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Conference - Foundations for Life: Children's Research at Trinity and the Launch of Trinity Research in Childhood Centre

Trinity

Trinity Research in Childhood Centre. If you are a professional working with children, a policy maker, academic member of staff or student this event will be of interest to you. There is no charge, but numbers are limited, so please use the email link to register. 
 
Our keynote speaker is Professor Mark Bellis, Director in Public Health Wales, he will speak on: ‘Building Stronger Children Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and their role in health and well-being across the life-course Presentation here

Further contributions from leading Trinity academics will include:

Foundations for Life: Using longitudinal data to understand the influence of childhood on adult health and well-being Growing Up in Ireland and The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing Professor Richard Layte and Dr Cathal McCrory and colleagues Presentation here

Children’s mental health Professor Louise Gallagher Presentation Here

The inscription of meaning: An interdisciplinary approach to understanding child sexual abuseDr Simon McCarthy-Jones and colleagues.

Disentangling facts and fictions: Girls with disabilities in West Africa Professor Carol Newman and colleagues Presentation Here


CRC Student Awarded Third Place in TCD Postgraduate Research Showcase

Sadhbh ByrneSadhbh Byrne was recently selected to present her ongoing PhD research at the TCD Postgraduate Research Showcase, hosted by Trinity College Graduate Students' Union and the Dean of Research. The Graduate Students' Union President, Meg Lee, stated: 'We wanted to show the strength of research among the postgraduate community here at Trinity College, and moreover, we wanted to celebrate the most innovative and exciting examples of that research'. From the twenty five excellent research projects that were presented across many disciplines in College, Sadhbh received a third place award from the Dean of Research, Professor Vinny Cahill.

22nd April 2015


Co-founder of the CRC, Professor Sheila Greene publishes second edition of her book

The second edition of Professor Sheila Greene's book, 'The psychological development of girls and women: Rethinking change in time' has been published by Routledge. The book was first published in 2003. Professor Greene is a co-founder of the CRC and was its Director from 2004 - 2011. She is now a Fellow Emeritus of the College, affiliated to the School of Psychology.

16th January 2015


Publication: New Study Highlights Barriers Homeless Young People Face in Accessing Housing

Trinity researchers investigated the ‘life stories’ of homeless young people, charted their experiences from early childhood and included the perspectives of their families

Pictured at the launch (left to right): Andrew Murphy, Children’s Research Centre; Sylda Langford, former Director General of the Office of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs; Christy Burke, Lord Mayor of Dublin; Jason, research participant; Dr. Paula Mayock and Sarah Parker, Children’s Research Centre.

A new study examining the lives and experiences of homeless young people in Ireland, carried out by the Children’s Research Centre at Trinity College Dublin, adds to our understanding of homelessness by providing a detailed account of the barriers young people face accessing housing. This report, entitled Young People, Homelessness and Housing Exclusion, was recently launched by Ms Sylda Langford, Homelessness Oversight Group member and former Director General of the Office of the Minister for Children and Youth AffairsChristy Burke, Lord Mayor of Dublin made the opening address at the launch.

The Trinity research group, led by  Dr Paula Mayock, Assistant Professor in Youth Research, School of Social Work and Social Policy and the Children's Research Centre and research assistants Sarah Parker and Andrew Murphy also in the Children’s Research Centre, investigated the ‘life stories’ of homeless young people and charted their experiences from early childhood. The researchers focussed specifically on their paths or routes to homelessness, their service interactions, family relationships, and experiences of seeking stable housing.

The study, which was funded by Focus Ireland, also makes an innovative departure from existing research on homeless youth in Ireland by including the perspectives of the families of 10 of the participants.  According to the researchers, the integration of the views and experiences of both young people and their careers has potential to shed new light on the complex and under-researched family dynamics that may propel young people to leave home prematurely, as well as on those family processes that facilitate a resolution to their homelessness.

The study involved the conduct of biographical interviews with 40 homeless young people aged between 16 and 24 years and makes an innovative departure from existing research on homeless youth in Ireland by including the perspectives of the family members of a sub-sample of the study’s participants. The integration of the views and experiences of both young people and their carers sheds new light on the complex and under-researched dynamics that may propel young people to leave home prematurely, as well as those family processes that facilitate a resolution to their homelessness.

