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The Irish School of Ecumenics the Trinity Centre for Asian Studies, the Centre for Post-Conflict Justice, the SSK Research Cluster and the University of North Korean Studies, Seoul.

 

Human Rights in the Korean Peninsula: Challenges to Peacebuilding

 

DATE: 29th July 2015
TIME: 5:30-7:30pm
VENUE: Lecture Room G16, Irish School of Ecumenics-Loyola Institute Building, Trinity College Dublin

Dr Bo-hyuk Suh is a Professor at the Institute for Peace and Unification Studies, Seoul National University. He was an Expert Adviser on North Korean human rights for the National Human Rights Commission of Korea. His research focuses on peace and human rights issues in the Korean Peninsula from the perspective of international relations. He has been providing advice to both governmental and non-governmental organisations on human rights.

Dr Rajiv Narayan is a Senior Policy Advisor at the International Commission Against the Death Penalty. He worked as a researcher for Amnesty International for thirteen years (until 2014), and produced work of international repute. He covered one of the most challenging regions concerning human rights in the world - East Asia, where he researched and reported extensively on North Korea, South Korea, and Japan.

Please click here for the event programme.

Please click here for the event flyer.

To register, please email Professor Jude Lal Fernando at fernanla@tcd.ie, or Dr Dong-Jin Kim at kimdj@tcd.ie.

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The Irish School of Ecumenics, the Centre for Post-Conflict Justice, Trinity College Dublin & the Irish Forum for Peace in Sri Lanka

 

Film Screening & Discussion: 'No Fire Zone: Sri Lanka's Killing Fields'

 

DATE: 10th June 2015
TIME: 6-9pm
VENUE: Lecture Room G16, Irish School of Ecumenics-Loyola Institute Building, Trinity College Dublin

No Fire Zone: Sri Lanka's Killing Fields, a feature documentary on the last phase of the war in Sri Lanka has highlighted mass atrocities committed by the Sri Lankan state against the Tamil people in the north and east of that island. Six years since the official end of the war and following a regime change in January 2015 there seems to be no mechanism for the pursuit of justice. The newly elected President has stated that he would not allow international investigations and has echoed the claim of the previous regime which asserted that the documentary was an outright fabrication and blocked its distribution in Sri Lanka.

Following the documentary there will be a discussion with the film's director as well as an exiled Sri Lankan journalist and a journalist who has investigated British complicity about the issues raised by the film and the current human rights situation in Sri Lanka.

Callum Macrae: The director of No Fire Zone: Sri Lanka's Killing Fields, writer, journalist and co-founder of Outsider Television in the UK.

Bashana Abeywardena: An exiled Sri Lankan journalist, former editor of Hiru newspaper and convenor of Journalists for Democracy in Sri Lanka - JDS.

Phil Miller: A journalist, author of 'Britain's Dirty War Against Tamil People' and an expert witness at the People's Tribunal on Sri Lanka.

All are welcome to attend. Please register to book your place at irishpeaceforum@gmail.com or call 085 156 2980.

Please click here for an event flyer.

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The Centre for Post-Conflict Justice

 

Booklaunch - 'Redeployment' by Phil Klay

 

TIME: 6pm
DATE: 28th May 2015
VENUE: IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor of the Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin

klay-redeployment

'"Redeployment" is military for "return", and Klay's fiction peels back every pretty falsehood and self-delusion in the encounter between veterans and the people for whom they supposedly fought.' - Dexter Filkins, New York Times.

Phil Klay was named National Book Foundation '5 under 35' honoree. In 2015, he received the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation's James Webb award for fiction dealing with the US Marines or Marine Corps life and the National Book Critics' Circle John Leonard Award for fiction in any genre. He was also short-listed for the Frank O'Connor Prize.

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The Irish School of Ecumenics, the Centre for Post-Conflict Justice (Trinity College Dublin), Carlow College (Co. Carlow), The Priory Institute (Tallaght) and Dublin City Interfaith Forum

 

Freedom of Speech and Religious Freedom, Human Rights and Interreligious Perspectives

 

TIME: 9:45am - 1pm
DATE: 12th March 2015
VENUE: Irish School of Ecumenics, Trinity College Dublin

Chaired by: Iain Atack and Gilian Wylie of Trinity College Dublin

Speakers:

Prof. Rosemary Byrne (School of Law, TCD) - Human Rights Perspectives: Widening the Lens

Prof. Ronit Lentin (Retired Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, TCD) - Religion, Racism and Freedom of Speech

Prof. Roja Fazaeli (Department of Near and Middle Eastern Studies, TCD) - Where are Women's Voices in Secular and Religious Discourses?

