: Rupert Murray, GB distr: Palace Pictures.
    Art directionWISON, David
    SIGGINS, Annie
    Costume designPOWELL, Sandy
    Production designJACKSON, Gemma
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleCRYING GAME, THE
    Production companyPalace Pictures
    Channel Four Films
    SponsorEurotrustees
    Nippon Film Development Finance Inc (N.D.F)
    British Screen
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerWOOLLEY, Stephen
    KARLSEN, Elizabeth
    DirectorJORDAN, Neil
    Script/AdaptationJORDAN, Neil
    PhotographyWILSON, Ian
    Sound recordingNICHOLSON, Colin
    EditingPAN, Kent
    Executive producerPOWELL, Nik
    Associate producerCOWAN, Paul
    Music composerDUDLEY, Anne
    Music performancePro Arte Orchestra of London
    Songs'When a Man Loves a Woman' by Cameron Lewis, Arthur Wright, perf. by Percy Sledge; 'Baby Jump' by Ray Dorset, perf. by Mungo Jerry; 'Live for Today' by/perf. by Cicero; 'Second Coming' by/perf. by Simon Boswell; 'The Crying Game' by Geoff Stephens, vocals by Kate Robbins; 'I Only Wanna Be With You' by Mike Hawker, Ivor Raymonde, vocals by Kate Robbins; 'The White Cliffs of Dover' by Nat Burton, Walter Kent, perf. by The Blue Jays; 'The Crying Game' by Geoff Stephens, pert. by Dave Berry; 'Let the Music Play' by Chris Barbarosa, Ed Chisholm, perf. by Carol Thompson; 'Stand by Your Man' by Tammy Wynette, Billy Sherrill, perf. by Lyle Lovett; 'The Crying Game' by Geoff Stephens, perf. by
    Boy George.
    CastForest Whitaker (Jody), Miranda Richardson (Jude), Stephen Rea (Fergus Hennessy), Adrian Dunbar (Peter Maguire), Breffmi McKenna (Tinker), Joe Savino (Eddie), Birdie Sweeney (Tommy), Jaye Davidson (Dil), Andree Bernard (Jane), Jim Broadbent (Col), Ralph Brown (Dave), Tony Slattery (Deveroux), Jack Carr (Franknum), Josephine White, Shar Campbell (bar performers), Brian Coleman (judge). Ray De-Haan, David Cronnelly (security men).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourEastmancolor
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration112
    Footage10043
    Format35mm
    Release date1992
    CopyIFA
    SummaryA black British army soldier, Jody, who is serving in Northern Ireland is picked up by Jude, a member of the IRA. Shortly afterwards Jody is kidnapped by the IRA and held hostage in exchange for one of their own senior members who is being interrogated in Castlereagh. The British are given three days in which to release the IRA man or Jody will be shot. Jude's boyfriend, Fergus, is one of Jody's guards and to the disapproval of the IRA's unit leader, Peter Maguire, they quickly develop a close rapport. Expecting to be shot, Jody shows Fergus a photograph of his girlfriend, Dil, and asks him to find her and tell her he loves her. Maguire appoints Fergus as Jody's reluctant executioner. As they are walking through the woods to an execution site, Jody runs away. While he chases after Jody, Fergus feels unable to shoot him. However, as Jody runs across a road, an army vehicle arriving to raid the hide-out knocks him down and kills him. The hide-out is destroyed and two IRA men. Tinker and Eddie, are killed. Fergus escapes to London, where he works on a building site. He changes his name to Jimmy and his nationality to Scottish. He finds Dil, who works as a hairdresser, and has his hair cut by her. He meets her at the Metro bar and then follows her home, observing Dil and her boyfriend, Dave, make love. The following night, Fergus returns to see Dil at the Metro, where she sings. Fergus follows Dil and intervenes in a fight between herself and Dave. Fergus and Dil become lovers, but he is shocked to find out that she is in fact a man. He recoils from Dil, but after he visits him at the building site where he works, they resume their relationship. Fergus is visited by Jude who tells him that the IRA have court-martialled him for desertion. Jude also tries to encourage Fergus to resume their relationship, but he shows no interest in her. Fergus is picked up by Jude and Maguire, who wants him to take part in an attack on a judge. With Jude knowing about Dil, Fergus cuts Dil's hair, dresses him in Jody's cricket clothes and takes him to a hotel to hide. Dil becomes upset and gets drunk. Fergus takes him back to Dil's flat, where he admits that he knew Jody and the circumstances of his death. While he is asleep, Dil ties Fergus to the bed. When Fergus fails to turn up for the rendezvous for the killing of the judge, Maguire shoots the judge but is killed himself. Jude escapes and goes to Dil's flat. Dil shoots her and discovers that she was responsible for entrapping Jody. Dil is about to commit suicide when Fergus stops him. Fergus is arrested and is visited in prison by Dil for whom he is serving time for Jude's murder. Dil is counting the days until his release, more than six years hence. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 29/10/1992 (Irish Film Centre). Screened at the 9th Galway Film Fleadh, 8 - 13 July 1997. Working title THE SOLDIER'S WIFE. Filmed at Lee International Film Studios Ltd, Shepperton, England, and on location in London and Ireland. In 1993, this film was nominated for six Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Best Achievement in Film Editing, and Best Original Screenplay for which Neil Jordan won an Oscar. The film won the 1992 Best Film Award of the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. The film won the Sir Alexander Korda award at the 1993 BAFTA awards. Neil Jordan also won the Best Original Screenplay Award from the Writers Guild of America for this film. On the morning of Neil Jordan's winning of the Oscar, the Irish Government decided to re-activate the Irish Film Board. A few months later Jordan was appointed a member of the Film Board. The Irish Film Archive hold a 35mm trailer for this film.
    ReferenceEmpire Oct 1992; Empire Nov 1992; Entertainment Weekly 12/2/1993;
    EH 27/10/1992; EH 30/3/1993:2-3, 10-11; EP 30/10/1992:15; FI, No. 32, Nov/Dec 1992:24-25; FI Apr-May 1993; Hot Press (Dublin) 4/11/1992; ID 28/10 -10/11/1992; II 2/11/1992; FT 25/9/1992:11; IT 30/10/1992:12; IT 3/11/1992:10; IT 14/11/1992:2; IT 15/12/1992:8; IT 19/12/1992:W5; IT 18/2/1993:12; IT 20/2/1993:2; IT 22/3/1993:4; IT 23/3/1993:11; IT 24/3/1993:3; IT 27/3/1993:W3; IT 30/3/1993:1; IT 31/3/1993:10; FT 2/4/1993:12, 13; IT 3/4/1993:W2; IT 5/7/1993; S&S Nov 1992:40/7; Moviegoer, Nov 1992; New Yorker 16/11/92; NYT 1/1/1993; P
    1/11/1992; S&S Nov 1992:40/7; SI 21/2/1993:7; SI 28/3/1993:2; SP 28/3/1993:25, 27; ST 1/11/1992:A15, B4; ST 28/3/1993:3, B5; Variety Journal 22/3/1993. Bell-Metereau 1993:282-87; Jordan 1993.

    Irish Times, 10/4/92:1, ‘From Cavan to Cannes’, mention of Neil Jordan film (The Soldier's Wife) at Cannes (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Times, 21/8/92:2, ‘When is an Irish film not an Irish film? - Jordan in Venice’, brief report of the Crying Game screened out-of-competition at the Venice Film Festival (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Times, 11/9/92:1, ‘New screens flow from edge to Centre’, report of screening of The Crying Game at the Irish Film Centre (Michael Dwyer).

    RTE Guide, 25/9/92, ‘Nuovo cinema paradiso’, report of screening The Crying Game at Irish Film Centre soon after opening.

    In Dublin, 29/9/92, ‘Screen gems: The new Irish Film Centre opens next week in Temple Bar’, report on opening of Irish Film Centre, mentioning films to be screened including The Crying Game (Anthony O'Keefe).

    The Crying Game: A film by Neil Jordan’, publicity: cast and credits lists, short synopsis, synopsis, production background, cast background. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    Irish Times, 16/10/92, ‘Reader's Film Review’, The Crying Game subject of Irish Times readers' competition.

    Evening Herald, 27/10/92, ‘Why Neil is not in the crying game’, interview with director of The Crying Game, Neil Jordan about his life and work (Anna Coogan).

    RTE Guide, 30/10/92, brief review of The Crying Game, with mention of success at Venice and Cork Film Festivals.

    New Statesman and Society, 30/10/92, review (Julie Wheelwright).

    The Independent, 30/10/92, brief review of The Crying Game (Gilbert Adair).

    ‘Last Palace Picture Show’, 30/10/1992, The Crying Game producer Stephen Woolley describes the production of the film, and comments on the film industry and the media. Held at the Tiernan MacBride Library of the Irish Film Institute.

    Evening Press, 30/10/92. ‘Jordan's cool look at a complex issue’, favourable review of The Crying Game (Mary Moloney).

    Irish Times, 4/12/1992, ‘Reel News. Sponsorship on the double for Dublin film festival’, The Crying Game opens to critical acclaim in the US.

    Irish Times (Sound and Vision), 30/10/92:12, ‘Tears for fears’, favourable review of The Crying Game (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Times, 31/10/92, ‘The Irish Film Centre...’, brief report on premiere of The Crying Game at the Irish Film Centre.

    Irish Press, 31/10/92, ‘Jordan's latest blockbuster’, report of premiere of The Crying Game at the Irish Film Centre (Gerry O'Hare).

    Evening Herald, 31/10/92, ‘Thriller's premiere’, photograph of The Crying Game stars at premiere at the Irish Film Centre.

    Irish Times, 31/10/92, brief review of The Crying Game showing in Dublin cinemas.

    Sunday Tribune, 1/11/92, ‘Life catches Woody out’, paragraph recommending The Crying Game film (Ciaran Carty).

    Sunday Press, 1/11/92, ‘He Neils to conquer!’, report of gala screening of The Crying Game at the Irish Film Centre.

    Sunday Tribune, 1/11/92, ‘Character with attitude’, review of actor Stephen Rea's career, with quotes from colleagues.

    Sunday Press, 1/11/92, ‘Jordan leads a brilliant week’, favourable review of The Crying Game.

    Irish Press, 2/11/92, ‘In The Crying Game...’, short favourable review of The Crying Game, comparing it to elements in Mona Lisa, Angel and Cal.

    Irish Independent, 2/11/92, ‘Mournful matters’, critical review of The Crying Game (Mary Mac Goris).

    Hot Press, 4/11/92, ‘Crying Time Again’, critical review of The Crying Game.

    Sunday Independent, 8/11/92, Irish Film Centre screening times for The Crying Game.

    Irish Times, 14/11/92, ‘In pursuit of his own obsessions: Neil Jordan’, profile of director Neil Jordan and his work (Joe Jackson).

    Irish Times, 14/11/92, paragraph review of The Crying Game from cinema listings.

    Variety, 30/11/92, cinema listings and short review of The Crying Game in America.

    Irish Times, 11/92, short favourable review of The Crying Game.

    Film Ireland, Nov/Dec 1992:24-5, feature on The Crying Game plot, cast, characterisation and director Neil Jordan's career (Sean Dunne).

    New York Magazine, 7/12/92, review (Tom Gliatto).

    Irish Times, 19/12/92, ‘A Crying Shame’, critical review of the portrayal of women in Jordan's films, including The Crying Game (Sarah O'Hara).

    Entertainment Weekly, Dec 1992, short review of The Crying Game.

    Hollywood Androgyny, 1993:282-7, ‘Sometimes it's hard to be a woman: The Crying Game’, analysis of The Crying Game's portrayal of gender and sexuality (Rebecca Bell-Metereau).

    Entertainment Weekly, 12/2/93:17-21, ‘The Crying Game: The movie everyone's not talking about’, feature discussing The Crying Game's grosses, awards, finance, background, and cast with director Neil Jordan and producer Stephen Woolley.

    New York Times, 31/1/93, ‘The Crying Game wins at gimmickry’, critical review of The Crying Game comparing it to Jordan's other films, Mona Lisa and The Miracle (Caryn James).

    Variety, 22/3/93:68-9, ‘Crying all the way to the bank’, feature on The Crying Game's finance and box office success, with quotes from producer Stephen Woolley, and Gerry Rich, film marketing (Michael Fleming, Leonard Klady).

    Sunday World, 11/4/93:18, ‘Hollywood will fuel the Troubles’, columnist's opinion on films glamourising the Troubles, including The Crying Game and Prayer for the Dying (Colin McClelland).

    Irish Times, 2/4/93, reader's letter arguing The Crying Game is not an Irish film because of European backing (Geoff Power).

    Film Ireland, Apr/May 1993:16-21, ‘Celtic dreamer’, interview with The Crying Game director Neil Jordan about portrayal of women and race in his films (Marina Burke).

    The Guardian, 1/7/93:5, ‘Ambiguously yours’, discussion of sexuality in films including The Crying Game (Richard Combs).

    Irish Times, 5/7/93, ‘Taboo themes made film a success, Jordan says’, director Neil Jordan talks on success of his films, through portrayal of gender and race (Conor Sweeney).

    Screen International, 24/9/93:2, ‘In Short’, paragraph on Neil Jordan winning screenplay prize.

    South Atlantic Quarterly, Winter 1996, p227-77, ‘Fork-tongued on the Border Bit: Partition and the politics of form in contemporary narratives of the Northern Irish conflict’, background to the Troubles, comparing narrative form of films including The Crying Game and Cal, summary (Joe Cleary).

    The Guardian, 10/4/98:9, ‘Decent exposure’, portrayal of sexuality in films since The Crying Game (Richard Williams).

    The Guardian, 10/4/98:14-15, ‘Close to the edit’, interview with Anne Dudley, music director for The Crying Game, about her work (Steven Poole).

    The Guardian, 1-7/8/98: 16-17, ‘Acts of violence’, review of characters portrayed in films about Northern Ireland, including The Crying Game (Dominic Wills).

    Irish Times, ‘Jaye finds the Oscars a trying game’, report from Hollywood on Oscars mentioning notables from The Crying Game (Michael Dwyer).

    Irish Times, ‘Not quite a crying game’, report from Oscars ceremony on six nominations received by The Crying Game (Michael Dwyer).

    Sight and Sound, Nov 1992:40, review (Jonathon Romney).

    Irish Tatler, Nov 1992, review.

    Film Quarterly, Vol 47, Spring 1994:31-42, ‘Sexing The Crying Game: Difference, Identity, Ethics’ (Kristin Handler).

    Irish Times, 21/11/1992, paragraph review of The Crying Game from cinema listings.

    In Dublin, 24/11/1992, ‘Cinema Extra: Art-house news’, cinema listing with The Crying Game screening at the Irish Film Centre

    Image, 11/92, cinema listings with The Crying Game screening at the Irish Film Centre.

    The Guardian, 25/9/99:23, ‘Those not so Brit-flicks’, letter criticising The Guardian's 100 best British films which included The Crying Game, Into The West and The Commitments as British films (Andrew McNulty).

    BFFS, 13-14/3/93:11, synopsis of The Crying Game (JC).

    Journal of Popular Film and Television, Vol 22 no 4 Winter 1995, 172-179, ‘Bending Phallic Patriarchy’, on Neil Jordan's construction of sexual difference in the context of political ideology and race, and the role of all three in cultural representation (Jack Boozer).

    New Yorker, 7/12/92:50, ‘Rules of the Game’, on the audience reaction to The Crying Game in the States.

    New York Times, 15/1/1993:C13 & C16, ‘The Crying Game: The Healing Powers of a Successful Movie’, interview with director Neil Jordan. He talks about the audience reaction to the Crying Game in the States, his Irish childhood, his filmmaking career and his Hollywood mishaps (Bernard Weinraub).

    Time, 30/11/1992:79, ‘Short Takes’, short preview of The Crying Game.

    New Republic, 14/12/92:29, review (Stanley Kauffman).

    Genders, No 24, 1996:1-33, ‘Ambivalence as Alibi: On the Historical Materiality of Late Capitalist Myth in The Crying Game and Cultural Theory’, academic reading of The Crying Game. In historicising the relationship between the film's mythic absorption of the transvestite and of neo-imperialism, the author offers an instance of how we might begin to understand some of the historical conditions of possibility in contemporary representations of gender and captitalism (Rosemary Hennessy).

    Queen's Quarterly, Vol 100 no 2 Summer 1993: 457-464, ‘Neil Jordan's Viewing Game’, the author argues that The Crying Game is a film of great depth and craft that deserves more than one viewing even after the suprise has been exhausted (Maurice Yacowar).

    Cineaction, no 32 Fall 1993:63-67, ‘Now You Can See It: The Liberial Aesthetic and Racial Representation in The Crying Game’, the notion of identities in The Crying Game (Darrell Moore).

    Representations, No 50, Spring 1995:101-121, ‘In the Field of Dreams: Transvestism in Twelfth Night and The Crying Game’, the author uses Twelfth Night as a point of reference for further assessment of The Crying Game's transvestite politics (Jonathan Crewe).

    Time, 1/3/93:57, ‘Don't Read This A Story!’, article on actor Jaye Davidson (Richard Corliss).

    Time, 25/1/93:63, ‘Queuing for The Crying Game’, article on how The Crying Game has managed to get US moviegoers talking while at the same time keeping quiet about the suprise (Richard Corliss).

    The Velvet Light Trap, No 43, Spring 1999:51-62, ‘Performativity in Disguise: Ideology and the Denaturalization of Identity in Theory and The Crying Game’, article on characters and identities in The Crying Game (Susan Lurie).

    Entertainment Weekly, 9/7/93:54, ‘Surprise! Who's 'Crying' Now?’, how The Crying Game succeeds in challenging audience expectations (Roger Ebert).

    Camera Obscura, 9/1995:33-47, ‘Black Femme Fatales amd Sexual Abuse in Progressive "White" Cinema: Neil Jordan's Mona Lisa and The Crying Game’, it is argued that Mona Lisa and The Crying Game are limited in their creativity and daring by racial-sexual stereotypes and repetitive themes (Joy James).

    Film Criticism, Vl 23, no 3 1998:61-73, ‘"I Thought You Knew!": Performing the Penis, the Phallus, and Otherness in Neil Jordan's The Crying Game’, it is argued that The Crying Game reinstates the divisions of racial, national and sexual identities through a series of performances (Shantanu Dutta Ahmed).

    Sunday Business Post (Agenda), ‘No panic’, interview with actor Forest Whitaker (Paul Byrne).
    DistributorMayfair (GB)
    Miramax Film Corp (USA)
    KeywordsTroubles
    Paramilitaries
    Irish in Britain
    Abductions
    Transsexuals
    LocationNorthern Ireland
    London
    Production creditsp.c: Palace Pictures/Channel Four Films. In association with Eurotrustees/Nippon Film Development Finance Inc (N.D.F). With the participation of British Screen. A Neil Jordan Film, p: Stephen Woolley, co-p: Elizabeth Karlsen, exec. p: Nik Powell, assoc. p: Paul Cowan, d/sc: Neil Jordan, sc. super: Diana Dill, dop/c.op: lan Wilson, focus puller: Kenny Byrne, clapper loader: Brendan Galvin, c. grip: Gary Hutchings, trainee c: Dan Zeff, p. co-ord: Fran Triefus, Fiona Traynor (Ireland), 1st a.d: Redmond Morris, 2nd a.d: Melvin Lind, Seamus Collins (Ireland), 3rd a.d: Jonathan Karlsen, Robert Quinn (Ireland), p.dsgn.: Jim Clay, art d: Chris Seagers, a. art d: Paul Ghirardani, art dept. runner: Jane Henwood, set dec: Martin Childs, ed: Kant Pan, a. ed: Martyn Robinson, 2nd a. ed: Victoria Boydell, m. orchestrated/m.c: Anne Dudley, m. perf. by The Pro Arte Orchestra of London, m. mix: Roger Dudley, songs: 'When a Man Loves a Woman' by Cameron Lewis, Arthur Wright, perf. by Percy Sledge; 'Baby Jump' by Ray Dorset, perf. by Mungo Jerry; 'Live for Today' by/perf. by Cicero; 'second Coming' by/perf. by Simon Boswell; 'The Crying Game' by Geoff Stephens, vocals by Kate Robbins; 'I Only Wanna Be With You' by Mike Hawker, Ivor Raymonde, vocals by Kate Robbins; 'The White Cliffs of Dover' by Nat Burton, Walter Kent, perf. by The Blue Jays; 'The Crying Game' by Geoff Stephens, pert. by Dave Berry; 'Let the Music Play' by Chris Barbarosa, Ed Chisholm, perf. by Carol Thompson; 'stand-by Your Man' by Tammy Wynette, Billy Sherrill, perf. by Lyle Lovett; 'The Crying Game' by Geoff Stephens, perf. by Boy George; soundtrack album on Spaghetti Recordings Ltd through Polydor Records, s: Colin Nicholson, boom op.: Tony Cook, trainee s: Damiano Vukotic, super, s. ed: Eddy Joseph, dial. ed: Rick DuNíord, fbley ed: Victor Nunes, a.s. ed: Leonard Green, s. re-rd. mix: Robin O'Donoghue, a. re-rd. mix: Dominic Lester, p.m: Gemma Fallen (Ireland), loc. m: Terry Blyther, Gilly Case (re-shoot), Martin O'Malley (Ireland), a. loc. m: Scott Rowlatt, cast: Susie Figgis, a. cast: Liora Reich, cost: Sandy Powell, ward. super: Paul Minter, Clare Spragge, a. ward: Wendy Asher (Ireland), chief make-up: Morag Ross, a. make-up: Miri Ben Shlom, chief hair: Gerry Jones, titles: The Optical Partnership, fairground super: Bernard McCormack, p. buyer: Celia Bobak, director's a: Brenda Rawn, Mr Woolley's a: Peter Ogunsalli, producers' a: Molly Withers, Molly Leys, p. runner: Andrew Zein, floor runners Samantha Plaisted, gaffer: Norman Smith, sp. effs. super: Peter Hutchinson, prosthetics: Daniel Parker, props, master: Micky Bacon, cnstr. m: Dave Alien, John Lamon (Ireland), stunt co-ord: Clive Curtis, stunt drivers: Del Baker, Wayne Michaels, Valentine Musetti, stunt doubles: Helen Caudwell, Abbi Collins, Elaine Ford, stand-ins: Steve Morphew, Marilyn Took, post.p. super: Amanda Posey, post.p. runner: Sally Hodges, p. accnt: Pat Isherwood, a. accnt: Sarah Lucraft, post.p. accnt: Michael Garland, legal adv: Angela Morrison, stills: Tom Hilton, publicity: Phil Symes, Michelle Sewell, Rogers & Cowan PSA, GB distr: Mayfair; USA distr: Miramax Film Corp.
    Art directionSEAGERS, Chris
    Costume designPOWELL, Sandy
    Production designCLAY, Jim
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Psychological Thriller

    TitlePLAYBOYS, THE
    Production companyGreen Umbrella Films
    Samuel Goldwyn Company
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerCARTLIDGE, William
    PERRY, Simon
    DirectorMACKINNON, Gilles
    Script/AdaptationCONNAUGHTON, Shane
    CRABBE, Kerry
    PhotographyCONROY, Jack
    Sound recordingLINDSAY, Peter
    EditingDIXON, Humphrey
    Music composerPETIT, Jean-Claude
    Music performanceIrish Film Orchestras
    Songs'Shake Rattle and Roll' by Chas Calhoun, perf. by John Smith; 'Only You' by Buck Ram, Andy Rand, perf. by Bill Brown; 'Down by the Sally Gardens' (trad), lyr: W B Yeats; 'Marching through Georgia' by Henry C Work; 'The Sweets of May', 'Lament for Owain Ruaidh O'Neill', 'Faith of Our Fathers', 'The Croppy Boy', 'Polly Wolly Doodle' (trad), s: Peter Lindsay
    CastAlbert Finney (Hegarty), Aidan Quinn (Tom), Robin Wright (Tara Maguire), Milo O'Shea (Freddie), Alan Devlin (Father Malone), Niamh Cusack (Brigid), lan McElhinney (Cassidy), Stella McCusker (Rachel), Niall Buggy (Denzil), Anna Livia Ryan (Vonnie), Adrian Dunbar (Mick), Lorcan Cranitch (John Joe Ryan), Aine Ní Mhuiri (Mrs Smith), Doreen Hepbum (Nuala Ryan), Kilian McKenna (Sean), Michelle Forbes (Maggie Rudden), P J Brady (McMahon), Tony Rohr (Kelly), Niall O'Brien (police superintendent), Pat Laffan (Duffy), Brian O'Leary (Timmy), Stephen Holland (Richie), Jimmy Keogh (Liam), Shane Connaughton (customs officer), Peter Morris, James Morris (Tara's baby). Pat Fallon (magician).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration109
    Footage9786
    FormatPanavision
    35mm
    Release date1992
    CopyIFA
    SummaryIn an Irish village in 1957, Tara Maguire and her sister Brigid run a shop, while Tara also smuggles goods across the nearby border with Northern Ireland. She gives birth to a child but refuses to name the father. The gers, especially the parish priest Fr Malone, are shocked by her independence and her refusal to get married, including to the persistent Sergeant Hegarty. When Mick, a small farmer, asks Tara to marry him and commits suicide shortly afterwards, Tara's reputation becomes even more notorious. A travelling performance troupe led by Freddie and including Tom arrives in the ge. Tara finds Tom trying to steal one of her chickens and demands ten shillings for it. On one of her trips across the border Tara is given a box for one of the players, Cassidy, which she is told contains razor blades. Tom and Tara gradually become attracted to each other. Fr Malone tries to convince Tara to have the child adopted or else to marry Hegarty. One night, Fr Malone stops the show because of what he regards as excessive showing of woman's bodies while Hegarty helps him to clear the tent. The police superintendent arrives in the ge to tell Hegarty that the IRA have exploded a bomb in the vicinity. When Tom accompanies Tara and the baby to a communal harvest at which the players help, Hegarty silently indicates his hostility to Tom's friendship with Tara. That night, Hegarty tells Tom that he is the father of the child, Later, Hegarty tells Tara that if she will not have him she will have no one. Tom appears and is shocked when Tara confirms that she had a one-night stand with Hegarty. Tara and Tom go to the countryside and take a boat on a lake. After they are forced to abandon the boat, they swim ashore. They are spotted by two men who inform Hegarty of seeing them together. Hegarty goes to the barn where he has been told Tara and Tom were seen. He finds Tara's knickers there and sets fire to the barn. During a performance of the play, an old blind woman claims that Freddie has performed a miracle when her eyesight is restored. Other members of the audience ask him to cure their ailments. Two boys see Cassidy prime a bomb. They steal explosives from him and use them to kill fish. When Hegarty discovers that they got the explosives from one of the players, he sees an opportunity to arrest Tom. While a religious procession led by Fr Malone is progressing through the village Hegarty arrests Tom for being a member of the IRA and for causing explosions. In retaliation, Tara tells the gers that Hegarty is indeed the father of the child. She later goes to the garda station and insists that Hegarty release Tom. Tara and Tom become lovers. The players go to see GONE WITH THE WIND at a cinema in a nearby town, and that night recreate the film on stage. Hegarty, an alcoholic, gets drunk. He bursts into the Maguires' house as Brigid and her boyfriend John Joe are making love. Hegarty takes the baby from the house and is confronted outside by Tara and Tom, who beats Hegarty in a fight. Dressed in civilian clothes, a subdued Hegarty leaves the village the next day. The players are also leaving and Tara and the baby go with them. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 29/5/1992; USA Rel ca. 20/4/1995 (New York).

    Filmed on location in and around the village of Redhills, Co Cavan, Ireland. Extracts from THE WESTERNER (1940), WUTHERING HEIGHTS (1939) and WONDERMAN (1945) are included in this film.
    ReferenceIT 23/5/1992:W3; IT 29/5/1992:10; IT 1/5/1995:12; Rockett 1992:50-2.
    DistributorSamuel Goldwyn (GB)
    Keywords1950s
    Rural Ireland
    Smuggling
    Troubles
    Illigitimacy
    Actors
    Priests
    Policemen
    Gardai
    LocationRedhills
    Cavan
    Production creditsp.c: Green Umbrella Films. For Samuel Goldwyn Company, p: William P Cartlidge, Simon Perry, d: Gillies MacKinnon, sc: Shane Connaughton, Kerry Crabbe, sc. super: Jean Skinner, dop: Jack Conroy, c. op: Des Whelan, focus puller: Alan Butler, clapper loader: John Conroy, grip: Luke Quigley, p. super: Loretta Ordewer, p. co-ord: Marilyse Morgan, p.m: Gemma Fallen, 1st a.d: Chris Carreras, 2nd a.d: Seamus Collins, 3rd a.d: Ted Cartlidge, art d: Arden Gantly, a. art d: Jean Kerr, art dept. trainee: Fiona Daly, ed: Humphrey Dixon, a. ed: Michael Kelliher, 2nd a. ed: Jason Costelloe (UK), Mary Casey (Ireland), trainee ed: Quinn Hawkins, p.dsgn.: Andy Harris, m: Jean-Claude Petit, m.p: Irish Film Orchestras, songs: 'Shake Rattle and Roll' by Chas Calhoun, perf. by John Smith; 'Only You' by Buck Ram, Andy Rand, perf. by Bill Brown; 'Down by the Sally Gardens' (trad), lyr: W B Yeats; 'Marching through Georgia' by Henry C Work; 'The Sweets of May', 'Lament for Owain Ruaidh O'Neill', 'Faith of Our Fathers', 'The Croppy Boy', 'Polly Wolly Doodle' (trad), s: Peter Lindsay, boom op.: Mervyn Moore, dub. mix: Gerry Humphreys, a. dub. mix: Dean Humphreys, s. ed: Alan Bell, a.s. ed: Sarah Ellis, Foley ed: Tony Message, loc. m: Mark Huffam, cast. d: Irene Lamb, Pam Dixon, cost: Consolata Boyle, ward. super: Mark Holmes, a. ward: Anne O'Halloran, Ger Scully, chief make-up: Rosie Blackmore, a. make-up: Jennifer Hegarty, chief hair: Eileen Doyle, a. hair: Carole Dunne, titles/opticals: General Screen Enterprises, dial. coach: Brendan Gunn, props buyer: Joe Nevin, props, master: Maurice Jones, sp. effs. super: Gerry Johnston, a. sp. effs super: Peter Dawson, a. sp. effs: Michael K.eams, Connor Coughlan, gaffer: Con Dempsey, best boy: Martin Holland, stunt co-ord: Patrick Condren, stunt doubles: Brendan Condren, Denise Lillie, p. accnt: David Kerney, cnstr. m: Steve Ede, stills: David Appleby, publicist: Jennifer Collen-Smith, a. to Simon Perry: Stacy Bell, dove handler: Jim Furlong, distr: Samuel Goldwyn.
    Art directionGANTLY, Arden
    KERR, Jean
    Costume designBOYLE, Consolata
    Production designHARRIS, Andy
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Romance
    Rural Drama

    TitleRAILWAY STATION MAN, THE
    Production companyBBC Films Productions
    First Film Company Ltd
    Sand Productions
    Turner Pictures
    Country of originGreat Britain
    USA
    ProducerRANDALL-CUTLER, Roger
    MARMOT, Amanda
    MOLYNEAUX, Andree
    DirectorWHYTE, Michael
    Script/AdaptationDELANEY, Shelagh
    PhotographyDE KEYSER, Bruno
    Sound recordingDERBYSHIRE, Clive
    CAMPBELL, Malcolm
    CHAPMAN, Phil
    EditingSTOTHART, John
    Executive producerSAND, Luren Joy
    SHIVAS, Mark
    Associate producerMILLS, Simon
    Music composerHARTLEY, Richard
    Songs'All I Have To Do Is Dream' by Boudleaux Bryant, perf. by The Everly
    Brothers; 'Creole Love Call' by Duke Ellington, perf. by Duke Ellington
    and his Famous Orchestra; 'Tallahassie Lassie' by Frank Slay, Bob Crewe,
    Frederick Picariello, perf. by Freddy Cannon; music from HIGH NOON by
    Dimitri Tiomkin.
    CastJulie Christie (Helen Cuffe), Donald Sutherland (Roger Hawthorne), John Lynch (Damien Sweeney), Frank MacCusker (Jack Cuffe), Mark Tandy (Manus Dempsey), Ingrid Craigie (Mary Heron), Niall Cusack (Father Quinlan), Maire Hastings (Mrs Sweeney), Peadar Lamb (Mr Hasson), Ann Callanan (policewoman), Gary Walker (policeman), John Craig (young Jack Cuffe).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration90
    Footage9000
    FormatPanavision
    35mm
    Release date1993
    TX channelBBC 2
    TX date30/12/1993
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    NFTVA
    SummaryIn Derry, Northern Ireland in 1981, Helen Cuffe and her son. Jack, are at home when two RUC police officers arrive to tell Helen that her husband Dan has been killed by mistake in a terrorist attack. Ten years later Helen is living across the border in Donegal where she paints. Jack spends most of his time in Dublin where he stays with his father's mother while he studies politics and economics at university. She goes to see Roger Hawthorne who has taken over a disused railway station and is restoring its signal box. He tells her that he prefers to spend time by himself and, thinking him rude, she leaves. Later in the pub, Roger meets Jack, who tells him that Damien, an old enemy of Jack's, is helping with the restoration of the station. At home Jack argues with his mother about socialism, describing her attitude to social change as bourgeois complacency. Jack goes to see Damien with a message for him from a paramilitary leader, Manus, who wants Damien to find a place where they can store armaments. Jack suggests that they could use the station's goods shed, but Damien is annoyed at this intrusion into his life. At a jumble sale where Helen and a friend, Mary Heron, are selling goods, Roger buys an old gramophone and then invites Helen to dance to one of the records. He takes her for a walk by the sea and then brings her home. He returns and reminds her that she left some of her paintings in his car and then gives her £100 for them. Damien sees Helen swimming naked and shyly intimidates her by refusing to leave. After she comes out of the water, Damien takes off his clothes and goes for a swim while she sketches him. She goes to see Roger again at the railway station. She begins a series of paintings of Damien in the sea and when Roger views them he calls them remarkable, but he is shocked at his own jealousy at seeing her paintings of Damien. They go for a drink together. On his way home, Roger meets Jack and Manus as they arrive from Dublin. When Manus sees the goods shed he declares it suitable for their purposes. Damien visits Helen's studio and is impressed by the paintings. Damien tells her that no one likes Manus and that he and Jack are on the fringes of a paramilitary organisation. Damien says he has backed himself out of the organisation. Helen visits Roger and they become lovers. One night. Jack and Manus bring the lorry load of weapons to the railway station, but Damien has disappeared. Jack arrives unexpectedly at Helen's to keep Roger occupied while the guns are unloaded. He is shocked when he sees his mother and Roger having oral sex. Roger leaves, but Jack becomes concerned that Roger will see the weapons being unloaded and goes after him by car. Jack is unable to overtake Roger who crashes his car into the load of weapons and causes an explosion, killing himself, two paramilitaries in the lorry and Jack, whose car is just behind his. Manus runs away. In voice over, Helen later reflects on the loss of the four and continues with her painting. (V).
    NoteTX BBC Nov 1993. Filmed on location around Glencolmchille, Co Donegal,
    Republic of Ireland and in Derry, Northern Ireland. Extracts from HIGH
    NOON (USA 1952) are included in this film.
    ReferenceS&S Mar 1994:56-57.
    DistributorBBC TV (GB)
    Keywords1980s
    Troubles
    RUC
    Terrorists
    LocationDonegal
    Dublin
    Production creditsp.c: A BBC Films Production. In association with The First Film Company Ltd and Sand Productions, pres: Turner Pictures, p: Roger Randall-Cutler, co-p: Amanda Marmot, p. for BBC Films: Andree Molyneux, exec. p: Lauren Joy Sand, Mark Shivas, p. exec. for BBC: Geoffrey Paget, assoc. p: Simon Mills, d: Michael Whyte, sc: Shelagh Delaney from the novel The Railway Station Man by Jennifer Johnston (London: Hamish Hamilton, 1984), dop: Bruno de Keyzer, aerial c. op: Adam Dale, c. op: Dominique Pinto, focus puller: John Jordan, clapper loader: Brendan Galvin, kep grip: John Arnold, dolly grip: Ron Fleet, 2nd unit c. op: Jeremy Gee, 2nd unit focus puller: Clive Jackson, 2nd unit clapper loader: Connor Hammond, steadicam op: John ward, helicopter pilot: Marc Wolff, art d: David Walley, cont: Glen Howarth, ed: John Stothart, a. ed: Debbie Pragnell, dub. ed: Helen Whitehead, a. dial. ed: Catherine Hodgson, effs. ed: Janet Lawson, Jeanine Hurley, 1st a.d: Dermot Boyd, 2nd a.d: P J Simpson, John Spencer, m: Richard Hartley, songs: 'All I Have To Do Is Dream' by Boudleaux Bryant, perf. by The Everly Brothers; 'Creole Love Call' by Duke Ellington, perf. by Duke Ellington and his Famous Orchestra; 'Tallahassie Lassie' by Frank Slay, Bob Crewe, Frederick Picariello, perf. by Freddy Cannon; music from HIGH NOON by Dimitri Tiomkin, choreo: Lindsay Dolen, s: Clive Derbyshire, Malcolm Campbell, Phil Chapman (m), boom op.: Simon Dart, Dolby cnslt: John lies, chief dub. mix: John Hayward, s. effs. ed: Janet Lawson, dialect coach: Joan Washington, loc. m: Kate Power, Linda Buxton, cast: John Hubbard, Ros Hubbard, cost: Dinah Collin, a. cost: Kate O'Farrell, make- up: Morag Ross (Julie Christie), Ann Brodie (Donald Sutherland), make- up dsgn: Kathy Carruth, titles dsgn: Linda Sherwood-Page, opticals: Studio 51, ADR engr: Paul Whitmarsh, Foley art.: Pauline Griffiths, Jacky Austin, Jenny Lee-Wright, p.dsgn.: Tony Burrough, original painting: Sue Dinkley, gaffer: Joe Ryan, elec: Joe Judge, Laurie Dodson, Dave Seaton, Janet Lawson, stunt co-ord: Gerry Crampton, action vehicle co-ord: Tony Sankey, sp. effs: Ace Effects, cnstr. m: Mark Collison, stunts: Helen Caldwell (swimmer), Roy Alon (driver), stunt double for Donald Sutherland: Richard Hammatt, stand-in for Julie Christie: Maura Dillon, stand-in for Donald Sutherland: James Linton, a. to p: Sophie Thomley, p.a: Angela Combeer, armourer: Brian Halliday, stills: Simon Mein, unit publicists: Corbett & Keene Ltd, distr: BBC TV.
    Art directionWALLEY, David
    Costume designCOLLIN, Dinah
    O'FARRELL, Kate
    Production designBURROUGH, Tony
    Genre/CategoryTV Film Drama