Speaking at the launch Dr Mayock, commented:

“Homelessness in a form of disempowerment and symbolises a unique form of marginality. Young people who become homeless are propelled into adult roles at an accelerated rate and, simultaneously, their homelessness prevents their participation in many of the institutions designed to help them to navigate the transition to transition to adulthood. The need to get young people into of age and ‘stage’-appropriate of housing with appropriate supports at the earliest possible juncture must be seen as paramount.”

However, the research uncovers significant barriers to housing stability for the study’s young people as well as numerous economic and systematic constraints of access, including: a lack of affordable accommodation options, a rental market that discriminates against those in receipt of rent supplement, and discrimination by landlords on the basis of age-related stereotypes. According to Dr Mayock, “Affordable housing options for young people on benefits or low incomes are currently extremely limited, which means that these young people run the risk of getting ‘trapped’ in a cycle of homelessness”.

Speaking at the launch, Sylda Langford said: This is the type of research that the Government, relevant departments and statutory bodies like Tusla must take note of and ensure it is fully taken account of when developing policy and services response to (and prevention of) youth homelessness.”

27th November 2014


Publication: 'Key thinkers in childhood studies' by Carmel Smith and Sheila Greene

'Key thinkers in childhood studies' by Carmel Smith and Sheila Greene was published in June by Policy Press in the UK and Chicago University Press in the USA. Carmel is a Research Associate of the CRC based in Carlow College. Sheila Greene is the former Professor of Childhood Research and co-founder of the Centre.

6th August 2014


Children’s Research Centre hosts International Summer School in Child and Youth Welfare

7 to 11 July 2014

The Children’s Research Centre (CRC) hosted 27 students and staff from Israel, Russia, Ireland and Germany at a week-long Summer School as part of the EU Tempus Project: Transnational Academic Careers in Child and Youth Welfare or ‘TACHYwe’.

TACHYwe, led at Trinity by Dr Michelle Share, Senior Research Fellow, CRC, is a transnational collaborative learning and working environment that aims to develop and implement postgraduate courses on international child and youth welfare. It has been grant funded (€970,000 over three years) by the EU Tempus IV programme.

Prior to attending the Summer School, students participated in a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) developed at the CRC with Trinity’s Centre for Academic Practice and Student Learning (CAPSL). Students viewed online lectures from staff at the University of Hildesheim, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Don State Technical University and Trinity, and completed blogs and discussion activities.

At the Summer School students’ VLE activities were developed through a cross-national comparative project on institutional care. They attended lectures and seminars on youth mental health, youth homelessness and undocumented migrants. A highlight was a visit to the Ombudsman’s for Children’s Office for an interactive seminar presented by EPIC (Empowering Young People Living in Care).

The Summer School concluded on a light-hearted but informative note as the students presented photographs and artefacts, music, stories and games that represented growing up in Israel, Russia, Ireland and Germany.

Dr Share, director of the Summer School, commented:
We set ourselves quite a challenge by developing a VLE for the Summer School but it certainly paid off. As the students were from diverse higher educational institutions and countries it was important that they came with some shared foundational knowledge. Instead of students just attending a series of lectures, they could develop their VLE educational experience and interrogate the Summer School theme collaboratively and cross-nationally. The Summer School and VLE have given participants the opportunity to explore commonalities and differences between institutional care in Ireland, Israel, Germany and Russia. They can now critically assess institutional care issues across these countries to inform research, policy and practice in the field of child and youth welfare. Students considered the Summer School to be both an enriching and challenging experience.

To view testimonials click here


Photo caption: Students and staff attending the TACHYwe Summer School at Trinity College Dublin 7-11 July 2014

24th July 2014


PUBLIC LECTURE:

The Children’s Research Centre and the School of Social Work and Social Policy are hosting a public lecture and symposium:

Food, families and health: critical perspectives

The event will feature lectures and discussion on themes of:
Food and families; health and weight; obesity discourse; and
representations of obesity in public reports and media.