Shaykh Dr. Muhammad Umar Al-Qadri (Islamic Educational and Cultural Centre, Ireland) - Freedom of Speech and Responsible Speech: Islamic Perspectives

Ms. Heather Abrahamson (Irish Council for Christians and Jews) and Dr. Peter Admirand (Mater Dei Institute of Education, DCU) - Jewish Perspectives on the Other and Intereligious Dialogue

Swami Purnananda (Spiritual Director of Nivedita Vedanta Society and the Eire Vedanta Society) - Hindu Perspectives on Freedom of Thought, Unity and Diversity

Ms. Sinéad Lynch (Chairperson of the Dublin City Interfaith Forum) - Freedom and Global Citizenship: A Buddhist Perspective

Prof. Andrew Pierce (Irish School of Ecumenics, TCD) - Religious and Secular Fundamentalisms: Christian Theological Perspectives

 

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The Irish School of Ecumenics, Trinity College Dublin

 

Gaza and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Analysis and Alternatives

 

DATE: 29th August 2014
TIME: 2 - 6:30pm
VENUE: Lecture Room G16, Irish School of Ecumenics-Loyola Institute Building, Trinity College Dublin

The seminar, which consists of two successive panels (Israel-Palestine Conflict Analysis, and Alternatives to Aggression and Militarism) with four speakers on each panel, is in response to the recent Israeli military attack on Gaza. It also provides an opportunity for deeper reflection and discussion about both the sources of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and alternatives to militarised approaches to the conflict.

Please click here for the event programme.

As places are limited, please confirm attendance by email to: alashqay@tcd.ie, by Tuesday, 26th August 2014.

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The Transitional Justice Institute, the Centre for Post-Conflict Justice & the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences

 

Postgraduate Research Student Seminar Day 2014

 

DATE: 7th November 2014
TIME: All day
VENUE: University of Ulster, York St. Campus (Belfast)

Call for Papers:

Showcasing postgraduate research on human rights, transitional justice and peace building

The Transitional Justice Institute (University of Ulster), the Centre for Post-Conflict Justice (Trinity College Dublin), and the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences (University of Ulster) invite proposals for a one-day postgraduate student research seminar to be held on Friday 7 November 2014.

This year's event, on human rights, transitional justice and peace building, will encourage interdisciplinary exchange and networking around challenging questions which arise for societies emerging from conflict or dealing with the legacy of human rights abuses. Papers are invited from current PhD students, from any discipline, whose work relates strongly to the theme.

Researchers wishing to be considered should submit an abstract of no more than 300 words, with their name, institution, discipline, year of study, and a 200 word biography, to Gwawr McGirr, mcgirr-g1@ulster.ac.uk by 31 August 2014. Places are necessarily limited, so unfortunately not every paper may be able to be accepted. We anticipate that final acceptances will be notified by the end of September. Non-presenting participants will then be welcome to register to attend, subject only to limitations of space.

About the research day: This conference is being run by and for postgraduate students from universities across Ireland, in conjunction with the Transitional Justice Institute (University of Ulster), the Centre for Post-Conflict Justice (Trinity College Dublin), and the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences (University of Ulster). Accepted papers will be organised into thematic panels, with short (max. 12 minute) summary paper presentations followed by expert feedback from an established academic in the field, then general Q&A. While there is no registration fee, and lunch will be provided on the day, we regret that we are unable to cover travel and accommodation costs. This event takes place during the Belfast version of the ESRC Festival of Social Sciences, 1-8 November, and so there will also be other events of interest happening across the city

About TJI: The Transitional Justice Institute, attached to the University of Ulster School of Law, studies the role of law and legal institutions in moves from conflict to peace. Click here to see the TJI website.

About CPCJ: The Centre for Post-Conflict Justice at Trinity College Dublin explores how societies come to terms with episodes of extreme violence in war, civil war and prolonged civil and political unrest. Click here to see our homepage.