    TitleWIDOWS PEAK
    Production companyRank Organisation
    Fine Line Features
    Jo Manuel Productions
    SponsorBritish Screen
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerMANUEL, Jo
    SEAWARD, Tracey
    DirectorIRVIN, John
    Script/AdaptationLEONARD, Hugh
    PhotographyROWE, Ashley
    Sound recordingLINDSAY, Peter
    ROSS-TURNER, Mike
    EditingTANNER, Peter
    Executive producerWHITE, Michael
    Music composerDAVIS, Carl
    Songs'I'll Be Your Sweetheart' by H Dacre; 'The Sweetheart of Sigma Chi' by
    F Vemor, B Stokes, perf. by Chris Bramwell; 'Mother Machree' by Rida
    Young, perf. by Donal Byrne.
    CastMia Farrow (Miss O'Hare), Joan Plowright (Mrs Doyle Counihan/Mrs DC), Natasha Richardson (Edwina Broom), Adrian Dunbar (Godfrey Doyle), Jim Broadbent (Clancy), Anne Kent (Miss Grubb), John Kavanagh (Canon), Rynagh O'Grady (Maddie), Gerard McSorley (Gaffney), Michael James Ford (1st Lieutenant Rokesby), Garrett Keogh (Grogan), Britta Smith (Mrs Colgan), Sheila Flitton (Mrs Mulrooney), Marie Conmee (Mrs Lawless), Ingrid Craigie (Mrs Purdieu), Doreen Keogh (Mrs Buckley), Eileen Colgan (Mrs Fogarty), Oliver Maguire (KilKelly), Phelim Drew (FX), Jasmine Russell (Bridgie), Tina Kellegher (Dolores), David Ganly (Liam), Nick Grennell (compere), Don Wycherley (rural lout), Malcolm Douglas (townie), Clive Geraghty (garda super), Pauline Cadell (Sister Teresa), Rachael Dowling (tall thin girl), Aisling Flitton (Mary Lucy), Maria McDermottroe (penitent), Donal Byrne (singer), Kevin O'Farrell (O'Farrell), Michael Casey (pianist). I
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration101
    Footage9107
    Format35mm
    Release date1993
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryIn 1926 the small rural Ireland community of Kilshannon is mainly inhabited by widows led by Mrs Doyle Counihan, who is also known as Mrs DC. Mrs Doyle's son Godfrey is being treated by the local dentist Clancy, who tells him that he is in love with Catherine O'Hare, a spinster who is strongly anti-English. Mrs Doyle warns her against too hasty a decision about marrying Clancy. An American, Edwina Brown, the widow of an Englishman, comes to live in the ge. As she is getting to know the other widows following a visit to the cinema to see Cecil B DeMille's THE TEN COMMANDMENTS, Catherine, mistakenly thinking Edwina is English, makes a strong outburst against the English. Godfrey meets her again, having originally tried to help her when one of the tyres on her car got a puncture. He had warned her against his mother's excessive desire to control events in the ge. Mrs Doyle encourages her son to court Edwina. They go to a dance together, but Edwina and Catherine get into an argument over which of them is a prize winner and a general melee develops. Thereafter, the women become openly hostile to each other. Edwina's maid, Maddie, reports on Edwina's life to the widows. While on a picnic with Godfrey, a woman, whom Edwina thinks is Catherine, releases the car's handbrake and it nearly runs over the couple. As Mrs Doyle tries to discourage Catherine from continuing the feud, she tells Mrs Doyle that Edwina is not what she seems. At a regatta, Edwina forces Catherine's boat on the rocks and later accepts Godfrey's marriage proposal. When a drunken English soldier, 1st Lieutenant Rokesby, arrives and professes to know Edwina, Catherine befriends him in order to find out more about her. That evening, Edwina discovers that her maid, Maddie, has been rifling through her correspondence and locks her in a room until she reveals details of Catherine's background. The Canon reads Edwina and Godfrey's banns at mass. Clancy receives an anonymous letter and Catherine admits to him that she had an illegitimate daughter years earlier. Catherine arrives at the Doyles' during lunch. She reveals to them that an English soldier was the father of her daughter born thirty years earlier. Under pressure from the women of thevillage, she allowed her baby to be adopted. As compensation, she was allowed live rent-free in the part of the ge known as Widow's Peak. She tells them that she eventually discovered that the baby had died. Edwina leaves when Catherine says that she is an impostor and calls her a prostitute who is looking for a rich man. On the following day, Edwina takes her luggage and is seen by the Doyles leaving on Catherine's boat. When the boat is found drifting the next day, Catherine is not on the boat as Edwina is rescued from it. After Edwina is brought back to Kilshannon, Mrs Doyle publicly denounces her as a murderess. As the police search the river for Catherine's body, Edwina is held in police custody and is to be removed to Limerick garda station. As the hysteria against Edwina is being whipped up by Mrs Doyle, she addresses a public meeting which is attended by the Minister for Agriculture and the Canon, who describes Catherine as a saint. Catherine reappears during the meeting and frightens them all. She explains to the police that she had gone to see her sister and announces that she intends going to live with her. Mrs Doyle is visited by a solicitor, Gaffney, who is representing Edwina. He tells Mrs Doyle that Edwina is suing her and the other women who denounced Edwina as a murderess for defamation of character. Mrs Doyle collapses from the shock. That night, Godfrey tries to leave Kilshannon by boat, but it sinks near the ge. On an ocean liner, Catherine and Clancy, now married, and Edwina and Rokesby, discuss the events at Kilshannon. It is revealed that Edwina is in fact Catherine's daughter and that the whole episode was organised by them to get revenge on the women of the village who separated Catherine from her daughter. (V).
    NoteSight and Sound 1994:5 identifies Prudence Farrow as co-producer of this
    film, though this name does not appear in the on-screen credits. Extracts
    from Cecil B DeMille's THE TEN COMMANDMENTS (USA 1923) are
    included in this film. Filmed on location in Inistoige, Co Kilkenny, Ireland.
    ReferenceSI 12/9/1993:15.
    DistributorRank (GB)
    KeywordsRural Ireland
    Widows
    1920s
    LocationInistoige
    Kilkenny
    Production creditsp.c: The Rank Organisation/Fine Line Features. With the participation of British Screen. A Jo Manuel Production. A John Irvin Film, p: Jo Manuel, co-p: Tracey Seaward, exec. p: Michael White, co-exec. p: Steven D Mackler, Julian Schlossberg, d: John Irvin, sc: Hugh Leonard from his own story, sc. super: Pat Ramblut, dop: Ashley Rowe, c. op: Kevin Scott, focus puller: Alan Butler: clapper loader: Jo Gibney, grip: Luke Quigley, 2nd unit c: Des Whelan, Shane O'Neill, 2nd unit focus: Dave Fitgerald, Bob Bridges, Matthew Skinner, 2nd unit trainee: Darryl Byrne, 1st a.d: Martin O'Malley, 2nd a.d: Michael Walsh, Robert Quinn, art d: David Wilson, Richard Elton, art dept. co-ord: Christine Austin, a. art d: Ned McLoughlin, ed: Peter Tanner, 1st a. ed: William Pamell, 2nd a. ed: Tracy Gallagher, p.dsgn.: Leo Austin, m/m.c: Carl Davis, harmonica perf. by: Harry Pitch, orch: Nic Raine, orch. c: Paul Wing, m. ed: Andrew Glen, songs: 'I'll Be Your Sweetheart' by H Dacre; 'The Sweetheart of Sigma Chi' by F Vemor, B Stokes, perf. by Chris Bramwell; 'Mother Machree' by Rida Young, perf. by Donal Byrne, s: Peter Lindsay, Mike Ross Turner (m.), boom op.: Mervyn Moore, s. mix/s. ed: Les Wiggins, Archie Ludski (dial), a.s. ed: Terry Busby, a. dial. ed: Jeremy Child, Foley ed: Rocky Phelan, dub. mix: John Hayward, mix. ed: Andrew Glen, p. co-ord: Fiona Traynor, p.m: Gemma Fallon, loc. m: Don Geraghty, a. loc. m: Grania 0'Shannon, loc. a: Noel Byrne, cast: Nuala Moiselle, cost: Consolata Boyle, ward. mistress: Rhona McGuirke, a. ward: Ann Stokes, Anne O'Halloran Sheila Fahey, chief make-up: Lois Burwell, Moma Ferguson, chief hair: Stevie Hall, Dee Corcoran, dial. coach: Brendan Gunn, sp. effs: Gerry Johnston, props buyer: Jim Harkin, props master: Nuala McKeman, standy-by props: Derek Wallace, Noel Walsh, dressing props: Rene Knol, Daragh Lewis, Owen Monahan, Frank O'Shea, trainee props: Triona Coen, titles/opticals: General Screen Enterprises, Foley art.: Jean Sheffield, Jenny Lee- Wright, stunt co-ord: Marc Boyle, stunts: Dominic Hewitt, Alan Walsh, Paul Kelly, Donal O'Farrell, p. accnt: Paul Myler, cnstr. m: Tommy Bassett, stills: Jonathan Hession, unit publicist: Gerry Lundberg, publicity: Lindsay Stride DDA, Brian Bruton, Rank Film Distributors Ltd, GB distr: Rank.
    Art directionWILSON, David
    ELTON, Richard
    Costume designBOYLE, Consolata
    Production designAUSTIN, Leo
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Rural Drama
    Romance

    TitlePRIEST
    Production companyBBC
    Electric Pictures
    Polygram Filmed Entertainment
    Country of originGreat Britain
    ProducerFABER, George
    WARD, Josephine
    DirectorBIRD, Antonia
    Script/AdaptationMcGOVERN, Jimmy
    PhotographyTAMMES, Fred
    Sound recordingCARTWRIGHT, Dennis
    EditingSPIVEY, Susan
    Executive producerSHIVAS, Mark
    Associate producerNEWBURY, Joanna
    Music composerROBERTS, Andy
    Songs'Green Green Grass of Home' by Cathy Patterson; 'Ay Paloma' by Mauricio Venegas, 'Guiagenita' (trad), arrg: Mauricio Venegas; 'Great Balls of Fire' by Otis Blackwell, Jack Hammer; 'He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother' by Bob Russell, Bobby Scott; 'The Fields of Athenry' by Pete St John; 'Googy the Liverpool Duck' by Don Woods; 'Anyone Who Had a Heart' by Burt Bacharach, Hal David, perf. by Dusty Springfield; 'You Never Walk Alone' by Richard Rogers, Oscar Hammerstein; 'Let's All Join Together' by Andy Ford.
    CastLinus Roache (Father Greg Pilkington), Tom Wilkinson (Father Matthew Thomas), Cathy Tyson (Maria Kerrigan), Robert Carlyle (Graham), James Ellis (Father Ellerton), Lesley Sharp (Mrs Unsworth), Robert Pugh (Mr Unsworth), Christine Tremarco (Lisa Unsworth), Paul Barber (Charlie), Rio Fanning (bishop). Jimmy Coleman (funeral director), Bill Dean (altar boy), Gilly Coman {Ellie Molloy}, Fred Pearson {Patrick}, Jimmy Gallagher{Micky Molloy), Tony Booth (Tommy), Charley Wilde, Euan Blair (Tommy's children), Giuseppe Murphy (man in lift), Kim Johnson (Mrs Gobshite), Keith Cole (Mr Gobshite), Adrian Luty (Jehovah's witness), Mandy Walsh, Stephanie Roscoe, Ann Haydn-Edwards, Mike Haydn {guests at wake}, Bobby Martino (Bobby), Rupert Pearson (man on skateboard), Victoria Arnold (girl in coNíessional), Gareth Potsig (boy car thief). Ray Williams (boy with stutter). Valeric Lilley (Sister Kevin), Kevin Jones (boy at beach), Michael Ananins (charge sergeant), Mickey Poppins (reporter), Marsha Thomason (nurse), Matyelok Gibbs (housekeeper), John Bennett (Father Redstone), Mauricio Venegas (leader, Chilean band).
    ColourEastmancolor
    SoundDolby Stereo
    Duration109
    Footage9768
    Format35mm
    Release date1995
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryAn elderly priest uses a large crucifix as an improvised battering ram to charge at a stained-glass window in the bishop's house as the bishop looks on. Fr Greg Pilkington, a young Catholic priest, is appointed to a working-class Liverpool parish after the elderly Irish priest has been retired because of his eccentric behaviour. Greg shares a house with Fr Matthew Thomas, who lives with their black housekeeper, Maria Kerrigan. In his first sermon, Greg preaches that individuals should take responsibility for their actions and not to blame society for their sins. The socially-radical Matthew disagrees with him and criticises abuses of political and religious power. In turn, Greg objects when he sees that Matthew sings in a karaoke bar which he regards as demeaning religion. When he insists, and against Matthew's advice, on visiting homes on a housing estate, all doors, except those of two Jehovah's Witnesses, are slammed in their faces. At an Irishman's wake, Greg tells the drinkers that he will hear confessions in the morning or even in the yard right then. The drinkers moan at his comment and the widow, Ellie Molloy, sings 'The Fields of Athenry' as the mourners become morose. Later, Greg dresses in civilian clothes and goes to a gay bar where he meets and goes to bed with a young man, Graham. They have sex, but Greg leaves quickly when Graham tells him that he thinks he is a Catholic. A young girl. Lisa Unsworth, tells him in confession that her father is sexually abusing her. After he advises her to tell her father to stop abusing her, her father warns Greg to mind his own business. Mr Unsworth also goes to see Greg in confession and tries to justify his abuse of his daughter as being somehow natural and what all fathers want to do to their children. During a class he is teaching on relationships. Lisa gets a fit and Greg takes her home. While having tea with Lisa and her mother, Mr Unsworth arrives. Greg is disturbed and feels helpless when he is unable to intervene as Lisa's father brushes her hair affectionately. Greg drops hints to both Lisa's mother and to one of Lisa's teachers about the abuse, but he is distressed at being unable to break the confidentiality of the confessional when they fail to recognise the nature of his hints. He rings Graham and they meet. As he tries to get Lisa's father to stop the abuse, he relies more and more on Graham. They meet and kiss on a beach. When Graham tries to take communion during mass, however, Greg refuses to give it to him and Graham angrily leaves the church. Greg goes to see the retired priest who advises him to leave the priesthood, something, he tells him, he would have done himself as a young man but he didn't want to upset his mother. By the time she died, he says, it was too late for him to start a new life outside the church. Greg shouts at a cross calling for divine intervention and he denounces the secrecy of the confessional when it protects evil. Mrs Unsworth, a community activist, arrives home from a meeting which Greg attended and finds her husband raping Lisa. As Greg is explaining the stations of the cross to a group of children, Mrs Unsworth appears and denounces him for not stopping the abuse. Greg goes to see Graham but he is with another man. He leaves and Graham follows him. Graham tells him that he loves him but as they embrace in his car the police arrive and arrest them. Greg pleads guilty to a charge of public indecency. A tabloid newspaper reports on his conviction and he tries to commit suicide. The bishop visits him in hospital and tells him to leave his diocese. Graham also visits him in hospital, but there is now a coldness between them. Charlie, with whom he worked out in the gym, arrives and denounces Greg. Matthew keeps pressing Greg to say mass again, but he fears the parishioners' response. Greg decides to succumb to the bishop's demand and leave the parish. Before he leaves Liverpool he goes to the Unsworths' flat to apologise to Lisa, but Mrs Unsworth slams the door on him. He is reassigned to a remote country parish. Meanwhile in Liverpool, Matthew gives a sermon denouncing the church's hierarchy and its abuse of power. The bishop, who hears the sermon, leaves and later orders that Matthew's car be taken away. In the country parish, Greg is met with hostility by Fr Redstone and his housekeeper, who know of the scandal. Redstone tells him he will be paid one pound for every mass he says and not to go out after dark. Matthew arrives and tells Greg that he has only broken the man-made rule of celibacy. Greg admits to Matthew that he loves Graham, but he regards such a relationship as sinful. That night, Greg and Matthew pretend that they are making love as a means of disturbing Redstone. The following day, Greg leaves the parish and goes back to Liverpool where he intends to say mass jointly with Matthew. One of the parishioners challenges Greg's right to say mass and he and most of me congregation leave. An argument develops between Greg and another parishioner over the bible's denunciation of men sleeping together. With a diminished congregation, the two priests say mass. Alone amongst the congregation. Lisa accepts communion from Greg, and as he cries at her for giveness of him, they embrace. (V).
    NoteMade on location in Liverpool, Manchester and London, England.
    ReferenceS&S Mar 1995:48.
    DistributorElectric Pictures (GB)
    KeywordsIrish in Britain
    Priests
    Catholicism
    LocationLondon
    Liverpool
    Manchester
    Production creditsp.c: BBC/electric Pictures/Polygram Filmed Entertainment, p: George Faber, Josephine ward, exec. p: Mark Shivas, assoc. p: Joanna Newbery, d: Antonia Bird, sc: Jimmy McGovern, sc. super: Cecilia Coleshaw, sc. ed: Anna Price, dop: Fred Tammes, focus puller: Nick Tumbull, Robert Shipsey (2nd unit), clapper loader: Alwyn Davies, key grip: John Rundle, grip: Keith Elliott, a. grip: Steve Martin, 2nd unit c: Nigel Slatter, 1st a.d: Brett Fallis, 2nd a.d: Jamie Annett, Amanda Neal, Debbie Slater (2nd unit), 3rd a.d: Fiona Murray, p.dsgn.: Raymond Langhorn, art d: Sue Pow, a. dsgn: Debbie Reynolds, ed: Susan Spivey, a. ed: Maria Walker, 2nd a. ed: Keith Ngcobo, m: Andy Roberts, songs: 'Green Green Grass of Home' by Cathy Patterson; 'Ay Paloma' by Mauricio Venegas, 'Guiagenita' (trad), arrg: Mauricio Venegas; 'Great Balls of Fire' by Otis Blackwell, Jack Hammer; 'He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother' by Bob Russell, Bobby Scott; 'The Fields of Athenry' by Pete St John; 'Googy the Liverpool Duck' by Don Woods; 'Anyone Who Had a Heart' by Burt Bacharach, Hal David, perf. by Dusty Springfield; 'You Never Walk Alone' by Richard Rogers, Oscar Hammerstein; 'Let's All Join Together' by Andy Ford, s: Dennis Cartwright, boom op.: Kate Morath, Steve Thomas, dub. mix: Aad Wirtz, Adrian Rhodes, Hugh Strain, s. ed: Roger Mitchell, Mark Auguste, a. dub. ed: Jan Cholawo, Gordon Brown, Derek Lomas, cast: Janet Goddard, cost: Jill Taylor, a. cost: Jane Hamnett, dressers: Christopher Bradshaw, Sarah Moor, make-up: Ann Humphreys, a. make-up: Carol Galley, p. co-ord: Frances Graham, Mary Hare, p. exec: Geoffrey Paget, p.m: Paul Judges, loc. m: Lisa Gravelle, Donna Rolf, Ann Harrison-Baxter, Bruce Abrahams (2nd unit), post.p. super: Ruth Mayorcas, titles/opticals: General Screen Enterprsies, children's choreo: Colette Fenlon-Byatt, fight arrg: Gareth Milne, p. buyer: Lena Kelsall, p. operations super: Harry McClusky, p. operatives: Mike Hennessey, David Jackson, p. runner: Fiona Murray, contracts exec: Maggie Anson, stills: John Jefford, Nicky Johnston, GB distr: electric Pictures.
    Art directionPOW, Sue
    Costume designTAYLOR, Jill
    Production designLANGHORN, David
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleMAN OF NO IMPORTANCE, A
    Production companyMajestic Films
    BBC Films
    Little Bird Productions
    Country of originGreat Britain
    Ireland
    ProducerCAVANDISH, Jonathan
    MURRAY, Craig
    DirectorKRISHNAMMA, Suri
    Script/AdaptationDEVLIN, Barry
    Sound recordingSTEPHENSON, David
    EditingFREEMAN, David
    Executive producerMITCHELL, James
    Music composerWILSON, Allan
    Music performanceLondon Filmworks Orchestra
    Songs'Let's Do It (Let's Fall in Love)' by Cole Porter, perf. by
    Eartha Kitt; 'Make the World Go Away' by Hank Cochraan, perf by
    Ray Price; 'Love Letters' by Edward Hayman, Victor Young, perf.
    Kitty Lester; 'Mambo Italiano' by Bob Men-ill, perf. by Rosemary
    Clooney; 'Can't Get Used to Losing You' by D Pomus, M Schuman
    perf. by Andy Williams; 'Theme for Young Lovers' by/perf. by Percy
    Faith; 'Till' by C Sigman, C Danvers, perf. by Percy Faith.
    CastAlbert Finney (Alfie Byrne), Brenda Fricker (Lily Byrne), Michael Gambon (Camey), Tara Fitzgerald (Adele Rice), Rufus Sewell (Robbie Fay), Patrick Malahide (Carson), Anna Manahan (Mrs Grace), Joe Pilkington (Ernie Lally), Brendan Conroy (Rasher Hynn), Pat Killalea (Phil Curran), John Killalea (Jack Curran) Joan O'Hara (Mrs Crowe) Eileen Conroy (Mrs Curtin), Eileen Reid (Mrs Rock), David Kelly (Baldy), Mick Lally (Father Kenny), Stuart Dunne (John), Joe Savino (Breton-Beret), Paudge Behan (Kitty), Dylan Tighe (landlady's son), Enda Oates (garda). Jimmy Keogh (treasurer), Catherine Byrne (woman at canal), Maureen Egan (Mrs Dunne), Paddy Ashe (Mr Ryan), Pascal Perry (Mr Gorman), Ingrid Craigie (waitress), Damien Kaye (Foley), Jonathan Rhys-Myers, Vincent Walsh, Paul Roe (young men).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourEastmancolor
    SoundDigital Stereo
    Duration99
    Footage8890
    Format35mm
    Release date1995
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryIn Dublin in 1963, Alfie Byme, a bus conductor, is staging a production of Oscar Wilde's Salome in a church hall. He asks Adele Rice, a passenger on the no. 34 bus on which he works, to play the title role, and bus driver Robbie to play opposite her. At rehearsals, Camey, a butcher, objects to being cast as King Herod and tells Alfie's sister. Lily, that he regards the play as blasphemous. She agrees to help him sabotage the production. Alfie's friend, Baldy, tells him that Camey is leading a campaign against the play, but Alfie insists on continuing with the production. During rehearsals, Adele collapses in tears and tells Alfie that she is pregnant. Alfie asks in confession what Adele's boyfriend should do. The priest identifies Alfie from his voice and wrongly assumes that Alfie is the child's father. Annoyed, Alfie leaves the church to go to see Adele. He arrives as Adele and her boyfriend are making love. That night, Alfie puts on make-up and dresses in a cape and goes to a gay bar. He asks a young man. Kitty, for an embrace, but Kitty and his friends attack and rob him. Camey and Lily see Alfie being brought home by a policeman. Alfie's homosexuality becomes publicly known and he attempts suicide by jumping into the canal, but there isn't enough water in it to drown him. At work the next day, Carson, Alfie's homophobic boss, tells him that Robbie asked to be transferred to another route. While Camey is also hostile to him, his passengers give him their support. Adele, who is migrating to England, wishes him well as she says goodbye to him. When he returns to the church and is contemplating events there, Robbie suddenly arrives and declares that he wants to re-join the production. He tells Alfie that Carson removed him from the bus route against his will. The two men read a poem by Oscar Wilde. (V).
    NoteIR Rel 23/3/1995 (premiere Dublin); 21/4/1995 (general release).
    ReferenceFl No. 45:30, Feb-Mar 1995:30; IT 21/4/1995:15; SP 26/3/1995:31.
    DistributorClarence Pictures/Winston Film Distributors (GB)
    Clarence Pictures (IE)
    Keywords1960s
    Bus Conductors
    Amateur Dramatics
    Theatre
    Oscar Wilde
    'Salome'
    Homosexuality
    LocationDublin City
    Production creditsp.c: Majestic Films. In association with BBC Films presents A Little Bird Production, p: Jonathan Cavendish, Craig Murray (London), exec p: James Mitchell, d: Suri Krishnamma, sc: Barry Devlin, sc. super: Catherine Morris, a.d: Lisa Mulcahy, Suzanne Nicell, Mary Gough steadicam op: John ward, ed: David Freeman, art d: Frank Flood dresser: Fiona Daly, m.c: Allan Wilson, orch: Nic Raine, m. co-ord: Denis Fine, m.p: The London Filmworks Orchestra, songs/music extracts: 'Let's Do It (Let's Fall in Love)' by Cole Porter, perf. by Eartha Kitt; 'Make the World Go Away' by Hank Cochraan, perf by Ray Price; 'Love Letters' by Edward Hayman, Victor Young, perf. Kitty Lester; 'Mambo ItalianO'by Bob Men-ill, perf. by Rosemary Clooney; 'Can't Get Used to Losing You' by D Pomus, M Schuman perf. by Andy Williams; 'Theme for Young Lovers' by/perf. by Percy Faith; 'Till' by C Sigman, C Danvers, perf. by Percy Faith, dub ed: Nick Adams, dial. ed: Tim Hands, ADR mix: Mick Boggins, Ted Swanscott, Foley ed: Mary Finlay, s. mix: David Stephenson, re-rd. mix: Paul Hamblin, p. co-ord: Fran Byrne, p.m: Kathy Sykes, loc m: Howard Gibbins, Jill Dempsey, cast: Michelle Guish, cost super- Annie O'Halloran, Ger Scully, make-up: Ken Jennings, hair: Bernie Dooley, sp. effs: Gerry Johnson, title dsgn: Chris Allies, titles/opticals: Peerless Camera Co Ltd, Foley art.: John Fuel, Julie Ackerton stunt co-ord: Martin Grace, GB distr: Clarence Pictures through Winston Film Distributors; IR distr: Clarence Pictures.
    Art directionFLOOD, Frank
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Comedy

    TitleOUTSIDER, THE
    Production companyCinematic Arts B.V.
    Paramount Pictures
    Country of originHolland
    DirectorLURASCHI, Tony
    Script/AdaptationLURASCHI, Tony
    PhotographyARONOVICH, Ricardo
    Sound recordingBATS, Bernard
    GILMORE, Dean
    EditingKELBER, Catherine
    Music composerTHORNE, Ken
    Songs'Dark Is the Colour of My True Love's Hair', 'Fisherman, Ship in Full
    Sail, Out on the Ocean' arrg. and perf. on the penny-whistle and flute by
    Matt Molloy, songs: 'Fill Fill a Run o' (pub song) perf. by Mary Black;
    'Bold Fenian Men' by Peadar Keamey, P J Ryan, perf. by W Campbell,
    J Dunkeriy (banjo); 'Finbar's Song' by and perf. by Bosco Hogan;
    'Bumble Bee, Bumble Bee' by and perf. by John Lee Hooker.
    CastCraig Wasson (Michael Flaherty), Sterling Hayden (Seamus Flaherty), Patricia Quinn (Siobhan), Niall O'Brien (Emmet Donovan), T P McKenna (John Russell), Niall Toibfn ('the Farmer'), Frank Grimes (Tony Coyle), Elizabeth Begley (Ivy Cochran), Bosco Hogan (Finbar (Donovan), Ray McAnally (MacWhirter), Jimmy [J G] Devlin (Sean Tweeny), Joe Dowling (Pat), Aiden Grennell (Hanlan), Joseph McPartland (Joe McDermott), Joe Lynch (Sean Thompson), Desmond Cave (trial prosecutor/Kevin McCann), Allan Cuthbertson (Billy Stanley), David Collings (Major Nigel Percival), Geoffrey Palmer (Colonel Wyndham), Paul Antrim (Father Jameson), Conal Keamy (Ted), John Murphy (Mr Flynn), Des Nealon (Colonel O'Darell), Edward Byrne, Bill Foley, (IRA Council members), Martin Dempsey (van driver). Pat Leavy (Mary Russell), Derek Young (UDR sergeant), Charles Mitchell, James Greeley (newscasters). Tony Phipps (Ivor), Martin Short (boy leader), Annie Dalton (Granny), Derek Lord (farmer's 1st man), Gerry Alexander (tough British sergeant), Emmet Bergin (Special Branch officer), Patricia Albrecht (Ginny), Avril Gentles (Mrs Flaherty), John Seitz (Mr Flaherty) John Paul Leeming (Michael Flaherty, aged 11), Pat Abemathy, Gabriel Byrne, Dennis Cahill, Robert Carrickford, Anita Clifford, Conor Evans, Gerard Flynn, Mikey Garland, Aiden Gibson, Marcella Grimes, Garret Keogh, Julie Hamilton, John Malloy, lan Marshall, Ray Murphy, Paul Nolan, Gerrard O'Brien, Troy O'Brien, Paul O'Reilley, Joe Pilkington, Jim Reid, Ann Rowan, Jonathan Ryan, Vincent Smith.
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    Soundsound
    Duration128
    Footage11484
    Format35mm
    Release date1979
    SummaryIn Detroit in 1973, a disillusioned Irish-American Vietnam-War veteran, Michael Flaherty, who is influenced by his grandfather, Seamus Flaherty's, stories of fighting for the IRA during the Irish War of Independence, comes to Ireland to join the Provisional IRA. He engages in an attack in County Monaghan in the Republic of Ireland. The Proves then send him to Northern Ireland without much regard for his well-being, anticipating the financial benefit in America should he be killed fighting for them. Michael and another IRA man. Emmet, kill Stanley, a kidnapped member of the Northern Ireland judiciary. In the Short Strand area of Belfast, 'The Farmer', commander of Belfast's C Brigade of the IRA, keeps Michael in hiding and does not use him in offensive actions. Colonel Wyndham of the Grenadier Guards is nervous at Michael's presence in the city and orders increased military patrols. A petrol-bomb thrower, a nephew of Michael's landlady, Mrs Cochran, and a British soldier are killed in a night-time incident. In order to protect an informer, the British Army try to encourage the IRA to kill Michael, planting the notion that he is a traitor to their cause. As a means of maintaining pressure on the IRA, Finbar, Emmet's visually-impaired brother, is arrested and interrogated by detectives. Rejecting attempts to convince him that Michael is an informer, Emmet names the real informer as John Russell, an IRA courier. Meanwhile, The Farmer has come to believe that another IRA man, John Coyle, is the informer. He is sent on a final mission to kill Michael. Coy Ie's rifle jams as he is about to shoot Michael, and Michael kills him, escaping afterwards on a ferry from Lame. Following information from Russell, the Army lay siege to the headquarters of C Brigade. Back in Detroit, as Seamus nears death, he tells the astonished Michael that Russell was a collaborator when he knew him. Michael rings Siobhan, Mrs Cochran's niece, with whom he fell in love but failed to develop the relationship, and then smashes the telephone booth in a rage at what has happened. (V).
    NoteIR Rel July 1979 (Dublin). The exterior scenes set in Northern Ireland were filmed in Dublin.
    ReferenceSI 29/7/1979:9; MFB 1980:10.
    MPG
    DistributorCIC (GB)
    KeywordsTroubles
    Republicanism
    Nationalism
    Irish-Americans
    LocationDublin
    Production creditsp.c: Cinematic Arts B.V./Paramount Pictures, d: Tony Luraschi, sc: Luraschi from the novel The Outsider (London: New English Library/Times Mirror, 1980); USA title of novel The Heritage of Michael Flaherty by Colin Leinster, c: Ricardo Aronovitch, c. op: Philippe Brun, John Marotzke (Detroit), p. super: Philippe Modave, Barry Blackmore (Detroit), p. co-ord: Giorgio Gentilli, p.m: Seamus Byrne, Arthur Steckler (Detroit), loc. co-ord: Cathy Handleman, unit m: Ginette Mejinsky, a.d: Barry Blackmore, Bernard Parrel, Robert Dwyer Joyce, Terrance M Sheeran (Detroit), ed: Catherine Kelber, m/m.c: Ken Thorne, a. m: 'Dark Is the Colour of My True Love's hair', 'Fisherman, Ship in Full Sail, Out on the Ocean' arrg. and perf. on the penny-whistle and flute by Matt Molloy, songs: 'Fill Fill a Run O'(pub song) perf. by Mary Black; 'Bold Fenian Men' by Peadar Keamey, P J Ryan, perf. by W Campbell, J Dunkeriy (banjo); 'Finbar's Song' by and perf. by Bosco Hogan; 'Bumble Bee, Bumble Bee' by and perf. by John Lee Hooker, art d: Franco Fumagalli, set dec: Tim Dewart (Detroit), chief painter: Ivano Todeschi, sp. effs: Gerry Johnson, Peter Johnke (Detroit), cost: Judy Dolan, make-up: Anna Dryhurst, Alien Weisinger (Detroit), s: Bernard Bats, Dean Gilmore (Detroit), s. ed: Jean Francois Naudon, s. re-rd: Gerry Humphreys, Army liaison: captain Brendan McCann, garda liaison: Inspector O'Neill, p.a: Patrick Danon, Nicholas Gormanston, GB distr: CIC.
    Art directionFUMAGALLI, Franco
    Costume designDOLAN, Judy
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Thriller