Speakers:
Professor John Coveney is Professor in the Discipline of Public Health and Dean in the School of Medicine at Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia. His teaching and research includes public health nutrition, food policy, and health promotion. He is the author of, among other works, Food, Morals and Meaning (2nd ed.) (Routledge)

Dr Perry Share is Head of Department of Social Sciences, Institute of Technology Sligo. He has published over a number of years in the sociology of popular culture and everyday life, including food, eating and drinking in Ireland. He is co-author of A sociology of Ireland (4th ed) (Gill and Macmillan)

Dr Lee Monaghan is a senior lecturer in Department of Sociology, University of Limerick. He has published research on bodies/embodiment, health risk and gender. He is author of Body-Building, Drugs and Risk and Men and the War on Obesity (Routledge).

 

Event Details
Date: Wednesday 11th June
Time: 2.00pm - 4.30pm
Venue: Neil Hoey Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub
All welcome, admission is free but places are limited
For further information and registration:http://www.eventbrite.com/o/childrens-research-centre-school-of-social-work-and-social-policytrinity-college-dublin-6320986329?s=25050477

13th May 2014


PUBLIC LECTURE:

The Children’s Research Centre in association with the Structured PhD in Child and Youth Research (a joint initiative of Trinity College Dublin and NUI Galway) is pleased to announce a public lecture:

Hillsborough
Resisting Injustice, Recovering Truth

Phil Scraton

Thursday May 8th 2014
4.30pm
Mhairtin Ui Chadhain Theatre (2041B),
Arts Building
Trinity College Dublin

This lecture is free but please register here

 

15 April 1989: an inescapable crush on the terraces at Hillsborough Stadium at an FA Cup Semi-Final led to the deaths of 96 men, women and children. Hundreds of Liverpool fans were injured, thousands traumatised. Throughout the investigations and inquiries, those who died and survived were vilified amid police allegations of drunkenness, violence, criminal and abusive behaviour. This had a profound impact on the families of the deceased who founded the Hillsborough Family Support Group to campaign for justice.

The families’ unrelenting campaign for truth recovery led to disclosure of all existing documents to an Independent Panel. Its definitive report revealed institutional mendacity, corrupted evidence and partial investigation. This brought an unreserved Government apology, new inquests - now in process, a criminal investigation into all agencies involved and an unprecedented investigation by the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

Author of the highly acclaimed Hillsborough: The Truth, Phil Scraton, Professor of Criminology, Queen’s University, headed the Panel’s research and was primary author of its report. In this talk he reflects on the trans-generational impact on families and their long-term campaign for truth. He details the Panel’s extensive findings and considers the implications for challenging institutional injustice and holding State institutions to account.

For further information, please contact Dr Lorraine Swords at swordsl@tcd.ie.

14th April 2014


Publication of New Study on Early School Leavers and Nutrition

The diet and physical activity habits of early school leavers are not optimal for health, according to a new study conducted by The Children’s Research Centre at Trinity College Dublin.

The new study, Early School Leavers and Nutrition - A needs assessment from a nutrition perspective, offers a comprehensive examination of food and physical activity related health issues for young people and service providers in alternative education and training settings on the island of Ireland.

The research, commissioned by Safefood, was led by Dr Michelle Share, Senior Research Fellow and Acting Director of the Children’s Research Centre, in collaboration with Dr Barbara Stewart-Knox at University of Ulster, Coleraine.

Young people who leave school early represent a population group at risk of poor health outcomes. Research into the nutrition and physical activity habits of these young people is limited. This survey of young people revealed that their diets and physical activity patterns are a concern and similar to other socio-economically marginalised groups. They are at risk of poor health outcomes in terms of the major non-communicable chronic diseases because of poor nutrition, overweight and obesity.

Key Gaps Identified by the Survey:

  • The survey of young people revealed that their diets and physical activity patterns are not optimal for health.
  • Programmes related to the promotion of nutrition and physical activity tended not to be aligned with other relevant curricula and overall programmes in ESL settings.
  • Young people lacked a critical awareness about diet and physical activity in general.
  • Young people have some confusion about food, eating, weight and health. They preferred foods that were convenient and high in fat and sugar.
  • Among both young men and women there was some confusion about nutrition and bodysize. For some young men there was a desire to increase weight while this was the opposite for young women.
  • Challenges for service providers included: resources for food provision; appropriateness of programmes and curricula; and expertise to address the complexity of food issues in alternative education and training settings.

