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Research Fellows


 

Iain Atack

 

Iain Atack

Iain Atack holds degrees in philosophy, politics and peace studies from Trinity College Dublin, the University of Toronto and the University of Ulster. He was formerly the Coordinator of the M.Phil. programme in International Peace Studies at the Irish School of Ecumenics, Trinity College Dublin and teaches courses on “Conflict Resolution and Nonviolence”, “The Politics of Development” and “The Politics of Peace and Conflict”.  He is the author of The Ethics of Peace and War (Edinburgh University Press, 2005), Nonviolence in Political Theory (Edinburgh University Press, 2012) and journal articles on various aspects of non-violence, peace-building and development ethics.  He is a member of the board of Afri (Action from Ireland), an Irish peace and human rights NGO.  He is also an active member of the Irish Forum for Peace in Sri Lanka.

Email: atacki@tcd.ie

Tel.: +353 (0)1 260 0350

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Rosemary Byrne

Rosemary Byrne

Rosemary Byrne (B.A. Columbia, 1986, J.D. Harvard, 1992) is Associate Professor of International and Human Rights Law. She currently the chair of the Scientific Committee of the EU Fundamental Rights Agency and serves on the Board of Advisors for the South Asia Democratic Forum. Recently, she completed a five-year term as a Human Rights Commissioner for the Irish Human Rights Commission, which is the national human rights institution established in the aftermath of the Good Friday Agreement. She has been a Visiting Professor of International Law at the Paris School of International Affairs, Institut d'Études Politiques (Sciences-Po) and at the China-EU School of Law, China University of Political Science and Law, Beijing.

In establishing the International Process and Justice Project, Professor Byrne directed extensive empirical research on international criminal trial process over a two year period at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and was the first external expert to have been invited to address a plenary session of the judges of the International Criminal Court. Her research has also been presented in closed sessions to the judges of both ICTR and ICTY. In the field of refugee law, she has been the Editor-in-Chief for five editions of the Refugee Law Reader: Cases Documents and Materials, the first online curriculum in refugee law that now appears French, Spanish and Russian language editions and is being used in several continents for teaching, training and research.   Additionally, Professor Byrne has given papers and lectured on human rights in over 20 countries, delivered human rights training for the Council of Europe and the Helsinki Committee, and served on the Management Committee of the COST ESF Project on International Law in Domestic Courts.

Throughout her career she has worked with a range of international and Irish non-governmental organizations and has been a Visiting Fellow at the Human Rights Program, Harvard Law School and a Government of Ireland Research Fellow.  Grants from the Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences, Enterprise Ireland, the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees have provided generous support for Professor Byrne’s work.

Email: rbyrne@tcd.ie

Tel: +353 (0)1 896 1201

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Jude Lal Fernando

 

TBC

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Andrew Finlay

 

Andrew Finlay

Andrew Finlay grew-up in Belfast, studied anthropology at University College London, and now teaches sociology at Trinity. His research is in two areas inter-related areas: Firstly, the anthropology of peace and pacification; i.e. the use of what is taken to be anthropological knowledge about culture, identity and ethnicity in 'liberal' and 'humanitarian' intervention; and secondly, ongoing debates about ethnic statistics, ethnic categorisation and anti-discrimination initiatives in Ireland, Europe and the USA.  Prominent among his publications are two books: Nationalism and Multiculturalism (LIT Verlag, 2004) and Governing Ethnic Conflict (Routledge, 2010)  http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415498036

Email: arfinlay@tcd.ie 

Tel: +353 (0)1 896 2353

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Linda Hogan

 

Linda Hogan

Linda Hogan is Vice-Provost/Chief Academic Officer and Professor of Ecumenics at Trinity College Dublin and holds degrees from the Pontifical University Maynooth and of Trinity College, Dublin, where she gained her Ph.D.  Her primary research interests lie in the fields of theological ethics, human rights and gender.  Amongst her recent publications are Religious Voices in Public Places, Oxford University Press, 2009 (edited with Nigel Biggar); Religions and the Politics of Peace and Conflict, Princeton Theological Monographs, 2009 (edited with Dylan Lee Lehrke); and Applied Ethics in a World Church, Orbis, 2008 (ed.) which received the 2009 Catholic Book Award from the Catholic Press Association of the USA and Canada.  She is also the author of Confronting the Truth: Conscience in the Catholic Tradition, Paulist Press, 2000 and From Women’s Experience to Feminist Theology, Sheffield, Sheffield Academic Press, 1995, 1998 as well as essays and journal articles in the fields of social and political ethics, feminist theological ethics and intercultural ethics.  She has been the co-editor of two special issues of Feminist Theory, i.e. Gendering Ethics/The Ethics of Gender 2001 and Ethical Relations, 2003.