    Series/Newsreel titleFAMOUS MUSIC MELODIES NO 2
    Episode/Item titleSongs Of Ireland
    Production companyJames A Fitzpatrick Pictures
    Mercury Booth Grainge Film Service
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerFITZPATRICK, James A.
    DirectorFITZPATRICK, James A.
    Script/AdaptationFITZPATRICK, James A.
    Songs'Come Back to Erin', 'Killarney', 'Peggy and her low-back car', 'Widow Machree', 'Rory O'More', 'Believe Me'.
    CastJames Knight (Rory O'More), Peggy Shaw (Peggy).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsil
    Footage1000
    Format35mm
    Release date1925
    SummaryRomantic stories illustrating songs as they were performed from the
    cinema stage. The settings include the lakes of Killamey.
    NoteGB Rel Feb 1926.
    ReferenceBio 5/11/1925:45.
    Gifford 08005: Nov 1925.
    DistributorFilm Distributors (GB)
    Production creditsp.c: James A Fitzpatrick Pictures for Mercury Booth Grainge Film Service,
    p/d/sc: James A Fitzpatrick, songs: 'Come Back to Erin', 'Killamey',
    'Peggy and her low-back car', 'Widow Machree', 'Rory O'More',
    'Believe Me', GB distr: Film Distributors.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleABIE'S IRISH ROSE
    Production companyParamount Famous Lasky Corp
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorFLEMING, Victor
    Script/AdaptationFURTHMAN, Jules
    PhotographyROSSON, Harold
    EditingWARREN, Eda
    Associate producerSCHULBERG, B.P.
    Songs'Rosemary', 'Little Irish Rose' by J S Zamecnik, 'The Wearing of the Green' (trad.) by Dion Boucicault.
    CastCharles Rogers (Abie Levy), Nancy Can-oil (Rosemary Murphy), Jean
    Hersholt (Solomon Levy), J Farrell MacDonald (Patrick Murphy), Bernard
    Gorcey (Isaac Cohen), Ida Kramer (Mrs Isaac Cohen), Nick Cogley
    (Father John Whalen), Camillus Pretal (Rabbi Jacob Samuels), Rosa
    Rosanova (Sarah).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsil/soun
    Duration80
    Footage10471
    Format35mm
    Release date1929
    CopyLC
    SummaryDuring World War One, Abie Levy, a soldier in the American Expeditionary Force, is wounded in combat, and while convalescing in a hospital, meets Rosemary Murphy, who is in France singing for the troops. They fall in love and after returning to the USA they are married in an Episcopal church in Jersey City. Abie takes Rosemary home and introduces her to his father as Mrs Abraham Levy. When he presses to know her maiden name Abie says that it is Rosie Murpheski to disguise her Irish background. Mr Levy insists on Rabbi Samuels marrying them again. During the ceremony Mr Murphy arrives with Fr Whalen, who, according to Mr Murphy, baptised Rosie and, therefore, should also marry her, while his favoured suitor for her is Irishman Michael Magee. The couple are married for the third time, by the priest in a Catholic ceremony. Rosie and Abie are then disowned by both families, but are befriended by the Cohens. On Christmas Eve, the Cohens and Rabbi Samuels persuade Mr Levy to see his son and his new grandchildren, while Fr Whalen urges Mr Murphy to do the same. The visit of the parents to the Cohens begins acrimoniously, as the two men compete with each other over Christmas presents. However, when the new-bom twins are brought out, the grandparents relent, especially as one is called Patrick Joseph, after Rosemary's father, and the other is named Rebecca, after Abie's dead mother. Christmas Day sees complete reconciliation between the parents and their children. (V).
    NoteSound (talking sequences, sound effects and music score: via Movietone). Also silent, 10,187 ft. USA Rel 5/1/1929 (silent); 22/12/1929 (sound). Copy: LC (8,456 ft, reels 3-12). 'Use of added sound makes [ABIE'S IRISH ROSE] a different matter. Most of the serious religious material has been eliminated and the story treatment has been greatly lightened.' (Var 26/12/1929:27). The hugely successful play from which this film is adapted had already spawned a large number of imitative Irish-Jewish comedies before this film was made.
    ReferenceFD 22/4/1928; NYT 20/4/1929:26. AFI Cat 1921-1930:1
    DistributorParamount Pictures (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Jewish Americans
    Soldiers
    World War I
    Production creditsp.c: Paramount Famous Lasky Corp, assoc. p: B P Schulberg, d: Victor Fleming, titles: Anne Nichols, Herman Mankiewicz, Julian Johnson, adapt: Jules Furthman from the play Abie's Irish Rose: a Comedy in Three Acts by Anne Nichols (New York, 1924), c: Harold Rosson, ed: Eda Warren, songs: 'Rosemary', 'Little Irish Rose' by J S Zamecnik, 'The Wearing of the Green' (trad.) and by Dion Boucicault, distr: Paramount Pictures.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Theatrical Adaptation

    TitleWILDE
    Production companyPolyGram Production Companies
    B. Samuelson Entertainment Ltd
    NDF International Ltd
    Dove International Inc
    Pony Canyon Inc
    Pandora Film
    Capitol Films
    BBC Films
    SponsorGreenlight Fund
    Wall-to-Wall Television Ltd
    British Screen Finance Ltd
    European Script Fund
    National Lottery
    Arts Council of England
    Country of originGreat Britain
    USA
    Japan
    Germany
    ProducerSAMUELSON, Marc
    SAMUELSON, Peter
    O'HAGAN, NIck
    DirectorGIHERT, Brian
    Script/AdaptationMITCHELL, Julian
    PhotographyFUHRER, Martin
    Sound recordingGREENHORN, John
    EditingBRADSELL, Michael
    Executive producerYOSHIAKI, Michiyo
    VINER, Micheal
    RAFFIN, Deborah
    HOWDEN, Alan
    GRAHAM, Alex
    Music composerWISEMAN, Debbie
    Songs'Ah, Leave Me Not to Pine Alone' from The Pirates of Penzance by W.S. Gilbert, A.S. Sullivan
    Poems 'In Summer' and 'Two Loves' by Lord Alfred Douglas.
    CastStephen Fry (Oscar Wilde), Jude Law (Lord Alfred Douglas 'Bosie'), Vanessa Redgrave (Lady Speranza Wilde), Jennifer Ehle (Constance Lloyd), Wilde Gemma Jones (Lady Queensberry) Judy Partitt (Lady Mount-Temple), Michael Sheen (Robert 'Robbie' Ross), Zoe Wanamaker (Ada Leverson), Tom Wilkinson (Marquess of Queensberry), Joan Gruffudd (John Gray), Matthew Mills (Lionel Johnson), Jason Morell (Ernest Dowson), Peter Barkworth (Charles Gill) Robert Lang (C.O. Humphreys), Philip Locke (judge), David Westhead (Edward Carson), Jack Knight (Cyril Wilde, aged 4), Laurence Owen (Vyvyan Wilde), Benedict Sandiford (Alfred Wood), Mark Letheren (Charles Parker), Michael Fitzgerald (Alfred Taylor), Orlando Bloom (rentboy), Bob Sessions (mine owner), Mam Garcia Jones (Joseph May 1st miner), Jamie Leene, James S'Arcy (friends), Orlando Wells (undergraduate), Robin Kermode (George Alexander), Avril Elgar (Lady Bracknell), Jean Linslie (Miss Prism), Undrew Havill (Algernon), Biddy Hodson, JudiMaynard (Mrs Allonby), Hugh Munro (Chasuble), Michael Simkins (Lord Illingworth), James Vaughan (hotel manager), Richard Cubison (head waiter), Christine Moore (nanny), John Bleasdale (warder), Peter Forbes (detective), Peter Harding (doorman at Cadogan), Edward Laurie (cabman), Geoffrey Leesley (policeman), Colin MacLachlan (prison officers), Hywel Simons (reporter), Albert Welling (Arthur), Arthur Whybrow (doorkeeper ).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    SoundDigital Stereo
    Duration117
    Footage10510
    Format35mm
    Anamorphic
    Release date1997
    TX channelRTE 1
    TX date18/11/2005
    SummaryDuring his 1882 lecture tour of the USA, Oscar Wilde visits a silver mine in Colorado and flirts with the miners. Back in London he marries Constance Lloyd, who is soon pregnant with their first of two children. However,when Wilde is seduced by their Canadian houseguest Robbie Ross, he finally aacknowledges to himself that he is mainly attracted to men and starts making excuses to his wife so that he can spend time with Ross. His conscience is assuaged by the financial success of The Picture of Dorian Gray. At the triumphant first night of Lady Windermere's Fan Wilde is greatly smitten by Lord Alfred Douglas, known as 'Bosie', a student at Oxford. Learning that Bosie is being blackmailed by a male prostitute, Wilde volunteers his own lawyer to deal with the matter - and gets sexually involved with Bosie. Their affair quickly cools (Bosie is in constant need of new excitements) but they remain close friends and make frequent visits to Alfred Taylor's male brothel in Cleveland Street; Wilde finds himself picking up the bills not only for their meals and excursions together but also for Bosie's gambling debts and other expenses. They have many rows. Constance, meanwhile, tells Wilde's old friend Ada Leverson that she blames herself for driving her husband away by devoting herself to the children. Bosie tries to pacify his tyrannical father the Marquess of Queensberry by introducing him to Wilde in a restaurant; the peer seems charmed, but afterwards threatens to disinherit Bosie if he ever again meets Wilde. The relationship ends after one particularly intense row, but Wilde relents when he discovers that Bosie's brother Francis has died. Queensberry repeatedly tries to catch Bosie and Wilde together, without success. After failing to disrupt the first night of The Importance of Being Earnest he leaves a note at Wilde's club, calling him a 'posing Somdomite'. Scoffing at the misspelling, Bosie urges Wilde to sue Queensberry for libel. Ross (who has remained close to both Wilde and Constance) foresees disaster if the case comes to court, and is proved right when Queensberry's lawyer produces working-class boys from Taylor's brothel to testify against Wilde. Arrested and sentenced to two years' hard labour, Wilde overnight becomes a 'non-person' in London society. Despite the scandal Constance stands by him, visiting him in Reading Gaol and promising never to divorce him - on condition that he never sees Bosie again. On his release, Wilde hands the manuscript of De Profundis to Ada. Mourning Constance, who has died, he travels to France with Ross. His resolve to cut Bosie out of his life soon cracks, and he goes to Italy to find him. Closing captions explain that Wilde left Bosie for good three months later, and died in 1900. Bosie himself died in 1945. Ross died in 1918, and his ashes were reinterred alongside Wilde's in 1950.
    ReferenceS&S 1997 10:65
    PeopleOscar Wilde
    KeywordsIrish writers
    Playwrights
    Theatre
    Homosexuality
    Prison
    London
    Production creditsp.c.: PolyGram Production Companies, B. Samuelson Entertainment Ltd/NDF international Ltd, A Samuelson production In association with Dove international Inc/NDF international Ltd/Pony Canyon Inc/Pandora Film/Capitol Films and BBC Films With the participation of The Greenlight Fund Produced in association withWall-to-Wall Television Ltd. Developed with the assistance of British Screen Finance Ltd and the support of the European Script Fund Supported by the National Lottery through The Arts Council of England. exec.p.s: Michiyo Yoshizaki, Michael Viner, Deborah Raffin, Alan Howden, Alex Graham, producers: Marc Samuelson, Peter Samuelson, p: NickO'Hagan, p.co-ord.: Fiona Weir, p.m. (Spanish unit): MarkAlbela, unit manager: Marilla Elliott, unit p.m. (Spanish unit): GillyCase, loc.m.: Rachel Neale, Amanda Stevens, (Spanish unit): Julio Fernandez, production super: John Kay, assistant directors: Cordelia Hardy, Toby Sherborne, Andrew Woodhead, a.: Alex Hester Spanish unit: Manolo Santa Cruz, Rodrigo Ruiz, sc.super: Liz West, script co-ord.: Nicky Ryde, cast.: Sarah Bird US: Donald Paul Pen-trick, ADR voice: Louis Elman, screenplay: Julian Mitchell From Oscar Wilde by Richard Ellmann, dop: Martin Fuhrer, c.op.s: Mike Miller, a.: Richard Philpot, Philip Sindall, Steve Parker, Ben Davis, Spanish unit: Joan Benet, Technocraneop.: John Murray, sp.effs.: Bob Hollow, ed: Michael Bradsell, p.dsgn.: Maria Djurkovic, art d.: Martyn John, cost: Nic Ede, cost.super: Ali Goss, a. costume: Melissa Layton, make-up chief artist: Pat Hay, artist: Helen Johnson Spanish unit, a.: Sandra Mundi Eugenio Bagalia chief hair dresser/ wigs design: Stephen Rose, hair dressers: Liz Michie, Gerry Jones Spanish unit, a.: Arrate Garmendia, Saturnine Merino, title dsgn.: Cine Image Optical; General Screen Enterprises, music/music conductor/score orchestrations: Debbie Wiseman, orchestra leader: Perry Montague-Mason, strings co-ord.: Justin Pearson, music recording: Dick Lewzey, music cnslt: Roz Coils, Songs 'Ah, Leave Me Not to Pine Alone' from 'The Pirates of Penzance' by W.S. Gilbert, A.S. Sullivan, poems 'In Summer', 'Two Loves' by Lord Alfred Douglas, sound rec: Jim Greenhorn, re-rd.mix.s: Ray Merrin, Graham Daniel, super.s.ed.:Colin Miller, dial.ed.: Stefan Henrix, Foley ed: Martin Cantwell.
    Art directionJOHN, Martyn
    Costume designEDE, Nic
    Production designDJURKOVIC, Maria
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Biopic
    Period Drama

    TitleLUCKY IN LOVE
    Production companyPathe Exchange Inc
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorWEBB, Kenneth
    Script/AdaptationMARKEY, Gene
    SEYMOUR, James
    PhotographyTANNURA, Philip
    STRADLING, Harry
    Sound recordingASHDOWN, V.S.
    DELANEY, J.A.
    EditingPfitzenmeier, Edward
    Songs'Love is a Dreamer', 'For the Likes O' You and Me', 'When They Sing the
    'Wearing of the Green' in Syncopated Time' by Sam Stept, Bud Green.
    CastMorton Downey (Michael O'More), Betty Lawford (Lady Mary Cardigan), Colin Keith-Johnston (Captain Brian Fitzroy), Halliwell Hobbes (Earl of Balkerry), J M Kerrigan (Connors), Edward McNamara (Tim O'More), Richard Taber (Paddy), Edward O'Connor (Rafferty), Mary Murray (Kate), Mackenzie Ward (Cyril), Louis Sorin (Abe Feinberg), Sonia Karlov (Lulu Bellew), Tyrrell Davis (Potts), Elizabeth Murray (landlady).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Photophone
    Duration10
    Footage6870
    Format35mm
    Release date1929
    SummaryMichael O'More, an Irish-American who lives in Ireland with his uncle, a horse trainer for the Earl of Balkerry, falls in love with Lady Mary Cardigan, granddaughter of the earl. Mary has another suitor. Captain Brian Fitzroy, who wants to buy the impoverished earl's castle and marry Mary. Following a fight with Fitzroy over Mary, in which Fitzroy is knocked unconscious, Michael flees to the USA. Mary follows him there as a means of avoiding Fitzroy. Michael becomes financially successful in the USA when department store owner Abe Feinberg employs him and then commissions him to establish a linen mill on the earl's Irish estate. Mary and Michael then return to Ireland and marry. (Adapted from NYT 14/12/1929:22; AFI Catalog 1921-1930:466-7).
    NoteUSA Rel 17/8/1929.
    ReferenceFD 15/12/1929; MPN 14/9/1929:985; Var 18/12/1929:18.
    DistributorPathe Exchange Inc (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Emigration
    Jewish Americans
    Production creditsp.c/distr: Pathe Exchange Inc, super: Robert Kane, d: Kenneth Webb, dial super: James Seymour, story/dial: Gene Markey, c: Philip Tannura, Harry Stradling, set d: Clark Robinson, ed: Edward Pfitzenmeier, songs: 'Love is a Dreamer', 'For the Likes O'You and Me', 'When They Sing the 'Wearing of the Green' in Syncopated Time' by Sam Stept, Bud Green, m.d: Sacha Bunchuk, s: V S Ashdown, J A Delaney.
    Art directionROBINSON, Clark
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleMOWER'S BOY
    Production companyPathe Exchange Inc
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerKANE, Robert T.
    DirectorBARKER, Stanley
    Script/AdaptationMARKEY, Gene
    SEYMOUR, James
    PhotographySTRADLING, Harry
    STRENGE, Walter
    TANNURA, Philip
    Sound recordingASHDOWN, V.S.
    DELANEY, J.A.
    EditingPfitzenmeier, Edward
    Songs'There'll Be You and Me', 'Come to Me', 'I'll Always Be Mother's Boy',
    'The World Is Yours and Mine' by Bud Green, Sam H Stept.
    CastMorton Downey (Tommy O'Day), Beryl Mercer (Mrs O'Day), John T Doyle (Mr O'Day), Brian Donlevy (Harry O'Day), Helen Chandler (Rose Lyndon), Osgood Perkins (Jake Sturmberg), Lorin Raker (Joe Bush), Barbara Bennett (Beatrix Townleigh), Jennie Moskowitz (Mrs Apfelbaum), Jacob Frank (Mr Apfelbaum), Louis Sorin (Mr Bumble), Robert Gleckler (Gus Le Grand), Tyrrell Davis (Duke of Pomplum), Allan Vincent (Dinslow), Leslie Stowe (evangelist).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Photophone
    Footage7423
    Format35mm
    Release date1929
    SummaryTommy O'Day, an Irish singer from New York's Lower East Side, is wrongly accused by his father of stealing the family savings. Tommy leaves home and meets up with Joe Bush, a press agent who gets him a place singing in a cabaret. Tommy is a success and soon obtains a leading part in a Broadway revue. As the curtain is about to go up on opening night, however. Tommy receives word from his sweetheart. Rose Lyndon, that his mother, whom he has not seen since leaving home, is apparently dying. Tommy deserts the show and goes to her bedside, bringing her back to life and health with a song. Tommy's mother completely recovers, and he is excused by the revue manager. Tommy becomes a star. (Adapted from NYT 8/5/1929:34; AFI Catalog 1921-1930:527).
    NoteUSA Rel 12/5/1929.
    ReferenceFD 12/5/1929.
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Singers
    Production creditsp.c: Pathe Exchange Inc, p: Robert T Kane, d: Bradley Barker, story/sc/dial: Gene Markey, dial. super: James Seymour, c: Harry Stradling, Walter Strenge, c. super: Philip Tannura, set d: Clark Robinson, ed: Edward Pfitzenmeier, rd. engr: V S Ashdown, J A Delaney, songs: 'There'll Be You and Me', 'Come to Me', 'I'll Always Be Mother's Boy', 'The World Is Yours and Mine' by Bud Green, Sam H Stept.
    Art directionROBINSON, Clark
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Drama

    TitleSMILING IRISH EYES
    Production companyFirst National Pictures Inc
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerMcCORMICK, John
    DirectorSEITER, William A.
    Script/AdaptationGERAGHTY, Tom J.
    PhotographyHICKOX, Sid
    FREULICH, Henry
    EditingHALL, Al
    Music composerSILVERS, Louis
    Songs'A Wee Bit of Love', 'Then I'll Ride Home With You', 'Old Killarney Fair' by Norman Spencer, Herman Ruby; 'Smiling Irish Eyes' by Ray Perkins.
    CastColleen Moore (Kathleen O'Connor), James Hall (Rory O'More), Robert Homans (Shamus O'Connor), Claude Gillingwater (Michael Q O'Connor), Tom O'Brien ('Black' Barney O'Toole), Robert Emmett O'Connor (Sir Timothy Tyrone), Aggie Herring (Grandmother O'More), Betty Francisco (Frankie West), Julanne Johnston (Goldie De Vere), Edward Earle (George Prescott), Fred Kelsey (County Fair manager), Barney Gilmore, Charles McHugh (his assistants), Madame Bosocki (fortune-teller), George Hayes (taxi driver), Anne Schaefer (landlady), John Beck (Sir Timothy's butler), Oscar Apfel (Max North), Otto Lederer (Izzy Levi), William Strauss (Moe Levi), Dave Thursby (Scotch Barker), Dan Crimmins (the trouble-maker).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsil/soun
    Vitaphone
    Footage8550
    Format35mm
    Release date1929
    CopyUCLA
    SummaryIn Kerry, Rory O'More, a musician who works in an Irish peat bog, and his girlfriend, Kathleen O'Connor, together write a song, 'Smiling Irish Eyes'. 'Black' Barney O'Toole appears and breaks Rory's violin and takes Kathleen's pet pig, Aloysius. At the fair the next day Kathleen catches the greased pig and wins enough money in a contest to allow Rory to go America to study. He promises to send for her as soon as he makes good. Although he writes letters daily to Kathleen, he does not post them, determined to hold them until he has good news to go with them. Finally he gets a job playing the violin in a theatrical production. Despondent at not hearing from him, Kathleen borrows money to go to America and to bring Rory back to Ireland. She returns to Ireland in a huff when she sees Rory on stage at the Garrick Theatre playing their song, 'Smiling Irish Eyes', while a girl kisses him. They are reconciled when Rory appears in Ireland, and after explaining the kiss to Kathleen's satisfaction, they sing 'Smiling Irish Eyes' by the wishing well. Later, the whole family migrate to the USA. (Adapted from NYT 2/7/1929:23; AFI Catalog 1921-1930:735-6).
    NoteSound Version: 8,550 ft. USA Rel 28/7/1929; silent version, 7,932 ft. USA Rel 22/9/1929. IR Rel 7/2/1930 (sound version). Copy: UCLA (sound discs only). Before the release of SMILING IRISH EYES at Dublin's Savoy Cinema on 7 February 1930 cuts were made to it by the exhibitor. Even so, there were complaints by film reviewers and audiences alike about the film's 'stage Irishness', and a demonstration against the film in the cinema four days later forced the cancellation of its run. For an accnt. of the controversy see Rockett et al, 1987:53-5. 'At times waves of nausea swept over me and the screen became a blur. Mercifully the dialogue was almost completely inaudible except for the occasional 'arrah'.... Enter Colleen herself; she plays with the pigs. O, yes, she plays with the pigs for quite a long time... Evidently the producers have run out of real Irish costumes, for there are Breton fisherfolk and Tyrolese peasants mingling in the crowd'. (Mary Manning, Irish Statesman, 22/2/1930:497). 'How anyone, with a piece of box office material as valuable as the personality and following of this star, could permit so utterly a poor picture to be released is beyond comprehension. Not only is Miss Moore seen to disadvantage, but the story, the dialog, direction and support are all bad. Jimmy Hall... hasn't done anything quite as bad as this in his whole picture career. Then [there are] the two roles played by Claude Gillingwater and Robert Homans, which are supposed to supply the comedy relief. If they don't bring down the wrath of the Irish societies in America on the heads of everyone connected with the picture then we are very much mistaken. In continuity and construction it is hard to find anything that is worthy of even the slightest praise... When [James Hall's] first fiddle was smashed the audience heaved a sigh of relief, only to start laughing aloud when he is presented with another one a few minutes later, for they realized that there was no escaping further torture.' ('Colleen Moore at Her Worst', MPN 27/7/1929:375). 'It was surely the longest, slowest, dullest picture ever made'. Colleen Moore, in her autobiography. Silent Star (Garden City, New Jersey: Doubleday & Co, 1968:198). Colleen Moore recalls singing 'Come Back to Erin' in the film. This film was originally scheduled to be made as a silent film in 1927 and to be directed by Mervyn LeRoy.
    ReferenceDEM 8/2/1930:6; EH 12/2/1930:7; FD 28/7/1929; II 8/2/1930:10;
    12/2/1930:11; Irish Statesman 12/4/1930:116-17; IT 12/2/1930:7; Leader (Dublin), Vol 60, No 4, 22/2/1930:77; Photoplay Oct 1929:151; Var 21/7/1929:17.
    KeywordsRural Ireland
    Emigration
    Irish-Americans
    Music
    Production creditsp.c: First National Pictures Inc, p: John McCormick, d: William A Seiter, story/sc/titles/dial: Tom J Geraghty, c: Sid Hickox, Henry Freulich, set d: Anton Grot, ed: Al Hall, m: Louis Silvers, songs: 'A Wee Bit of Love', 'Then I'll Ride Home With You', 'Old Killarney Fair' by Norman Spencer, Herman Ruby; 'Smiling Irish Eyes' by Ray Perkins, choreo: Larry Ceballos, Walter Wills, Carl McBride, a.d: James Dunne, ward: Edward Stevenson.
    Art directionGROT, Anton
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Drama

    TitleSONG O' MY HEART
    Production companyFox Film Corp
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorBORZAGE, Frank
    Script/AdaptationBARRY, Tom
    LEVIEN, Sonya
    PhotographyLYONS, Chester
    BRICK, Al
    TAYLOR, J.O.
    Sound recordingCOSTELLO, George P.
    EditingMURRAY, Jack
    STONE, John
    Associate producerOLIVER, Harry
    Music composerLIPSCHULZ, George
    Music performanceMcCORMACK, John
    Songs'I Feel You Near Me', 'A Pair Of Blue Eyes', 'Song O'My Heart' m/lyr: Charles Glover, William Kemell, James F Hanley; 'Paddy, Me Lad' m/lyr: Albert Hay Malotte; 'Then You'll Remember Me' m/lyr: Alfred Bums, William
    Michael Balfe; 'A Fairy Story By The Fireside', 'Just For A Day, Kitty My
    Love', 'The Rose Of Tralee' by Charles Glover, C Mordaunt Spencer;
    'Little Boy Blue' lyr: Eugene Field, m: Ethelbert Nevin; 'I Hear You
    Calling Me' m/lyr: Harold Herfbrd, Charles Marshall; 'The Magpie's
    Nest' (trad.), 'Kitty, My Love, Will You Marry Me?' (trad.), 'Irish,
    Mother Irish', 'Luoghi Sereni E Can'.
    CastJohn McCormack (Sean O'Carolan), Alice Joyce (Mary Lenehan), Maureen O'Sullivan (Eileen Lenehan), Tommy Clifford (Tad Lenehan), John Gan-ick (Fergus O'Donnell), Effie Ellsler (Mona), J M Kemgan (Peter, the jarvey), J Farrell MacDonald (Dan Rafferty), Emily Fitzroy (Aunt Elizabeth Kennedy), Edwin Schneider (Vincent), Andres De Segurola (Guido), Edward Martindel (Dennis Fullerton, impresario).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration85
    Footage7740
    Format35mm
    70mm
    Graneur
    Release date1930
    CopyLC
    SummaryIn an Irish village two men, Dan Rafferty and Peter, a jarvey, discuss the life of heartbroken Sean O'Carolan, who gave up his concert-singing career years earlier when his sweetheart, Mary Lenehan, was forced by her aunt, Elizabeth Kennedy, to marry for money rather than to the one she loved, impoverished Sean. When her husband deserts her, and with two children, Eileen and Tad, the poverty-stricken family is forced to live with her Aunt Elizabeth, a strict spinster. Rather than sympathise with her plight. Aunt Elizabeth castigates Mary for continuing to be in love with Sean, and blames her for her husband's desertion of her. Meeting the children, Sean sings them a story about a prince who goes away and leaves behind a princess. Fergus O'Donnell, an architect, who is in love with Eileen, is not permitted by Aunt Elizabeth to see her. Drawing on his own experience with Mary, Sean advises that nothing should be allowed to come between the young lovers. Sean goes on a singing tour to the USA. During a break in a concert in New York, and following a feeling that someone was calling his name during the song 'Ireland, Mother Ireland', Vincent opens a telegram from Sean's housekeeper Mona saying that Mary is dead. After the concert, and when he knows of Mary's death, Sean opens a letter from her telling him that she is ill and asking him to look after her children. Sean decides to postpone the concert tour to return home. Meanwhile in Ireland, the gers are reading of Sean's success. Eileen is being sent away by Aunt Elizabeth to her Aunt Martha because Fergus is due to arrive. Eileen defies her grandaunt, declaring that she won't let her break her heart like she had done with her mother. Aunt Elizabeth tells her '. not to come back, while Tad also runs away saying he will leave also. Eileen meets Fergus, who tells her that he has been a failure. Eileen lies to him by telling him that everything is okay, while Mona finds out from Tad what has happened. Mona attacks Aunt Elizabeth, having remained silent on the issue for thirty years, and accuses her of breaking Mary's heart. Mona tells her that she has a stone in her heart and that she has interfered too much in others peoples' lives. Eventually, Fergus discovers that Eileen is being sent away, and he proposes marriage to her as Sean arrives home. Eileen and Fergus marry in the village church. After the ceremony, Sean congratulates the couple, and they are taken away in a carriage, while Sean plans to take Tad and Mona to America, where her brother lives. (V).
    NoteUSA Rel 11/3/1930 (New York premiere); IR Relm 1/8/1930. Copy: LC (16mm, 3,138 ft). This was the first sound feature film shot in Ireland, and with WINGS OF THE MORNING (GB 1937), was the only other feature film in which John McCormack (1884-1945) acted and sang. McCormack was the greatest lyric tenor of his era and a very popular concert performer. The film was a huge hit in Ireland. 'Here we have some genuine Irish wit and repartee far removed from the Conn the Shaughraun business'. (DEM 2/8/1930:5). 'The scenes in this picture are true representations, and the Irish characters are typically Irish. This alone would make the piece worthy of notice, for no race has suffered more at the hands of American and English film and stage producers than has ours'. (DEM 12/8/1930:7). 'This masterpiece'. (DEM 13/9/1930:2). 'Never has an audible film been recorded as flawlessly as this feature.' (NYT 12/3/1930:32). The New York premiere was attended by Governor Al Smith, while the Dublin premiere was attended by President Cosgrave. According to New York Times J J McCarthy was supervisor of the film, travelling both to Ireland and to Hollywood to oversee the production.
    ReferenceEH 2/8/1930:2; MPN 15/3/1930:46; National Board of Review Magazine, Apr 1930:20; NYT 12/3/1930:32; SI 1/6/1930:2. AFI Cat 1921-1930:745; IT 14/6/1984:10; Movie Song Catalog No. 1183; MPG.
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Emigration
    Tenors
    Singers
    Rural Ireland
    Production creditsp.c: Fox Film Corp. pres: William Fox, d: Frank Borzage, story/dial: Tom Barry, adapt: Sonya Levien, ed. super: John Stone, c: Chester Lyons, Al Brick, grandeur c: J O Taylor, titles: Kerry Clarke, m: George Lipschultz, art d: Harry Oliver, ed: Jack Murray, a.d: Lew Borzage, cost: Sophie Wachner, s: George P Costello, songs sung by John McCormack: 'I Feel You Near Me', 'A Pair Of Blue Eyes', 'Song 0' My Heart' m/lyr: Charles Glover, William Kemell, James F Hanley; 'Paddy, Me Lad' m/lyr: Albert Hay Malotte; 'Then You'll Remember Me' m/lyr: Alfred Burns, William Michael Balfe; 'A Fairy Story By The Fireside', 'Just For A Day, Kitty My Love', 'The Rose Of Tralee' by Charles Glover, C Mordaunt Spencer; 'Little Boy Blue' lyr: Eugene Field, m: Ethelbert Nevin; 'I Hear You Calling Me' m/lyr: Harold Herfbrd, Charles Marshall; 'The Magpie's Nest' (trad.), 'Kitty, My Love, Will You Marry Me?' (trad.), 'Irish, Mother Irish', 'Luoghi Sereni E Can'.
    Costume designWACHNER, Sophie
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Drama

    TitlePUBLIC ENEMY
    ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE
    Production companyWarner Bros Pictures Inc
    Vitaphone Corp
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerZANUCK, Darryl F.
    DirectorWELLMAN, William A.
    Script/AdaptationTHEW, Harvey
    PhotographyJENNINGS, Dev
    Sound recordingMcDERMOTT, Edward M.
    Music composerMENDOZA, David
    Music performanceVitaphone Orchestra
    Songs'I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles' by Jean Kenbrovin, John W Kellette; 'I Surrender Dear' by Harry Barris, Gordon Clifford.
    CastJames Cagney (Tom Powers), Jean Harlow (Gwen Allen), Edward Woods (Matt Doyle), Joan Blondell (Mamie), Beryl Mercer (Ma Powers), Donald Cook (Mike Powers), Mae Clarke (Kitty), Leslie Fenton (Samuel Nails Nathan), Robert Emmet O'Connor (Paddy Ryan), Munay Kinnell (Putty Nose), Ben Hendricks Jr (Buddy Moran), Rita Flynn (Molly Doyle), Frank Coghlan Jr (Tom as a boy), Frankie Darro (Matt as a boy), Purnell Pratt (officer Powers, Tom's father), Robert E Homans (Pat Burke, a policeman), Louise Brooks (Bess), Sam McDaniel (black headwaiter), Eddie Kane (Joe, the headwaiter), George Daly (machine gunner), Charles Sullivan (mug), Helen Parris, Dorothy Gray, Nanci Price (little girls), Ben Hendricks 3rd (Bugs as a boy), Mia Marvin (Jane Daugherty), Clark Burroughs (Dutch), Snitz Edwards (Hack Miller), Adele Watson (Mrs Doyle), Dorothy Gee (Nails' girl). Lee Phelps (Steve, the bartender), Douglas Gerrard (assistant tailor), William H Strauss (pawnbroker), Landers Stevens (doctor), Russ Powell (bartender).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Footage748083
    Format35mm
    Release date1931
    SummaryIn Chicago in 1909 two ten-or eleven-year-olds, Tom Powers and Matt Doyle, get a pail of beer from Patrick J Ryan's saloon and drink some themselves. Later, they are chased by a policeman and a store worker after stealing goods. Outside the Powers' home they trip up Matt's sister, Molly, who is on roller skates. Tom's father, a stem policeman, beats him with a leather strap for his behaviour. Defiant, Tom accepts the punishment. Tom and Matt go to see Putty Nose at the Red Oaks Club where they sell him watches they have stolen. Six years later in 1915, teenagers Tom and Matt visit the club again where they are now regulars. Putty Nose offers to make them part of a gang robbing a fur warehouse, gives them revolvers, and promises to help them if they get into trouble. During the robbery, a gang member, 'Limpy' Larry Dalton, is shot by the police, while Tom fires at a pursuing policeman and hits him. When they arrive back at the club Putty Nose has disappeared, while they are told by Hack Miller to lie low. At Larry's wake, his mother is comforted by Mrs Powers, while Tom and Matt look on silently. In 1917 when America becomes involved in World War One, Tom is driving a truck, while Tom's brother, Mike, now engaged to Molly, is studying and working as a tram driver. At a saloon, Tom and Matt meet Paddy Ryan, its owner, who offers to befriend them. Mrs Powers is comforted by Molly when Tom arrives home to be told that Mike has enlisted in the marines to fight in Europe. Tom reassures his mother that he won't join up. In a confrontation with his brother over his associates, Tom is hit by Mike. With the advent of Prohibition in 1920, Ryan encourages Tom and Matt to rob liquor warehouses and to supply his and other saloons with it. They siphon alcohol from stored barrels in a warehouse into a gasoline tanker. With their new-found wealth, Tom and Matt live in style. Leeham, the owner of a closed brewery, joins with Ryan and Samuel 'Nails' Nathan, a West Side gangster, in supplying bootleg beer. Tom and Matt act as enforcers and demand that supplies of beer from 'Schemer' Bums' gang stop being used. At the Powers' home during a celebration for Mike's return from war. Matt pours beer for Mike, but he refuses it, declaring they are murderers. Tom retorts that Mike, too, has blood on his hands from the war. As a result of the confrontation, Tom moves from home to a hotel. At the hotel. Nails rings Tom to get him to enforce a payment. Before leaving, an irritated Tom pushes a half-grape- fruit into the face of his mistress. Kitty. Shortly afterwards he meets Gwen Alien, with whom he becomes involved, while Matt becomes engaged to Jane, whom he met with Kitty in a nightclub. Seeing Putty Nose at a club, Tom and Matt follow him to his apartment. Tom accuses him of abandoning them years earlier and kills him despite Matt's silent disapproval. Tom goes to see his mother, but as he is giving her money Mike arrives and demands that Tom's 'blood money' be refused. After Mike hits him, Tom tears up the money and leaves. When Nails is thrown from a horse and then killed by a kick from it, Tom buys the horse and shoots it dead. With Nails dead, Ryan's gang becomes vulnerable to Burns' gang, who blow up Ryan's saloon and destroy the brewery. In an attempt to stop the gang war, Ryan takes his gang's money and guns and puts them in the apartment of a friend, Jane. Ryan, however, is observed leaving the hide-out by Hack Miller, who informs Bums of the gang's whereabouts. The following morning, and after Tom apparently spends the night with Jane, Matt is gunned down and killed by Bums' men, while Tom escapes. Tom gets guns at a pawnbroker's and then goes to Bums' gang's headquarters, where he is wounded after shooting it up. In hospital, Tom is visited by his mother, brother and Molly, just as Ryan is leaving. At the Powers', Ryan arrives to tell Mike that Tom has been kidnapped from the hospital by Bums' gang. Ryan says he has offered to quit the rackets if Tom is delivered back to the Powers' home. Later, Mike takes a phone call in which he is told that Tom is being brought home. When a knock comes to the door, Mike opens it to find Tom wrapped in bandages and dead. He falls into the room, while his happy mother upstairs makes his room ready for his homecoming. (V).
    NoteUSA Rel 15/5/1931. GB title ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE, with a running time of 80 minutes. There are scenes included in the published screenplay, Cohen 1981, such as on pages 163-5, which are not in the available video (MGM/UA; Turner Entertainment, published 1994). These include a scene in which Tom Powers returns to Gwen Alien's apartment after Matt's death to find a note saying she has returned to Texas. (According to Cohen, part of this scene is included in some prints, but the rest was left out of the finished film). Tom then gets the guns at the pawnbroker's and goes to Bums' headquarters. Bright and Glasmon received an Academy Award nomination for their original story. This film made Cagney a star and established Wamer Bros as the leading studio producing gangster films in the 1930s. Edward Woods was originally due to play the lead, but when William Wellman replaced Archie Mayo as director shortly before commencement of shooting, he switched the two men's roles. Cohen, 1981:183, gives the running time at 96 minutes, and incorrectly names the conductor as David Mendota, and along with Motion Picture Guide, identifies the film editor as Ed McCormick.
    ReferenceFD 26/4/1931:10; HR 20/12/1930:4; MPH 17/1/1931:50; MPH 24/1/1931:48; NYT 24/4/1931:27; Var 29/4/1931:12. An Cat 1931-1940:1711; Cohen, 1981;JowettinO'Connor&Jackson(eds), 1979.
    DistributorWarner Bros Pictures Inc
    Vitaphone Corp
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Bootleggers
    Mother Son Relationships
    Family
    Gangsters
    Crime
    Production creditsp.c/distr: Warner Bros Pictures Inc; The Vitaphone Corp, p: Darryl F Zanuck, d: William A Wellman, sc: Harvey Thew from an unpublished novel Beer and Blood: The Story of a Couple O'Wrong Guys by Kubec Glasmon, John Bright, c: Dev Jennings, art d: Max Parker, ed: Edward M McDermott, ward: Earl Luick, Edward Stevenson, songs: 'I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles' by Jean Kenbrovin, John W Kellette; 'I Surrender Dear' by Harry Barris, Gordon Clifford, make-up: Perc Westmore, m.c: David Mendoza, m.p: Vitaphone Orchestra.
    Art directionPARKER, Max
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Literary Adaptation
    Gangster Film
    Crime Drama