The project results will inform Safefood’s and other agencies’ future food and nutrition work in this area.

30th January 2014


Dr Michelle Share speaks at the National Youth Council of Ireland’s conference Food for Thought

Photo: Left - Dr Michelle Share, Children’s Research Centre, Ms Mary Cunningham, Director, National Director, National Youth Council of Ireland, Ms Siobhan Brennan, Senior Project Officer, National Youth Health Programme

Dr Michelle Share, Senior Research Fellow and Acting Director of the Children’s Research Centre was invited to speak at the National Youth Council of Ireland’s conference on 17 October 2013, Food for Thought, a conference exploring food, health and wellbeing in the youth sector. The conference provided opportunities for youth workers to explore practical strategies to assess and respond to the food needs of young people. Michelle presented findings from her safefood-funded study of food and nutrition needs among early school leavers in Ireland.

12th November 2013


Children’s Research Centre leads EU Tempus Project for the development of youth welfare postgraduate courses

Click here to read more

20th August 2013


Launch of Report “Family Wellbeing on a Limited Income: A Study of Families Living at Risk of Poverty in Ireland”


On Monday July 15th the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Frances Fitzgerald, TD, launched the Children’s Research Centre report, “Family Wellbeing on a Limited Income: A Study of Families Living at Risk of Poverty in Ireland”. The report written by Dr Lorraine Swords, Dr Brían Merriman and Ms Michelle O'Donnell was funded by the Family Support Agency through the Irish Research Council and used data collected as part of Growing Up in Ireland, the National Longitudinal Study of Children, to describe the wellbeing of Irish families living on limited incomes and shed light on the factors associated with their wellbeing.

Please click here to download the report.

Please see news reports from The Irish Times and the Irish Examiner.

17th July 2013


Report Launch for "Young People's Homeless and Housing Pathways: Key Findings from a 6-year Qualitative Longitudinal Study"

Congratulations to Dr. Paula Mayock, Assistant Professor, School of Social Work and Social Policy & Children's Research Centre and Dr. Mary-Louise Corr, Lecturer, Edinburgh Napier University, whose report entitled "Young People's Homeless and Housing Pathways: Key Findings from a 6-year Qualitative Longitudinal Study" was launched yesterday, July 10th, 2013, by Michele Clarke, Social Work Specialist, Department of Children and Youth Affairs.

In a statement, Frances Fitzgerald, TD, Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, welcomed the report, stating that it "provides us with a platform to examine how we dealt with youth homelessness, what we did right, where we erred and what direction we should now take."

Click here to download the report

Click here to read the Department of Children and Youth Affairs press release

Press release from The Irish Times and The Irish Examiner

11th July 2013


Launch of Family Wellbeing on a Limited Income: A Study of Families Living at Risk of Poverty in Ireland

The Children's Research Centre, Trinity College Dublin and the Family Support Agency invite you to the launch of 'Family Wellbeing on a Limited Income: A Study of Families Living at Risk of Poverty in Ireland' by Lorraine Swords, Brían Merriman and Michelle O'Donnell. The launch will take place at 10.15am on Monday, 15th July in the 6th Floor Conference Room, 3 College Green, Dublin 2 (Please note the entrance to this building in is on Dame Street between Starbucks and Costa)

Using data collected as part of Growing Up in Ireland, the National Longitudinal Study of Children, this report describes the wellbeing of Irish families living on limited incomes and sheds light on the factors associated with their wellbeing.

The report will be launched by Ms Frances Fitzgerald, TD, Minister for Children and Youth Affairs.

Please RSVP to Ms Louise Yorke by email yorkel@tcd.ie by 5pm July 11th.

