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You are here Undergraduate > Module Outlines > Senior Sophister > Women and Politics

Women and Politics

Module Code: PO4790

Module Name: Women and Politics 2018-19

  • ECTS Weighting: 15
  • Semester/Term Taught: Michaelmas + Hilary Term
  • Contact Hours: One hour lecture + one hour seminar per week
  • Module Personnel: Lecturer - Dr Lisa Keenan
  • Office hours: tbc

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Define sex/gender;
  • Understand how sex/gender influence how we define and understand social and political issues;
  • Explore obstacles to representation for women in political life, as well as the associated strategies to address them;
  • Consider whether the relevance of sex/gender varies across other categories of difference (social class, race, ethnicity etc.).

Module learning aims

This module aims to build students’ understanding of the myriad ways in which sex/gender matter for how we think about and study political life.


Module content

This course examines the position of women in political life in cross-national perspective. A large part of the course will study the obstacles that women can face when seeking positions of power (from parties, from voters, from the media etc.), as well as policies that aim to remove or lessen such barriers. However, it will also explore topics such as women’s social movements and the gender gap in voting behaviour. In addition, the course will ask whether the numeric (or descriptive) representation of women guarantees their substantive representation. The module finishes by asking whether the relevance of sex/gender varies across other categories of difference (social class, race, ethnicity etc.).

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Recommended reading list


Detailed readings for each topic will be provided on the module syllabus. Some key readings are:

Ford, L. (2010). Women and politics: The pursuit of equality. Nelson Education.

Inglehart, R., & Norris, P. (2003). Rising tide: Gender equality and cultural change around the world. Cambridge University Press.

Norris, P., & Lovenduski, J. (1995). Political recruitment: Gender, race and class in the British Parliament. Cambridge University Press.

Lovenduski, J., & Norris, P. (Eds.). (1996). Women in politics. Oxford University Press.

Tadros, M. (Ed.). (2014). Women in politics: gender, power and development. Zed Books Ltd.


Assessment details (DRAFT – the coursework listed is subject to change)

The module is assessed entirely through coursework – there is no end of year examination. Coursework comprising 50% of the overall grade for the module will be submitted in MT, with the remaining 50% being submitted in HT.

The coursework for MT consists of two essays and one policy memo. In HT, students will be assessed on their ability to produce a research proposal investigating an original research question of their choice. To this end, students will submit two versions of their proposal (an initial outline, followed by the completed version), as well as presenting their proposal in class to their colleagues.

 

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