    TitleYOUNG SINNERS
    Production companyFox Film Corp
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorBLYSTONE, John
    Script/AdaptationCONSELMAN, William
    PhotographySEITZ, John
    Sound recordingCLAYTON WARD, E.
    EditingDIXON, Ralph
    Songs'You Called It Love', 'Better Wait Till You're Eighteen', m/lyr: James F Hanley.
    CastHardie Albright (Gene Gibson), Thomas Meighan {Tom McGuire}, Dorothy Jordan (Constance Sinclair), Cecilia Loftus (Caroline Sinclair), James Kirkwood (John Gibson), Edmund Breese (Trent), Lucien Prival (Baron Karl Franz von Konetz), Edward Nugent (Bud), Gaylord Pendleton (Reggie), David Rollins (Tommy), Arnold Lucy (butler), Nora Lane {Maggie McGuire}, Joan Castle (Sue), John Arledge (Jimmy), Yvonne Pelletier (Madge), Billy Butts {Timmy McGuire}, Sid Jordan (sleigh driver), Dixie Lee.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration70/78-9
    Footage7100
    Format35mm
    Release date1931
    SummaryUpper-class sweethearts Constance Sinclair and Gene Gibson are drinking on a Florida beach with their friends. When the alcohol runs out the couple go for additional supplies in Gene's motorboat, but they are arrested by revenue officers. When Constance's photograph is published in a newspaper, her mother, Caroline, separates her from the drunken Gene. She takes her to Samoa where they meet Baron von Konetz and Caroline arranges an engagement between her daughter and the baron. Gene appears during the engagement celebrations and declares his love for Constance. When she goes to tell her mother that she will not marry the baron. Gene finds out about the engagement and departs after leaving a note of congratulations. Gene goes on a drunken binge, but when his father, John, appears he accuses him of parental neglect. John's advisor Trent suggests that Gene be put into the care of Tom McGuire, an Irishman who lives in the Adirondacks and is experienced in building up physically and morally dissolute persons. At McGuire's cabin, Gene determines to become strong so that he can beat McGuire, whom he resents. However, Gene comes to respect McGuire who is devoted to his wife, Maggie, and to their son, Timmy, and contrasts this happy family with his own. McGuire reluctantly agrees to attend Gene's sister's wedding and leaves Gene behind at the cabin. When McGuire has left, Constance appears and, trapped at the cabin during a snowstorm, spends the night there. After unsuccessfully trying to seduce Gene, who locks himself in his bedroom, Constance begins to admire him again. When McGuire returns the next day, he is furious to discover that Constance has spent the night at the cabin. Before Gene has the opportunity to explain that nothing untoward happened, a fight is sparked between the two men, which Gene wins. In the meantime. Gene's parents and Trent arrive. When Gene declares that he wants to marry Constance, his father agrees and offers him a job and an apartment. A delighted McGuire announces that Gene is now a graduate of his tutoring, while Caroline acknowledges her matchmaking mistake as the baron has been revealed as a fraudster. Gene then thanks McGuire as a friend. (Adapted from AFI Catalog 1931-1940: 2501-02, articles).
    NoteUSA Rel 17/5/1931; (New York ca. 8/5/1931).
    ReferenceFD 10/5/1931:10; HR 20/4/1931:2; NYT 9/5/1931:15; Var 13/5/1931:36.
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Production creditsp.c/distr: Fox Film Corp, pres: William Fox, d: John Blystone, a.d: Jasper Blystone, stage d: Samuel T Godfrey, adapt/cont/dial: William Conselman from the play Young Sinners (copyrighted under the title Wings of Youth) by Elmer Harris (1st perf. New York, 28/11/1929), c: John Seitz, art d: Gordon Wiles, ed: Ralph Dixon, cost: Sophie Wachner, s: E Clayton ward, fight double for Thomas Meighan: Sid Jordan, ski double for Hardie Albright: Sigurd Wathne, ski double for Dorothy Jordan: Eva Monrad, ski double for Thomas Meighan: H P Devick, songs: 'You Called It Love', 'Better Wait Till You're Eighteen', m/lyr: James F Hanley.
    Art directionWILES, Gordon
    Assistan directorBLYSTONE, Jasper
    Costume designWachner, Sophie
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Theatrical Adaptation

    TitleLADIES THEY TALK ABOUT
    Production companyWarner Bros Pictures Inc
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorBREMERTON, Howard
    KEIGHLEY, William
    Script/AdaptationHOLMES, Brown
    McGRATH, William
    SUTHERLAND, Sidney
    PhotographySEITZ, John
    EditingWRANGLE, Basil
    Songs'If I Could Be with You One Hour Tonight' m: James P Johnson, lyr: Henry Creamer, sung by Lillian Roth; 'St Louis Blues' m/lyr: W C Handy, sung by Etta Moten, Vitaphone Orchestra c: Leo F Forbstein.
    CastBarbara Stanwyck (Nan Taylor), Preston S Foster (David Slade), Lyle Talbot (Don), Dorothy Burgess (Susie), Lillian Roth (Linda), Maude Ebume (Aunt Maggie), Ruth Donnelly (Noonan), Harold Huber (Lefty), Robert McWade (District Attorney Walter Simpson), Robert Warwick (the warden), Helen Ware (Miss Johnson), Grace Cunard (Marie), Madame Sul-te-wan (Mustard), Harold Healy (Dutch), Harry Gibbon (bank guard), De Witt Jennings (Tracy), Cecil Cunningham (Mrs Arlington) Helen Mann (Blondie), William Keighley, Isabel Withers, Harry C Bradley, Davison dark, Ferris Taylor, Helen Dickson.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration64/68
    Format35mm
    Release date1933
    SummaryNan Taylor is arrested after acting as a decoy during a bank robbery. David Slade, a radio evangelist, who has been calling for longer sentences for criminals recognises Nan as a former classmate whose father was the deacon in the town where Slade's father was an alcoholic. Seeing her opportunity, she pleads for help from Slade, who becomes attracted to her. A sceptical district attorney releases her to Slade's care. When she tells Slade that she was part of the robbery gang, he withdraws his offer of support and she is jailed. She rebuffs Slade's attempts to see her in jail, but she incurs the wrath of Susie, a fellow prisoner, who is jealous of Slade's interest in her. Nan finds out that two gang members, Don and Dutch, have been arrested. She agrees to see Slade, though with the intention of helping their plans to escape. She puts a letter in Slade's pocket without his knowledge, but when it is discovered by the police the escape bid is foiled. Don and Dutch are killed in the escape attempt, and Nan is denied parole for her part in the plot. She believes that Slade is responsible for the men's death, so when she is released from prison she tracks him down with the intention of killing him. She lures him to a meeting with a false sense of remorse for her criminal activity, and then shoots him. She is immediately remorseful, and with the arrival of the police, Slade announces that he and Nan are getting married. (Adapted from AFI Catalog 1931-1940:1127, articles).
    NoteUSA Rel 4/2/1933.
    ReferenceFD 25/2/1933:4; HR 29/12/1932:3; MPH 7/1/1933:26; NYT 25/2/1933:20;
    Var 28/2/1933:15.
    DistributorWarner Bros Pictures Inc
    Vitaphone Corp
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Crime
    Production creditsp.c: Warner Bros Pictures Inc. d: Howard Bremerton, William Keighley, sc: Brown Holmes, William McGrath, Sidney Sutherland from the play Ladies They Talk About by Dorothy Mackaye, Carlton Miles (Los Angeles, production date undetermined), c: John Seitz, art d: Esdras Hartley, ed: Basil Wrangle, gowns: Orry-Kelly, songs: 'If I Could Be with You One Hour Tonight' m: James P Johnson, lyr: Henry Creamer, sung by Lillian Roth; 'St Louis Blues' m/lyr: W C Handy, sung by Etta Moten, Vitaphone Orchestra c: Leo F Forbstein, distr: Wamer Bros Pictures Inc; The Vitaphone Corp.
    Art directionHARTLEY, Esdras
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Theatrical Adaptation
    Crime Drama

    TitlePEG O'MY HEART
    Production companyMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp
    Loew's Inc
    Robert Z Leonard Production
    Cosmopolitan Production
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorLEONARD, Robert Z.
    Script/AdaptationADAMS, Frank R.
    MARION, Frances
    PhotographyBARNES, George
    Sound recordingSHEARER, Douglas
    EditingBOOTH, Margaret
    Music composerSTOTHART, Herbert
    Songs'Sweetheart Darlin', 'I'll Remember You' lyr/m: Nacio Herb Brown, Arthur Freed.
    CastMarion Davies {Peg O'Connell}, Onslow Stevens (Sir Gerald/Jerry Markham), J Farrell MacDonald {Pat O'Connell}, Juliette Compton (Ethel Chichester), Irene Browne (Mrs Chichester), Tyrrell Davis (Alaric Chichester), Alan Mowbray (Captain Christopher Brent), Doris Lloyd (Mrs Grace Brent), Robert Grieg (Jarvis), Nora Cecil (Smythe), Geoffrey Gill (Terance), Billy Bevan.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration80/85-86
    Footage8140
    Format35mm
    Release date1933
    CopyLC
    SummaryIn an Irish fishingvillage, an English lawyer, Sir Gerald Markham, arrives to tell Patrick O'Connell that his daughter, Peg, can inherit two million pounds from her dead mother's relatives, the Chichesters, provided she lives with them in England for three years and be separated from her father, of whom the Chichesters disapprove. Patrick withholds the information at first and tells Sir Gerald that Peg will stay in Ireland, but when some local fishermen are drowned he decides to let her go. Peg reluctantly agrees to leave her father when he convinces her that she should go, though without telling her of the enforced separation from him. At the Chichesters', her uncouth manners contrast with the upper-class pretensions of her relatives, especially Mrs Chichester, who treats her as a servant at first and then tries to groom her by refining her language and dress. Mrs Chichester's daughter, Ethel, and Chris Brent are secret lovers as he is married and claims his wife. Grace, refuses to divorce him. Publicly, Ethel is attached to Jerry, but Peg, unaware that he is Sir Gerald, falls in love with him. However, Brent loves his wife's money more than Ethel. Ethel agrees to marry Jerry to restore the family's fortunes, but asks that it be kept secret for the time being. Meanwhile, Alaric, under pressure from his mother, proposes to Peg, but, to his relief, she merely laughs at the suggestion. When Brent tells Ethel that his wife will not give him a divorce, she approves the announcement of the engagement at a party after a fox hunt. Peg is upset at the news and writes to her father to allow her to go home. However, Peg's father arrives unexpectedly during the party and tells Jerry that he intends migrating to America. After watching Peg through a window, he asks Jerry to tell her that he has died at sea so that he's out of her life. Jerry reluctantly lies to Peg about her father being dead. Later, though, and not wishing for her to return to Ireland, Pat suggests that she accompany him to America. Upset, Peg is crying in her room when she becomes aware that Ethel is about to elope with Brent. She confronts Ethel with the foolishness of her scheme and goes to challenge Brent at a nearby inn. Shortly afterwards Ethel also arrives, while Peg observes Grace coming with two policemen. Peg hides Ethel, declaring that she is Brent's mistress, while Grace reports that her husband had refused to divorce her. On the following day, Mrs Chichester reads in the newspaper of Peg's behaviour and denounces her as Jerry looks on. Peg decides not to reveal Ethel's relationship with Brent and announces her intention of returning to Ireland. Before leaving she finds out from Alaric about the favourable financial arrangements for the Chichesters, who are being paid £5,000 per year if Peg stays there. She tells Jerry that she is giving up the inheritance and going back to Ireland. In turn. Jerry reveals that he is Sir Gerald Markham, which further infuriates Peg. She rushes off to stop her father going to America and returns to Ireland. Jerry follows her to Ireland by which time his friendship with Peg has changed to love. (V).
    Note9 reels. USA Rel ca. 19/5/1933 (New York); 26/5/1933 (general release).
    See note above with first released film version of the play in
    1922. 'Sweetheart Darlin' became a No. 1 hit song in the USA.
    ReferenceFD 10/2/1933:6; FD 20/5/1933:3; HF 25/2/1933:12; HR 2/9/1931:3;
    HR 4/9/1931:1; HR 25/11/1932:6; MPD 20/4/1933:8; MPH 20/5/1933:29;
    NYT 20/5/1933:11; Var 23/5/1933
    DistributorLoew's Inc (USA)
    KeywordsRural Ireland
    Fishing Villages
    Irish in Britain
    Class Conflict
    Inheritance
    Social Aspiration
    Production creditsp.c: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp; controlled by Loew's Inc. A Robert Z Leonard Production. A Cosmopolitan Production, d: Robert Z Leonard, a.d: Harry Bucquet, sc: Frank R Adams from the play Peg O'My Heart by J Hartley Manners (1st perf, Los Angeles, 26/5/1912), adapt: Frances Marion, c: George Bames, art d: Cedric Gibbons, ed: Margaret Booth, gowns: Adrian, m: Herbert Stothart, songs: 'Sweetheart Darlin', 'I'll Remember You' lyr/m: Nacio Herb Brown, Arthur Freed, rd. d: Douglas Shearer, mix: Robert Shugart, USA distr: Loew's Inc.
    Art directionGIBBONS, Cedric
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Theatrical Adaptation

    TitleDUBLIN IN BRASS
    Production companyVitaphone Co
    Warner Bros Pictures Inc
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorHENABERY, Joseph
    Script/AdaptationOTVOS, A. Dorian
    BENNETT, George
    PhotographyDU PAR, E.B.
    EditingFRANK, Bert
    Music composerMENDOZA, David
    Songs'That's How I Spell Ireland'
    'Any Place is Heaven'
    CastMorton Downey (Danny/Daniel O'Neill), Andrea Marsh (Eileen
    O'Malley), Smith, Rogers & Eddie, Hugh Cameron, Lawrence Henchey.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration24
    Format35mm
    Release date1935
    CopyIFA
    LC
    WCFTR
    SummaryAt the Policeman's School in Ireland Danny O'Neill is taught how to be a New York cop before migrating there. He goes to see his fiancee Eileen, a schoolteacher, who is trying to teach a pupil, Mickey, how to spell Ireland. Danny sings a song, 'That's How I Spell Ireland', on the theme. He imagines himself a traffic policeman, and shows a group of young women in another musical number how to obey traffic rules. Eileen's uncle. Pat O'Malley, has been a New York cop for twenty years. Following graduation from police school, Danny attends the New York St Patrick's Day parade, where a cop dances an Irish jig. After Danny is wrongfully arrested for bombing the parade, he asks at the police station for Pat O'Malley. Ten policemen step forward answering to that name. Eventually, Eileen's uncle appears, and he then tells him that Eileen came over on the same boat as himself. Re-united with Eileen, Danny sings another song. Pat brings him to the Associated Broadcasting Co radio station where he is given a singing contract. (V).
    ReferenceCatalog of Copyright Entries: Motion Pictures 1912-1939; Catalog of Wamer
    Bros Short Subjects.
    DistributorWarner Bros Pictures Inc (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Emigration
    Policemen
    Radio Stars
    Singers
    Production creditspres: The Vitaphone Corp. a subsidiary of Warner Bros Pictures Inc; A Broadway Brevity, d: Joseph Henabery, story: A Dorian Otvos, George J Bennett, c: E B Du Par, ed: Bert Frank, m.c: David Mendoza, sp. songs: Cliff Hess, SaNíord Green, Mack David, dances arrg: Harland Dixon, songs: 'That's How I Spell Ireland', 'Any Place is Heaven', distr: Warner Bros Pictures Inc.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleINFORMER, THE
    Production companyRKO Radio Pictures Inc
    John Ford Productions
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorFORD, John
    Script/AdaptationNICHOLS, Dudley
    PhotographyAUGUST, Joseph H.
    Sound recordingMcDOWELL Jr., Hugh
    EditingHIVELY, George
    Associate producerREID, Cliff
    Music composerSTEINER, Max
    Songs'The Rose of Tralee' (trad.), 'Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms' lyr: Thomas Moore.
    CastVictor McLaglen (Gypo Nolan), Heather Angel (Mary McPhillip), Preston Foster (Dan Gallagher), Margot Grahame (Katie Madden), Wallace Ford (Frankie McPhillip), Una O'Connor (Mrs McPhillip), J M Kerrigan (Terry), Joseph Sauers (Bartley Mulholland), Neil Fitzgerald (Tommy Connor), Donald Meek (Pat Mulligan), D'Arcy Corrigan (the blind man), Leo McCabe (Donahue), Gaylord Pendleton (Daley), Francis Ford (Flynn), May Boley (Madame Betty), Grizelda Harvey (the lady), Denis O'Dea (street singer), Clyde Cook (man at Madame Betty's), J Farrell MacDonald (man in street). Major Sam Harris, Earle Foxe (British officers). Jack Mulhall (lookout), Robert Parrish (young soldier), Frank Baker, James Murray, Frank Moran, Arthur McLaglen, Barlowe Borland.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration91/95/97
    Format35mm
    Release date1935
    CopyLC
    NFTVA
    SummaryIn 1920 during the Irish War of Independence in a fog-enveloped Dublin, Gypo Nolan, a big but slow-witted man, is wandering through the streets when he sees a wanted poster with a £20 reward for information leading to the capture of his friend, Frankie McPhillip, who is an IRA member on the run. He recalls when both of them were in the IRA drinking and singing together. He affectionately touches the poster, but then angrily tears it from the wall. As he approaches his girlfriend, prostitute Katie Madden, a potential client others is grabbed by Gypo and thrown to the ground. Katie reassures Gypo that he is the only one for her. Katie points to a steamship poster with passage to America for £10 each, but Katie declares that it might as well be a million pounds to them. A frightened Gypo thinks she is referring to the reward money. Frankie McPhillip comes to the city and avoids a military patrol. He goes to Dun Boy House, an eating place, where he sits down opposite a surprised Gypo. Frankie is exhausted and nervous from evading the police and tells him that he is going to visit his mother and sister, Mary. Gypo tells Frankie that as he has been court-martialled and thrown out of the Organisation for failing to carry out an execution. Gypo also tells him that the guard has been removed from his house and Frankie goes to see his family. Gypo leaves the restaurant shortly afterwards and wanders the streets wrestling with his conscience over his need for money and his friendship with Frankie. Finally, he goes to the army headquarters to claim the reward and tell where Frankie is. Gypo waits while the Black and Tans go to the McPhillips' house. Meanwhile, Frankie is being greeted by his mother and sister, who are happy to see him, but worried that he might be arrested. He tells them that he feels safe, as the only person who knows he is in the city is Gypo. As he sits down to eat, the Tans arrive and surround the house. Frankie rushes upstairs to escape but he is shot and killed. Army headquarters are informed that Frankie is dead, whereupon an officer contemptuously pushes the £20 reward across the table to Gypo, telling him to leave by the back door. On the street, Gypo meets a blind man whom he attacks thinking he has seen him leave the barracks. He is then confronted by the scowling image of Frankie projected on the wanted poster. Gypo goes to a pub where he drinks whiskey and gives money to a surprised barman who expects him to be impoverished. Katie comes in and reassures Gypo again that he is the only one for her. He tells her he got the money by robbing a drunken American sailor. He then goes to the McPhillips' home for Frankie's wake. While there, his nervous behaviour arouses suspicion amongst the IRA men present, a view reinforced when a number of coins fall from Gypo's pocket. Two IRA men take Gypo to Dan Gallagher, the IRA commandant, who tells Gypo that he will be reinstated in the Organisation if he identifies the informer. Appearing to help, Gypo names Pat Mulligan, a tailor, as the informer, claiming that he had a grudge against Frankie because he had got his sister Susie 'in trouble'. He also says that he saw Mulligan go into army headquarters earlier in the night. Gallagher orders his men to arrest Mulligan and take him to a meeting that night at the ammunition dump. After pub-closing time Gypo knocks out a policeman on the street and encouraged by a crowd takes them all to have fish and chips. Bartley, an IRA man, watches, and later tells Gypo to attend the meeting. Gypo is taken by a free-loader, Terry, to a shebeen, a late-night drinking club, where he drunkenly mistakes another woman for Katie. In the meantime at the wake, Gallagher embraces Mary, his girlfriend, and asks her about Frankie's fatal visit. She tells him that Frankie said that he had met Gypo at the Dun Boy eating house. The IRA men go to the shebeen and observe Gypo. Before leaving with the IRA men, Gypo gives £5 to the woman he has mistaken for Katie and who is trying to get back to London. They meet Katie on their way to the meeting, and Gypo tells her he has the £20 for their passage to America, but he only gives her the remaining £5. Katie now realises what he has done. At the meeting, which is attended by Mary McPhillip and a group of IRA men, a drunken Gypo is brought in. A confused and ill Mulligan is questioned by the court of enquiry and it quickly becomes clear after he gives a series of alibis that he is not responsible for Frankie's death. He tells Gallagher that he has no sister by the name of Susie, and his one sister, Mary Ellen, has lived in Boston for twenty eight years. The tribunal then turns to Gypo who eventually confesses to informing on Frankie. Gallagher is unmoved by Gypo's plea that he didn't know why he did it, and locks him up. The IRA men draw straws to see who will execute him. Gypo breaks out of the makeshift prison and goes to Katie's flat where he confesses to her that he informed on Frankie. Katie goes to see Gallagher and pleads for Gypo's life, but while there reveals that Gypo is at her flat. While Gypo is sleeping in front of Katie's fire, the IRA men come up the stairs of the house. Gypo hears them and makes his escape but he is shot by Bartley as he leaves the house. He staggers across the road to the church and confesses to Frankie's mother as she is praying there. She forgives him, saying he did not know what he was doing. Gypo calls out to Frankie, saying his mother forgives him, as he collapses, dead, arms outstretched, in front of the altar. (V).
    Note10 reels, 91/95/97 mins; GB: 7,919 ft, 87 mins. USA Rel 9/5/1935 (New York); 24/5/1935 (general release); GB Rel ca. 4/10/1935; IR Rel 27/12/1935. GB Re-release 1947. USA Re-release 1948. Filmed in Hollywood. During the trial Gallagher calls Mulligan, Peter, instead of Pat, as he is described earlier. Variety 15/5/1935:19 reports that Irish-American Robert Sisk assisted with the production through his knowledge of Irish history and culture. For the background on the production see note withA/7 Catalog 1931-1940:1025-6. O'Flaherty's novel was influenced by an agricultural labour strike in the early 1920s and not by the military events in Ireland. This was the second cinema version of O'Flaherty's novel (see THE INFORMER, GB 1929, above), and was John Ford's first sound film set in Ireland. Ford received an Academy Award and the New York Film Critics Award for Best Director for THE INFORMER, while Victor McLaglen (Best Actor), Dudley Nichols (Best Screenplay) and Max Steiner (Best Music Score) also received Academy Awards. The film was also nominated for Best Picture, but this award went to MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY. It won the New York Film Critics 'Gold Medal' Award for Best Picture of 1935. It also won the Prix du Roi at the 1935 Brussels International Rim Festival and the 1935 Best Picture Award from the National Board of Review (USA). the film was rejected for public exhibition by the Official Film Censor, but was later passed by the Censorship of Films Appeals Board. The British Board of Film Censors made 129 cuts, including all references to violence, to the Black and Tans, and to the Irish Republican Army. The film was banned in Peru, and cut in Ontario, Canada. A third adaptation of O'Flaherty's book UP TIGHT (Jules Dassin, USA 1968), was set in Cleveland, Ohio in the context of the struggle for African-American civil rights. "The spirit of Liam O'Flaherty's novel has been caught perfectly... The story, of course, is not pleasant... The producers have aimed at no more than a vague presentation of Dublin, but, although there are a few inevitable mistakes in detail, the general effect is surprisingly good. There is, at least, nothing in this film which is "stage-Irish" and very few things which strike a false note.' (IT 24/12/1935:4). 'If you lived through Trouble of 1919-21, you must see an impressionistic study of those times which with minor inaccuracies which do not matter, captures the spirit of the time... If you like good entertainment you must see one of the most gripping films ever shown in Dublin'. (II 28/12/1935:10). 'Cinema audiences have been supplied with many historical films, but for some unknown reason, that exciting period in the history of Dublin - from 1914 to 1923 - has been featured but seldom'. (EH 8/12/1935:7). 'Considered solely as a film, it ranks very high... John Ford has built up his atmosphere in the gloomy fog-bound streets with a sensitive, imaginative power that merits the highest praise. As an Irishman who lived through that period in Dublin, I see nothing to object to but it is not a realistic study. I never felt, even once, "the scene is essentially Dublin", or even "typically Dublin"...It is a legitimate and impressionistic study of "The Terror". The details are correct...but the atmosphere is wrong. It is too grim and too sombre. That is inevitable from the plot; and the incidents chosen, the I.R.A., act typically enough, but perforce we only see one side of them. Normally, if "The Terror" can be called normal, they were a far more cheerful lot than these stem tight-lipped revolutionaries'. (EH 20/12/1935:9). 'The theme of the story has been so cleverly dealt with, and its undoubtedly dramatic facets so subtly emphasised, that the note of sordidness which prevails in the book obtrudes only very slightly in the film. To Dublin audiences in particular this picture will bring back memories of one of the most terrible periods in the history of the city, and one which we can hardly yet see in the proper perspective'. (SI 29/12/1935:4). 'Many incidents recall similar ones from the saga of the fight for political freedom. But the details are worked out in hopeless variance with fact... Yet, one has got to admit the greatness of the film. Its force, its ceaseless questioning, make up for its inaccuracies'. (IP 31/12/1935:5). 'Many men who were associated with the fight for Irish Independence have seen the film and paid tribute to its artistry, and to Victor McLaglen's performance in the title role, which places him amongst the great actors of the screen'. (SI 5/1/1936:4).
    ReferenceDV 24/4/1935:3; DEM 28/12/1935:7; EH 21/12/1935:7; EH 28/12/1935:7; FD 1/5/1935:8; FD 31/10/1935:13; HR 17/12/1934:3; HR /3/1935:14-15; HR 24/4/1935:3; HR 1/3/1938:1; LAT 18/9/1948; MFB 1935:104; MPD 25/4/1935:4; MPH 16/3/1935:35; MPH 4/5/1935:32-5; NYT 10/5/1935:25; NYT 28/7/1935; NYT 8/9/1935; NYT 2/1/1936:21; NYT 5/1/1936; NYT 29/3/1936; NYT 5/4/1936; NYT 23/8/1936; Observer (London) 6/10/1935; TC 24/6/1935:8. IT 6/10/1958:6; Sun 18/1/1973; SP 15/7/1951.

    Records of the Film: The Informer; Publicity: plot synopsis, cast and crew lists for the film (BFI, London, 1930s, Roger Manvell).

    Cinema of John Ford, 1971:48-57, ‘Old Ireland: The Informer, The Rising of the Moon’, chapter on director John Ford's work, using The Informer as an example (John Baxter).

    Films and Filming, July 1960:10-2, 35, ‘Great Films of the Century, No.3 - The Informer’, plot synopsis, biographies of stars and crew, quotes from critics and a re-evaluation of the film.

    Sight and Sound, Autumn 1976:231-2, review (Gorge Luis Borges).

    Sight and Sound, Winter 35/36:172, ‘The Informer is most of the time...’, review (Alistar Cook).

    Monthly Film Bulletin, Aug. 1935:104 (J.W.U.T.).
    DistributorRKO Radio Pictures Inc (USA)
    KeywordsWar of Independence
    Irish History
    IRA
    Informers
    Black and Tans
    Production creditsp.c: RKO Radio Pictures Inc. A John Ford Production, assoc. p: Cliff Reid, d: John Ford, a.d: Edward O'Fearna, Eddie Donahue, sc: Dudley Nichols from the novel The INíormer by Liam O'Flaherty (London: Jonathan Cape, 1925), contribution to treatment: Liam O'Flaherty, c: Joseph H August, ed: George Hively, art d: Van Nest Polglase, art d. assoc: Charles Kirk, set dec: Julia Heron, cost: Walter Plunkett, s: Hugh McDowell Jr, m: Max Steiner, songs: 'The Rose of Tralee' (trad.), 'Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms' lyr: Thomas Moore, trad. m. research: Elizabeth McGaffey, press agent: S Barret McCormick, USA distr: RKO Radio Pictures Inc.
    Art directionPolglase, Van Nest
    KIRK, Charles
    Assistan directorO'Fearna, Edward
    DONAGHUE, Eddie
    Costume designPLUNKETT, Walter
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Historical Drama
    Political Thriller
    Literary Adaptation