10th July 2013


Public Lecture: Growing up with the Millennium Development Goals: a longitudinal study of children in four developing countries by Dr Virginia Morrow, University of Oxford

On April 29 2013, the Structured PhD in Child and Youth Research in association with the Children's Research Centre, School of Social Work and Social Policy and Trinity International Development Initiative were pleased to host a Public Lecture by Dr Virginia Morrow, Young Lives, Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. The lecture entitled Growing up with the Millennium Development Goals: a longitudinal study of children in four developing countries presented research from Young Lives, a longitudinal study of childhood poverty in Ethiopia, Andhra Pradesh (India), Peru and Vietnam over 15 years, the lifespan of the UN's Millennium Development Goals.

The lecture explored patterns of inequality in contexts of rapid economic development and social change. The evidence revealed that children from the poorest households are the most vulnerable in terms of equality of opportunity as well as outcomes, and how gender-based differences evolve over the life course. Dr Morrow went on to explore the impact of diverse school systems on inequalities in terms of access, quality and outcomes. Throughout the talk she drew upon qualitative research to illustrate how these trends are experienced by children and young people, and how their aspirations change over time.

Ginny Morrow is senior research officer and deputy director of Young Lives at the University of Oxford. Her research focuses on children’s work in developed and developing countries, sociological approaches to the study of childhood and children’s rights, the ethics of social research with children, children’s understandings of family, and children and ‘social capital’. She has held research positions at the University of Cambridge (Centre for Family Research), London School of Economics (Gender Institute), Brunel University, and a teaching post at the Institute of Education, University of London, where she ran the MA Sociology of Childhood & Children’s Rights for seven years, and where she was Reader in Childhood Studies. She has been co-editor of Childhood: A Journal of Global Child Research since 2006.

Photo caption: Professor Robbie Gilligan (TCD), Dr Lorraine Swords (TCD), Dr Michelle Share (TCD), Dr Vincent O'Neill (Irish Aid), Dr Padraig MacNeela (NUIG), Dr Virginia Morrow (University of Oxford) and Dr John Canavan (NUIG)

Photo caption: Dr Morrow with staff and students of the Structured PhD in Child & Youth Research from TCD and NUIG

23 May 2013



Three research reports from the Children's Research Centre launched by Minister for Children, Frances Fitzgerald

Photo caption (from left to right): Ms Brigina Crowe, ELI. Dr Josephine Bleach, Director ELI; Ms Beth Fagan, ELI; Ms Catriona Flood, ELI; Dr Michelle Share, Children’s Research Centre (CRC); Ms Sandra McCarthy, CRC, Professor Sheila Greene, CRC, Ms Aoife O’ Gorman, ELI.

On 13 February 2013 three research reports from the Children's Research Centre (CRC) were launched by the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Frances Fitzgerald at large public event that took place at the National College of Ireland.

These reports were the culmination of a two-year baseline evaluation of the Early Learning Initiative (ELI) at the National College of Ireland (2009-2011). The study was funded by Pobal and was led by Dr Michelle Share, Acting Director and Senior Research Fellow, Children's Research Centre, Trinity College Dublin in collaboration with Professor Sheila Greene and Ms Sandra McCarthy of the CRC.

One study examined the ELI's Stretch to Learn programme that takes place in seven Docklands primary schools. Baseline data was collected on contextual, socio-demographic, attitudinal and educational performance indicators. The study involved principals, 2nd and 6th class students, and parents.

A second study focused on the ELI's family home reading programme, the Parent Child Home Programme (PCHP) aimed at mothers and their toddlers living in the Docklands catchment area. The research, that took place over two years, examined the impact of involvement in the in PCHP for parents, children, and home visitors.

An overall report - Final Report of the Baseline Evaluation of the Early Learning Initiative - examined the successes and challenges of the Early Learning Initiative in the context of its programme, capacity building, and sustainability.

Overall the study has resulted in four reports. The first report Developing Early Years Professionalism, a study of the ELI's professional development programme in community childcare centres (Share, Kerrins & Greene, 2011) was published and launched in May 2011.