Professor Hogan teaches on a range of modules including Ethics in International Affairs; Human Rights in Theory and Practice; Gender, War and Peace and Ecumenical Social Ethics.  Previously, she held the post of Lecturer in Gender, Ethics and Religion in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies, University of Leeds.  In January 2005 she was a visiting professor at the Colleges of Divinity in both Sydney and Melbourne.  She also delivered the Helder Camara Lectures in Sydney and Melbourne in July 2004. 

She has served on the Editorial Boards of Feminist Theory; the Journal of Religious Ethics and the Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics and Soundings: An Interdisciplinary Journal and has been a member of the Irish Council for Bioethics.

Email: lhogan2@tcd.ie

Tel: +353 (0)1 206 0352

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Anne Holohan

 

Anne Holohan

Anne Holohan is lecturer in Sociology. A graduate of Trinity College Dublin, the London School of Economics and the University of California, Los Angeles, her research and teaching interests include organizations, information and communication technologies, media and communications, conflict resolution and disaster management, and globalization. Her most recent book is Networks of Democracy (Stanford, 2005). Until January 2006 she was Marie Curie International Fellow at the University of Trento, Italy.

Email: aholohan@tcd.ie

Tel: +353 (0)1 896 1478

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John Horne

 

John Horne

John Horne is Professor of Modern European History and a Member of the Royal Irish Academy. He earned his D.Phil at the University of Sussex. and has worked on the history of modern France and also of modern warfare, with a special emphasis on the First World War. He is a member of the board of the Research Centre of the Historial de la Grande Guerre, Péronne (France) and is also on the French National Commission for the Commemoration of the Great War. He was the founding  Director of the Centre for War Studies, Trinity College Dublin. He has authored nearly eighty chapters and articles, many relating to the history of war. His books include, Labour at War: France and Britain, 1914-1918, (Clarendon Press, 1991); (ed), State, Society and Mobilization in Europe during the First World War (Cambridge University Press, 1997; translated into Chinese by the Beijing Institute of Technology Press, 2008);  and (with Alan Kramer), German Atrocities, 1914: A History of Denial (Yale, 2001), which was translated into German (2003) and French (2005). He has recently published the Blackwell Companion to the First World War (2010), Vers la guerre totale: le tournant de 1914-1915 (Paris, 2010), and with Robert Gerwarth, War in Peace: Paramilitary Violence in Europe after the First World War (Oxford University Press, 2012).  His edited book (with Edward Madigan), Towards Commemoration: Ireland in the Decade of the Great War, is forthcoming with the Royal Irish Academy. In 2012-13, he will be a Fellow of the Freiburg Institute for Advanced Study in Germany.

Email: jhorne@tcd.ie

Tel:  +353 (0)1 896 1101

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Alan Kramer

 

Alan Kramer

Alan Kramer is Professor of European History and Director of the Centre for War Studies. His research interests are the history of Continental Europe in the era of the First World War, especially focusing on the analysis of military violence, political violence, the relationship between armed forces and civilians/non-combatants, war crimes, and prisoners of war, in Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy. He earned his Dr. phil. from the University of Hamburg. During the last two decades he has been at the forefront of the development of the cultural history and the history of mentalities of the First World War; in 2001 he published with his co-author John Horne the award-winning German Atrocities 1914: A History of Denial, (Yale, 2001).  Alan Kramer’s most recent book, Dynamic of Destruction: Culture and Mass Killing in the First World War (Oxford, 2007) portrays the wider wave of cultural destruction and mass killing that swept the world from the Balkans in 1912, via the western front, Turkey, Italy, and eastern Europe, to the seven-year catastrophe of war and revolution in Russia. He is founding co-editor of ‘1914-1918 Online: International Encyclopedia of the First World War’. He is currently working on a major research project on 'The International History of Concentration Camps'.

Email: alkramer@tcd.ie

Tel: +353 (0)1 896 1411

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Ronit Lentin

 

Ronit Lentin

Ronit Lentin is Associate Professor in Sociology at the Department of Sociology, Trinity College Dublin, where she earned her Ph.D. Between 1997 and 2012 she was the director of the MPhil in Race, Ethnicity, Conflict (formerly Ethnic and Racial Studies), and between 2009-2012 she was head of department. Ronit was a founding member of the Trinity Immigration Initiative, where she focused on migrant activism, leading to the edited collection Migrant Activism and Integration from Below in Ireland, published by Palgrave in 2012. Ronit is a pioneer in researching racism in Ireland and has published, with Robbie McVeigh, Racism and Antiracism in Ireland (2002), and After Optimism? Ireland, Racism and Globalisation (2006). Ronit publishes extensively on Israel/ Palestine, gender and genocide, racism and migration in Ireland and has researched representations of the Shoah, particularly through the gendering of the relationship between a masculinised Israel and a feminised Jewish diaspora, and testimonies of women who survived Transnistria, an area of deportation in Southern Ukraine, during World War II.