About IRiSS: The Institute for Research in Social Sciences at the University of Ulster works on a broad range of social and public policy matters. Click here to see the IRiSS website.

For further information, please click here for a copy of the Call (PDF) or email tombsd@tcd.ie. For directions to the University of Ulster's Belfast Campus, please click here.

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Irish School of Ecumenics

 

One-Day Conference: Power, Conflict, Resistance

 

DATE: 20/21st June 2014
TIME: 7pm on the 20th June; 9am - 6pm on the 21st June
VENUE: Hamilton Building on the 20th; IIIS Seminar Room on the 21st

Since 1997, graduates from the Trinity College’s MPhil Race, Ethnicity, Conflict have played a leading role in research on migration, ethnicity, antiracism and conflict in Ireland and overseas. The graduate conference will explore the theme of “Power, Conflict, Resistance”. It will include a reading by Fishamble Theatre Company of extracts from Rosaleen McDonagh’s new play Protégée and paper presentations by MPhil graduates.

The keynote lecture will take place in the Hamilton Building, Trinity College Dublin at 7pm on the 20th June and will be given by veteran social activist and human rights campaigner Bernadette McAliskey who currently works with migrants as part of the South Tyrone Empowerment Programme (STEP).

To register for either the keynote speech on the 20th or the conference on the 21st, please email mphilrec@tcd.ie.

Please follow these links for directions to the Hamilton Building and the IIIS.

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Irish School of Ecumenics and the Centre for Post-Conflict Justice

 

Transformations of Identity: The Political Psychology of War Rape in Bosnia

 

DATE: 12th May 2014
TIME:
5pm - 6:30pm
VENUE:
Neil Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin

Dr. Inger Skjelsbaek is deputy director at the Peace Research Institute Oslo as a psychologist and peace researcher, specializing in sexual violence in war. The lecture examines developments in the scholarly understandings of the impact and use of sexual violence in war, and also discusses methodological and ethical concerns. It will discuss her experiences of fieldwork in Bosnia, and interactions with victims and survivors of war traumas. This event is co-organised by the Irish School of Ecumenics and the Centre for Post-Conflict Justice through Research Incentive Scheme Funding from the Trinity Long Room Hub.

Please click here for the event flyer.

For further information email tombsd@tcd.ie.

To listen to a podcast of the event, please follow this link. Please click here for a copy of Dr Skjelsbaek's presentation.

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Centre for Post-Conflict Justice, Trinity College Dublin & Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster

Film and Guest Speaker: Amnesty and Reconciliation - Post-Conflict Justice in Brazil

 

DATE: 16th April 2014
TIME:
9:30am - 4pm
VENUE:
Irish School of Ecumenics, 683 Antrim Road, Belfast

Film: 9.30am Repare Bem (2013, 95 mins). A left-wing militant dies in 1970, after having been tortured for 109 days by the Brazilian military. His girlfriend Denise, imprisoned in Brazil during her pregnancy, manages to flee to Chile after the birth of her daughter and meet her parents. But the Pinochet coup forces them to leave. After 40 years in Italy and Holland, Denise and her daughter are given amnesty and reparation from Brazil. Director Maria de Medeiros

Speaker: 2.00pm. Marcelo Torelly has served as advisor for the Brazilian Ministry of Justice on Transitional Justice issues and Head of the Historical Memory Department of the Amnesty Commission (see further details below).

Organisers: The day is co-organised by the Trinity Centre for Post-Conflict Justice and the University of Ulster Transitional Justice Institute (free to all participants). It will serve as a follow-up to the seminar by Marcelo Torelly at the TJI on 15th April 2014, the day before (please click here for details), but attendance at the 15th April seminar is not required. There will be a break at lunchtime to allow attendance at INCORE Accounts of the seminar at the Public Records Office. Participants wishing to attend either the TJI seminar on the 15th April or the INCORE seminar on 16th April please follow the links above and reply direct to the respective contact emails.