    TitleSWEEPSTAKE ANNIE
    Production companyLiberty Pictures Corp
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorNIGH, William
    Script/AdaptationDARLING, W. Scott
    PhotographyNEUMANN, Harry
    Sound recordingBUMBAUGH, Harold
    EditingJOHNSON, Mildred
    Songs'Babbling Tongues', 'Country Folk' lyr/m: J Walter Leopold.
    CastTom Brown (Bill Enright), Marion Nixon (Annie Foster), Wera
    Engels (Baroness Yvonne Baritska), Inez Courtney (Marge), Ivan
    Lebedeff (Baron Rudolph Baritska), Lucien Littlefield (Mr Henry Foster),
    Dorothy Peterson (Mrs Foster), William Janney (Arthur Foster), Carol
    Tevis (Sally Foster).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration73/75/81
    Format35mm
    Release date1935
    SummaryWhen hard-working Annie Foster draws a horse in the Irish Sweepstakes, her mother organises a neighbourhood party, at which her fiance. Bill Enright, accuses her ungrateful family of exploiting Annie. As a result, she breaks off their engagement. When she wins the Sweepstakes, she gives her family $25,000, and keeps $125,000 for herself. She moves into a large house with her friend Marge. They befriend Baron and Baroness Baritska, who try to swindle Annie out of the money. When Annie's family spend the money she gave them, they move into Annie's house, and bring their friends to Annie's parties. Bill becomes the Baritskas' chauffeur and exposes their plot. By now disillusioned, Annie returns to work as a script clerk, while Bill becomes manager of a lighting company, and the couple are reconciled. (Adapted from AFI Catalog 1931-1940:2105-6, articles).
    Note8 reels. USA Rel 5/3/1935. This film was one of many British and American films which used the Irish Sweepstakes as a narrative device in the 1930s and 1940s.
    ReferenceDV 28/12/1934:3; FD 30/1/1935:9; HR 12/11/1934:7; HR 29/12/1935:3; MPD 4/1/1935:16; MPH 23/2/1935:58; Var 27/2/1935:26.
    DistributorLiberty Pictures Corp
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Sweepstakes Lottery
    Production creditsp.c/distr: Liberty Pictures Corp. pres: M H Hoffman, d: William Nigh,
    story/cont/dial: W Scott Darling, suggested by Evelyn Law, c: Harry
    Neumann, ed: Mildred Johnson, s: Harold Bumbaugh, songs: 'Babbling
    Tongues', 'Country Folk' lyr/m: J Walter Leopold, p.m: Rudolph
    Flothow, a. to p: M H Hoffman Jr.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleCOLLEEN
    Production companyWarner Bros Pictures Inc
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorGREEN, Alfred E.
    Script/AdaptationMILNE, Peter
    HERBERT, F. Hugh
    HERZIG, Sig
    LORD, Robert
    PhotographyHASKIN, Byron
    POLITO, Sol
    EditingMORSE, Terry
    Executive producerWARNER, Jack L.
    WALLIS, Hal B.
    Music composerWARREN, Harry
    Music performanceVitaphone Orchestra
    Songs'I Don't Have to Dream Again' sung by Dick Powell; 'You Gotta Know How to Dance' sung by Ruby Keeler; 'An Evening with You' sung by Powell; 'A Boulevardier from the Bronx' sung by Jack Oakie, lyr: Al Dubin, m: Harry Warren.
    CastDick Powell (Donald Ames 3rd), Ruby Keeler {Colleen Reilly}, Jack Oakie (Joe Cork), Joan Blondell (Minnie Hawkins), Hugh Herbert (Cedric Ames), Louise Fazenda (Alicia Ames), Paul Draper (Paul Gordon), Marie Wilson (Mabel), Luis Albemi (Carlo), Hobart Cavanaugh (Noggin), Berton Churchill (Logan), J M Kerrigan {Pop Reilly}, Addison Richards (Schuyler), Charles Coleman (butler). Spencer Charters (Doctor Frothingham), Andre Beranger (jeweller), Mary Treen (Miss Hively), Colleen Coleman (Lois), Herbert Evans (footman), Viola Lowry (receptionist), Emmett Vogan (official), Cyril Ring (client). Harry Depp (assistant), Bob Murphy (1st officer). Ward Bond (2nd officer). Alma Lloyd (nurse), Sarah Edwards (1st society woman), Laura Pierpont (2nd society woman), John Albright (page boy), Alphonse Martell (head waiter), Andre Cheron (waiter). Iris March (Miss Graham), Edward Keane (Edwards), Pauline Garon (maid), Antonio Filauri (bartender), Charles E Delaney (ship radio officer), Shirley Lloyd.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration89/100
    Format35mm
    Release date1936
    SummaryBusinessman Cedric Ames buys a dress shop for Minnie Hawkins, a gold digger. Cedric's nephew, Donald Ames 3rd, goes to the shop to sort out the consequent administrative mess. However, the shop's bookkeeper, Colleen Reilly, tries to convince Donald of the worth of the venture in light of the publicity surrounding its purchase. She plans a fashion show with some designs of her own and convinces Donald to keep the shop open. At dinner with Donald, she tells him that she is engaged to Joe. Joe himself invites Minnie to dinner, at which they scheme to cheat Cedric of his money by having him adopt Minnie. Cedric's wife hears of the plan and demands that Donald close the shop. By now Donald and Colleen have fallen in love, but she mistakenly blames him for her being fired. Distressed, she accepts an offer to open a dress shop on an ocean liner. It is the same ship that Donald is on with Cedric and Alicia, and the couple are reconciled. (Adapted from AFI Catalog 1931-1940:371-2, articles).
    Note10 reels. USA Rel 21/3/1936. Originally 100 minutes, prior to general release this film was cut to 89 minutes.
    ReferenceDV 5/11/1935:2; FD 6/3/1936:9; FD 9/3/1936:4-5; HR 21/1/1936:3;
    MFB 1936:64; MPD 3/3/1936:3; MPH 14/12/1935:51; MPH 1/2/1936:46;
    NYT 9/3/1936:20; Var 11/3/1936:15.
    DistributorWarner Bros Pictures Inc
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Fashion
    Production creditsp.c/distr: Warner Bros Pictures Inc, exec. p: Jack L Warner, Hal B Wallis, super: Robert Lord, d: Alfred E Green, a.d: Jack Sullivan, sc: Peter Milne, F Hugh Herbert, Sig Herzig from a story by Lord, c: Byron Haskin, Sol Polito, art d: Max Parker, ed: Terry Morse, gowns: Orry-Kelly, Vitaphone Orchestra c: Leo F Forbstein, songs: 'I Don't Have to Dream Again' sung by Dick Powell; 'You Gotta Know How to Dance' sung by Ruby Keeler; 'An Evening with You' sung by Powell; 'A Boulevardier from the Bronx' sung by Jack Oakie, lyr: Al Dubin, m: Harry Warren, m. arrg: Ray Heindorf, choreo: Paul Draper, prod. numbers created/staged: Bobby Connolly.
    Art directionPARKER, Max
    Assistan directorSULLIVAN, Jack
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleLAUGHING IRISH EYES
    Production companyRepublic Pictures Corp
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerLEVINE, Nat
    DirectorSANTLEY, Joseph
    Script/AdaptationCOOPER, Olive
    RYAN, Ben
    RAUH, Stanley
    PhotographyKRASNER, MIlton
    LANNING, Reggie
    Sound recordingKELLUM, Terry
    EditingSELDEEN, Murray
    LEWIS, Joseph H.
    Songs'Bless You, Darlin' Mother' m/lyr: Sam H Stept; 'All My Life', 'Laughing Irish Eyes' m: Stept, lyr: Sidney Mitchell; 'The Londonderry Air' (trad).
    CastPhil Regan (Danno O'Keefe), Walter C Kelly (Pat Kelly), Evalyn Knapp (Peggy Kelly), Ray Walker (Eddie Bell), Mary Gordon (Mrs O'Keefe), Warren Hymer (Tiger O'Keefe), Betty Compson (Molly), J M Kerrigan (Tim), Herman Bing (Weisbacher), Raymond Hatton (Gallagher), Clarence Muse (Deacon), Russell Hicks (Silk Taylor), Maurice Black (Tony Martin), John Sheehan (Joe Cronin), Robert E Homans (announcer), John Indrisano (fight trainer), Ritchie McCarron ('Dynamite' O'Reilly), Jimmy O'Gatty ('Killer' O'Keamy), Don LaRue (Kid Campo), Charles Randolph (referee). Ray Brown (editor).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration70/73
    Footage63386348
    Format35mm
    Release date1936
    CopyNFTVA
    IFA
    SummaryPat Kelly, co-owner of the Irish-American Athletic Club and a fight promoter, discovers that the two contestants in a fight are not as they are called 'Dynamite' O'Reilly and 'Killer' O'Keamey, but 'a couple of Eskimos', or those of non-Irish parentage. Disappointed at the lack of Ireland fighters. Pat challenges his partners. Silk Taylor and Tony Martin, with a $10,000 bet and his interest in the club that he can go to Ireland and find an Irish boxer who can be a title contender within six months. Pat's reputation has been tarnished by radio sports commentator Eddie Bell, who is in love with Pat's daughter, Peggy. Pat and Peggy go to Ireland where Pat arranges a contract with boxing trainer Joe Cronin for middleweight boxer Tiger O'Keefe, a heavy drinker, to go to America. While Pat waits for Tiger at a pub, Peggy meets Danno O'Keefe, a singing blacksmith, with whom she travels to the County Cork Fair. At a singing contest at the Fair, Dubliner Francis Xavier Mulcahy sings 'Kitty Me Love Will You Marry Me?'. Peggy encourages Danno to enter the contest, and he sings 'The Londonderry Air'. Danno wins the contest and the prize of a motorcar. He takes Peggy to the country in it and she kisses what he says is the Blarney Stone. He gets her to put on a blindfold which he says is necessary for the experience and she ends up kissing him. Shortly afterwards, distracted by Peggy, he releases the handbrake on the car and then steps out of it. The car runs down the hill and crashes into a tree. The couple return to the pub where they left Pat. Danno says goodbye to Peggy and leaves, only to encounter Tiger with whom he has a fight. Danno knocks out Tiger and impresses Pat. Cronin convinces Danno to pretend that he is Tiger and to go to America with the Kellys, as Pat has not yet met Tiger, while Cronin can still collect his $15,000 commission. En route to America, Peggy discovers that her father thinks Danno is Tiger, but Danno reassures her that he will not disgrace him. In New York, Peggy arranges with Eddie for Danno to sing on the radio. On the night of his radio debut, Danno is also due to have his first fight, but Pat tells Peggy that he will lose his share of the Club if Danno is not the contender within six months. Peggy tells Eddie that Danno is not a professional boxer, information which Eddie uses with Silk and Tony to allow Danno to win his first two fights with the intention of collecting a large sum later. Silk and Tony bribe Danno's first two opponents. Kid Campo and Battling Winters, to throw the fights. When he is due to face the contender, K 0 Schultz, Pat bets heavily with Silk, including his interest in the club, that Danno will win in six rounds. Peggy tells Eddie that she and Danno are due to be married after the fight. A jealous Eddie tells his listeners about Danno's real identity, which leads to a confrontation between Danno and Eddie, who tells Danno that Peggy has misled him. Danno decides to return to Ireland before the fight, but Peggy finds him at the pier. He discovers from her that Pat didn't fix the fights as Eddie had said, and she reassures him of her love for him. He goes to Madison Square Garden for his championship fight challenge. After a tough fight Danno beats the contender, while Pat's future is secured by the victory. Peggy announces that she will not allow him to fight again, and he resumes his singing career on the radio. (V).
    Note8 reels. USA Rel 15/3/1936; IR Rel ca. 9/4/1936. Re-issued GB 1937. Limerick Film Archive holds a 16mm print of this film.
    ReferenceBox 21/3/1936; DV 5/3/1936:3; EH 10/11/1936:4; FD 21/10/1935:10;
    FD 4/3/1936:5; HR 20/7/1935:4; HR 14/11/1935:3; HR 18/1/1936:3;
    HR 20/1/1936:18; HR 5/3/1936:3; MFB 1937:34; MPD 4/3/1936:29; MPH 14/3/1936:58; NYT 4/4/1936:11; Var 8/4/1936:16. AH Cat 1931-1940:1158; MPG.
    DistributorRepublic Pictures Corp (USA)
    British Lion Film Corporation (GB)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Boxing
    Production creditsp.c: Republic Pictures Corp. p: Nat Levine, super: Colbert Clark, d: Joseph Santley, a.d: Mack Wright, sc: Olive Cooper, Ben Ryan, Stanley Rauh from an original story by Sidney Sutherland, Wallace Sullivan, c: Milton Krasner, Reggie Lanning, ed: Murray Seldeen, super, ed: Joseph H Lewis, m. super: Harry Grey, songs: 'Bless You, Darlin' Mother' m/lyr: Sam H Stept; 'All My Life', 'Laughing Irish Eyes' m: Stept, lyr: Sidney Mitchell; 'The Londonderry Air' (trad), s: Terry Kellum, USA distr: Republic Pictures Corp. GB distr: British Lion Film Corporation.
    Assistan directorWRIGHT, Mack
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitlePADDY O DAY
    IMMIGRANT, THE
    IMMIGRANTS
    LITTLE IMMIGRANT, THE
    Production companyTwentieth Century-Fox Film Corp
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorSEILER, Lewis
    Script/AdaptationBRESLOW, Lou
    ELISCU, Edward
    PhotographyMILLER, Arthur
    Sound recordingBRUZLIN, Alfred
    EditingDE GAETANO, Al
    Executive producerWURTZEL, Sol M.
    Songs'Keep That Twinkle in Your Eye', 'I Like a Balalaika' lyr: Edward Eliscu, Sidney
    Clare, m: Harry Akst; 'Changing My Ambitions' lyr/m: Pinky Tomlin,
    Coy Poe; 'Which Is Which' lyr: Clare, m: Troy Sanders; 'Sleep My Baby'
    (Bauishka Bain, Russian lullaby)
    CastJane Withers {Paddy O'Day}, Pinky Tomlin (Roy Ford), Rita Cansino [later Rita Hayworth] (Tamara Petrovitch), Jane Darwell (Dora), George Givot (Mischa), Francis Ford (Tom McGuire), Vera Lewis (Aunt Flora Ford), Louise Carter (Aunt Jane Ford), Russell Simpson (Benton), Michael Visaroff (Popushka Petrovitch), Nina Visaroff (Momushka Petrovitch), Pat O'Malley (Wilson), Robert Dudley (chauffeur), Selmer Jackson, Ruth Clifford, Larry Steers (first-class passengers), Harvey dark (ship's doctor), Jessie Pringle, Evelyn Selbie (immigrant women), Myra Marsh (matron), Jane Keckley (maid). Tommy Bupp, Sherwood Bailey, Harry Watson (street boys), Russ dark (New York traffic policeman}, Larry Fisher (truck driver), Hal K Dawson (motorist), Egon Brecher, Leonid Snegoff, Demetrios Alexis (Russian musicians), Clarence H Wilson (Brewster), Richard Powell (taxi driver), Aaron Rosenberg.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration73/75-76
    Footage6800
    Format35mm
    Release date1936
    SummaryEight-year-old Paddy O'Day and her dog Tim travel from Ireland to New York to live with her mother, a cook, who works for the Fords, a wealthy family. At Ellis Island the Fords' butler Benton tells immigration officer Tom McGuire that Paddy's mother died a few days earlier. McGuire tells Paddy that her mother is sick and as a result is unable to come, and although distressed at her plight, he arranges for her to return to Ireland. Another immigrant, Russian Tamara Petrovitch, with whom Paddy became friends on the boat, finds out that Paddy's mother has died. She offers to look after her, as Paddy has no family in Ireland, but McGuire refuses an entry permit for Paddy. Paddy hides in a truck and gets to Manhattan. She becomes involved in a fight with a street tough who mimics her Irish accent, but an Irish policeman tells a motorist whom he has stopped for speeding to take Paddy to the Fords' home in Southampton. At the Fords', Roy Ford, a reclusive songwriter and collector of stuffed birds, lives with his aunts. Flora and Jane. When Paddy arrives, Dora, a maid, reveals that Paddy's mother has died, and convinces Benton and the other servants to hide Paddy in the house. After Paddy's dog chases the Fords' cat, Paddy hides in Roy's room. He then protects her from his aunts. Tamara and her brother Mischa, who run the Cafe Petrovitch, visit Paddy. Tamara convinces Roy to let Paddy live with her, because she would be safe from the immigration officers there. Mischa gets Roy, who is attracted to Tamara, to invest $10,000 in putting on a stage show and to help in renovating the cafe. Roy adopts a Russian persona and attire, which causes his aunts to faint. As part of his change, Roy substitutes live birds for the stuffed ones, and takes to drinking vodka. On the day before the opening of the show. Flora and Jane discover that Tamara has been hiding Paddy. They plan to have Tamara and Paddy deported and to have Roy placed in a sanatorium. After the show, which includes songs written by Roy, McGuire arrives at the behest of the aunts. Roy offers to adopt Paddy and then reveals that he married Tamara the previous day. The aunts faint again, but when they recover they accept the new situation. (Adapted from AH Catalog 1931-1940:1606-7, articles).
    Note8 reels. USA Rel 17/1/1936, IR Rel ca. 15/8/1936. Working titles THE IMMIGRANT; IMMIGRANTS; THE LITTLE IMMIGRANT.
    ReferenceDV 26/10/1935:3; FD 29/10/1935:6; HR 24/8/1935:2; HR 4/9/1935:2;
    HR 17/9/1935:6; HR 21/9/1935:4; HR 26/10/1935:3; IT 18/8/1934:4; MFB 1937:12; MPD 28/10/1935:9; MPH 2/11/1935:57; NYT 8/2/1936:19; Var 31/6/1935; Var 12/2/1936:18. MPG
    DistributorTwentieth Century-Fox Film Corp
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Emigration
    Production creditsp.c/distr: Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. exec. p: Sol M Wurtzel, d: Lewis Seiler, a.d: Aaron Rosenberg, Sam Schneider, sc: Lou Breslow, Edward Eliscu, c: Arthur Miller, art d: Duncan Cramer, Lewis Creber, ed: Al De Gaetano, cost: Helen Myron, m.d: Samuel Kaylin, songs: 'Keep That Twinkle in Your Eye', 'I Like a Balalaika' lyr: Edward Eliscu, Sidney Clare, m: Harry Akst; 'Changing My Ambitions' lyr/m: Pinky Tomlin, Coy Poe; 'Which Is Which' lyr: Clare, m: Troy Sanders; 'Sleep My Baby' (Bauishka Bain, Russian lullaby), dances staged by: Fanchon, s: Alfred Bruzlin.
    Art directionCRAMER, Duncan
    CREBER, Louis
    Costume designMYRON, Helen
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama

    TitleOUTLAWS OF THE PRAIRIE
    Production companyColumbia Pictures Corp of California Ltd
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorNELSON, Sam
    Script/AdaptationEARL REPP, Ed
    PhotographyBOYLE, John
    EditingLYON, William
    Executive producerBRISKIN, Irving
    Associate producerDECKER, Harry L.
    Songs'Blue Prairie', 'Song of the Bandit', 'Open Range Ahead' lyr/m:
    Bob Nolan; 'My Saddle Pal and I' lyr/m: Len Syle.
    CastCharles Starrett (Dart Collins), Donald Grayson (Slim Grayson), Ins Meredith (Judy Garfield), Norman Willis (William Lupton), Dick Curtis (Dragg), Edward Le Saint (Lafe Garfield), Eddie Cobb (Jed Stevens), Art Mix (Lawton), Steve dark (Cobb), Hank Bell (Jim), Earle Hodgins (Neepah), Lee Shumway (Captain MacMillian), Sons of the Pioneers, Jack Rockwell (sheriff). Bob Nolan (Bob Nolan), Frank Shannon (Dart Collins Sr), Fred Burns (Hank), Charles Brinley (1st guard), Delmar Watson (Dart Coilins Jr), Lambert Rogers (Bill Lupton), Dick Alexander (Rufe Lupton), Joe Yrigoyen, Chuck Baldra, Jim Corey, Bert Dillard, Art Dillard, Frank McCarroll, Jack Shannon (outlaw bulldogs), Frank Austin (doctor), George Chesebro (citizen), Vernon Dent (bearded man), E L Dale (ge doctor). Buck Moulton (Calvin), Jack Kirk, Charles LeMoyne, Curley Dresden, George Morrell, Buel Bryant, Ray Jones, Blackie Whiteford, Pat Brady, Hugh Fair, Karl Farr, Bob Burns.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration56/57/58
    Format35mm
    Release date1937
    SummaryTexas Ranger Dart Collins is practising shooting at the Tres Nogales ranger station and is evasive when his friend, Slim Grayson, enquires about his missing fingers. Investigator Calvin arrives dead at the station after enquiring into stagecoach hold-ups near Oro Grande. Dart takes over the investigation, and the other rangers masquerade as a medicine show to give him back-up. Dart visits his father's grave outside Oro Grande and tells Slim that his fingers were severed by his father's murderer when he was a child. Mine owners Lafe Garfield and Jed Stevens are arranging for a gold shipment through William Lupton, the town banker, who is behind the robberies. Before the gold reaches Oro Grande it is stolen by Dragg and his gang, who work for Lupton. The rangers watch in surprise as the gang are helped by the stagecoach guards. When the empty stagecoach arrives in town, Lupton tells the mine owners that he will foreclose on their mines. Dart meets Garfield and his daughter, Judy, who is employed as Lupton's secretary, and discovers that the guards work for Lupton. Judy agrees to get the combination of Lupton's safe to find proof of his role in the robberies. While trying to ingratiate himself with Lupton, Dragg discovers Dart's ranger's papers in his saddle and sees him with the Garfields. Garfield and the other miners plan to ship the gold themselves, while Dart gets the evidence from Lupton's safe. The gold is shipped on the stagecoach with Lupton's men acting as guards, but the rangers attack it and swap clothes with Lupton's men. When the gang attack the stagecoach, they are killed or taken prisoner. Dart has discovered that Lupton killed his father, so he discards his ranger's badge and goes to town alone in search of Lupton. Dart forces Lupton from his office, and in a shoot-out on the street. Dart kills Lupton and then shoots Dragg on a roof. While the rangers go back to Tres Nogales, Dart stays behind with Judy. (Adapted from AFI Catalog 1931-1940:1597-8, articles).
    NoteUSA Rel 31/12/1937. Working title THE SINGING RANGERS.
    ReferenceBox 5/2/1938; FD 2/2/1938:6; HR 25/10/1937:6; Var 26/1/1938:15.
    DistributorColumbia Pictures Corp of California Ltd (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Production creditsp.c/distr: Columbia Pictures Corp of California Ltd, exec. p: Irving Briskin, assoc. p: Harry L Decker, d: Sam Nelson, a.d: Milton Carter, sc: Ed Earl Repp from the short story 'Trigger Fingers' by Harry F Olmsted (publication undetermined), c: John Boyle, ed: William Lyon, songs: 'Blue Prairie', 'Song of the Bandit', 'Open Range Ahead' lyr/m: Bob Nolan; 'My Saddle Pal and I' lyr/m: Len Syle.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Literary Adaptation
    Western

    TitleIN OLD CHICAGO
    Production companyTwentieth Century-Fox Film Corp
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorKING, Henry
    Script/AdaptationTROTTI, Lamar
    LEVIEN, Sonya
    PhotographyMARLEY, Peverall
    VAN WARMER, J.
    CLARK, Daniel B.
    Sound recordingGROSSMAN, Eugene
    HEMAN, Roger
    SNYDER, W.R.
    EditingMcLEAN, Barbara
    BILLINGS, Richard
    FRITCH, Bobby
    Associate producerMACGOWAN, Kenneth
    Music composerSILVERS, Louis
    Songs'In Old Chicago' sung by Alice Faye, chorus, lyr: Mack Gordon, m: Harry Revel; 'I'll Never Let You Cry', 'I've Taken a Fancy to You' sung by Faye, lyr: Sidney D Mitchell, m: Lew Pollack; 'Take a Dip in the Sea' sung by Tyler Brooke, chorus, lyr: Mitchell, m: Pollack; 'Carry Me Back to Old Virginny' sung by Faye, Brooke, Male Quartet, chorus, m/lyr: James A Bland, 'Sweet Genevieve' sung by Alice Brady, Tyrone Power, Don Ameche, Tom Brown, June Storey, m/lyr: George Cooper, Henry Tucker.
    CastTyrone Power {Dion O'Leary}, Alice Faye (Belle Fawcett), Don Ameche {Jack O'Leary}, Alice Brady {Molly O'Leary}, Andy Devine (Pickle Bixby), Brian Donlevy (Gil Warren), Phyllis Brooks (Ann Colby), Tom Brown {Bob O'Leary}, Sidney Blackmer (General Phil Sheridan), Berton Churchill (Senator Colby), June Storey (Gretchen O'Leary), Paul Hurst (Mitch), Tyler Brooke (speciality singer), J Anthony Hughes (Patrick O'Leary}, Gene Reynolds {Dion O'Leary as a boy}. Bobs Watson {Bob O'Leary as a boy}, Billy Watson {Jack O'Leary as a boy}, Madame Sul-te-wan (Hattie), Spencer Charters (Beavers), Rondo Hatton (Rondo, bodyguard), Thelma Manning (Carrie Donahue), Ruth Gillette (Miss Lou), Eddie Collins (drunk), Scotty Mattraw (beef king), Joe Twerp (stuttering clerk), Charles Lane (booking agent), Clarence Hummel Wilson (lawyer), Frank Dae (judge). Harry Stubbs (fire commissioner), Joe King (ship's captain), Francis Ford (driver), Robert Murphy, Wade Boteler (police officers), Gustav von Seyffertitz, Russell Hicks (men in Jack's office), Bess Flowers (woman with Senator Colby), Harrison Greene (man with Senator Colby), Rice & Cady (Dutch comedians). Jack Cheatham, Eleanor Prentiss, Jane Ray, Muriel Scheck, Louise Seidel, Hope Taylor, June Terry, Valerie Traxler, Lurline Uller, Marion Weldon, Dorothy White, Mary Louise Kopp, Billie Lee, Patricia Lee, Patsy Lee, Mary Lorraine, Patty Parrish, Patsy Pen-in, Julie Cabanne, Harriette Haddon, Norah Gale, Edna Mae Jones, Jean Joyce, Adelaide Kaye, Crystal Keate, Jacqueline Kopp, Kathryn Bames, Sue Barstead, Doris Becker, Patsy Bedell, Barbara Booth, Dale Dee, Jeanette Bates, John Roy, Harry Hayden (Johnson, Jack's secretary), Ed Brady (wagon driver), Vera Lewis (witness), Minerva Urecal (frantic mother).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration110/115
    Footage10002
    Format35mm
    Release date1938
    SummaryIn 1854 Molly O'Leary, her husband Patrick and their young sons, Dion, Jack and Bob, are travelling by covered wagon to Chicago. Patrick is killed when he tries to outrun a train and the wagon's horses drag him on the ground. Before he dies, he tells his sons to grow up with Chicago which he believes will become the hub of the country. By 1867 Molly owns a successful French laundry in Chicago. The O'Learys' cow Daisy kicks Bob and he falls into the arms of Gretchen, who has been milking the cow, and they marry soon afterwards. Dion finds a map of the new tramline in the laundry his mother is doing for Gil Warren's saloon. The Hub, in the area of Chicago known as The Patch. Dion goes to Warren's saloon, sees the newly-arrived Belle Fawcett singing and falls in love with her, but he is thrown out. Frustrated at Belle's lack of interest in him, Dion hides in her carriage and wrestles with her as he tells her he loves her, but she later pushes him into a water trough. He breaks into her apartment, wrestles her to the ground again and they kiss. She agrees to appear at a saloon he plans to open on property she owns and in opposition to The Hub. Their saloon. The Senate, is a success, and The Hub's owner, Gil Warren, offers to close down his saloon and give Dion $10,000 if he will support his candidacy for mayor. Dion accepts the money. Meanwhile, Jack, by now a lawyer with sympathy for the poor, is asked to run as a reform candidate for mayor. Dion encourages Jack to run as a reform candidate, but he tells his brother that he will clean up The Patch if he is elected. After a family celebration, Dion tricks his mother into meeting Belle, whom she objects to as she works in a saloon. At an election rally, Dion initiates a brawl to stop Warren's ward heelers, repeat voters and others planning to gerrymander the election. They are arrested by police organised by Dion. He also ensures that the Police Commissioner, the election commissioner who is one of Warren's men, and the judges have left town so that Warren's men cannot be released from jail to sabotage the election. Jack is elected and immediately initiates his plan to close down The Patch, which he regards as rotten and the source of Chicago's vice and crime. Dion overhears Jack tell Belle that he will investigate him and use Belle as a witness. Belle agrees to support Jack's campaign, but Dion tells her she must choose between the reformers and him. The day before Belle is due to testify against him, Dion convinces her to marry him. As Jack is telling the investigation that he regards The Patch as a fire hazard and that it should be rebuilt in steel. Jack and Belle arrive. Dion asks a delighted Jack to perform the marriage ceremony and he does so in his office. Afterwards, though, Dion tells them that now Belle is married to him she cannot testify against him. Jack hits Dion and tells him he will close down The Patch with 500 special deputies. While she is looking after Daisy and a young heifer, Molly hears about the fight from Gretchen. She leaves Daisy and the heifer, but during feeding Daisy kicks over a lantern in the barn and a fire starts and spreads rapidly throughout the city. Warren fuels a rumour that Jack is responsible for the fire as a means of getting rid of The Patch, and a mob goes in search of him. Bob tells Dion that Daisy was responsible for the fire, and despite a further fight between Jack and Dion, the three brothers are soon trying to contain the fire on the south side of the river, by helping keep it away from the gasworks. Though the mob is threatening him. Jack sets fire to the fuses for the dynamite to blow up buildings to create a fire break, but one of Warren's men shoots him. As Jack is being carried away from a building, it blows up and kills him. The explosion startles the cattle in the stockyards and they break out. As they run through the streets. Warren falls from a building into their path and is trampled underfoot. As Dion and Bob escape to safety they find Gretchen and her baby, while Belle comes across Molly. Dion searches for his mother and finds her with Belle on the river. Belle initially ignores him, but Molly demands she become reconciled with her husband. They hug and all three recall Patrick's and Jack's dreams of building the city. (V).
    NoteGB: 9,995 ft, 111 mins. USA Rel 6/1/1938 (world premiere. New York); 15/4/1938 (general release). At $2 million, this was one of the most expensive films yet made and was designed to emulate M-G-M's success with SAN FRANCISCO (USA 1936), a film which is not included in this book, but is of interest as 'Father Tim Mullin', played by Spencer Tracy, fits within the range of representations of Irish-American Catholic priests in this period. Alice Brady won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress and Robert Webb, who was in charge of the disaster sequence, won an Oscar for Assistant Director. The film was also nominated for Best Picture, Best Original Writing (Niven Busch), Best Music Score (Louis Silvers), and Best Sound Recording. Philip Wylie wrote a serialisation of the screenplay, which was published in contemporary newspapers including Daily News (Los Angeles, 3-25 Jan 1938). A condensation of the screenplay was published in The Ten Best Pictures of the Year by Frank Vreeland. The first twenty five sequences were pub- lished in a textbook for educational use by The Macmillan Co. The film was cut by 45 minutes, and with an extra 25 minutes of new disaster- sequence material filmed by Albert S Rogell, and featuring Kevin McCarthy, Jeff Morrow, Roland Winters, Jack Albertson, Laureen Tuttle, and Anne Jeffryes, it was retitled CITY IN FLAMES and re- released for television during the 1956-7 season as part of 'The Twentieth Century-Fox Hour'. (API Catalog 1931-1940:1017-19).
    ReferenceBox 8/1/1938; DV 31/12/1937:3; FD 26/5/1937:16; FD 26/6/1937:1;
    FD 4/1/1938:6; HR 14/5/1937:3; HR 1/6/1937:2; HR 16/6/1937:1; HR 21/6/1937:1; HR 28/6/1937:23; HR 13/7/1937:7; HR 30/8/1937:19; HR 31/12/1937, sect 1:3; sect 2:20-1, 90; HR 14/1/1938:4-5; HR 18/1/1938:5-21; LAEx 8/7/1937; LAT 12/10/1936; MFB 1938:73-4; MPH 4/9/1937:48-9; MPH 8/1/1938:48; NYT 27/6/1937; NYT 10/10/1937; NYT 19/12/1937; NYT 7/1/1938:15; Time 17/1/1938:44-5; Var 12/10/1936; Var 21/11/1936; Var 5/1/1938:16. Movie Song Catalog No. 601; MPG.
    DistributorTwentieth Century-Fox Film Corp (USA)
    Keywords1800s
    Irish-Americans
    Politics
    Production creditsp.c: Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp; Darryl F Zanuck in charge of production, assoc. p: Kenneth Macgowan, d: Henry King, dial. d: Edwin H Curtis, a.d: Robert Webb, 2nd a.d: Robert Hemdon, 2nd unit a.d: Ed O'Fearna, sc: Lamar Trotti, Sonya Levien from the story 'We the O'Learys' by Niven Busch, c: Peverell Marley, c. op: K Green, a.c: J Van Wormer, sp. effs staged by: Fred Sersen, Ralph Hammeras, Louis J Witte, sp. effs. d: H Bruce Humberstone, sp. effs. c: Daniel B Clark, gaffer: Eddie Petzoldt, art d: William Darling, Rudolph Stemad, ed: Barbara McLean, a. cutter: Richard Billings, Bobby Fritch, set dec: Thomas Little, cost: Royer, cost. supplied by: Western Costume Co, The united Costumers, ward: Albert Conti, cost. super: Arthur M Levy, ward man: Bob Lee, ward girl: Ollie Hughes, m.d: Louis Silvers, songs: 'In Old ChicagO'sung by Alice Faye, chorus, lyr: Mack Gordon, m: Harry Revel; 'I'll Never Let You Cry', 'I've Taken a Fancy to You' sung by Faye, lyr: Sidney D Mitchell, m: Lew Pollack; 'Take a Dip in the Sea' sung by Tyler Brooke, chorus, lyr: Mitchell, m: Pollack; 'Carry Me Back to Old Virginny' sung by Faye, Brooke, Male Quartet, chorus, m/lyr: James A Bland, 'Sweet Genevieve' sung by Alice Brady, Tyrone Power, Don Ameche, Tom Brown, June Storey, m/lyr: George Cooper, Henry Tucker; vocal super: Jule Styne, m. cast: Frank Tresselt, dance d: Jack Haskell, Geneva Sawyer, Nick Castle, s: Eugene Grossman, Roger Heman, W R Snyder, boom: Bob Bertrand, cableman: H Richards, hair: Gale Roe, make-up: Ben Nye, p.m: Ed Ebele, unit m: Booth McCracken, sc. clerk: Max Larey, Theresa Brachetto, grip: Jack Percy, a. grip: Al Bumpus, N Hanley, props: Duke Abrahams, research work: Gene Fowler, 2nd unit sc. clerk: Rose Steinberg, a. prop: Fremdling, best boy: Clarence Collins, cast. d: Walter Whaley, horse super: Sid Jordan, press rep: Charles E McCarthy, pub. d: Harry Brand, stunts: Jack Raye, USA distr: Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
    Art directionDARLING, William
    STEMAD, Rudolph
    Costume designLEVY, Arthur
    Royer
    Western Costume Co
    United Costumers
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Period Drama

    TitleOUTSIDE OF PARADISE
    LOVE ON APPROVAL
    Production companyRepublic Pictures Corp
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorAUER, John H.
    Script/AdaptationSAUBER, Harry
    PhotographyMARTA, Jack
    EditingNIMS, Ernest
    SELDEEN, Murray
    Associate producerSAUBER, Harry
    Music composerCOLOMBO, Alberto
    Songs'Outside of Paradise' lyr/m: Jack Lawrence, Peter Tinturin; 'Sweet Irish Sweetheart of Mine', 'Shenanigans', 'I Was the Power Behind the Throne', 'All for One and One for All', 'A Little Bit of Everything' lyr/m: Lawrence,
    'Shenanigans' staged by Larry Ceballos
    CastPhil Regan (Daniel 'Danny' Francis O'Toole}, Penny Singleton {Colleen Kerrigan), Bert Gordon (Mischa, the Mad Russian), Leonid Kinskey (Ivan Petrovitch), Ruth Coleman (Dorothy Stonewall), Mary Forbes (Mrs Stonewall), Lionel Pape (Mr Stonewall), Ralph Remley {Timothy}, Renie Riano (Ellen), Lind Hayes (Lind), Joe E Marks (Bass), David Kerman (Felix), Billy Young (Johnny), Cliff Nazarro (Cliff), Harry Alien (old man), Robert Homans {Uncle Terence}.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration66/68
    Footage5995
    Format35mm
    Release date1938
    SummaryWhen Daniel 'Danny' Francis O'Toole, a singer in a New York Russian cafe, inherits an Irish castle his musician colleagues collect the money to allow him to travel to Ireland. When he reaches the castle he discovers that he only has a half share in it, the other half being owned by Colleen Kerrigan, a member of a clan who have feuded with the O'Tooles for centuries. Although attracted to each other, they are constantly fighting. Colleen won't agree to sell the castle, and also insists that Danny cook for himself in the castle. One night English travellers, Mr and Mrs Stonewall, and their daughter, Dorothy, come to the castle during a storm. After seeing Danny cook a hamburger, Mr Stonewall suggests that Danny open a restaurant in the castle. Though at first opposed to the idea. Colleen finally agrees. Danny and Colleen begin to fall in love and 'Hamburger Dan's', which Danny hopes will raise the money with which he can return to the USA, becomes a success. Danny's musician colleagues from New York, who find themselves out of work when the cafe closes, come to Ireland courtesy of their former boss, Ivan Petrovitch. Ivan decides to open a nightclub at the castle, which is financed by Dorothy who is attracted to Danny. When Colleen discovers that Dorothy financed the nightclub, she decides to sell the castle as she is jealous of Dorothy, whereas Danny thinks Ivan funded the venture himself. To thwart the sale of the castle, one of the band members, Lind, imitates Danny's voice to indicate to Dorothy as Colleen listens that it is Colleen he loves, but the plan is discovered when Colleen sees Danny and Dorothy together shortly afterwards. Colleen tells her uncle Terence that she hates Danny. He fuels the old conflict between the O'Tooles and the Kerrigans as he believes that Danny is talking advantage of Colleen. The Kerrigan clan turn up at the nightclub and start a fight. During the fight, Ivan tells Colleen about the funding of the club. Just as Danny and Colleen are becoming reconciled a ghost in armour appears and Danny tells Colleen that the traditional feud can only be ended when she agrees to marry him. Even though the ghost turns out to be one of the musicians, Mischa, Colleen agrees to marry Danny. (Adapted from AFI Catalog 1931-1940:1598-9, articles).
    Note8 reels. GB: 6,180 ft, 69 mins. USA Rel 7/2/1938. Aka LOVE ON APPROVAL. Monthly Film Bulletin (1938:136) and Motion Picture Guide refer to the character of 'Colleen' as 'Mavoumeen'. Variety (16/2/1938:17) and Motion Picture Guide refer to one of the songs as 'Doing Shenanigans'. Bert Gordon was known as The Mad Russian following his appearance on the Eddie Cantor radio show. Motion Picture Guide calls his character in this film, 'The Mad Russian'. "This is an intentionally improbable film, with artificial Irish scenery, three quite catchy songs and characters out of a cheerful dream. There is plenty of slapstick and the complete lack of logic displayed is in keeping with the spirit of the film.' (MFB).
    ReferenceBox 19/2/1938; DV 12/2/1938:3; FD 11/2/1938:15; HR 19/11/1937:8;
    HR 22/11/1937:6; HR 12/2/1938:2; MPD 14/2/1938:3; MPH 19/2/1938:46-7.
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Inheritance
    Castles
    Singers
    Production creditsp.c/distr: Republic Pictures Corp, assoc. p/sc: Harry Sauber, d: John H Auer, a.d: Phil Ford, c: Jack Marta, art d: John Victor Mackay, ed: Ernest Nims, super, ed: Murray Seldeen, cost: Irene Saltern, Marjorie Montgomery, Patricia Perkins, m.d: Alberto Colombo, songs: 'Outside of Paradise' lyr/m: Jack Lawrence, Peter Tinturin; 'Sweet Irish Sweetheart of Mine', 'Shenanigans', 'I Was the Power Behind the Throne', 'All for One and One for All', 'A Little Bit of Everything' lyr/m: Lawrence, 'Shenanigans' staged by Larry Ceballos, p.m: Al Wilson.
    Art directionMACKAY, John Victor
    Costume designSALTERN, Irene
    MONTGOMERY, Marjorie
    PERKINS, Patricia
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Comedy