She has also researched the co-memoration of the Palestinian 1948 catastrophe by Israeli Jews, and her monograph, Co-memory: Israeli Jews Commemorising the Palestinian Nakba was published by Manchester University Press in 2010. Her other books include Conversations with Palestinian Women (1982), Gender and Catastrophe (1997), Israel and the Daughters of the Shoah: Reoccupying the Territories  of Silence (2000), Women and the Politics of Military Confrontation: Palestinian and Israeli Gendered Narratives of Dislocation (with Nahla Abdo 2002), Re-presenting the Shoah for the 21st Century (2004), Race and State (with Alana Lentin, 2006), and Thinking Palestine (2008). http://people.tcd.ie/rlentin

Email: rlentin@tcd.ie

Tel: +353 (0)1 896 2766

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Geraldine Smyth

 

Geraldine Smyth

Geraldine Smyth is an Associate Professor of Ecumenics and Head of the Irish School of Ecumenics at Trinity College Dublin. She has worked in the fields of theology, literature, ecumenics and pyschotherapy and holds a BA Hons from University of Ulster and an MA and Ph.D from Trinity College Dublin. Her research interests include reconciling memories in post-conflict societies; religion’s role in violence and peacebuilding; dealing with loss in transitional societies.

Currently, Dr. Smyth is a member of the Programme Advisory Committee (8 members) of the Ernst Struengmann Forum on Formative Childhoods: Paths to Peace?, who are currently working with the Ernst Struengmann Foundation to organise an international Struengmann Forum of  70-80 international experts from the fields of neuroscience, psychology, paediatrics,child development, theology, social ethics and international relations (Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, 13-18 October 2013). 

She was Coordinator of the Opshal Commission – a Citizen’s Inquiry on a Way Forward for Northern Ireland, 1993-94; was Director of the Irish School of Ecumenics, 1995-99; Chair of the International Advisory Group of INCORE (Institute for Conflict Research), University of Ulster, 2007-2010; is a member of the Board of Directors, Healing through Remembering, an independent organisation for research and dialogue on dealing with the past in the aftermath of ‘the conflict in and about Northern Ireland’, and is Chair of its Commemoration working group, coordinating seminars (2011-2013) on Ireland’s Decade of Commemorations. She was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from Queens University Belfast in 2003 for services to reconciliation, and the James McCord award from Princeton for ‘Advanced scholarship promoting ecumenical understanding in a global era’, in 2005.

She is a current member of the Maze-Long Kesh Strategic Development Board Reference Group, currently working with Daniel and Nina Libeskind – on the vision, conceptualisation and development of an International Conflict Transformation Centre in the context of the regeneration of the former MLK prison site.

Her publications include: ‘Forgiveness between the Theological and the Social, ed. Thomas Eggensberger, Ulrich Engel and Angel F. Méndez Montoya, Edward Schillebeeckx: Impetus Towards Theologies in the 21st Century, Ostfildern, Germany, Matthias- Grünewald-Verlag, 2012; ‘Unbar the Door: Ecumenical Reflections in Westminster Abbey’ in Doctrine and Life, 60, (9), 2010, p2 – 17; ‘Telling a Different Story: Hope for Forgiveness and Reconciliation in Northern Ireland’ in (Eds.,) Philipa Rothfield, Cleo Fleming, and Paul A. Komesaroff, Pathways to Reconciliation: Between Theory and Practice, (Ashgate, 2008), 67-78; ‘A New and Shocking Valuation,’ Mary Grey, From Rwanda and Back: Liberation, Spirituality and Reconciliation, London, Darton, Longman and Todd, (2007), in Doctrine and Life, Vol. 58, No. 2, 56-63.

Email: gsmyth@tcd.ie

Tel: +353 (0)1 218 0535


 

Etain Tannam

 

Etain Tannam

Etain Tannam received her PhD in politics from the London School of Economics and lectures in International Peace Studies at the Irish School of Ecumenics. She specialises in conflict resolution and international organisations, European Union politics and Northern Ireland politics. She has published various articles and a book in this area. She is currently researching for a book, International Intervention in Ethnic Conflict:  a comparison of the EU and UN’ (Palgrave, 2014 forthcoming).  Her publications include The European Union and Conflict Resolution: Northern Ireland, Cyprus and Bilateral Cooperation, Government and Opposition, 47, (1), 2012, p47 – 71, Explaining British-Irish Cooperation: a rational institutionalist approach, Review of International Studies, (3), 2011, p1191 – 1214, ‘Understanding and Explaining International Intervention: the state of the art’, Ethnopolitics, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 341-353 (also Editor for special edition of this volume) and ‘The Divided Irish’, in Mabry T., McGarry J. and O’Leary B. (eds.) 2012, Europe’s Divided Nations, Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press. She is also author of Cross-Border Co-operation in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, Basingstoke, Macmillan, (1999).

Email: tanname@tcd.ie 

Tel. +353 (0)1 260 1144

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Last updated 3 July 2015 by cpcj@tcd.ie.