About the Speaker: Marcelo Torelly has served as advisor for the Brazilian Ministry of Justice on Transitional Justice issues; head of the Historical Memory Department of the Amnesty Commission (a Brazilian State agency in charge of reparations and memory programs for dictatorship victims), and manager of the Transitional Justice Exchange and Development Program jointly sponsored by the Brazilian Federal Government and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). He has lectured in the theory and philosophy of law at Brasilia Catholic University in the Brazilian capital. He holds a J.D. from Brazil's Catholic University of Porto Alegre, and an M.Sc. from the Brasilia University Law School (UnB) where he is currently a PhD candidate. In 2013 he was a visiting researcher at the Institute for Global Law and Policy, Harvard Law School. He has published works on transitional justice and human rights in English, German, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Background readings:
Blog piece link: http://transitionaljusticeinbrazil.com/
Explanation of the 'Amnesty Caravans' run by the commission: http://transitionaljusticeinbrazil.com/ 
Interview with Marcelo Torelly  http://transitionaljusticeinbrazil.com/2013/12/12/interview-with-marcelo-torelly/

Please click here for a copy of the event flyer.

To register your interest, please contact: tombsd@tcd.ie

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Irish School of Ecumenics & the Centre for Post-Conflict Justice, Trinity College Dublin

 

'The Body of War: Media, Ethnicity and Gender in the Break-up of Yugoslavia'

With Dr. Dubravka Zarkov, International Institute of Social Studies, The Hague, Netherlands

DATE: 26th March 2014
TIME:
6pm - 7:30pm
VENUE: Ui Chadhain Theatre. Room 2041B, Arts Building, Trinity College Dublin

The lecture will examine representations of female and male bodies in the Croatian and Serbian press in the late 1980s and in the early 1990s, during the war in which Yugoslavia disintegrated. It explores the process through which ethnicity was generated, showing how lived and symbolic female and male bodies became central to it. Dubravka Zarkov is Associate Professor in Gender, Conflict and Development Studies at the International Institute for Social Studies in the Hague. The lecture is co-organised by the Irish School of Ecumenics and the Trinity Centre for Post-Conflict Justice. It is supported by the Visiting Professorships and Fellowships Benefaction Fund. All welcome.

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Centre for Post-Conflict Justice, Trinity College Dublin

 

CPCJ Postgraduate Research Day

DATE: 15th November 2013
TIME: 9am - 5:30pm
VENUE: IIIS Seminar Room, Sutherland Centre, TCD (Directions to the IIIS)

This conference is being run by the Centre for Post-Conflict Justice at Trinity College Dublin conjunction with postgraduate research students. The day will consist of three themed panels with student paper presentations lasting 10-12 minutes that will be followed by feedback from scholars working across relevant fields. We have invited respondents for our three panels, Colin Harvey (QUB), Cath Collins (UU), and Iain Atack (TCD). Please see below for more details:

Panel 1: Memory and Truth Recovery, chaired by Prof David Tombs (TCD) with Prof Cath Collins (UU) responding.

Panel 2: Legal and Institutional Reforms, chaired by Prof Rosemary Byrne (TCD) with Prof Colin Harvey (QUB) responding.

Panel 3: Development, Peace Studies and Education, chaired by Prof Ronit Lentin (TCD) with Prof Iain Atack (TCD) responding.

The day is also intended to be an informal networking opportunity, bringing together students and faculty from different departments, colleges and universities.

Please click here for a timetable of the day and here for a copy of our flyer.

 

CPCJ hosts a Book Launch for 'The Politics of Memory in Chile'

DATE: 14th November 2013
TIME: 6-8pm
VENUE: Room G06, Irish School of Ecumenics and Loyola Institute Building, Trinity College Dublin (Next to the Dept of Zoology - Directions to the ISE-LI Building)

The Centre for Post-Conflict Justice will also hold a booklaunch for Cath Collins, Katherine Hite and Alfredo Joignant's book 'The Politics of Memory in Chile: From Pinochet to Bachelet' (Boulder, CO: First Forum Press 2013), co-hosted by the Irish School of Ecumenics. Speaking at the book launch will be Cara Levey, Lecturer in Latin American Studies, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies, University College Cork.

Here you will find a flyer with the above details.

All are invited to attend - this will especially be good for attendees of the PG Research Day to get to know the other attendees and speakers.

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All academics and research students, including potential research students, who work in areas related to Post-Conflict Justice are invited to attend both events. Please register your interest at cpcj@tcd.ie.

