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Inclusion - Who Benefits?

The following is a list of simple changes you can make to your teaching and learning that can have a great effect on your students' learning experience.

The following are case studies of students who may have particular difficulties with traditional lecture- based teaching
Action Who Benefits?

Timely provision of an annotated reading lists.

Reading list benefits - more information

Anyone wishing to engage in focused, efficient reading.
Student who works part-time of necessity.
Student with family commitments that limit reading time.
Student with a specific learning difficulty who finds reading time consuming and tiring.
Student who is a non-native English speaker.
Student with a chronic illness leading to fatigue / pain; or concentration difficulties due to medication.

Distribute lecture handouts in advance of lectures.

Handouts benefits - more information

All students who wish to prepare for a lecture in advance.
All students who find lectures become exercises in speed writing rather an active cognitive engagements.
Mature Student with lower stamina who finds it difficult to write continuously for an hour and could use a handout.
Student who finds it hard to follow the structure of the lecture aurally and can gain structure from the handout.
International Student who finds it difficult to write and listen simultaneously in a second language.
Student who sometimes miss classes for medical reasons.

Distribute timetables in plenty of time before the beginning of term.

Timetable benefits - more information

Any students organising activities around classes.
Student who needs to arrange child minding while in class.
Student from disadvantaged socio-economic background needing to arrange part-time work during term time.
Student with mobility difficulties who must ensure all classes are accessible and can be reached in the time allowed between lectures.

Offer a range of assessment methods including alternatives to exams.

Assessment choice benefits - more information

Any student who for any reason underperforms in certain assessment situations.
Older student with lower stamina who finds it difficult to write continuously for three hours or who's short term memory is not as strong as younger students.
Dyslexic student who finds structuring essays in limited time difficult.
International Student who finds completing essays in a second language under time constraints difficult.
Student with a physical impairment who finds it difficult to write continuously for three hours or who writes at a slower pace than her peers.

Offer a range of teaching methods including alternatives to lectures.

Flexible teaching benefits - more information

All students who learn better via methods other than traditional chalk and talk.
Student who sometimes must miss lectures due to significant outside responsibilities (e.g. sick child).
Student who finds it difficult to concentrate in lectures due to difficulties at home.
Student with a specific learning difficulty who finds it difficult to ascertain the main points and arguments in a lecture.
Student with ADHD who has difficulty note taking due to difficulties with concentration and short-term memory.
Students who miss many vital points when sitting in lectures in a non-native language.

 


Last updated 22 September 2016 by Trinity Inclusive Curriculum (Email).