All four reports are available for download on the links below:

  1. Early Years Professionalism: An Evaluation of the Early Learning Initiative's Professional Development Programme in Community Childcare Centres in the Dublin Docklands
  2. Baseline evaluation of the Parent Child Home Programme
  3. The Early Learning Initiative's Stretch to Learn Programme: Baseline Evaluation in Primary Schools in the Dublin Docklands
  4. Baseline Evaluation of the Early Learning Initiative: Final Report

19 February 2013


Public Seminar on 'Women and Homelessness in Ireland'

Dr Paula Mayock, Assistant Professor in Youth Research and Course Director, MSc in Applied Social Research Methods, and Ms. Sarah Sheridan, Research Assistant, Children's Research Centre, recently published two research papers from their study on "Women and Homelessness in Ireland." The papers were launched at a public seminar on 23 February 2012 in the Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin. Nicholas Pleace, Senior Research Fellow from the Centre of Housing Policy, University of York travelled to Dublin to respond to the presentation and research papers. Susan McKay, writer, journalist and former director of the National Women's Council of Ireland chaired the event. Both the research papers and presentation are available to download here.


The Children's Research Centre Hosts Seminar on Young People, Food and Alternative Education and Care

On 23rd November 2011, the Children's Research Centre (CRC) hosted a seminar titled 'Young People, Food and Alternative Education and Care'. The seminar aimed to initiate wider debate on this issue, which has received little attention within the broader context of young people, food and eating. The seminar showcased Irish and UK research that considers food and nutrition issues for young people in alternative education and care settings. It provided an occasion to network, to progress debate and to inform policy and practice by bringing together individuals and organisations from a range of disciplines and sectors.

Professor Robbie Gilligan, School of Social Work and Social Policy, provided the opening address. Presentations from Ms Deirdre Byrne (Institute of Technology, Sligo) and Dr Ruth Emond (University of Stirling, Scotland) examined the use of food in care work within the residential care sectors in Ireland and Scotland.

Ms Marita Hennessy (CRC) provided an overview of research that is currently being undertaken at the CRC 'Early School Leavers and Nutrititon: A Needs Assessment' funded by safefood, the Food Safety Promotion Board. This was followed by a presentation from Dr Michelle Share (CRC) who provided insight into food and health issues for young people with intellectual disabilities. A lively Q&A session ensued and, following lunch, discussion continued in the workshop groups.

Photo: (Left to Right) Dr Ruth Emond (Senior Lecturer in Social Work, University of Stirling); Ms Deirdre Byrne (IRCHSS Scholar, Institute of Technology, Sligo); Ms Marita Hennessy (Research Assistant, Children's Research Centre, TCD); Dr Michelle Share (Acting Director/ Senior Research Fellow, Children's Research Centre, TCD)


Launch of New GUI Report: Influences on 9-Year-Olds' Learning: Home, School and Community

On Thursday 26th January Growing Up in Ireland launched the latest report from the study, Growing Up in Ireland - Influences on 9-Year-Olds' Learning: Home, School and Community.

The report was launched jointly by Ms. Frances Fitzgerald T.D., Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, and Mr. Ruairi Quinn T.D., Minister for Education and Skills at 10.30am, Pearse Street Library, 138-144 Pearse St, Dublin 2.

Using data from the first wave of the 9-year-old cohort of the Growing Up in Ireland, this report looks at children's out-of-school activities and how these relate to the domains of family, school and neighbourhood. The report provides new information on the types of recreational activities engaged in by nine-year-old children and explores the relationship between their out-of-school lives and their academic performance at school. Policy implications are also discussed.

For more information on Growing Up in Ireland, click here

Professor Jonathan Bradshaw delivers Public Lecture on Child Poverty and Deprivation

On Thursday 8th December Professor Jonathan Bradshaw, Professor of Social Policy at the University of York, delivered a public lecture entitled 'Child Poverty and Deprivation in Comparative Perspective'.

Professor Bradshaw's public lecture began by providing an overview of poverty and deprivation rates among Irish children and highlighting how these children compared with counterparts from Europe and further afield. The lecture then went on to examine some characteristics of families with children experiencing poverty, including lone-parenting, large families and ‘workless’ households. Professor Bradshaw also took time to reflect upon our current definitions and measures of child poverty and deprivation and outlined difficulties with the use of proxy household informants and the arbitrary threshold employed when calculating relative or consistent rates of poverty. The lecture concluded with some suggested directions for future research before the speaker and audience engaged in a stimulating discussion on the key points.