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Department of Sociology, TCD & the Centre of Post-Conflict Justice, TCD

 

'Surveillance, Fear and Israeli Colonialism'

with Prof Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

DATE: 20th February 2013
TIME: 7-9 pm
VENUE: Robert Emmet Theatre, Arts Building, TCD, Dublin 2

Control and monopoly over territory, life, terminology and the practice of naming enables colonizers to accumulate their power through dispossession, and simultaneously recompose themselves with the other. By discussing surveillance over colonized Palestinian subjects, Prof Shalhoub-Kevorkian argues that colonial dispossession functions in different layers. The presentation will use David Harvey’s concept “accumulation of dispossession” to claim that surveillance over living and dead bodies of the colonized, and the military control over their land, life and political economy, imposes new regimes of regulation and accumulation by dispossession, and veils the exploitative relationships between the colonized and the colonizer.

The psychological violence - including the promotion and production of the colonized as feared other and the legal violence that legislates laws and regulations and produces the colonized, as Fanon explains, in “zoological” terms, imposes heavy surveillance over the colonized. By discussing Israel’s surveillance regime in Occupied East Jerusalem, Prof Shalhoub-Kevorkian wishes to discuss the historical injustices and the coercive power of continuing dispossession that manufactures the colonizer as socially superior, while denying the colonized the right to home, family, society, and dignified living. Understanding the way Israel’s surveillance regime contributes to accumulation by dispossession will have a crucial bearing on the organization and articulation of dissent in the present.

Professor Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian is a leading expert on human rights and women’s rights, especially within Israel/Palestine. She has been visiting professor at the Faculty of Law at Georgtown University, and is a professor at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem. She is also a member of the Trauma, Peace-building and Development Project of the University of Ulster, Northern Ireland

A prolific author, Dr. Shalhoub-Kevorkian’s main fields of research include gendered violence, crimes of abuse of power, surveillance, securitization and social control, and trauma and recovery in militarized zones. Her latest book, Militarization and Violence Against Women in Conflict Zones in the Middle East: A Palestinian case-study, was published by Cambridge University Press (2010). She has recently published reports on the politics of birth in Jerusalem and the trauma associated with military occupation. Among her latest journal articles are "E-Resistance and Technological In/Security in Everyday Life," British Journal of Criminology (2011); and “The Grammar of Rights in Colonial Contexts: The Case of Palestinian Women in Israel,”Middle East Law and Governance (2012).

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Department of Sociology, TCD & the Centre of Post-Conflict Justice, TCD

 

'The Politics of Birth in Jerusalem'

with Prof Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

DATE: 21st February 2013
TIME: 1-3 pm
VENUE: Room 1.16, 3-4 Foster Place, Dublin 2

Understanding the meanings ascribed to and experiences of childbirth for women who live in violent colonial contexts is challenging. This presentation explores the politics, practices, and subjective experiences of pregnancy and childbirth for Palestinian women living in Occupied East Jerusalem (OEJ). It examines women’s particular experiences, understandings, and practices in multiple dimensions, including physical, spatial, political, social, and psychological. The departure point is that Palestinian women in OEJ live in a violent context of settler colonialism. My understanding of settler colonialism is as an inherently eliminatory structure (Wolfe, 2006), with the primary motive underlying this desire for elimination being access to territory and to individuals in communities.

In viewing the realities of Palestinians living in Jerusalem through the lens of settler colonialism, the presentation will also be overlaid with a spatial, legal and temporal analysis, as Prof Shalhoub-Kevorkian will focus on identifying how living in different areas in Jerusalem, and with different residential statuses or lack thereof, affects women’s experiences at a time of particular vulnerability, when and while giving birth. Specifically, women’s locations and statuses in OEJ and the wider Jerusalem area will be examined so as to map the overall situation for pregnant and birthing Palestinian women in the city and its environs. Considering the fragmentation of East Jerusalem by various checkpoints, walls, and other restrictions on movement (generally enacted by the municipality under the guise of “security”), these legal and spatial emphases are key to understanding the issues faced by pregnant and birthing Palestinian women there. They will enable me to forge a well-rounded account of the consequences of the Jewish state’s settler-colonial policies on Palestinian women’s birthing experiences in Occupied East Jerusalem.