    TitleGREAT VICTOR HERBERT, THE
    GAY DAYS OF VICTOR HERBERT, THE
    LIFE OF VICTOR HERBERT, THE
    VICTOR HERBERT
    LIFE AND MELODIES OF VICTOR HERBERT, THE
    Production companyParamount Pictures Inc
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerSTONE, Andrew L.
    DirectorSTONE, Andrew L.
    Script/AdaptationCROUSE, Russell
    LIVELY, Roger
    PhotographyMILNER, Victor
    Sound recordingGRENZBACH, Hugo
    COPE, John
    EditingSMITH, James
    Executive producerLE BARON, William
    Music composerHERBERT, Victor
    LANGE, Arthur
    Songs'Ah, Sweet Mystery Of Life' sung by Allan Jones, lyr: Rida Johnson Young; 'All For You' sung by Allan Jones, Mary Martin, lyr: Henry Blossom; 'I'm Falling In Love With Someone' sung by Jones, Martin, lyr: Young, 'I Love Thee, I Adore Thee' sung by Jones, lyr: Henry B Smith; 'I Might Be Your 'Once in a While'' sung by Martin, lyr: Smith; 'A Kiss in the Dark' sung by Martin, lyr: B G De Sylva; 'Kiss Me Again' sung by Susanna Foster, lyr: Blossom; 'Neapolitan Love Song' sung by Jones, lyr: Blossom; 'There Once Was An Owl' sung by Jones, Martin, lyr: Smith; 'Thine Alone' sung by Jones,
    Martin, lyr: Blossom; 'To The Land Of My Own Romance' sung by Jones,
    Foster, lyr: Smith; 'Wonderful Dreams' lyr: Gus Kahn, m: Victor Herbert.
    CastAllan Jones (John Ramsey), Mary Martin (Louise Hall), Walter Connolly (Victor Herbert}, Lee Bowman (Doctor Richard Moore), Susanna Foster {Peggy}, Judith Barren (Marie dark), Jerome Cowan (Barney Harris), John Garrick (Warner Bryant), Pierre Watkin (Albert Martin), Richard Tucker (Michael Brown), Hal K Dawson (George Faller), Emmett Vogan (Forbes), Mary Currier (Mrs Victor Herbert), James Finlayson (lamp lighter).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration84/96
    Footage8199
    Format35mm
    Release date1939
    SummaryLouise Hall, a choir girl in Riverford, goes to New York to become a singer, leaving behind her doctor boyfriend. In New York she meets John Ramsey, who appears in the operas of Irish-born Victor Herbert. Ramsey falls in love with Louise and promotes her career. Her success causes strains in their relationship and she gives up her career to save their marriage. A daughter, Peggy, is bom, but his popularity declines with female fans as a result of his becoming a father. He begins to blame Louise for the decline of his career to minor roles. Louise leaves him and takes Peggy to Switzerland, but she returns to New York when she hears that his acting career continues to decline. She finds him in poverty and gives singing lessons to support the family. Ashamed at his circumstances, he leaves his family. He takes a role in the revival of one of his operettas. On opening night, Louise is unable to sing due to her upset at the failure of the marriage, but Peggy substitutes for her. She gives a poor performance until her father coaches and encourages her, and soon she is a star. (V).
    Note10 reels. GB: 8,202 ft, 90 mins. USA Rel ca. 7/12/1939 (New York); 29/12/1939 (general release). Working titles THE GAY DAYS OF VICTOR HERBERT; THE LIFE OF VICTOR HERBERT; VICTOR HERBERT; THE LIFE AND MELODIES OF VICTOR HERBERT. A pre-credits sequence shows the real-life Victor Herbert entering a concert hall and raising the baton to conduct an orchestra. Sources give the number of musical compositions in the film as twenty eight (MPG) and thirty five (MFB 1940:21). The above song list is taken from Movie Song Catalog No. 491, while Motion Picture Guide adds 'Someday', lyr: William Le Baron; 'Al Fresco', 'Punchinello', lyr: Henry Blossom; 'Absinthe Frappee', 'Rose Of The World', 'March Of The Toys', lyr: Glen Macdonough; and 'Sweethearts', lyr: Henry B Smith.
    ReferenceDV 13/12/1937:6; DV 27/11/1939:3; FD 1/12/1939:8; HR 3/1/1939:1; HR
    18/7/1939:6; HR 5/8/1939:2; HR 17/8/1939:4; HR 23/9/1939:6-7; HR 28/11/1939:3; MPD 1/12/1939:1, 7; MPH 2/12/1939:41; NYT 7/12/1939:35; Var 29/11/1939:14. AFI Cat 1931-1940:833-4.
    DistributorParamount Pictures Inc (USA)
    PeopleVictor Herbert
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Opera
    Musicians
    Production creditsp.c/distr: Paramount Pictures Inc, p/d: Andrew L Stone, exec. p: William Le Baron, sc: Russel Crouse, Robert Lively from a story by Lively, Stone, a.d: Stanley Goldsmith, dop: Victor Milner, art d: Hans Dreier, Ernst Fegte, ed: James Smith, int. dec: A E Freudeman, cost: Edith Head, m: Victor Herbert, m. score: Arthur Lange, m. super: Phil Boutelje, orch. d: Arthur Kay, vocal arrg: Max Terr, songs: 'Ah, Sweet Mystery Of Life' sung by Allan Jones, lyr: Rida Johnson Young; 'All For You' sung by Allan Jones, Mary Martin, lyr: Henry Blossom; 'I'm Falling In Love With Someone' sung by Jones, Martin, lyr: Young, 'I Love Thee, I Adore Thee' sung by Jones, lyr: Henry B Smith; 'I Might Be Your 'Once in a While'' sung by Martin, lyr: Smith; 'A Kiss in the Dark' sung by Martin, lyr: B G De Sylva; 'Kiss Me Again' sung by Susanna Foster, lyr: Blossom; 'Neapolitan Love Song' sung by Jones, lyr: Blossom; 'There Once Was An Owl' sung by Jones, Martin, lyr: Smith; 'Thine Alone' sung by Jones, Martin, lyr: Blossom; 'To The Land Of My Own Romance' sung by Jones, Foster, lyr: Smith; 'Wonderful Dreams' lyr: Gus Kahn, m: Victor Herbert, m. numbers staged by: LeRoy Prinz, s: Hugo Grenzbach, John Cope, tech. adv: Edwin Lester, p.m: Robert Stillman, stills: Hal McAlpin.
    Art directionDREIER, Hans
    FEGTE, Ernst
    Costume designHEAD, Edith
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Drama
    Biopic

    TitleLET FREEDOM RING
    SONG OF THE WEST
    Production companyMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp
    Loew's Inc
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerRAPF, Harry
    DirectorCONWAY, Jack
    Script/AdaptationHECHT, Ben
    PhotographyWAGNER, Sidney
    Sound recordingSHEARER, Douglas
    EditingSMITH, Frederick Y.
    Music composerLANGE, Arthur
    Songs'Dusty Road' m/lyr: Otis Rene, Leon Rene; 'When Irish Eyes Are Smiling' m: Ernest R Ball, lyr: Chauncey Olcott, George Graff; 'Pat, Sez He' m: Phil Ohman, lyr: Marty Symes; 'Where Else But Here' m: Sigmund Romberg, lyr: Edward Heyman; 'Home, Sweet Home' m: H R Bishop, lyr: John Howard Payne; 'My Country 'Tis of Thee' m: Henry Carey, lyr: Samuel Francis Smith; 'Love's Serenade' m: Riccardo Drigo, lyr: Bob Wright, Chet Forrest; 'The
    Star-Spangled Banner' m/lyr: Francis Scott Key; 'I've Been Working on
    the Railroad' m/lyr: Wright, Forrest, orch. arrg: Leonid Raab.
    CastNelson Eddy (Steve Logan), Virginia Bruce (Maggie Adams), Victor McLaglen (Chris Mulligan), Lionel Barrymore (Thomas Logan), Edward Arnold (Jim Knox), Guy Kibbee (Judge David Bronson), Charles Butterworth (the Mackerel), H B Warner (Rutledge), Raymond Walburn (Underwood), Dick Rich ('Bumper' Jackson), Trevor Bardette (Gagan), George F Hayes (Jerry Top' Wilkie), Louis Jean Heydt (Ned Wilkie), Sarah Padden ('Ma' Logan), Eddie Dunn ('Curly'), Captain C E Anderson (Sheriff Hicks), Philo McCullough, Harry Fleischmann, Ralph Bushmangag (Gagan's henchmen), Maude Alien (Hilda), Adia Kuznetzoff (Pole), LuisasE Albemi (Tony). Emory Parnell (Swede), Tenen Holtz (Hunky), Mitchellsaw Lewis (Joe), Victor Potel (2nd Swede), Constantine Romanoff (Russian), Lionel Royce (German), Billy Bevan (cockney), Syd Saylor, Ted Thompson (surveyors).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Sepia
    Soundsound
    Duration85/87
    Format35mm
    Release date1939
    SummaryAs the railroad is being built westward, Clover City is becoming an important junction. Railroad promoter Jim Knox hires gunmen to terrorise ranchers whose land he wants to acquire for the line. The ranchers' leader is Thomas Logan, whose son is a recent graduate of Harvard Law School, The house of rancher Jerry 'Pop' Wilkie is burned down and a neighbour, Rutledge, shoots Gagan, one of Knox's men who started the fire. Maggie Adams, Steve's ex-girlfriend, tells Knox that Steve will become an effective leader of the townspeople in bringing him to trial. Steve decides that the best means of defeating Knox is to pretend to be his fnend. As a result, he is disowned by his family and friends. Steve secretly establishes an underground newspaper attacking Knox and accusing him of stealing land. In a speech to the railroad construction crew, he preaches democracy and freedom of choice. He also wins the allegiance and friendship of Chris Mulligan, the crew's foreman, who accepts that Knox is a criminal. Thinking'that Steve has abandoned his principles, Maggie agrees to marry Knox as a means of making Steve jealous. Knowing that Knox is worried about the underground newspaper, Knox agrees to Steve's plan to establish a rival newspaper. Knox purchases printing equipment, which Steve then steals to use against Knox. Relations between the two men deteriorates further when Steve's father's house is burned down and Knox tries to prevent Steve from rescuing his father. Steve then outlines to his father and Maggie his strategy to defeat Knox. He then speaks to the townspeople, but at the same meeting Knox threatens Steve. With the meeting turnings against Steve, Maggie leads the people in singing 'My Country 'Tis of Thee'. As a consequence, the people support Steve, and Knox's power is broken With democracy restored to Clover City, Maggie and Steve are reconciled. (Adapted from AFI Catalog 1931-1940:1179, articles).
    Note9 reels. USA Rel 24/2/1939. Working titles THE DUSTY ROAD; SONG OF THE WEST. Quoting contemporary sources, AFI Catalog 1931-1940-A 179, reports that German censors 'deleted the song praising America as a land of freedom', reference to one of the characters as an 'Irish windmill', and a fight between 'Mulligan' and 'Steve'. Estonian censors deleted the line: 'You Germans, Italians, Jews... All you who are oppressed... here are free'.
    ReferenceDV 15/2/1939-3- FD 20/2/1939:9; HR 25/11/1938:3; HR 26/11/1938:2; HR 29/11/1938-3- HR 1/12/1938:2; HR 6/1/1939:4; HR 11/1/1939:7, 8; HR 15/2/1939:3; MPD 20/2/1939:5; MPH 14/1/1939:36; MPH 18/2/1939:42; NYT 10/3/1939:19; Var 22/2/1939:12.
    DistributorLoew's Inc (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    1800s
    Railroads
    Production creditsp.c: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp; controlled by Loew's Inc, p: Harry Rapf, d: Jack Conway, 2nd unit d: John Waters, a.d: Horace Hough, sc/original story: Ben Hecht, c: Sidney Wagner, montage: John Hoffman, art d: Cedric Gibbons, art d. assoc: Daniel B Cathcart, ed: Frederick Y Smith, set dec: Edwin B Willis, women's cost: Dolly Tree, men's cost: Valles, m.d: Arthur Lange, songs: 'Dusty Road' m/lyr: Otis Rene, Leon Rene; 'When Irish Eyes Are Smiling' m: Ernest R Ball, lyr: Chauncey Olcott, George Graff; 'Pat, Sez He' m: Phil Ohman, lyr: Marty Symes; 'Where Else But Here' m: Sigmund Romberg, lyr: Edward Heyman; 'Home, Sweet Home' m: H R Bishop, lyr: John Howard Payne; 'My Country 'Tis of Thee' m: Henry Carey, lyr: Samuel Francis Smith; 'Love's Serenade' m: Riccardo Drigo, lyr: Bob Wright, Chet Forrest; 'The Star-Spangled Banner' m/lyr: Francis Scott Key; 'I've Been Working on the Railroad' m/lyr: Wright, Forrest, orch. arrg: Leonid Raab, rd. d: Douglas Shearer, make-up: Jack Dawn, USA distr: Loew's Inc.
    Art directionGIBBONS, Cedric
    CATHCART, Daniel B.
    Costume designTREE, Dolly
    Valles
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Drama
    Western

    TitleIRENE
    Production companyImperadio Pictures Ltd
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerWILCOX, Herbert
    DirectorWILCOX, Herbert
    Script/AdaptationDUER MILLER, Alice
    PhotographyMETTY, Russell
    Sound recordingVAN HESSEN, Richard
    EditingWILLIAMS, Elmo
    Associate producerWHITE, Merrill G.
    Songs'Alice Blue Gown' sung by Anna Neagle, Martha Tilton, The Dandridge Sisters; 'Castle of Dreams' sung by chorus; 'Irene' sung by chorus; 'You've Got Me Out on a Limb' sung by Neagle, Stuart Robertson; 'Worthy of You', 'Something in the Air', 'Sweet Vermosa Brown' lyr: Joseph McCarthy, m: Harry Tierney.
    Cast(premiere, Portland, Oregon), 3/5/1940 (general release). Anna Neagle {Irene O'Dare}, Ray Milland (Don Marshall), Roland Young (Mr Smith), Alan Marshal (Bob Vincent), May Robson (Granny O'Dare}, Billie Burke (Mrs Herman Vincent), Arthur Treacher (Bethel-ton), Marsha Hunt (Eleanor Worth), Isabel Jewell (Jane McGee), Doris Nolan (Lillian), Stuart Robertson (Freddie), Ethel Griffies (Princess Minetti), Tommy Kelly {Michael O'Dare}, Juliette Compton (Mrs Emily Newlands Grey), Roxanne Barkley (Helen), Johnny Long and His Orchestra (themselves), Martha Tilton (Susie Smith), The Dandridge Sisters (singers), Hattie Noel (Mama), Louis Jean Heydt (Biffy Webster, the columnist). Rod Bacon (usher), Cyril Ring, Tom Quinn, Rosemary La Planche (dance extras), Larry Steers, Major Sam Harris (guests), Nella Walker (Mrs Marshall), Alex D'Arcy (Dumont, the couturier), Syd Saylor (gardener).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Technicolor
    Soundsound
    Duration101
    Footage9051
    Format35mm
    Release date1940
    SummaryIrene O'Dare, who works as an upholsterer's assistant, meets wealthy Don Marshall while measuring chairs at the Herman Vincent estate in Long Island. Don decides to secretly promote her career as a model by buying Madame Lucy's, an exclusive dress shop in Manhattan, and having her employed there. Mr Smith is appointed manager and Irene sells dresses to Mrs Herman Vincent and other socialites. While other models resent her rapid promotion. Bob Vincent, Mrs Vincent's son, becomes attracted to her. Mr Smith arranges for the models to attend a ball at the Vincent estate. Irene is mistaken for Irish nobility at the ball, thus providing Mr Smith with an idea for promoting the collection. Mr Smith rents a Park Avenue apartment for Irene and supplies her with expensive jewellery and furs, while Bob becomes her escort. A gossip columnist is tipped off by an envious model and an article questioning Irene's origins is published. Irene confronts Madame Lucy and finds out that Don is the real owner of the shop. Angry, she agrees to marry Bob, but on the eve of their wedding, Bob realises that he really loves his abandoned girlfriend, Eleanor Worth. Simultaneously, Irene realises that she loves Don. Both couples are reconciled. (V).
    Note13 reels. USA Rel 23/4/1940. This film was a remake of IRENE (USA 1926). Movie Song Catalog No. 615 credits orchestration to Johnny Long. Jeanette MacDonald starred in a 'Lux Radio Theatre' version of the play in 1936. 'When Colleen Moore brought ['Irene'] to the screen in 1926 she was Irish in appearance and action, but the brogue was silent. As she is created once again, this time by Anna Nagle, ...she is again a mercurial, impudent, blue-eyed and red-haired lass with the soft burr of County Clare on her tongue' (MPH 20/4/1940:30).
    ReferenceDV 18/4/1940:3; FD 19/4/1940:9; HR 29/6/1934:1; HR 25/11/1939:6-7;
    HR 16/12/1939:4; HR 12/4/1940:2; MFB 1940:91; MPD 23/4/1940:6;
    MPH 3/2/1940:37; NYT 24/5/1940:23; Var 24/4/1940:16.
    AFI Cat 1931-1940:1037; MPG.
    DistributorRKO Radio Pictures Inc (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Models
    Social Aspiration
    Production creditsp.c: Imperadio Pictures Ltd, p/d: Herbert Wilcox, assoc. p: Merrill G White, a.d: Syd Fogel, Lloyd Richards, Bill Dorfman, sc: Alice Duer Miller from the musical Irene; book by James H Montgomery, m/lyr: Harry Tiemey, Joseph McCarthy (1st pert. New York, 1/11/1919), dop: Russell Metty, sp. effs: Vernon Walker, montage: Douglas Travers, art d: L P Williams, ed: Elmo Williams, set dec: Darrell Silvera, gowns: Edward Stevenson, m.d: Anthony Collins, songs: 'Alice Blue Gown' sung by Anna Neagle, Martha Tilton, The Dandridge Sisters; 'Castle of Dreams' sung by chorus; 'Irene' sung by chorus; 'You've Got Me Out on a Limb' sung by Neagle, Stuart Robertson; 'Worthy of You', 'Something in the Air', 'Sweet Vermosa Brown' lyr: Joseph McCarthy, m: Harry Tiemey, orch. arrg: Anthony Collins, Gene Rose, choreo: Aida Broadbent, rd. d: Richard Van Hessen, USA distr: RKO Radio Pictures Inc.
    Art directionWILLIAMS, L.P.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Literary Adaptation
    Remake

    TitleIT ALL CAME TRUE
    AND IT ALL CAME TRUE
    ROARING NINETIES, THE
    Production companyWarner Bros Pictures Inc
    Warner Bros-First National Pictures
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorSELLER, Lewis
    Script/AdaptationFESSIER, Michael
    KIMBLE, Lawrence
    PhotographyHALLER, Ernest
    Sound recordingTHOMAS, Dolph
    EditingRICHARDS, Thomas
    Executive producerWARNER, Jack L.
    WALLIS, Hal B.
    Associate producerHELLINGER, Mark
    Songs'Gaucho Serenade', 'Angel in Disguise' lyr/m: Kim Gannon, Paul Mann, Stephen Weiss, James Cavanaugh, John Redmonds, Nat Simon; 'Pretty Baby', 'Memories' lyr/m: Gus Kahn, Egbert van Alstyne; 'Ain't We Got Fun'
    lyr/m: Richard Whiting; 'Put On Your Old Grey Bonnet' lyr/m: Stanley
    Murphy, Percy Wenrich; 'When Irish Eyes Are Smiling' lyr/m: Chauncey
    Olcott, George Graft Jr.
    CastAnn Sheridan {Sarah Jane Ryan}, Jeffrey Lynn {Tommy Taylor}, Humphrey Bogart (Grasselli/Chips Maguire), ZaSu Pitts (Miss Flint), Una O'Connor {Maggie Ryan}, Jessie Busley {Mrs Nora Taylor}, John Litel (Mr Roberts), Grant Mitchell (Rene Salmon), Felix Bressart (the Great Boldini), Charles Judels (Henri Pepi de Bordeaux/Leantopopulos), Brandon Tynan (Mr Van Diver), Howard Hickman (Mr Prendergast), Herbert Vigran (Monks), Tommy Reilly, the Elderbloom Chorus, Bender and Daum, White and Stanley, the Lady Killer's Quartet.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration97
    Footage8700
    Format35mm
    Release date1940
    SummaryNora Taylor and Maggie Ryan inherited a boarding house from Miss Minny where they worked and which they now run. The residents are eccentric retired vaudevillians and others. The bank is threatening to foreclose on the mortgage on the boarding house unless back taxes are paid. Their hope of saving the house resides in Maggie's daughter, Sarah Jane, who is an aspiring singer working in Atlantic City, and whom Nora believes will be a success. Sarah Jane, however, loses her sixth job in a year, so Nora hopes that her son. Tommy, a composer, who has been away, perhaps in Paris, for the past five years, will save the house. Tommy, a young composer, works at the Cairo Club and gets into trouble when his boss, gambler Chips Maguire, murders a gangster associate, Monks, who has informed on him to the police who come to arrest him for corruption. Maguire has put the gun used to kill Monks in Tommy's name. As a result, Tommy is wanted on a murder charge, while Maguire demands that he be allowed hide at the boarding house. Tommy goes home with Maguire, who uses the pseudonym Mr Grasselli, and is claiming that he needs total privacy due to a nervous breakdown. Nora tells Maguire that she hopes Sarah Jane will become a great singer, that Tommy will become a composer, and that the pair will fall in love. Sarah Jane hears one of Tommy's compositions and suggests they work together, but Tommy, concerned at Maguire's hold over him, reluctantly turns down the proposal. Sarah Jane discovers Maguire's true identity and she sets out to use him to back her and Tommy's act. Maguire decides to attend dinner at the house for the first time, and later the vaudevillians put on their act, including The Great Boldini whose performance is ruined by his poodle. Jealous at her friendship with Maguire, Tommy rejects Sarah Jane's proposal to use Maguire to promote their careers. Nora and Maggie receive another warning from the bank that it will close in twenty four hours unless almost twelve hundred dollars in taxes are paid. Maguire pays the taxes and proposes turning the house into a 'Roaring 90s' club. Miss Flint, who has fantasised about Maguire, finds an article about him in a detective story magazine and shows it to him. Sarah Jane frightens Miss Hint into silence with a story about an informer who is tortured and killed in New York. Maguire plans to leave, but on the opening night of the club. Miss Flint, who drinks a lot of champagne, leaves the club as she is afraid of Maguire. She goes to the police station asking to be locked up, telling them than he intends killing her. She also tells them that Grasselli is at the house, and inadvertently reveals Maguire's whereabouts to the police. Two detectives arrive to arrest Maguire. When Nora tells him that he has made them happy, saved the house, and that Sarah Jane and Tommy are in love, he clears Tommy's name and accepts responsibility for the crime himself. With the club popular and Sarah Jane and Tommy telling him that they are planning to marry, he refuses to accept that he has gone soft on the world and on women. (V).
    Note11 reels. USA Rel 6/4/1940. Working titles THE ROARING NINETIES; AND IT ALL CAME TRUE. DV 2/4/1940:3; FD 5/4/1940:4; HR 16/2/1940:7; HR 3/4/1940:3; HR 28/11/1940:2; MFB 1940:92; MPD 3/4/1940:5; MPH 6/4/1940:39; NYT 6/4/1940:13; Var 10/4/1940:14.
    API Cat 1931-1940:1043.
    DistributorWarner Bros Pictures Inc (USA)
    Warner Bros-First National Picture (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Vaudeville
    variety
    Showbusiness
    Production creditsp.c/distr: Warner Bros Pictures Inc. A Warner Bros-First National Picture, exec. p: Jack L Warner, Hal B Wallis, assoc. p: Mark Hellinger, d: Lewis Seller, dial. d: Robert Foulk, a.d: Russ Saunders, sc: Michael Fessier, Lawrence Kimble from the short story 'Better Than Life' by Louis Bromfield in Hearst's International-Cosmopolitan (Jan 1936), contribution to treatment: Delmer Daves, c: Ernest Haller, art d: Max Parker, ed: Thomas Richards, gowns: Howard Shoup, m.d: Leo F Forbstein, orch. arrg: Ray Heindorf, Frank Perkins, songs: 'Gaucho Serenade', 'Angel in Disguise' lyr/m: Kim Gannon, Paul Mann, Stephen Weiss, James Cavanaugh, John Redmonds, Nat Simon; 'Pretty Baby', 'Memories' lyr/m: Gus Kahn, Egbert van Alstyne; 'Ain't We Got Fun' lyr/m: Richard Whiting; 'Put On Your Old Grey Bonnet' lyr/m: Stanley Murphy, Percy Wenrich; 'When Irish Eyes Are Smiling' lyr/m: Chauncey Olcott, George Graft Jr, dance d: Dave Gould, s: Dolph Thomas, make-up: Perc Westmore, unit m: Louis Baum.
    Art directionPARKER, Max
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Literary Adaptation
    Musical Comedy

    TitleKITTY FOYLE
    Production companyRKO Radio Pictures Inc
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerHEMPSTEAD, David
    DirectorWOOD, Sam
    Script/AdaptationTRUMBO, Dalton
    PhotographyDE GRASSE, Robert
    Sound recordingCASS, John L.
    EditingHERMAN, Henry
    Executive producerEDINGTON, Harry E.
    Music composerWEBB, Roy
    Songs'I'll See You In My Dreams' m/lyr: Isham Jones; 'Happy Days Are Here Again' m/lyr: Milton Ager, Jack Yellen; 'Want a Girl?', s: John L Cass.
    CastGinger Rogers {Kitty Foyle}, Dennis Morgan (Wyn Strafford), James Craig (Doctor Mark Eisen), Eduardo Ciannelli (Giono), Ernest Cossart {Pop/Tom Foyle), Gladys Cooper (Mrs Strafford), Odette Myrtil (Delphine Detaille), Mary Treen (Pat), Katherine [later K.T.] Stevens (Molly), Walter Kingsford (Mr Kennett), Cecil Cunningham (grandmother), Nella Walker (Aunt Jessica), Edward Fielding (Uncle Edgar), Kay Linaker (Wyn's wife), Richard Nichols (Wyn's boy), Florence Bates (customer). Heather Angel (girl in prologue), Tyler Brooke (boy in prologue), Hattie Noel (black woman), Frank Milan (Parry), Charles Quigley (Bill), Harriett Brandon (Miss Bala), Harold Entwistle (butler). Billy Elmer (Neway), Walter Sande (trumpeter). Ray Teal (saxophonist), Joey Ray (drummer), Mel Ruick (violinist leader). Doodles Weaver (pianist), Theodore Von Eltz (hotel clerk), Max Davidson (flower man), Charles Miller (doctor), Mary Gordon {charwoman}. Fay Helm (prim girl), Helen Lynd (girl in elevator), Dorothy Vaughan (charwoman), Mimi Doyle (Jane), Hilda Plowright (nurse), Spencer Charters (father), Gino Corrado (guest), Rosa Palmese (flower woman), Joe Bernard, Tom Herbert (waiters), Mary Currier (clerk), Julie Carter (2nd girl in elevator), Patricia Mayer (beauty operator). Pat Flaherty (cop). May Boley (customer), Joe Whitehead (porter), Edward McNamara (Tim, doorman), Helen Brown (desk clerk), Anna Mills (elevator operator), Polly Bailey (tenement woman), Patricia Conway (iNíant baby), Frank Mills (taxi driver), Charles Irwin (drunk), Jane Patten, Renee Hall, Gerda Mora, Gohr Van Vleck, Mary Benoit, Bill Ramsay, Brooks Benedict, Tom Quinn.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration105
    Footage9627
    Format35mm
    Release date1940
    SummaryIn 1900 women's traditional role in the home is being challenged by the developing suffragist movement and the increasing employment of women in white-collar jobs. By 1940, single women are drawn between the tension of being single and being married. After work in an office, twenty-six- year-old Kitty Foyle meets her boyfriend, Dr Mark Eisen, who after deliv- ering a baby asks Kitty to marry him. Later in a taxi he asks Kitty whether she still feels for Wyn Strafford, the one she loved in Philadelphia. She tells him that she is finished with him, and they agree to meet at midnight and get married. When she returns to her apartment. Kitty is shocked to find Wyn there. He tells her that he is sailing to South America at midnight and he wants her to join him. She agrees to go with him. She looks in a glass snowball and talks with her other self reflected in the mirror about the relative value of being married or being with the separated Wyn. Recalling when she was fifteen. Kitty discusses her future with her father. Pop, with whom she disagrees about her future ambitions. During the Depression, her dreams are shattered by having to study for a typing diploma in her Philadelphia Irish working-class home. She meets upper-class Wyn, a friend of her father, who gives her a job in the office of his magazine, 'The Philly'. He is embarrassed when Kitty hears his flirtatious commentary about her on the dictaphone, but he then acknowledges he is making love to her. Recalling the subsequent happy days. Kitty remembers going to New York with Wyn and visiting a speakeasy as the Hoover/Roosevelt presidential election results of 1932 come in. Kitty's father is concerned about her ability to fit into Wyn's family. When the Depression causes the closure of the magazine, Wyn admits that it lost $10,000 of family money and no more will be provided. Accepting failure, he says he'll go back to being a banker. Kitty tries to instil confidence in him, while she says she'll go to work in New York. He offers to keep her on the payroll until she gets another job, but she angrily rejects his proposal, saying she will remain independent. She returns home to find her father dead. She goes to New York because that city reminds her of Wyn, and she hopes he will join her there. In the perfume shop where she works. Kitty presses the burglar alarm instead of the stock room bell, but covers her mistake by fainting. Police and a doctor. Mark Eisen, arrive at the scene. He asks her out as blackmail to disguise her deception in the store. Mark calls to see her that evening, but to her surprise he insists on staying in and playing cards. She agrees to go out with him a few days later, and he asks her whether she was ever in love. She remembers Wyn and tells him she didn't marry him because he had too much money. The next day she buys a Philadelphia newspaper and on her return to the apartment she finds it is fall of flowers sent anonymously. She decides they are from Wyn, who arrives shortly afterwards. He tells her he loves her and they go out dancing. The following morning, he asks her to marry him. She initially refuses his offer because she doesn't want to live near his snobbish upper-class family in Philadelphia as she would be unhappy there. Later, she changes her mind when he gets the band to play 'The Sidewalks of New York', their theme song, he tells her. The band also plays 'Here Comes the Bride' and they get married. Wyn wants to go back to Philadelphia to tell his parents about their marriage. He tells the family gathering that he and Kitty are married, but Wyn reveals that he had promised his family to wait a year before marrying her. They want her to be schooled in their lifestyle. She replies that because of her family background she couldn't live in Philadelphia. She challenges their attempt to strait-jacket her into their ways. They reply that Wyn's money is tied into a trust fund that requires him to live in the family home. Overwhelmed by the power of the family tradition, Kitty leaves the house and returns to New York. One day she meets Mark on the street. Over a drink, she tells him she has just got a divorce, but that she still loves Wyn. Kitty discovers that she is pregnant. The same day she gets a call from Wyn, but as she waits for him she sees a newspaper item about his engagement. She tells her boss, Delphine, that she will have the baby and call him Tom Foyle after her father. In hospital, she reminisces with Delphine, but she gradually realises she has lost the baby. Five years later in 1940, Delphine sends Kitty to Philadelphia to open a branch of her store there. Towards the end of her stay. Kitty realises that Wyn's wife is one of her customers. She gives Wyn's son the ring given to her by him to be returned to him as a secret present. As she leaves her apartment for the last time apparently to meet Wyn at the boat to take them to South America, she tells Tim, the doorman, to give a message to Wyn when he turns up that she is going to marry Mark that night. (V).
    NoteGB: 9,627 ft, 107 mins. USA Rel 27/12/1940. This film was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Sound, Best Screenplay, but only Ginger Rogers won an Oscar, for Best Actress. In 1941 'Lux Radio Theatre' performed a version of the story using the film's actors, while television versions were broadcast by NBC in 1950, ABC in 1954, and CBS in 1955. The story was also featured as a daytime NBC serial in 1958. (AFI Catalog 1931-1940:1116).
    ReferenceDV 17/12/1940:3; FD 23/12/1940:6; HR 8/4/1940:6; HR 26/8/1940:9; HR
    25/10/1940:7; HR 18/11/1940:3; HR 17/12/1940:4; HR 19/12/1940:3; MFB 1941:57; MPD 23/12/1940:1-4; MPH 21/12/1940:41; NYT 9/1/1941:27; Var 18/12/1940:16. MPG.
    DistributorRKO Radio Pictures Inc (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Women's rights
    Suffragettes
    Class Conflict
    Production creditsp.c/distr: RKO Radio Pictures Inc, p: David Hempstead, exec. p: Harry E Edington, d: Sam Wood, a.d: Argyle Nelson, sc: Dalton Trumbo from the novel Kitty Foyle by Christopher Morley (New York, 1939), a. dial: Donald Ogden Stewart, contribution to treatment: Robert Ardry, dop: Robert de Grasse, sp. effs: Vernon L Walker, art d: Van Nest Polglase, art d. assoc: Mark-Lee Kirk, ed: Henry Herman, set dec: Darrell Silvera, gowns: Renie, make-up: Mel Burns, m: Roy Webb, songs: 'I'll See You In My Dreams' m/lyr: Isham Jones; 'Happy Days Are Here Again' m/lyr: Milton Ager, Jack Yellen; 'Want a Girl?', s: John L Cass.
    Art directionPOLGRASE, Van Nest
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Literary Adaptation

    TitleLILLIAN RUSSELL
    Production companyTwentieth Century-Fox Film Corp
    Darryl F Zanuck Productions
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorCUMMINGS, Irving
    Script/AdaptationMcGUIRE, William Anthony
    PhotographySHAMROY, Leon
    Sound recordingVON KIRBACH, Alice
    HEMAN, Roger
    EditingTHOMPSON, Walter
    Associate producerMARKEY, Gene
    Songs'Adored One' m/lyr: Newman, Mack Gordon; 'Blue Love Bird' m/lyr: Gus Kahn, Bronislau Kaper; 'Waltz is King' m/lyr: Gordon, Charles Henderson; 'Back in the Days of Old Broadway' m/lyr: Henderson, Newman; 'After the Ball is Over', 'Rosie, You are My Posie', 'The Band Plays On' perf. by Alice
    .
    CastAlice Faye (Lillian Russell), Don Ameche (Edward Solomon, a husband of Lillian's), Henry Fonda (Alexander Moore, another husband of Lillian's), Edward Arnold {'Diamond' Jim Brady}, Warren William (the famous J. L./Jessie Lewisohn), Leo Carrillo (Tony Pastor), Helen Westley (Lillian's Grandmother Leonard), Dorothy Peterson (Cynthia Leonard), Ernest Truex (Charles K Leonard), Nigel Bruce (William Gilbert), Claude Allister (Arthur Sullivan), Lynn Ban (Edna McCauley), Weber & Fields (themselves), Eddie Foy Jr {Eddie Foy Sr), Una O'Connor (Marie), Joseph Cawthom (Leopold Damrosch), Diane Fisher (Dorothy), Elyse Knox, Joan Valerie, Alice Armand (Lillian's sisters), William Davidson (President Cleveland), Hal K Dawson (chauffeur), Charles Halton (Doctor Dobbins), Robert Emmett Keane (jeweller). Harry Hayden (Mr Sloane), Frank Darien (coachman), Frank Sully (Hank), Ottola Nesmith (Miss Smythe), Ferike Boros (Mrs Rose), Frank Thomas (official), Robert Homans (stage doorman), Cecil Cunningham (Mrs Hobbs), William Haade, Irving Bacon, Paul Burns (soldiers), Richard Carle (Bradley), Milbum Stone, Charles Tannen (reporters), Philip Winter (tenor), Leyland Hodgson (hotel clerk), Thaddeus Jones (Moso), Dave Morris (drunk). Bob Ryan (Owen), Tom London (Frank), Paul McVey (stage manager), Alex Pollard (waiter), James C Morton (bartender), Steve O'Brien (boy), Stella Shirpser (baby), Lillian West (nurse), Floyd Shackelford (valet), A S 'Pop' Byron (policeman), Dennis Kaye (newbom baby), Robert Shaw.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration127
    Footage11433
    Format35mm
    Release date1940
    SummaryBorn at the beginning of the Civil War in Clinton, Iowa, Helen Leonard trains as a singer with Leopold Damrosch in New York when she is an adult. Damrosch tells her that while she doesn't have a voice for grand opera, she can nevertheless sing. Helen meets Alexander Moore, an aspiring reporter, when he stops the runaway carriage in which she is travelling with her grandmother. Moore meets theatre impresario Tony Pastor shortly afterwards. A suffragist meeting is taking place at the Leonards' home which is addressed by Helen's mother who agrees to run for mayor of New York, but she is defeated. The house is attacked by anti-suffragist men who are calmed by Helen. Alexander appears and talks with Helen and they make a pact that they will meet again when they achieve success. Pastor hears her singing and offers her an audition, but her mother is opposed to her going on the stage. Pastor changes her name to Lillian Russell and describes her as an English ballad singer as a means of deceiving her mother. After a successful debut, Lillian receives flowers and a bracelet from 'Diamond' Jim Brady, who also showers her with presents of jewellery without indicating who sent them. At the theatre, 'Diamond' Jim is told by one of Lillian's suitors, Jessie Lewisohn, that she is singing by telephone for the president. She is introduced to 'Diamond' Jim before she sings. Later, 'Diamond' Jim has dinner with Lillian and composer Edward Solomon, whom she eventually marries. Though in love with Lillian, Alexander doesn't get in contact with her as he is intimidated by her success and works for 'The Pittsburgh Telegraph', whose editor tells him that he might succeed him. Assigned to cover the story of Lillian's family and career, Alexander re-enters Lillian's life while she is playing in London. After a meeting with her, she goes to get her husband to introduce him to Alexander. He is slumped over the piano apparently asleep, but he is later pronounced dead. Amongst the telegrams of sympathy she receives is one from 'Diamond' Jim. On her return to America, she goes cycling with Jim and Jessie. 'Diamond' Jim asks Lillian to marry him, but while acknowledging the many presents she has received from him, she tells him that she doesn't love him. She is also shocked to hear that Jessie, another of her suitors, and Edna, an ex-companion of 'Diamond' Jim's, have married. Jim makes light of her rejection, pretending he didn't mean it, but he is clearly upset. Alexander sends her a note during a show and she agrees to see him. He tells her he now has his own paper, 'The Pittsburgh Leader', and that he is divorced. After he leaves, Lillian realises that Alexander has been in love with her all her life and she sends her maid Marie to get him before he leaves for Pittsburgh. Returning to the dressing room she sees his signature on a love message on the mirror and they kiss. (V).
    Note14 reels. GB: 11,462 ft, 127 mins. USA Rel 24/5/1940. Richard Day and Joseph C Wright were nominated for an Academy Award for Art Direction for their work on this film. See also DIAMOND JIM (USA 1935), in which Edward Arnold also played 'Diamond' Jim Brady. In 1940 'Lux Radio Theatre' presented a radio version of the Lillian Russell story with Alice Faye and Victor Mature.
    ReferenceDV 16/5/1940:4; FD 16/5/1940:12; HR 20/1/1940:6-7; HR 10/2/1940:10; HR 21/2/1940-7- HR 1/3/1940:30; HR 26/4/1940:1; HR 16/5/1940:3; MFB 1940:92; MPD 17/5/1940:1; MPH 13/4/1940:46; MPH 18/5/1940:48; NYT 22/2/1939; NYT 18/5/1940:11; Var 22/5/1940:14.
    AH Cat 1931-1940:1199-1200.
    DistributorTwentieth Century-Fox Film Corp (USA)
    Darryl F Zanuck Productions (USA)
    PeopleLillian Russell
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Singers
    Opera
    Production creditsp.c/distr: Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. A Darryl F Zanuck Production, assoc. p: Gene Markey, d: Irving Cummings, sc: William Anthony McGuire, 2nd unit d: D Ross Lederman, a.d: Booth McCracken, c: Leon Shamroy, art d: Richard Day, Joseph C Wright, ed: Walter Thompson, set dec: Thomas Little, cost: Travis Banton, corset dsgn: Madame Rosa Binner, m.d: Alfred Newman, songs: 'Adored One' m/lyr: Newman, Mack Gordon; 'Blue Love Bird' m/lyr: Gus Kahn, Bronislau Kaper; 'Waltz is King' m/lyr: Gordon, Charles Henderson; 'Back in the Days of Old Broadway' m/lyr: Henderson, Newman; 'After the Ball is Over', 'Rosie, You are My Posie', 'The Band Plays On' perf. by Alice Faye, s: Arthur von Kirbach, Roger Heman, dances staged by: Seymour Felix.
    Art directionDAY, Richard
    WRIGHT, Joseph C.
    Costume designBANTON, Travis
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Comedy
    Biopic