To see a podcast on Professor Bradshaw's lecture, click here.

Growing Up in Ireland - Minister Launches New Findings from National Study of 11,100 Three-Year-Olds and their Families

On December 1st 2011, the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Frances Fitzgerald TD, launched the first findings from Growing Up in Ireland: The Infant Cohort at 3 Years involving 11,100 three-year-olds and their parents.

The latest results from the study paint a picture of how these families are faring across a range of areas in their lives including their health, family life and financial and economic circumstances. In general the findings show that three-year-olds in Ireland are in good health with a few notable public health and related issues (including overweight and obesity), there is overall stability in family structures over the short term and that the recession has had a substantial effect on families with young children over the last number of years.

These are the first longitudinal findings from the study. The first wave of fieldwork with the families of the Infant Cohort included approximately 11,100 nine-month-olds, their parents and carers. Interviews began in September 2008 and were completed in March 2009. Interviews for the second round of interviews with this cohort took place between January and August 2011. A total of 90% of the original sample of nine-month-olds were successfully re-interviewed. (A full download of the results released today, presented in three briefing documents can be found by clicking here.)

To read more on the launch of the new findings, please click here.

Growing Up in Ireland Launch Report on Overweight and Obesity Among 9-Year-Old Children

Growing Up in Ireland has published a major new report from the study on overweight and obesity among childen in Ireland. The report was launched jointly by the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, Ms. Frances Fitzgerald T.D., and the Minister for Health Dr. James Reilly T.D., at an event in the Pearse Street Library, Dublin, on 9th November 20ll.

Growing Up in Ireland - Overweight and Obesity Among 9-Year-Olds examines patterns of overweight and obesity among children in Ireland, and associated factors including diet, exercise, child and parental recognition of the problem, and the influence of a child's weight status on his/her self-esteem. Policy implications are also discussed. A full copy of the report and the executive summary can be found here.

The Growing Up in Ireland Anonymised Microdata File (AMF) from Wave 1 of the Child Cohort (at 9 years) is available from the Irish Social Science Data Archive (ISSDA). Potential users wishing to access the anonymised data should apply to the ISSDA at http://www.ucd.ie/issda/data/growingupinireland

For more information on Growing Up in Ireland, please click here.

Photo: (Left to Right) Mary Doyle (Director General, Department of Children and Youth Affairs); Prof. Richard Layte (ESRI); Dr James Reilly, TD, Minister for Health; Frances Fitzgerald, TD, Minister for Children and Youth Affairs; Prof. Frances Ruanne (ESRI); Dr Cathal McCrory (ESRI); Prof. James Williams (ESRI)

Professor Diane Levin Visits the Children's Research Centre

On 18th October 2011, the Children's Research Centre welcomed Diane Levin, Professor of Education at Wheelock College, Boston. Professor Levin is visiting Ireland with the support of the Irish Social Science Platform, of which Trinity College Dublin is a member.

Professor Levin is internationally recognised as a leader in the study of the commercialisation of childhood. She helps parents and professionals to understand and counteract the harmful effects of violence, war, media and commercial culture on children.

At the CRC, she spoke about her research to an interdisciplinary group that involved local childcare practitioners, researchers, the National Parents' Council (primary) and Barnardos. Her presentation focused on the commercialisation and sexualisation of childhood. She also visited Dáil Éireann as a guest of Aodhán O Riordáin, T.D.

Professor Levin is a founder of Teachers Resisting Unhealthy Children's Entertainment (TRUCE) (www.truceteachers.org), an organisation that prepares materials to help parents deal with the media and commercial culture in their children's lives. She is also a founder of the Campagin for Commercial-Free Childhood (www.commercialfreechildhood.org) which works to educate the public about, and end, the commercial exploitation of children.

 

Photo: (Left to Right) Sandra McCarthy (CRC); Professor Diane Levin; Dr Michelle Share (CRC); Aine Lynch (National Parents' Council Primary); Dr Margaret Wachtler (CRC)

Archived News


Last updated 14 March 2017 by The Children′s Research Centre (Email).