Professor Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian is a leading expert on human rights and women’s rights, especially within Israel/Palestine. She has been visiting professor at the Faculty of Law at Georgtown University, and is a professor at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem. She is also a member of the Trauma, Peace-building and Development Project of the University of Ulster, Northern Ireland

A prolific author, Dr. Shalhoub-Kevorkian’s main fields of research include gendered violence, crimes of abuse of power, surveillance, securitization and social control, and trauma and recovery in militarized zones. Her latest book, Militarization and Violence Against Women in Conflict Zones in the Middle East: A Palestinian case-study, was published by Cambridge University Press (2010). She has recently published reports on the politics of birth in Jerusalem and the trauma associated with military occupation. Among her latest journal articles are "E-Resistance and Technological In/Security in Everyday Life," British Journal of Criminology (2011); and “The Grammar of Rights in Colonial Contexts: The Case of Palestinian Women in Israel,”Middle East Law and Governance (2012).

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Centre for Post-Conflict Justice, TCD/Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster/Irish School of Ecumenics


'Granito: How to Nail a Dictator' - Film Screening and Discussion

with Dr. Roddy Brett, School of International Relations, University of St. Andrews
co-hosted by Prof. David Tombs, Irish School of Ecumenics, TCD and Prof. Cath Collins, TJI, UU

DATE: 24th January 2013
TIME: 6:30pm
VENUE: Irish School of Ecumenics, 683 Antrim Rd., Belfast

The film, 'Granito': How to Nail a Dictator (2011) (http://skylightpictures.com/films/granito) is a story of how a documentary film on Guatemala’s conflict became an active player in a present-day genocide trial and will be followed by a discussion with Dr. Roddy Brett, School of International Relations, University of St. Andrews. The evening is co-hosted by Prof. David Tombs, CPCJ/ISE, TCD and Prof. Cath Collins, TJI, UU.

Dr. Brett spent a decade in Guatemala and Colombia, working as an academic and practitioner in the fields of indigenous and human rights and post-conflict justice. He lived and worked in communities that had experienced the massacres of the counterinsurgency in the 1980s, and was actively involved in the trial investigation for the cases in Guatemala against Rios Montt, Lucas Garcia, Mejia Victores and their high commands (for genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity). He has acted as Advisor to the United Nations Development Programme in both Colombia and Guatemala, and to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in Guatemala. Dr. Brett also served as Advisor on Indigenous Affairs to the Norwegian Embassy in Guatemala.

All are welcome, but since places are limited, if you would like to attend, please contact Caroline Clarke at the ISE in Belfast on (028) 9077 0087 or email reconsec@tcd.ie. Directions are available at www.ecumenics.ie/contact-us.

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Centre for Post-Conflict Justice / Department of Sociology / MPhil in Race, Ethnicity, Conflict


Roots and Dynamics of the Ongoing Revolutionary Upheaval
in the Middle East and North Africa

By Professor Gilbert Achcar, School of Oriental and African Studies

  • DATE:
    • Thursday 2 February 2012
  • TIME:
    • 1900-2100
  • VENUE:
    • Thomas Davis lecture theatre, Arts Block, TCD

 

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The Institute for International Integration Studies (IIIS) The Trinity International Development Initiative (TIDI)

The Centre for Post-Conflict Justice invite you to a seminar


The Silent Plague: Hunger, Justice And Money In The 21st Century


By David Rieff

  • DATE:
    • Tuesday 1st November 2011
  • TIME:
    • 4.30-5.30 p.m.
  • VENUE:
    • Long Room Hub, TCD

Internationally acclaimed author and journalist David Rieff currently teaches History of Humanitarian Action at the Paris School of International Affairs, Sciences-Po. During the 1990s, he covered conflicts in Africa (Rwanda, Burundi, Congo, Liberia), the Balkans (Bosnia and Kosovo), and Central Asia. Now a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine, and a contributing editor for the New Republic, he has written extensively about Iraq, and, more recently, about Latin America. He is a Senior Fellow at the World Policy Institute at the New School for Social Research, a Fellow at the New York Institute for the Humanities at New York University, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Additionally, he is a board member of Central Eurasia Project of the Open Society Institute and of Independent Diplomat. He is the author of eight books, including Slaughterhouse: Bosnia and the Failure of the West and A Bed for the Night: Humanitarianism in Crisis.