    TitleLITTLE NELLIE KELLY
    Production companyMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp
    Loew's Inc
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerFREED, Arthur
    DirectorTAUROG, Norman
    Script/AdaptationMcGOWAN, Jack
    PhotographyJUNE, Ray
    Sound recordingSHEARER, Douglas
    EditingSMITH, Frederick Y.
    Songs'Nellie Kelly, I Love You' sung by Judy Garland, Douglas
    McPhail, George Murphy, Charles Winninger, chorus, m/lyr: George M
    Cohan; 'Nellie is a Darling', 'It's a Great Day for the Irish', 'Pretty Girl
    Milking Her Cow' sung by Garland, m/lyr/adapt: Roger Edens; 'Singing in
    the Rain' sung by Garland, lyr: Arthur Freed, m: Nacio Herb Brown;
    'Danny Boy' (trad. adapt.) m/lyr: Fred E Weatherly.
    CastJudy Garland (Nellie Kelly/Little Nellie Kelly}, George Murphy {Jerry Kelly} Charles Winninger {Michael Noonan}, Douglas McPhail {Dennis Fogarty}, Arthur Shields {Timothy J Fogarty}, Rita Page {Mary Fogarty}, Forrester Harvey (Moriarty), James Burke (Sergeant McGowan), George Watts (Keevan), Addison Richards (judge), Sidney Miller (boy at dance), Robert Homans (Dooley), Thomas P Dillon {Father Malone}, Henry Blair {Dennis as a child}, Frederick Worlock (Lord Cavelstoke), Charles McAvoy (cop), Milton Kibbee (clerk), George Guhl (postman), Joseph Crehan {O'Brien}, Margaret Bert (Miss Deane), Barbara Bedford (Miss Wilson) Robert Emmett Keane (Doctor Walton), John Raitt (intern), Almira Sessions (baby nurse), Catherine Lewis (W U girl). Pat Monanty (workman), George McKay (Bill), Lee Phelps (Barter), Howard Mitchell (Boyd) Charles Halton (judge). Pat O'Malley (mounted cop), Edward Heam (court clerk), John Power, Bill Armstrong, Frank O'Connor, Bob Ingersoll, Larry Clifford {Irish cronies}, Vondell Dan- (girl dancer), Robert Bradford, Earl Covert, Hubert Head, Norman Nielson (solos in 'Little Nellie Kelly' number).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration96/98
    Footage8861
    Format35mm
    Release date1940
    SummaryMichael Noonan avoids work despite the encouragement ot his daughter Nellie. Michael also opposes Nellie's involvement with Jerry Kelly whom she marries despite his objections, but nevertheless he accompanies them when they migrate to America. They live in New York where Jerry becomes a policeman, but still Michael will not speak to him. Nellie dies in childbirth, and despite having a granddaughter in the house, also named Nellie, whom he takes care of, Michael still refuses to speak with Jerry. Jerry is promoted to police captain and Nellie grows up in the image of her mother. Nellie is pulled between her fondness for Michael and her father as the feud between the two men continues. Nellie is forced to make a choice between her own independence and Michael's objections when she is invited to her first dance by Dennis Fogarty, son of an old friend of Michael's. After Michael tells Nellie that she has to choose between him and Dennis, she reluctantly rings Dennis to cancel the date. Assessing what has happened, Dennis' father Timothy arranges with Nellie's father to arrest Michael. Two detectives arrive at the apartment and take him away. Nellie rings her father, who tells her that he'll keep him in jail until midnight so that she can go to the dance without Michael knowing it. Michael is fined for contempt of court, but he refuses to pay and is jailed. After failing to encourage a sense of romance in her at the dance Dennis announces that Nellie will sing and she sings 'Singm' in the Rain' Noonan's fine is paid by Fogarty. When he refuses to accept the payment he is told by a cop that he can't stay in jail. Outside the apartment building Noonan meets Dennis and Nellie as they return from the dance. He shouts at Dennis and a fight is only averted when Nellie's father arrives in a police car. Captain Kelly decides to confront Michael's intransigence, while Nellie finally tells him that he is the cause of their unhappiness and she doesn't know why he has always hated her father. Michael says he will leave the house. After Michael leaves, Nellie goes to his old haunts to try to find him. Going for a walk in the park during the Policeman's Ball. Nellie and Dennis discover to their surprise that Michael has got a job driving a hansom cab. Despite his problems in controlling the horse, Michael's job helps pave the way for the reconciliation of Michael, Jerry and Nellie. (V).
    Note10 reels. USA Rel 22/11/1940. The plot of this film bears little relationship to George M Cohan's musical.
    ReferenceDV 19/11/1940-3; FD 15/11/1940:8; HR 30/7/1940:1; HR 2/8/1940:38;
    HR 20/9/1940:1; HR 18/11/1940:4; MFB 1941:17; MPD 13/11/1940:4;
    NYT 25/12/1940:33; Var 20/11/1940:18. AH Cat 1931-1940:1212-3; MPG.
    DistributorLoew's Inc (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Migration
    Crime
    Policemen
    Production creditsp.c: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp; controlled by Loew's Inc. p: Arthur Freed, d: Norman Taurog, a.d: Marvin Stuart, sc: Jack McGowan from the musical comedy Little Nellie Kelly by George M Cohan (1st perf. New York 13/11/1922), c: Ray June, art d: Cedric Gibbons, art d. assoc: Harry McAfee, ed: Frederick Y Smith, set dec: Edwin B Willis, women's cost: Dolly Tree, men's cost: Gile Steele, m. adapt: Roger Edens, m.d: George Stoll, songs: 'Nellie Kelly, I Love You' sung by Judy Garland, Douglas McPhail, George Murphy, Charles Winninger, chorus, m/lyr: George M Cohan; 'Nellie is a Darling', 'It's a Great Day for the Irish', 'Pretty Girl Milking Her Cow' sung by Garland, m/lyr/adapt: Roger Edens; 'Singing in the Rain' sung by Garland, lyr: Arthur Freed, m: Nacio Herb Brown; 'Danny Boy' (trad. adapt.) m/lyr: Fred E Weatherly, dance d/waltz teacher to Douglas McPhail: Eleanor Walsh, rd. d: Douglas Shearer, make-up: Jack Dawn, distr: Loew's Inc.
    Art directionGIBBONS, Cedric
    McAFEE, Harry
    Costume designTREE, Dolly
    STEELE, Gile
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Comedy
    Biopic
    Theatrical Adaptation

    TitleSTRAWBERRY BLONDE, THE
    Production companyWarner Bros-First National
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerWARNER, Jack L.
    DirectorWALSH, Raoul
    Script/AdaptationEPSTEIN, Julius J.
    EPSTEIN, Philip G.
    PhotographyWONG HOWE, James
    Sound recordingLEE, Robert E.
    EditingHOLMES, William
    Executive producerWALLIS, Hal B.
    Associate producerCAGNEY, William
    Music composerROEMHELD, Heinz
    Songs'The Band Played On' lyr: John Palmer, m: Charles Ward, sung by James Cagney, Rita Hayworth; 'Bill Bailey, Won't You Please Come Home' lyr/m: Hugh Cannon, sung by chorus; 'In the Evening by the Moonlight' lyr/m: James A Bland, sung by chorus; 'Love Me and the World is Mine' lyr: Dave Reed Jr, m: Ernest R Ball, sung by quartet; 'Meet Me in St Louis, Louis' lyr: Andrew B Sterling, m: Kerry Mills, sung by Lucille Fairbanks; 'Wait Till the Sun Shines, Nellie' lyr: Andrew B Sterling, m: Harry von Tilzer, sung by chorus.
    CastJames Cagney {Biff Grimes}, Olivia de Hand (Amy Lind), Rita Hayworth (Virginia Brush), Alan Hale {Old Man/William Grimes}, George Tobias (Nicholas Pappalas), Jack Carson (Hugo Bamstead), Una 0'Connor {Mrs Mulcahey}, George Reeves (Harold), Lucille Fairbanks (Harold's girlfriend), Edward McNamara (Big Joe), Herbert Heywood (Toby), Helen Lynd (Josephine), Peter Ashley (young man), Roy Gordon (bank president), Tim Ryan (street cleaner/foreman). Eddy Chandler, Jack Mower, John Sheehan, David Thursby (street cleaners), Addison Richards (official), Frank Mayo, Max Hoffman Jr, Pat Flaherty (policemen), Peggy Diggins, Susan Peters, Ann Edmonds, Margaret Carthew (girls), Jack Daley (bartender). Bob Perry, Harrison Greene (hangers-on), Dick Wessel, William 'Billy' Newell, Frank Melton, Harry Seymour (men), Dorothy Vaughan (woman), Richard Clayton (Dandy), Herbert Anderson (boy), Frank Orth (Baxter), James Flavin (boat inspector), George Campeau (sailor), Abe Dinovitch (singer), Paul Phillips (Fellow), George Humbert (Giuseppi), Creighton Hale (secretary), Carl Harbaugh (workman), Lucia Carroll (nurse), Russell Hicks (Treadway), Wade Boteler (warden).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration97/99
    Footage8882
    Format35mm
    Release date1941
    SummaryIn the early part of the century, dentist Biff Grimes has recently been released after spending five years in prison. He is playing a game of horseshoes with his Greek friend, Nick Pappalas, a barber, when he receives a call from alderman Hugo Bamstead seeking dental treatment. Even though it is a Sunday, Biff agrees to treat him and relishes the thought of inflicting pain on his arch enemy. In flash-back, the combative Biff recalls the events which led to the breach with Hugo. Biff, the son of lazy William Grimes, is, like his friends, infatuated by Virginia Brush, a flirting strawberry blonde. Hugo is a hustler friend of Biff and when Virginia and her friend, Amy Lind, agree to meet Hugo in the park, he invites Biff to make up die foursome. Biff wants to leave when he sees Amy dressed in a nurse's uniform. Hugo and Virginia go behind the bushes while Biff is shocked by Amy's suffragist and free-thinking ideas on love, marriage ('an out-moded silly convention started by the cavemen and encouraged by the florists and jewellers') and procreation. Biff storms off and Hugo, emerging dishevelled from the bushes, promises him that the next time they are out he can spend time with Virginia. On the next date when the couples are separated during a boat trip, Biff spends the day with Virginia, on whom he lavishes all his money. By the end of the day. Biff is in love with Virginia but she is casual towards him. When he is due to meet her again, Amy arrives instead of her. Nick also arrives with his girlfriend and Biff finds out that Virginia married Hugo that afternoon. Biff disguises his annoyance by pretending he knew and did not care. After Nick leaves. Biff tests Amy's free-thinking ideas, but quickly discovers that it was merely a front and that she is a conventional girl. Biff asks her if they could go steady and she agrees. They get married and Biff works hard as he takes lessons from a dentist's correspondence course. The following year. Biff meets Virginia and she invites him and Amy to dinner. At the Bamsteads' mansion. Biff and Amy see that Virginia's and Hugo's marriage is fraught with tension despite their ostentatious wealth. Knowing that Biff and Amy are poor, Virginia encourages her husband to employ Biff in his construction company. Hugo makes Biff a vice-president and his father is given a job as foreman. When there is a power failure during dinner at the mansion, Virginia kisses Biff, who later discovers from Amy that she did not kiss him as he had thought. Within a short time. Biff is bored with his job as he is given nothing to do except sign documents he does not understand. When a building which has been built by Hugo's company collapses. Biffs father is killed. Biff is charged with negligence on the evidence of the documents he signed, while Hugo goes free. He is found guilty and sentenced to five years in jail. Amy returns to nursing and Biff practises dentistry on his fellow prisoners and the warden, gaining his dentist's diploma in prison. Returning to the present. Biff decides to kill Hugo with gas when he arrives to have a tooth extracted. When they arrive, Biff notices that Hugo and Virginia are more pathetic than when he had last seen them. Determining that life with Virginia is punishment enough. Biff decides not to kill Hugo but he does extract the tooth without anaesthetic. After the Bamsteads leave. Biff and Amy go for a walk. To his delight, she tells him that she is going to have a baby. (V).
    NoteThis film was a remake of ONE SUNDAY AFTERNOON (USA 1933) and was remade by director Raoul Walsh as ONE SUNDAY AFTERNOON (USA 1948).
    ReferenceMFB 1941:73. MPG.
    DistributorWarner Bros Pictures (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Crime
    Production creditsp.c: Warner Bros-First National, p: Jack L Warner, exec. p: Hal B Wallis, assoc. p: William Cagney, d: Raoul Walsh, sc: Julius J Epstein, Philip G Epstein from the play One Sunday Afternoon by James Hagan (1st perf, NY 15/2/1933), dial. d: Hugh Cummings, dop: James Wong Howe, art d: Robert Haas, ed: William Holmes, m: Heinz Roemheld, orch. arrg: Ray Heindorf, m.d: Leo F Forbstein, songs: 'The Band Played On' lyr: John Palmer, m: Charles ward, sung by James Cagney, Rita Hayworth; 'Bill Bailey, Won't You Please Come Home' lyr/m: Hugh Cannon, sung by chorus; 'In the Evening by the Moonlight' lyr/m: James A Bland, sung by chorus; 'Love Me and the World is Mine' lyr: Dave Reed Jr, m: Ernest R Ball, sung by quartet; 'Meet Me in St Louis, Louis' lyr: Andrew B Sterling, m: Kerry Mills, sung by Lucille Fairbanks; 'Wait Till the Sun Shines, Nellie' lyr: Andrew B Sterling, m: Harry von Tilzer, sung by chorus, s: Robert E Lee, sp. effs: Willard Van Enger, gowns: Orry-Kelly, make-up: Perc Westmore, distr: Warner Bros Pictures Inc.
    Art directionHAAS, Robert
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Literary Adaptation
    Remake

    TitleYANKEE DOODLE DANDY
    Production companyWarner Bros Pictures Inc
    Warner Bros-First National Pictures
    Country of originUSA
    DirectorCURTIZ, Michael
    Script/AdaptationBRUCKNER, Robert
    JOSEPH, Edmund
    PhotographyWONG HOWE, James
    Sound recordingBROWN, Everett A.
    LEVINSON, Nathan
    EditingAMY, George
    Executive producerWARNER, Jack L.
    Associate producerCAGNEY, William
    Songs'Belle of the Barber's Ball' sung by James Cagney, Jeanne Cagney, Rosemary DeCamp, Walter Huston; 'Come Along With Me' sung by James Cagney, chorus; 'The Dancing Master' sung by James Cagney, Jeanne Cagney, DeCamp, Huston; 'Forty-Five Minutes From Broadway' sung by James Cagney; 'Give My Regards to Broadway' sung by James Cagney, chorus; 'Harrigan' sung by James Cagney, Joan Leslie; 'I'll Be True to You' sung by James Cagney, Jeanne Cagney, DeCamp, Huston; 'I Was Born in Virginia' sung by James Cagney, Huston, DeCamp, Jeanne Cagney; 'Mary's a Grand Old Name' sung by James Cagney, Leslie, Irene Manning; 'Molly Malone' sung by Frances Langford; 'Nellie Kelly, I Love You' sung by Langford; 'The Warmest Baby in the Bunch' sung by Joan Leslie; 'Billie' sung by Frances Langford; 'Oh, You Wonderful Girl' sung by James Cagney, Jeanne Cagney, Walter Huston, Rosemary DeCamp; 'Over There' sung by James Cagney, Langford; 'So Long, Mary' sung by Irene Manning, chorus; 'The Yankee Doodle Boy' sung by James Cagney; 'You're a Grand Old Flag'
    sung by James Cagney, chorus; other songs: 'All Aboard for Old
    Broadway' by Jack Scholl, M K Jerome, sung by James Cagney, chorus;
    'The Love Nest' m: Louis A Hirsch, lyr: Otto Harbach, sung by Langford,
    'Off the Record' m: Richard Rodgers, lyr: Lorenz Hart, sung by James
    Cagney.
    CastJames Cagney {George M Cohan}, Joan Leslie (Mary), Walter Huston (Jerry Cohan}, Richard Whorf (Sam Harris), George Tobias (Dietz), Irene Manning (Fay Templeton), Rosemary DeCamp {Nellie Cohan}, Jeanne Cagney {Josie Cohan}, S Z Sakall (Schwab), George Barbier (Erlanger), Walter Catlett (theatre manager), Frances Langford (Nora Bayes), Minor Watson (Ed Albee), Eddie Foy Jr {Eddie Foy}, Chester Clute (Harold Goff), Douglas Croft (George M Cohan at 13 yrs}. Patsy Lee Parsons {Josie at 12 yrs}. Captain Jack Young (Franklin D Roosevelt), Audrey Long (receptionist), Odette Myrtil (Madame Bartholdi), Clinton Rosemond (White House butler). Spencer Charters (stage manager in Providence), Dorothy Kelly, Marijo James (Sister Act), Henry Blair {George at 7 yrs}, JO'Ann Marlow {Josie at Ó yrs}, Thomas Jackson (stage manager), Phyllis Kennedy (Fanny), Pat Flaherty (White House guard), Leon Belasco (magician), Syd Saylor (Star boarder), William B Davidson (New York stage manager). Harry Hayden (Doctor Lewellyn), Francis Pierlot (Doctor Anderson), Charles Smith, Joyce Reynolds, Dick Chandlee, Joyce Home (teenagers), Frank Faylen (sergeant), Wallis dark (Theodore Roosevelt), Georgia Carroll (Betsy Ross), Joan WiNíield (Sally), Dick Wessel, James Flavin (Union Army veterans). Sailor Vincent (Schultz in 'Peck's Bad Boy'), Fred Kelsey {Irish cop in 'Peck's Bad Boy'}, Tom Dugan (actor at railway station), Garry Owen (army clerk), Murray Alper (wise guy), Creighton Hale (telegraph operator), Ruth Robinson (nurse), Eddie Acuff, Walter Brooke, Bill Edwards, William Hopper (reporters), William Forrest, Ed Keane (critics), Dolores Moran (girl). Poppy Wilde, Leslie Brooks (chorus girls in 'Little Johnny Jones' number), Jerrie Lynne (singer), Vivien Coe (pianist), Mary Wickes.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration126
    Footage11303
    Format35mm
    Release date1942
    SummaryIn the early part of World War Two after playing the President in a play, I'd Rather Be Right, the elderly George M Cohan is summoned to the White House. He enters the White House to meet President Franklin D Roosevelt and is brought to meet the President by an elderly black butler who tells him how much he enjoyed his singing and dancing years earlier. Sitting opposite the President, George is told that one thing for which he has always admired Irish-Americans is how they carry their love of country out in the open like a flag. Its a great quality he says. George tells him he has inherited that from his father who ran away from Massachusetts at the age of thirteen to join the Union army during the Civil War. In flashback, George tells how he was bom on Independence Day 1878. His father Jerry was performing at the time and rushed from the stage to the hospital where his mother Nellie had given birth to a boy. George and his younger sister Josie perform with their parents under the name. The Four Cohans. In 1891, he has a hit with 'Peck's Bad Boy', but George's parents are disturbed by his conceit. A group of tough boys beat up George as a response to his role, but he remains as cocky as ever. As a young man, he comes to specialise in character parts, even playing his own father's father in one play. Believing him to be the wise old man he played, a young girl, Mary, goes backstage to seek his advice about whether she should go on the stage. He encourages her to pursue a stage career and then surprises her by doing a lively dance and discarding his make-up. Eventually he marries her and has a hit with 'Mary's A Grand Old Name' which he wrote for her. George continues to write songs, but his attempts to sell them in New York's Tin Pan Alley are unsuccessful. Mary and he perform 'Harrigan', a song from a play, for Dietz & Goff. Librettist Sam Harris is no more successful in selling his material to the two men. Overhearing people at the boarding house talk about the difficulty George causes to the family troupe, George announces that his play is to be produced. Delighted, the rest of the family decide to go on tour. George meets Sam again in a cafe and together they convince patron of the arts Schwab to back a musical they are writing. The show. Little Johnny Jones, is a hit with the song 'The Yankee Doodle Boy', which is set during the English Derby, proving a success. Later George tries to convince Broadway star Fay Templeton to perform in one of his shows, but she dismisses him as a 'flag-waver' and a writer of novelty tunes. She also tells him that she is glad she lives in New Rochelle, forty-five minutes from Broadway, away from loud members of the profession such as himself. During the first act George writes 'Forty-Five Minutes from Broadway' and gives it to Fay, who likes it. When Fay likes another song, 'Mary's A Grand Old Name', she agrees to star in his next musical. However, George has promised that his wife will sing in his next musical and he is concerned at her response. When he returns home, he is surprised to find out that his wife already knows that Fay has the song and that she is not concerned about it. Fay makes hits of the two songs. It is the beginning of a series of hits with Sam Harris. George plays the lead in George Washington Jr in which he sings 'It's A Grand Old Flag'. Further hit shows follow. George becomes a solo performer when his parents leave the act to retire to a farm and his sister gets married. He writes a straight play 'Popularity' but it is poorly received. When he tries to enlist in the army during World War One he is told he is too old. He demonstrates his dancing prowess to the recruiting officer, but he is told that he should use his abilities in America. When he leaves the office, he hears a tune played by soldiers and uses a variation on it for his patriotic World War One song, 'Over There'. Later he performs the song with singer Nora Baynes for troops about to leave for France. His subsequent career (in all he wrote forty plays and more than 1,000 songs) continues his earlier success. Cohan and Harris dissolve their fifteen-year- old partnership as George decides to retire after his father's death. George and Mary retire to the farm following a world tour. He is called upon to play President Roosevelt in I'd Rather Be Right. The reason for Roosevelt inviting him to the White House is to confer the Congressional Medal of Honor on him for writing 'It's A Grand Old Rag' and 'Over There', the first member of the theatrical profession to receive the medal. After he leaves the White House, he joins in a passing parade of soldiers and civilians singing 'Over There'. (V).
    NoteIn 1942 this film received seven Academy Award nominations: Best Picture, Best Director (Michael Curtiz), Best Actor (James Cagney), Best Supporting Actor (Walter Huston), Best Original Story (Robert Buckner), Sound Recording (Nathan Levinson), and Best Song (Ray Heindorf, Heinz Roemheld). James Cagney was the only one to win in the major categories, though Levinson, and Heindorf and Roemheld, also won. MPG adds the following songs by George M Cohan to the above list which is taken from Movie Song Catalog No. 1439: 'You're a Wonderful Girl', 'Blue Skies, Grey Skies', 'In a Kingdom of Our Own', and 'The Man Who Owns Broadway'. MPG also adds the titles 'The Barbers' Ball', which may be the same as 'Belle of the Barber's Ball' and 'Little Nellie Kelly, which may be the same as 'Nellie Kelly, I Love You'.
    ReferenceMFB 1942:147.
    DistributorWarner Bros Pictures Inc (USA)
    PeopleGeorge M. Cohan
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    World War II
    Singers
    Musicians
    Songwriters
    Dancers
    Show Business
    Entertainment
    Production creditsp.c: Warner Bros Pictures Inc. A Warner Bros-First National picture, exec. p: Jack L Warner, Hal B Wallis, assoc. p: William Cagney, d: Michael Curtiz, sc: Robert Buckner, Edmund Joseph based on the story of George M Cohan, from an original story by Buckner, dial. d: Hugh MacMullan, dop: James Wong Howe, ed: George Amy, art d: Carl Jules Weyl, montage: Don Siegel, m.d: Leo F Forbstein, orch. arrg: Ray Heindorf, songs by George M Cohan: 'Belle of the Barber's Ball' sung by James Cagney, Jeanne Cagney, Rosemary DeCamp, Walter Huston; 'Come Along With Me' sung by James Cagney, chorus; 'The Dancing Master' sung by James Cagney, Jeanne Cagney, DeCamp, Huston; 'Forty-Five Minutes From Broadway' sung by James Cagney; 'Give My Regards to Broadway' sung by James Cagney, chorus; 'Harrigan' sung by James Cagney, Joan Leslie; 'I'll Be True to You' sung by James Cagney, Jeanne Cagney, DeCamp, Huston; 'I Was Born in Virginia' sung by James Cagney, Huston, DeCamp, Jeanne Cagney; 'Mary's a Grand Old Name' sung by James Cagney, Leslie, Irene Manning; 'Molly Malone' sung by Frances Langford; 'Nellie Kelly, I Love You' sung by Langford; 'The Warmest Baby in the Bunch' sung by Joan Leslie; 'Billie' sung by Frances Langford; 'Oh, You Wonderful Girl' sung by James Cagney, Jeanne Cagney, Walter Huston, Rosemary DeCamp; 'Over There' sung by James Cagney, Langford; 'So Long, Mary' sung by Irene Manning, chorus; 'The Yankee Doodle Boy' sung by James Cagney; 'You're a Grand Old Flag' sung by James Cagney, chorus; other songs: 'All Aboard for Old Broadway' by Jack Scholl, M K Jerome, sung by James Cagney, chorus; 'The Love Nest' m: Louis A Hirsch, lyr: Otto Harbach, sung by Langford, 'Off the Record' m: Richard Rodgers, lyr: Lorenz Hart, sung by James Cagney; s: Everett A Brown, Nathan Levinson, dances numbers staged and d: Leroy Prinz, Seymour Felix, James Cagney's dances routined by John Boyle, make-up: Perc Westmore, gowns: Milo Anderson, tech. adv: William Collier Sr, distr: Warner Bros Pictures Inc.
    Art directionWEYL, Charles Jules
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical
    Biopic
    Period Drama

    TitleDOUGHBOYS IN IRELAND
    Production companyColumbia Pictures Corp
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerPIER, Jack
    DirectorLANDERS, Lew
    Script/AdaptationGREEN, Howard J.
    BRICE, Monte
    PhotographyO'CONNELL, L.W.
    Sound recordingTHORSEN, Mel
    Songs'Mother Machree' by Rida Johnson Young, Chauncey Olcott, Ernest R Ball; 'When Irish Eyes Are Smiling' by Olcott, Ball, George Graft Jr; 'My Wild Irish Rose' by Olcott; 'All Or Nothing At All' by Jack Lawrence, Arthur Airman; 'I Have Faith', 'I Knew, Little American Boy', 'McNamara's Band' by Shamus
    O'Connor, John J Stanford; 'There Must Be an Easier Way to Make a
    Living'.
    CastKenny Baker (Danny O'Keefe), Jeff Donnell (Molly Callahan), Lynn Merrick (Gloria Gold), Guy Bonham (Chuck Mayers), Red Latham (Corny Smith), Wamp Carlson (Tiny Johnson), Bob Mitchum (Ernie Jones), Buddy Yarus (Jimmy Martin), Harry Shannon (Michael Callahan), Dorothy Vaughan (Mrs Callahan), Larry Thompson (captain), Syd Saylor (sergeant), Herbert Rawlinson (Larry Hunt), Neil Reagan (medical captain), Constance Purdy (Miss Wood), Harry Anderson (soldier), James Carpenter (sentry), Craig Woods (corporal). Muni Seroff (Nick Greco).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourcol
    Soundsound
    Duration61/62
    Footage5636
    Format35mm
    Release date1943
    CopyIFA (VHS)
    SummaryDuring World War Two, Danny O'Keefe, a band leader and singer, is called up by the American army along with three of his orchestra. Chuck, Corny and Tiny. He is unhappy with leaving Gloria Gold, a glamorous singer, but he is aware that she does not deserve his infatuation. Danny and his contingent of troops go to Northern Ireland to finish their training. Danny falls in love with a local girl, Molly Callahan. The relationship is complicated by the arrival of Gloria, but Chuck, Corny and Tiny smooth the couple's path. The troops go on a Commando raid and Danny returns wounded. Molly and Danny are reunited and she looks after him. (Adapted from KW 13/1/1944; MFB 1944:16). MPG.
    ReferenceKW 13/1/1944; MFB 1944:16. MPG.
    DistributorColumbia Pictures Corp (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    World War II
    Band Leaders
    Musicians
    Doughboys
    US Army
    Soldiers
    LocationNorthern Ireland
    Production creditsp.c: Columbia Pictures Corp, p: Jack Pier, d: Lew Landers, sc: Howard J Green, Monte Brice, dop: L W O'Connell, ed: Mel Thorsen, art d: Lionel Banks, m.d: M W Stoloff, songs sung by Kenny Baker: 'Mother Machree' by Rida Johnson Young, Chauncey Olcott, Ernest R Ball; 'When Irish Eyes Are Smiling' by Olcott, Ball, George Graft Jr; 'My Wild Irish Rose' by Olcott; 'All Or Nothing At All' by Jack Lawrence, Arthur Airman; 'I Have Faith', 'I Knew, Little American Boy', 'McNamara's Band' by Shamus O'Connor, John J StaNíord; 'There Must Be an Easier Way to Make a Living', distr: Columbia Pictures Corp.
    Art directionBANKS, Lionel
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Comedy

    TitleIT AIN'T HAY
    MONEY FOR JAM
    Production companyUniversal Pictures Co
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerGOTTLIEB, Alex
    DirectorKENTON, Eric C.
    Script/AdaptationBORETZ, Allen
    GRANT, John
    PhotographyVAN ENGER, Charles
    EditingGROSS, Frank
    Songs'The Sunbeam Serenade', 'Hang Your Troubles On a Rainbow', 'Glory Be', 'Old Timer'.
    CastBud Abbott (Grover Mockridge), Lou Costello {Wilbur Hoolihan}, Grace McDonald (Kitty McGloin), Eugene Pallette (Gregory Warner), Leighton Noble (Private Joe Collins), Cecil Kellaway {King O'Hara}, Patsy O'Connor {Princess O'Hara}, Shemp Howard (Umbrella Sam), Eddie Quillan (Harry the Horse), David Hacker (Chauncey the Eye), Richard Lane (Slicker), Samuel S Hinds (Colonel Brainard), Harold De Garro (stilt-walker). the Vagabonds (musical speciality), Andrew Tombes (Bighearted Charlie), Pierre Watkin (Major Harper), William Forrest (banker), Ralph Peters (man at mike). Wade Boteler (Reilly), Bobby Watson (clerk), James Flavin (cop). Jack Norton (drunk), Tom Hanlon (radiO'Announcer). Harry Harvey (Shorty), Herbert Vigran (man in mike room), Ed Foster (grafter). Harry Strang (policeman), Mike Mazurki, Sammy Stein (bouncers), Herbert Hayes (manager), Barry Macollum (hack driver), Eddie Bruce (good humour man), Paul Dubov (tout), Charles Bennett (S.P.C.A. driver). Rod Rogers (jockey), Janet Ann Gallow (little girl), Kate Drain Lawson (matron), Frank Penny (ticket seller), Fred Cordova (attendant). Spec O'Donnell (newsboy), Stephen Gottlieb (child), the Step Brothers (themselves), Selmer Jackson (Grant), the Hollywood Blondes, Leighton Noble and his Orchestra, Charles Coleman, Robert E Homans, Matt Willis, Kit Guard.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration79
    Format35mm
    Release date1943
    SummaryGrover Mockridge and Wilbur Hoolihan try to swop King O'Hara's
    horse which was fed sweets by mistake and died. They find a substitute
    horse at a racetrack and take it, unaware that it is a champion horse named
    'Tea Biscuit'. Hoolihan tries to ride the horse without much success.
    NoteGB title MONEY FOR JAM. This film was a remake of PRINCESS
    O'HARA (USA 1935).
    ReferenceMFB 1943:29.
    MPG.
    DistributorUniversal Pictures (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Horseracing
    'Teabiscuit'
    Crime
    Production creditsp.c: Universal Pictures Co, p: Alex Gottlieb, d: Eric C Kenton, sc: Allen Boretz, John Grant from the story 'Princess O'Hara' by Damon Runyon (Collier's, 3/4/1934), dop: Charles Van Enger, art d: John B Goodman, ed: Frank Gross, m.d: Charles Previn, songs by Paul Francis Webster, Harry Revel: 'The Sunbeam Serenade', 'Hang Your Troubles On a Rainbow', 'Glory Be', 'Old Timer', distr: Universal Pictures.
    Art directionGOODMAN, John B.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Literary Adaptation
    Comedy
    Remake