 

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Against Remembrance


  • DATE:
    • Friday 21st October 2011
  • TIME:
    • 16.00-18.00
  • VENUE:
    • IIIS Seminar Room, 6th Floor Arts Building, Trinity College
Download Invitation

David Rieff will discuss his recent book Against Remembrance, followed by comments on healing through remembering in Northern Ireland by Geraldine Smyth and memory and the Palestinian Nakba by Ronit Lentin.

Internationally acclaimed author and journalist David Rieff currently teaches History of Humanitarian Action at the Paris School of International Affairs, Sciences-Po.During the 1990s, he covered conflicts in Africa (Rwanda, Burundi, Congo, Liberia), the Balkans (Bosnia and Kosovo), and Central Asia. Now a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine, and a contributing editor for the New Republic, he has written extensively about Iraq, and, more recently, about Latin America. He is a Senior Fellow at the World Policy Institute at the New School for Social Research, a Fellow at the New York Institute for the Humanities at New York University, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Additionally, he is a board member of Central Eurasia Project of the Open Society Institute and of Independent Diplomat. He is the author of eight books, including Slaughterhouse: Bosnia and the Failure of the West and A Bed for the Night:Humanitarianism in Crisis. His memoir of his mother's final illness, Swimming in a Sea of Death, appeared in January 2008. His most recent book is entitled  Against Remembrance (2009).Currently he is working on a book about the global food crisis.

 

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Surviving Field Research: Working In Violent And Difficult Situations.


By Professor Chandra Sriram, SOAS

  • DATE:
    • Monday 4th April
  • TIME:
    • 14:00-15:30
  • VENUE:
    • Seminar Room, Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin


Chandra Lekha Sriram is a Professor of Law at SOAS and the author and editor of various books and journal articles on international relations, international law, human rights and conflict prevention and peacebuilding. Her works include: Peace as governance: power-sharing, armed groups, and contemporary peace negotiations (Palgrave 2008); Globalizing justice for mass atrocities: A revolution in accountability (Routledge 2005); and Confronting past human rights violations: Justice versus peace in times of transition (Frank Cass 2004). In 2010, the book she co-edited with Suren Pillay, Peace versus justice? The dilemma of transitional justice in Africa, Durban: University of KwaZulu-Natal Press, 2009 and Oxford: James Currey, 2010) won an Outstanding Academic Title award from choice, of the American Librarian Association. She was previously founder and director of the interdisciplinary Centre on Human Rights in Conflict at the University of East London.

 

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Centre for Post-Conflict Justice Inagural Lecture

Post-Conflict Justice: An Industry or a Necessity

By Professor Kadar Asmal

Kadar Asmal

Inaugral Address (PDF, 57KB)

Opening Remarks by The Provost, Dr. John Hegarty

  • DATE:
    • Thursday 25th February 2010
  • TIME:
    • 18:00
  • VENUE:
    • The Public Theatre, Front Square, Trinity College Dublin

Professor Kader Asmal is Professor Extraordinary of Law at the University of the Western Cape and Honorary Professor of Law at the University of Cape Town. He is former South African Minister of Water Affairs and Forestry and former Minister of Education.

 

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Hosted by Centre for Post-Conflict Justice with the Amsterdam Center for International Law and COST ESF

International Law in Domestic Courts — Rule of Law Working Group

20-21th May 2010

40 scholars from over 25 counties will come to the Centre for Post-Conflict Justice to participate in the annual meeting of  the International law in Domestic Courts (ILDC)  project. The working group on the Rule of Law will bring together international legal experts to explore the rule of law and transitional justice through international law in domestic jurisdictions.  Case studies will be presented on Serbia, Bosnia, Russia, Palestine, Iraq, Afganistan, and East Timor.

The ILDC  project is inspired by the  recognition that a proper understanding of international law requires knowledge of the role of domestic jurisdictions. Until now, access to domestic case law has been limited. Many cases are unpublished, few translated into English, and even if they are available, their effects may not be fully understood without explanations about the underlying domestic legal system.  With a growing network of national reporters, covering over 70 jurisdictions already, ILDC aims to bring to light the full range of domestic jurisprudence not only from Western Europe, the Commonwealth and North America, but also from Africa, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and Central and South.

This event is funded by COST ESF11 different countries

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Celebrating World Refugee Day In the Best Interests of the Child: Meeting the Needs of Separated Children Seeking Asylum in Ireland


  • DATE:
    • 17th June 2009
  • VENUE:
    • IIIS Seminar Room, Arts Block, Trinity College Dublin

The Centre for Post-Conflict Justice and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees will host a half day conference in celebration of World Refugee Day and the 20th anniversary of the Convention of the Rights of the Child. This conference is generously supported by the EU Commission's Representation in Ireland.

The conference will be opened by Professor Michael Freeman, University College London, who will speak on the evolution and implementation of the ‘best interests of the child’ principle under international human rights law. This will be followed by a panel discussion with speakers from a variety of sectors in Ireland working with refugee and asylum seeking children who will address current Irish practice and policy in the area. For further information contact cpcj@tcd.ie .

Programme


  • 9:00-9:30
    • Arrival and Registration
    • Welcome
    • Rosemary Byrne, Director, Centre for Post-Conflict Justice
    • Manuel Jordão, Representative in Ireland of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

  • 9:50-11:00
    • Session One

    • Twenty Years On: The Best Interests of the Child Principle in International Law
    • Chair - Rosemary Byrne, Director,Centre for Post-Conflict Justice

    • Keynote Address
    • Professor Michael Freeman, University College London

    • Discussant: The Implications of the Best Interests of the Child Principle for National Asylum Procedures
    • Emilie Wiinblad Mathez, Protection Officer, UNHCR Ireland

  • 11:00-11:15
    • Coffee break

  • 11:15-12:30
    • Session Two

    • Challenges of Implementation Irish Law and Practice
    • Chair - Suzanne Egan, Commissioner, Irish Human Rights Commission

    • Panelists
    • Geoffrey Shannon, Special Rapporteur for Children in Ireland
    • HSE Social Work team for Separated Children (to be confirmed)
    • Jyothi Kanics, Separated Children Officer, Irish Refugee Council
    • Sophie Magennis, Head of Policy and Legislation, Ombudsman for Children's Office

  • 12:30-12:45
    • Closing Remarks
    • Martin Territt, Director of the European Commission's Representation in Ireland

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Hosted By The Centre for Post-Conflict Justice, the Immigrant Council of Ireland and the Irish Human Rights Commission

Sex Trafficking and Prostitution: The Dilemma of Demand


Date: Tuesday 23rd June 2009

Venue: Swift Lecture Theatre, Room 214. A Ground Floor Arts Block, Trinity College

The features of post conflict societies that give rise to or facilitate sex trafficking are focal points for the international community’s efforts to combat trafficking. The role and responsibilities of receiving states in addressing the ‘demand’ in their own jurisdictions that fuels the trafficking of victims from these regions remains a subject of considerable controversy. This half day seminar examines how the international community responds to the dilemma of ‘demand’ in light of international human rights law. It also will discuss the implications of these approaches for Irish debate and policy.  Canadian investigative journalist, Victor Malarek, author the The Nataschas will deliver the keynote address. For more information please contact the cpcj@tcd.ie.

 

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Torture & Post-Conflict Justice


  • DATE:
    • Friday 26th June 2009
  • TIME:
    • 9:30-12:45

A half-day event organised to mark the annual anniversary of the UN Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment. A videoconference link is planned for the ISE in Belfast. Further details: reavesj@tcd.ie

  • 9:30
    • Welcome, Dr. Rosemary Byrne, Centre for Post-Conflict Justice

  • 9:45
    • Screening of documentary, 'Torture in Brazil'

  • 10:45
    • Coffee

  • 11:15
    • Dr. David Tombs, ISE, 'Torture in Brazil and Post-Conflict Justice'

  • 12:00
    • Dr. Peter Admirand, ISE, 'Accounts of Torture in Testimonial Literature'
This event is free and open to all. It is organised as a follow-up to the public seminar and discussion on 25 June organised by SPIRASI and the Irish School of Ecumenics on ‘Survivors of Torture - the Irish Response’. For further details on the 25 June event, which will take place at the Swift Lecture Theatre, Trinity College, Dublin, with opening address by President of Ireland, Mary McAleese, please contact: Maura Connolly, SPIRASI, 213 North Circular Road, Dublin 7. tel 01 838 9664, Email seminar@spirasi.ie

 

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Last updated 31 August 2015 by cpcj@tcd.ie.