    TitleSWEET ROSIE O'GRADY
    Production companyTwentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerPERLBERG, William
    DirectorCUMMINGS, Irving
    Script/AdaptationENGLUND, Ken
    PhotographyPALMER, Ernest
    Sound recordingFREERICKS, Bernard
    HEMAN, Roger
    EditingSIMPSON, Robert
    Songs'Battle Cry' lyr/m: Maude Nugent, sung by Lilyan Irene; 'Get Your Police Gazette' lyr: Mack Gordon, m: Harry Warren, sung by Betty Grable, chorus; 'Going to the County Fair' lyr: Gordon, m: Warren, sung by Grable; 'Heaven Will Protect the Working Girl' lyr: Edgar Smith, m: A Baldwin Sloane, sung by Grable, Robert Young; 'Little Annie Rooney' lyr/m: Michael Nolan, sung by
    Grable, Young, Frank Orth; 'My Heart Tells Me' lyr: Gordon, m: Warren,
    sung by Grable, Phil Regan; 'My Sam' lyr: Gordon, m: Warren, sung by
    Grable; 'Sweet Rosie O'Grady' lyr/m: Maude Nugent, sung by Grable,
    Young, Adolphe Menjou, chorus; 'Two Little Girls in Blue' lyr/m: Charles
    Graham, sung by Grable, Young; 'I Waited at the Church' lyr: Fred W
    Leigh, m: Henry E Pettier, sung by Grable, chorus; 'Where, Oh Where, Is
    the Groom?' lyr: Gordon, m: Warren, sung by Grable, chorus; 'The
    Wishing Waltz' lyr: Gordon, m: Warren, sung by Grable, Regan
    CastBetty Grable {Madeleine Marlowe/Rosie O'Grady}, Robert Young {Sam McGee}, Adolphe Menjou (Morgan), Reginald Gardiner (Duke Charles), Virginia Grey (Edna Van Dyke), Phil Regan (composer), Sig Ruman (Joe Flugelman), Alan Dinehart (Arthur Skinner), Hobart Cavanaugh (dark), Frank Orth (cabby), Jonathan Hale (Mr Fox), Stanley Clements (Danny), Byron Foulger (Rimplemayer), Lilyan Irene (Gracie), Milton Parsons (Madison), Hal K Dawson (Poindexter), George Chandler (Kelly), Charles Trowbridge (husband), St Brendan's Choir (themselves), Leo Diamond and his Solitaires (themselves), Oliver Blake (White, the artist), Cyril Ring, Herbert Vigran, Perc Launders (photographers), Dorothy Granger (singer), Mary Gordon (Connie Leon, charwoman), Gabriel Canzona (hurdy-gurdy man with monkey), Edward Earle, James Metcalfe, Bruce Warren, John Dilson, Paul Maxey, Sam Wren, Hooper Atchley (salesmen), Joe King (burly ship official).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    Soundsound
    Duration71/74
    Footage6826
    Format35mm
    Release date1943
    SummaryIn the 1880s Madeleine Marlowe, who is really Irish-American burlesque queen Rosie O'Grady, has moved to London and is working in legitimate theatre. She has many admirers, including Charles, Duke of Trippingham. After Charles sends her a bracelet, a message follows it to indicate he wants to marry her and make her the Duchess of Trippingham. She is due to return to the USA with the show in a few days and Charles agrees to join her there. As they are embarking for America, Rosie's manager sees the Police Gazette and an article by reporter Samuel McGee who has discovered Rosie's true identity. His article and the accompanying cartoons claim that Rosie has abandoned her Irish- American heritage. When Rosie arrives in New York, McGee uses a pseudonym to meet her, and ends up getting a scoop. However, Rosie turns the tables on him by claiming that an intimate romance exists between her and McGee, which leads to McGee being fired from his job by Moran, the paper's editor. Forced to maintain the facade, Rosie causes severe embarrassment to Sam during lunch at Delmonico's. Admitting he has met his match, McGee sues for a truce. When this is not forthcoming, McGee resumes writing for the Gazette, reporting on the supposed romance, and serenading her with a song, 'Sweet Rosie O'Grady'. Rosie, too, decides the joke has gone far enough, but by then, especially during a trip to her old haunt, Fugelman's, where she used to sing, the couple acknowledge the affair. When they get to her apartment, and as they are being intimate, the Duke of Trippingham, is waiting for her. When the Duke sees McGee's articles, he breaks off the engagement. Charles and McGee go to Barney's and get drunk and commiserate about their respective broken engagements with Rosie. McGee convinces Charles that he should marry Edna, Rosie's constant companion, who likes him. Rosie is annoyed when a number of commercial concerns use her image to sell beer and other products. Rather than sue them, Rosie's manager decides that a show about 'Rosie O'Grady' should be put on. Rosie agrees, and the show is a parody of the Police Gazette and of her relationship with McGee. When Rosie meets McGee at the interval, she realises that she is attached to him, while Edna and Charles announce their engagement. However, when a more direct parody of McGee is sung, with an actor wearing a mask likeness, the audience laugh, upsetting McGee. Moran steals the letters from Charles to Rosie. McGee goes to the Gazette where he knocks down Moran, takes back the letters and as he is burning them to ensure they will not be published, he declares he loves Rosie. Rosie comes in with Charles and Edna, and Rosie challenges Sam to say it again. They kiss, and McGee says to her that they will be married within a week. (V).
    NoteThis film is a remake of LOVE IS NEWS (USA 1937; see API Catalog 1931-1940:1250-1). This film was remade as THAT WONDERFUL URGE (USA 1948). MPG adds the following titles to the above song title list which is taken from Movie Song Catalog No. 1262: 'Oh, Where is the Groom ['Where, Oh Where, Is the Groom ?'] with the same personnel as above; 'Going to the Country Fair' ['Going to the County Fair']; and 'Sidewalks of New York'.
    ReferenceMFB 1943:126.
    MPG.
    DistributorTwentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Burlesque
    Vaudeville
    1800s
    Production creditsp.c: Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, p: William Perlberg, d: Irving Cummings, sc: Ken Englund from stories by William R Lipman, Frederick Stephani, Edward Van Every, in charge of production: William Goetz, dop: Ernest Palmer, ed: Robert Simpson, art d: James Basevi, Joseph C Wright, set dec: Thomas Little, associate set dec: Frank E Hughes, Technicolor d: Natalie Kalmus, sp. effs: Fred Sersen, dances staged by Hermes Pan, musical numbers super: Panchon, m.d: Alfred Newman, Charles Henderson, songs: 'Battle Cry' lyr/m: Maude Nugent, sung by Lilyan Irene; 'Get Your Police Gazette' lyr: Mack Gordon, m: Harry Warren, sung by Betty Grable, chorus; 'Going to the County Fair' lyr: Gordon, m: Warren, sung by Grable; 'Heaven Will Protect the Working Girl' lyr: Edgar Smith, m: A Baldwin Sloane, sung by Grable, Robert Young; 'Little Annie Rooney' lyr/m: Michael Nolan, sung by Grable, Young, Frank Orth; 'My Heart Tells Me' lyr: Gordon, m: Warren, sung by Grable, Phil Regan; 'My Sam' lyr: Gordon, m: Warren, sung by Grable; 'Sweet Rosie O'Grady' lyr/m: Maude Nugent, sung by Grable, Young, Adolphe Menjou, chorus; 'Two Little Girls in Blue' lyr/m: Charles Graham, sung by Grable, Young; 'I Waited at the Church' lyr: Fred W Leigh, m: Henry E Pettier, sung by Grable, chorus; 'Where, Oh Where, Is the Groom?' lyr: Gordon, m: Warren, sung by Grable, chorus; 'The Wishing Waltz' lyr: Gordon, m: Warren, sung by Grable, Regan, chorus, s: Bernard Freericks, Roger Heman, cost: Rene Hubert, make-up: Guy Pearce, distr: Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation.
    Art directionBASEVI, James
    WRIGHT, Joseph C.
    Costume designHUBERT, Rene
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical
    Period Drama
    Remake

    TitleBOWERY TO BROADWAY
    Production companyUniversal Pictures Co
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerGRANT, John
    DirectorLAMENT, Charles
    Script/AdaptationJOSEPH, Edmund
    LYTTON, Arthur L.
    PhotographyVAN ENGER, Charles
    EditingHILTON, Arthur
    Music composerWARD, Edward
    Songs'Just Because You Made Dem Goo Goo Eyes At Me' by Hughie Cannon, John Queen; 'The Love Waltz', 'There'll Always Be a Moon' by Everett Carter, Edward Ward; 'Montevideo', 'Coney Island Waltz' by Kirn Gannon,
    Walter Kent; 'My Song of Romance' by Don George, Dave Franklin;
    'Under the Bamboo Tree' by Bob Cole, J Rosamond-Johnson; 'Daisy Bell'
    by Harry Dacre; 'Yippie-I-Addy-I-Ay' by Will Cobb, John H Flynn; 'Wait
    Till the Sun Shines, Nellie' by Andrew B Sterling, Harry von Tilzer; 'He
    Took Her for a Sleigh Ride' (trad).
    CastMaria Montez (Marina), Jack Oakie {Michael O'Rourke}, Donald Cook {Dennis Dugan}, Susanna Foster (Peggy Fleming), Turhan Bey (Ted Barrie), Ann Blyth (Bessie Jo Kirby), Louise Albritton (Lillian Russell), Frank McHugh (Joe Kirby), Rosemary De Camp (Bessie Kirby), Leo Carillo (P J Fenton), Andy Devine (Father Kelley), Evelyn Ankers (Bonnie Latour), Thomas Gomez (Tom Harvey), Richard Lane (Walter Rogers), George Dolenz (George Henshaw), Mantan Moreland (Alabam), Ben Carter (No More), Maude Ebume (Madame Alda), Robert Warwick (Cliff Brown), Donald 0'Connor, Peggy Ryan (speciality number).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration94
    Footage8490
    Format35mm
    Release date1944
    SummaryTwo rival Bowery showmen, Michael O'Rourke and Dennis Dugan, take their vaudeville-developed talents to 42nd St. Though the theft of each other's material has caused tension between them in the past, they collaborate on a show that proves to be a big success. When Dennis dissolves the partnership to produce serious dramatic works for Marina, Michael falls out with him. After years of estrangement, the two join forces to revive one of their earlier successes.
    ReferenceMFB 1944:147.
    MPG.
    DistributorGeneral Film Distributors Ltd
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Vaudeville
    Burlesque
    Production creditsp.c: Universal Pictures Co, p: John Grant, d: Charles Lament, sc: Edmund Joseph, Bart Lytton, Arthur L Horman from a story by Lytton, dop: Charles Van Enger, ed: Arthur Hilton, m/m.d: Edward ward, songs: 'Just Because You Made Dem Goo Goo Eyes At Me' by Hughie Cannon, John Queen; 'The Love Waltz', 'There'll Always Be a Moon' by Everett Carter, Edward ward; 'MontevideO', 'Coney Island Waltz' by Kirn Gannon, Walter Kent; 'My Song of Romance' by Don George, Dave Franklin; 'Under the Bamboo Tree' by Bob Cole, J Rosamond-Johnson; 'Daisy Bell' by Harry Dacre; 'Yippie-I-Addy-I-Ay' by Will Cobb, John H Flynn; 'Wait Till the Sun Shines, Nellie' by Andrew B Sterling, Harry von Tilzer; 'He Took Her for a Sleigh Ride' (trad), choreo: Carlos Romero, Luis De Pron, John Boyle, GB distr: General Film Distributors Ltd.
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Comedy

    TitleGOING MY WAY
    Production companyParamount Pictures Inc
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerMcCAREY, Leo
    DirectorMcCAREY, Leo
    Script/AdaptationBUTLER, Frank
    CAVETT, Frank
    McCAREY, Leo
    PhotographyLINDON, Lionel
    Sound recordingMERRITT, Gene
    COPE, John
    EditingSTONE, Leroy
    Songs'Ave Maria' lyr: Sir Walter Scott, m: Franz Schubert, sung by Bing Crosby, Rise Stevens; 'The Day After Forever' lyr: Johnny Burke, m: James Van Heusen, sung by Crosby, Jean Heather; 'Going My Way' lyr: Burke, m: James Van Heusen, sung by W.B. Crosby, Stevens; 'Silent Night' lyr: Joseph Mohr, m: Franz Gruber; 'Swinging on a Star' lyr: Burke, m: Van Heusen; 'Too-Ra-Loo-Ra-Loo-Ral' lyr/m: James Royce Shannon, sung by Crosby; 'Habanera' from Bizet's Carmen sung by Stevens.
    CastBing Crosby (Father Charles Francis Patrick 'Chuck' O'Malley), Barry Fitzgerald (Father Fitzgibbon), Rise Stevens (Genevieve Linden), Frank McHugh (Father Timothy O'Dowd), Gene Lockhart (Ted Haines Sr), William Frawley (Max Dolan), James Brown (Ted Haines Jr), Jean Heather (Carol James), Porter Hall (Mr Belknap), Fortunio Bonanova (Tomasso Bozzani), Eily Maylon (Mrs Carmody), George Nokes (Pee Wee), Tom Dillon (officer McCarthy), Stanley Clements (Tony Scaponi), Carl 'Alfalfa' Switzer (Herman Langerhanke), Hugh Maguire (Pitch Pipe), Sybyl Lewis (maid at Metropolitan Opera House), George McKay (Mr Van Neusen), Jack Norton (Mr Lilley), Anita Bolster (Mrs Quimp), Jimmie Dundee (fireman), Adeline Reynolds (Mother Fitzgibbon), Gibson Gowland (churchgoer), Julie Gibson (taxi driver). Bill Henry (intern), Robert Tafur (Don Jose), Martin Garralaga (Zuniga), Robert Mitchell Boychoir.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsound
    Duration124/130
    Footage11167
    Format35mm
    Release date1944
    SummaryAt the Church of Saint Dominic, New York, Fr Fitzgibbon tries to convince Ted Haines Sr, a banker from the Knickerbocker Savings and Loans Association, to give money to the heavily indebted parish for a furnace to heat the church. The banker's son, Ted Haines Jr, tells his father that there has never been a foreclosure on a church in the city. Fitzgibbon has been at the church for forty-five years and is sent a young assistant, Fr O'Malley, by the bishop. In fact, O'Malley is sent to sort out the administration of St Dominic's and is supposed to be in charge of the parish. Fr Timothy O'Dowd, a childhood friend of O'Malley's, works in the adjoining parish of St Francis. O'Malley meets Ted Haines Jr as he is trying to get rent arrears from a parishioner. O'Malley tells him that St Dominic's will guarantee the rent, but young Haines laughs at the suggestion and says that his father wants to tear down the church to make way for a parking lot. At the church, Fitzgibbon intercepts two boys. Tony Scaponi and Herman Langerhanke, who have stolen a turkey from a truck. They tell him that they won the turkey they are carrying in a raffle and Fitzgibbon accepts it as a gift from them. When O'Malley tells how the local youngsters, including Tony and Herman, stole turkeys, Fitzgibbon realises that the one they are eating has been stolen. As a way of trying to befriend the boys, O'Malley invites them to a baseball game. Policeman McCarthy brings eighteen-year-old Carol James, an aspiring singer, to the presbytery after she has left home without money. O'Malley, also a singer, demonstrates to her the need to put more feeling into her songs. O'Malley gets Tony's gang to form a choir for the church, though Herman needs some convincing from Tony before he joins in. Irritated by the boys singing 'Three Blind Mice', Fitzgibbon goes to see the bishop to have O'Malley transferred to another parish. Fitzgibbon returns depressed after seeing the bishop and tells O'Malley that he realised that the bishop had already decided to replace him and that he recommended to the bishop that O'Malley be put in charge. Shortly afterwards, Fitzgibbon leaves the presbytery without notice, but McCarthy brings him back that night. He tells O'Malley and the housekeeper, Mrs Carmody, that he has only come back temporarily. The two priests drink to Fitzgibbon's ninety-year-old mother who still lives in Ireland. As O'Malley is passing the Metropolitan Opera House he meets singer Genevieve Linden, whom he knew well from before he was a priest. She is playing 'Carmen' in Bizet's opera. A gossip, Mrs Quinn, arrives at the presbytery to complain that Ted Haines Jr is spending long periods of time at Carol James' apartment, which is across the road from her own. O'Malley goes to see Carol and finds Ted there. He is told that Ted has provided her with the apartment and he is trying to get her a job. Genevieve gets a copy of a song 'Going My Way' written by O'Malley, which he hoped could be sold to a publisher to raise money for the church. Ted's father arrives at Carol's apartment where he discovers that his son is married to her. To his father's annoyance, Ted tells his father that O'Malley married them. Ted Sr is also upset that his son has quit his job, but he is overwhelmed when Ted reappears from a bedroom dressed in an army uniform and leaves for the war straightaway. O'Dowd arranges for a music publisher. Max Dolan, to hear Genevieve and the boys sing 'Going My Way' at the Metropolitan. Dolan says it is too high-class for them and decides not to publish it, but he returns when a more popular song is performed. The money for the song is put into the church collection following a plea for money from the pulpit by Fitzgibbon, though he thinks the large collection is in response to his sermon. Just as O'Malley is telling Fitzgibbon that there is now enough money for him to go to Ireland to see his mother, the church catches fire and it is destroyed. O'Malley sends the choir on tour with Genevieve, and the money is gradually raised to rebuild the church. O'Malley is reassigned to another parish which is in trouble. Before he leaves, O'Malley appoints Tony as choir leader. O'Dowd is appointed to St Dominic's and Haines gives a mortgage so that the church can be rebuilt. As Fitzgibbon is speaking to a farewell celebration for O'Malley, Fitzgibbon's mother arrives, having being brought over from Ireland by O'Malley. As O'Malley walks away to his new assignment, Fitzgibbon and his mother embrace. (V).
    NoteThis film won Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Song ('Swingin' On A Star'), Best Actor (Bing Crosby) and Best Supporting Actor (Barry Fitzgerald). Fitzgerald was actually nominated in both the Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor cat- egories, the last time such a double nomination was possible; the procedure was abolished in 1945. THE BELLS OF ST MARY'S (USA 1945), is a sequel to this film.
    ReferenceMFB 1944:69. MPG; Movie Song Catalog No. 462.
    DistributorParamount Pictures Inc (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Irish Priests
    Production creditsp.c: Paramount Pictures Inc. p/d: Leo McCarey, sc: Frank Butler, Frank Cavett, McCarey from a story by McCarey, dop: Lionel Lindon, sp. c. effs: Gordon Jennings, ed: Leroy Stone, art d: Hans Dreier, William Flannery, set dec: Steve Seymour, m.d: Robert Emmet Dolan, vocal arrg: Joseph J Lilley, music associate: Troy Sanders, songs: 'Ave Maria' lyr: Sir Walter Scott, m: Franz Schubert, sung by Bing Crosby, Rise Stevens; 'The Day After Forever' lyr: Johnny Burke, m: James Van Heusen, sung by Crosby, Jean Heather; 'Going My Way' lyr: Burke, m: James Van Heusen, sung by W.B. Crosby, Stevens; 'Silent Night' lyr: Joseph Mohr, m: Franz Gruber; 'Swinging on a Star' lyr: Burke, m: Van Heusen; 'Too-Ra-Loo-Ra-Loo- Ral' lyr/m: James Royce Shannon, sung by Crosby; 'Habanera' from Bizet's Carmen sung by Stevens, s: Gene Merritt, John Cope, cost: Edith Head, make-up: Wally Westmore, distr: Paramount Pictures Inc.
    Art directionDREIER, Hans
    FLANNERY, William
    Costume designHEAD, Edith
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Comedy

    TitleIRISH EYES ARE SMILING
    Production companyTwentieth Century-Fox Film Corp
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerRUNYON, Damon
    DirectorRATOFF, Gregory
    Script/AdaptationBALDWIN, Earl
    TUCKER BATTLE, John
    ELLINGTON, E.A.
    PhotographyJACKSON, Harry
    Sound recordingLEVERETT, George
    HEMAN, Roger
    EditingJONES, Harmon
    Songs'Be My Little Baby Bumble Bee' lyr: Stanley Murphy, m:
    Henry I Marshall, sung by June Haver, chorus; 'Dear Little Boy of Mine'
    lyr: J Keim Brennan, m: Ernest R Ball, sung by Blanche Thebom, Dick
    Haymes; 'I Don't Need a Million Dollars' lyr: Mack Gordon, m: James V
    Monaco, sung by Haymes; 'I'll Forget You' lyr: Annelu Bums, m: Ball,
    sung by Haymes; 'Let the Rest of the World Go By' lyr: Brennan, m: Ball,
    sung by Haymes, Male Quartet; 'A Little Bit of Heaven' lyr: Brennan, m:
    Ball, sung by Leonard Warren; 'Mother Machree' lyr: Rida Johnson
    Young, m: Chauncey Olcott, Ball, sung by Blanche Thebom, chorus; 'Strut
    Miss Lizzie' lyr/m: Henry Creamer, Turner Layton, sung by Haver; 'When
    Irish Eyes Are Smiling' lyr: Olcott, George Graff Jr, m: Ball, sung by
    Haymes; 'Bessie in a Bustle' lyr: Gordon, m: Monaco.
    CastMonty Woolley (Edgar Brawley), June Haver {Mary 'Irish' O'Brien}, Dick Haymes (Ernest R Ball}, Anthony Quinn (Al Jackson), Beverly Whitney (Lucille Lacey), Maxie Rosenbloom (Stanley Ketchel), Veda Ann Borg (Belle La Tour), Clarence Kolb (Betz), Chick Chandler (stage manager), Kenny Williams (speciality dancer), Michael Dalmatoff (headwaiter), Marian Martin (prima donna), Charles Williams (song plugger). Art Foster (sparring partner), George Chandler (electrician), Mary Gordon {Irishwoman}, Emmett Vogan (purser), Pat O'Malley (steward), Minerva Urecal (militant wife), Arthur Hohl (barker), J Farrell MacDonald (doorman), Eddie Acuff (Harry), Leonard Warren, Blanche Thebom (Metropolitan Opera singers), William 'Billy' Newill (ticket clerk), Robert E Homans (cop), Charles E Wilson (detective), John Sheehan (referee/stage manager). Marietta Canty (Phoebe, the maid), Sam Wren (piano player), Leo Mostovoy (pawnbroker), Maurice Cass (Doctor Medfbrd), Harry Seymour (pianist), Mary Adams Hayes, Ray Spiker (acrobats), Frank Marlowe, Ray Walker (hoofers), Joey Ray (2nd electrician). Max Smith, Martin Sperzel, John Rarig, Gumey Bell (sportsmen's quartet).
    LanguageEnglish
    ColourTechnicolor
    Soundsound
    Duration89/90
    Footage8045
    Format35mm
    Release date1944
    SummaryIn 1911 in Cleveland, music teacher Ernest R Ball, a composer of sentimental ballads and love songs, is fired from his job at the Cleveland Conservatory of Music because he is playing his own compositions which are regarded by the director as degraded classical music. Ernest goes to a burlesque show with an all-girls chorus led by Belle La Tour to thank her for sending him a kind note about one of his songs. Mary 'Irish' O'Brien is missing from the chorus line as she is singing in Belle's dressing room. Ernest mistakes her for Belle, whom he wants to sing one of his compositions, 'I'll Forget You'. Belle returns while Ernest is performing the song for Mary. She dismisses the song and tells Mary she is fired from the show. Ernest and Mary plan to go to New York together, but Ernest has no money. After trying unsuccessfully to interest a prima donna in a song, 'Boy O'Mine', he fights boxer Stanley Ketchel, the middleweight champion of the world, at $25 per round, to get the money to go to New York. He meets Ketchel's manager, Edward Brawley, a former playboy and racehorse owner, who put up the money for the bout and allows Ernest to go three rounds. Emest goes to New York where he searches for Mary but fails to find her. He gets a job as a song plugger and is sent to a restaurant, Reisenheimer's, to promote a song to Lucille Lacey who is going to be there. When the song he is sent to promote is poorly received, Ernest plays one of his own compositions, 'Let the Rest of the World Go By', which is wildly applauded. He meets Lucille who is in company with Brawley and gambler Al Jackson. Other hit songs follow, including 'Mother Machree', 'I'll Forgot You' and 'A Little Bit of Heaven (Shure They Call it Ireland)' and he becomes America's most popular songwriter. When Edgar, Al, Lucille and Ernest go to Churchill's restaurant, Mary is working there as a hatcheck girl. She initially tries to hide from Emest. She then agrees to meet him in an hour when she is convinced that he is not involved with Lucille as the newspapers report. Brawley proposes a bet of $25,000 that within three months he can make a comedy star of the next : person who appears from the ladies' lounge. Al tries to ensure it is Phoebe, a black maid, whom he is paying $100 if she comes out ahead of Lucille, while Emest organises it so that Mary comes out first. Mary wins, but she is annoyed with Emest at being made what she thinks is the butt of their joke. Before Emest can explain what happened, Mary quits her job and storms off. Lucille goes to see her and arranges a job for her in Patterson, New Jersey so as to get her out of town and away from Emest. When Brawley and Emest arrive at Mary's he sings 'When Irish Eyes are Smiling' outside her door. However, an Irishwoman comes out to tell them that Mary has left. They go to the Ajax Detective Agency, who prove unable to locate her. Jackson orders his men to find Mary when Brawley tells him she is already an accomplished singer and dancer. When she is tracked down to the New Jersey nightclub, Al offers her a job in an American revue in Havana. She is to leave for Cuba on the following day. By now, Emest is only writing sad songs. The detective agency finds out that Mary is on the ship. Emest goes there but Mary refuses to listen to him and he is sent ashore. After the boat has left the quayside, Al arrives drunk in Mary's room and tries to make love to her. She orders him out and he then tells her that he is merely taking her to Havana to win the bet. She gets back to New York on the pilot boat. Meanwhile, Emest leaves for an unknown destination. When Brawley returns to his apartment, Mary is asleep in a chair. Brawley puts on a musical Kathleen with Mary in the lead and with backing arranged through Lucille. Brawley puts in newspapers notices with his own name as the author of the songs, including 'When Irish Eyes Are Smiling', as a way of infuriating Emest into returning to New York. The premiere of the show is proving a success when Ernest arrives. Initially diffident when he meets Mary, she encourages him to embrace and kiss her. Al also appears and gives Brawley the $25,000 as the winner of the bet and then tells him he is the ultimate backer of the show. Ernest and Mary sing a medley of Ernest's songs as the climax to the show. (V).
    NoteGB Rel ca. 17/11/1944.
    ReferenceMFB 1944:133; MFB 1944:143; ST 19/11/1944.
    MPG; Movie Song Catalog No. 616.
    DistributorTwentieth Century-Fox Film Corp (USA)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Songwriters
    Composers
    Boxing
    Production creditsp.c: Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp, p: Damon Runyon, d: Gregory Ratoff, sc: Earl Baldwin, John Tucker Battle from a story by E A Ellington, dop: Harry Jackson, Technicolor d: Natalie Kalmus, assoc. Technicolor d: Richard Mueller, sp. c. effs: Fred Sersen, art d: Lyle Wheeler, Joseph C Wright, assoc. art d: Al Grenbach, ed: Harmon Jones, m.d: Alfred Newman, Charles Henderson, orch. arrg: Herbert Spencer, m. cnslt: Mack Gordon, songs: 'Be My Little Baby Bumble Bee' lyr: Stanley Murphy, m: Henry I Marshall, sung by June Haver, chorus; 'Dear Little Boy of Mine' lyr: J Keim Brennan, m: Ernest R Ball, sung by Blanche Thebom, Dick Haymes; 'I Don't Need a Million Dollars' lyr: Mack Gordon, m: James V Monaco, sung by Haymes; 'I'll Forget You' lyr: Annelu Burns, m: Ball, sung by Haymes; 'Let the Rest of the World Go By' lyr: Brennan, m: Ball, sung by Haymes, Male Quartet; 'A Little Bit of Heaven' lyr: Brennan, m: Ball, sung by Leonard Warren; 'Mother Machree' lyr: Rida Johnson Young, m: Chauncey Olcott, Ball, sung by Blanche Thebom, chorus; 'Strut Miss Lizzie' lyr/m: Henry Creamer, Turner Layton, sung by Haver; 'When Irish Eyes Are Smiling' lyr: Olcott, George Graff Jr, m: Ball, sung by Haymes; 'Bessie in a Bustle' lyr: Gordon, m: Monaco; dances staged by Hermes Pan, s: George Leverett, Roger Heman, cost: Rene Hubert, make-up: Guy Pearce, distr: Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
    Art directionWHEELER, Lyle
    WRIGHT, Joseph C.
    GRENBACH, Al
    Costume designHUBERT, Rene
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Drama
    Period Drama
    Biopic

    TitleMERRY MONAHANS, THE
    Production companyUniversal Pictures Co
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerFESSIER, Michael
    PAGANO, Ernest
    DirectorLAMENT, Charles
    Script/AdaptationFESSIER, Michael
    PhotographyVAN ENGER, Charles
    EditingMAYNARD, Charles
    Songs'Lovely', 'Beautiful to Look At', 'We're Havin' a Wonderful Time',
    'Impersonations', 'Stop Foolin' lyr: Irving Bibo, m: Don George; 'Isle
    d'Amour' by Earl Carroll, Leo Edwards; 'When You Wore a Tulip' by
    Jack Mahoney, Percy Wenrich; 'What Do You Want to Make Those Eyes
    at Me For' by Howard Johnson, Joseph McCarthy, James V Monaco;
    'Rock-A-Bye Your Baby with a Dixie Melody' by Sam Lewis, Joe Young,
    Jean Schwartz; 'Rose Room' by Harry Williams, Art Hickman; 'I'm
    Always Chasing Rainbows' by Joseph McCarthy, Harry Carroll; 'In My
    Merry Oldsmobile' by Vincent Bryan, Gus Edwards; 'I Hate to Lose You'
    by Grant Clarke, Archie Gottler.
    CastDonald O'Connor (Jimmy Monahan}, Peggy Ryan {Patsy Monahan}, Jack Oakie {Pete Monahan}, Ann Blyth (Sheila De Royce), Rosemary De Camp (Lillian De Royce), John Miljan (Arnold Pembroke), Gavin Muir (Weldon Laydon), Isabel Jewell (Rose), lan Wolfe (clerk), Robert E Homans {policeman}, Marion Martin (soubrette), Lloyd Ingraham (judge), the Hollywood Lovelies.
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsil
    Duration90
    Footage8167
    Format35mm
    Release date1944
    SummaryAt the turn of the century, Jimmy Monahan is in love with Lillian, a fellow vaudevillian, and he announces their engagement from the theatre stage. Annoyed, Jimmy's partner Rose declares that he asked her to marry him the previous night when he was drunk, but he has no recollection of it. Lillian leaves, and Jimmy agrees to marry Rose. By 1910, the Four Monahans are touring: the parents and their grown-up son Pete and daughter Patsy. Rose abruptly leaves the family. In a note to Jimmy, she says that she is tired of the cheap hotels and cheap acts in which she has been performing. She adds in a postscript that Jimmy did not propose to her at the time she said. The Three Monahans get a contract from the Keith circuit. En route to Philadelphia, Pete meets Sheila De Royce after he has been taking a walk on the roof of the train. She mistakes him for a hobo and gives him a dollar. She is annoyed initially when she meets him again at the theatre where she is a singer with the Keith circuit. It turns out that Sheila's mother is Lillian, now a widow, and when Jimmy and Lillian meet again their love and friendship are rekindled. Retired actor Arnold Pembroke, who is coaching Sheila, is jealous of Lillian's friendship with Jimmy. He also threatens to replace Sheila in the show unless she works harder. They travel across the country and the show's booker tells Pembroke that it is only his coaching of Sheila which allows him to remain on the payroll now that his own career is over. Jimmy tells his children that he intends to ask Lillian to marry him, but just as he is about to ask her, Pembroke tells him that Lillian has agreed to marry him. On the train the next day. Jimmy gets drunk, while Sheila and Pete cause the train to stop when they climb onto the roof. Pete and Patsy cover for their father when he is drunk. Sheila decides to leave her mother and Pembroke and goes to see Pete. In the park, an Irish policeman is temporarily fooled by Sheila when he thinks she is a reported missing person. Pete and Sheila go to the marriage licence office from where the clerk calls the hotel where Patsy, acting as if she is Pete's mother, gives her consent to the marriage. The clerk also calls Lillian who arrives with Pembroke at the office. Jimmy hits Pembroke when he calls him a drunk. Back at the hotel, Sheila tells Pembroke that she will run away at every available opportunity. After she leaves, Lillian demands to know why Sheila hates him so much. Pembroke admits that he has been living off Sheila's talent for three years now that his own talent has declined and that he cannot forgive her for taking the spotlight from him. Jimmy throws a brick through a liquor store window and is sentenced to thirty days in jail. Pete and Patsy are given a break on a Broadway show, but they turn down a contract when their father is not included in the arrangements. Jimmy is released from jail and is reunited with Patsy and Pete, promising them to stay off drink. He disappears from the hotel and Patsy and Pete think he may have gone to the theatre to re-establish his credibility. At the theatre. Patsy and Pete join their father on stage and the Three Monahans are re-established. Then in turn, Sheila and Lillian appear on stage to complete the group and all five sing and dance together. (V).
    ReferenceMFB 1944:129-30. MPG.
    DistributorGeneral Film Distributors Ltd (GB)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Vaudeville
    Production creditsp.c: Universal Pictures Co, p: Michael Fessier, Ernest Pagano, d: Charles Lament, sc: Fessier, dop: Charles Van Enger, sp. c: John P Fulton, art d: John B Goodman, Martin Obzia, set dec: Russell A Gausman, Leigh Smith, ed: Charles Maynard, a.d: Mack Wright, m.d: Hans J Salter, songs: 'Lovely', 'Beautiful to Look At', 'We're Havin' a Wonderful Time', 'Impersonations', 'Stop Foolin' lyr: Irving Bibo, m: Don George; 'Isle d'Amour' by Earl Carroll, Leo Edwards; 'When You Wore a Tulip' by Jack Mahoney, Percy Wenrich; 'What Do You Want to Make Those Eyes at Me For' by Howard Johnson, Joseph McCarthy, James V Monaco; 'Rock-A-Bye Your Baby with a Dixie Melody' by Sam Lewis, Joe Young, Jean Schwartz; 'Rose Room' by Harry Williams, Art Hickman; 'I'm Always Chasing Rainbows' by Joseph McCarthy, Harry Carroll; 'In My Merry Oldsmobile' by Vincent Bryan, Gus Edwards; 'I Hate to Lose You' by Grant Clarke, Archie Gottler, choreo: Louis De Pron, Carlos Romero, gowns: Vera West, GB distr: General Film Distributors Ltd.
    Art directionGOODMAN, John B.
    OBZIA, Martin
    Genre/CategoryFeature Film Drama
    Musical Comedy

    TitlePATRICK THE GREAT
    Production companyUniversal Pictures Co
    Country of originUSA
    ProducerBENNETT, Howard
    DirectorRYAN, Frank
    Script/AdaptationBENNETT, Dorothy
    MILLHAUSER, Bertram
    HALL, Jane
    BLOCK, Frederick
    BLOCK, Frank
    PhotographyREDMAN, Frank
    EditingKENT, Ted T.
    Music composerSALTER, Hans J.
    Songs'Song of Love', 'For the First Time', 'Don't Move', 'Ask Madam Zan', 'The
    Cubacha', 'When You Bump Into Someone You Know' by Charles
    Tobias, David Kapp, Sidney Miller, Inez James, Charles Previn
    CastDonald O'Connor {Pat Donahue Jr}, Peggy Ryan (Judy Watkin), Frances Dee (Lynn Andrews), Donald Cook {Pat Donahue Sr}, Eve Arden (Jean Mathews), Thomas Gomez (Max Wilson), Gavin Muir (Prentis Johns), Andrew Tombes (Sam Bassett), Irving Bacon (Mr Memey), Emmett Vogan (Alsop), Isabelle Mal (grande dame), Robert Emmett Keane (Henry Ames), Joel Alien (actor). Lee Phelps (prop man), Ernie Adams (constable). Billy Benedict (Joey), Douglas Wood (Sir Orville Armstrong), Sidney Miller (Tony), Eddie Dunn (plumber). Buster Brodie (bellboy). Ray Walker (orchestra leader), George Chandler (bellhop), George Lloyd (fisherman). Harry Harvey, Neely Edwards (waiters), Cal Rothenberg, Robert Coleman, John Truel, Joe 'Corky' Geil, Walter Carter, Bobby Scheerer (Jivin' Jacks), Grace Costello, Shiriey Mills, Peggy Brant, Dolores Diane, Jean Davis, Patsy O'Connor (Jivin' Jills).
    LanguageEnglish
    Colourb&w
    Soundsil
    Duration88/89
    Footage8030
    Format35mm
    Release date1944
    SummaryActors Pat Donahue Sr and his son. Pat Donahue Jr, compete for the same part in a Broadway play. Tension develops between the two men when Pat Jr gets the part. Their feud continues as they take a vacation in a mountain lodge. They meet Judy Watkin and Lynn Andrews there and Pat Sr forgets about his lost role when Lynn agrees to marry him. (Adapted from MPG).
    ReferenceMFB 1944:93.
    DistributorGeneral Film Distributors Ltd (GB)
    KeywordsIrish-Americans
    Vaudevil